Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Drive: A state of internal activity of an organism that is a necessary condition before a given stimulus will elicit a class of responses; e.g., a certain level of hunger (drive) must be present before food will elicit an eating response.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Base Composition: The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.Genes, rRNA: Genes, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which are transcribed to produce the RNA which is incorporated into RIBOSOMES. Prokaryotic rRNA genes are usually found in OPERONS dispersed throughout the GENOME, whereas eukaryotic rRNA genes are clustered, multicistronic transcriptional units.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Fatty Acids: Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes: A vocabulary database of universal identifiers for laboratory and clinical test results. Its purpose is to facilitate the exchange and pooling of results for clinical care, outcomes management, and research. It is produced by the Regenstrief Institute. (LOINC and RELMA [Internet]. Indianapolis: The Regenstrief Institute; c1995-2001 [cited 2002 Apr 2]. Available from http://www.regenstrief.org/loinc)Actinomycetales: An order of gram-positive, primarily aerobic BACTERIA that tend to form branching filaments.Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.RNA, Bacterial: Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Korea: Former kingdom, located on Korea Peninsula between Sea of Japan and Yellow Sea on east coast of Asia. In 1948, the kingdom ceased and two independent countries were formed, divided by the 38th parallel.Quinones: Hydrocarbon rings which contain two ketone moieties in any position. They can be substituted in any position except at the ketone groups.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Geologic Sediments: A mass of organic or inorganic solid fragmented material, or the solid fragment itself, that comes from the weathering of rock and is carried by, suspended in, or dropped by air, water, or ice. It refers also to a mass that is accumulated by any other natural agent and that forms in layers on the earth's surface, such as sand, gravel, silt, mud, fill, or loess. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1689)Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Vitamin K 2: A group of substances similar to VITAMIN K 1 which contains a ring of 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinione and an isoprenoid side chain of varying number of isoprene units. In vitamin K 2, each isoprene unit contains a double bond. They are produced by bacteria including the normal intestinal flora.Dictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Famous PersonsPublishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Pigments, Biological: Any normal or abnormal coloring matter in PLANTS; ANIMALS or micro-organisms.Sodium Chloride: A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.Classification: The systematic arrangement of entities in any field into categories classes based on common characteristics such as properties, morphology, subject matter, etc.Patient Identification Systems: Organized procedures for establishing patient identity, including use of bracelets, etc.Aerobiosis: Life or metabolic reactions occurring in an environment containing oxygen.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Flavobacteriaceae: A family of bacteria in the order Sphingobacteriales, class Sphingobacteria. They are gram-negative rods, mostly saprophytic in terrestrial and aquatic habitats.Alphaproteobacteria: A class in the phylum PROTEOBACTERIA comprised mostly of two major phenotypes: purple non-sulfur bacteria and aerobic bacteriochlorophyll-containing bacteria.Gammaproteobacteria: A group of the proteobacteria comprised of facultatively anaerobic and fermentative gram-negative bacteria.Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid: The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.Diaminopimelic AcidEponymsLocomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Bacillaceae: A family of bacteria which produce endospores. They are mostly saprophytes from soil, but a few are insect or animal parasites or pathogens.Fresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Rhodobacteraceae: A family in the order Rhodobacterales, class ALPHAPROTEOBACTERIA.Xanthomonadaceae: A family of gram-negative bacteria, in the order Xanthomonadales, pathogenic to plants.Drugs, Generic: Drugs whose drug name is not protected by a trademark. They may be manufactured by several companies.Gentian Violet: A dye that is a mixture of violet rosanilinis with antibacterial, antifungal, and anthelmintic properties.DNA, Ribosomal Spacer: The intergenic DNA segments that are between the ribosomal RNA genes (internal transcribed spacers) and between the tandemly repeated units of rDNA (external transcribed spacers and nontranscribed spacers).Gram-Positive Endospore-Forming Rods: Rod-shaped bacteria that form endospores and are gram-positive. Representative genera include BACILLUS and CLOSTRIDIUM.Cytophagaceae: A family of gram-negative, gliding bacteria in the order Cytophagales, class Cytophagia. They are found in SOIL and SEA WATER.MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Abstracting and Indexing as Topic: Activities performed to identify concepts and aspects of published information and research reports.Dictionaries, ChemicalTemperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Bacteriology: The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of bacteria, and BACTERIAL INFECTIONS.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Chryseobacterium: A genus of aerobic, gram-negative bacteria in the family FLAVOBACTERIACEAE. Many of its species were formerly in the genus FLAVOBACTERIUM.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Vocabulary, Controlled: A specified list of terms with a fixed and unalterable meaning, and from which a selection is made when CATALOGING; ABSTRACTING AND INDEXING; or searching BOOKS; JOURNALS AS TOPIC; and other documents. The control is intended to avoid the scattering of related subjects under different headings (SUBJECT HEADINGS). The list may be altered or extended only by the publisher or issuing agency. (From Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed, p163)China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.PaintingsAlteromonadaceae: A family of marine, gram-negative PROTEOBACTERIA including the genera ALTEROMONAS; Colwellia; Idiomarina; MARINOBACTER; MORITELLA; PSEUDOALTEROMONAS; and SHEWANELLA.PhenazinesAmino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Hot Springs: Habitat of hot water naturally heated by underlying geologic processes. Surface hot springs have been used for BALNEOLOGY. Underwater hot springs are called HYDROTHERMAL VENTS.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Halobacteriaceae: A family of extremely halophilic archaea found in environments with high salt concentrations, such as salt lakes, evaporated brines, or salted fish. Halobacteriaceae are either obligate aerobes or facultative anaerobes and are divided into at least twenty-six genera including: HALOARCULA; HALOBACTERIUM; HALOCOCCUS; HALOFERAX; HALORUBRUM; NATRONOBACTERIUM; and NATRONOCOCCUS.Semantics: The relationships between symbols and their meanings.Sphingomonadaceae: A family of gram-negative, asporogenous rods or ovoid cells, aerobic or facultative anaerobic chemoorganotrophs. They are commonly isolated from SOIL, activated sludge, or marine environments.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Halomonas: A genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped or pleomorphic bacteria which are halotolerant. Members of this genus are capable of growth in sodium chloride concentrations of up to 20% or more. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Panax: An araliaceous genus of plants that contains a number of pharmacologically active agents used as stimulants, sedatives, and tonics, especially in traditional medicine. Sometimes confused with Siberian ginseng (ELEUTHEROCOCCUS).Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Abbreviations as Topic: Shortened forms of written words or phrases used for brevity.Carbohydrate Metabolism: Cellular processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of CARBOHYDRATES.Sewage: Refuse liquid or waste matter carried off by sewers.Ethnobotany: The study of plant lore and agricultural customs of a people. In the fields of ETHNOMEDICINE and ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, the emphasis is on traditional medicine and the existence and medicinal uses of PLANTS and PLANT EXTRACTS and their constituents, both historically and in modern times.DNA, Archaeal: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of archaea.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Databases, Genetic: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Desert Climate: A type of climate characterized by insufficient moisture to support appreciable plant life. It is a climate of extreme aridity, usually of extreme heat, and of negligible rainfall. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Anaerobiosis: The complete absence, or (loosely) the paucity, of gaseous or dissolved elemental oxygen in a given place or environment. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Linguistics: The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Rhodospirillaceae: A family of phototrophic bacteria, in the order Rhodospirillales, isolated from stagnant water and mud.Database Management Systems: Software designed to store, manipulate, manage, and control data for specific uses.Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Lysobacter: A genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped, gliding bacteria in the family XANTHOMONADACEAE. Strongly proteolytic, it is involved in lysing a variety of microorganisms.Betaproteobacteria: A class in the phylum PROTEOBACTERIA comprised of chemoheterotrophs and chemoautotrophs which derive nutrients from decomposition of organic material.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Databases, Bibliographic: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of references and citations to books, articles, publications, etc., generally on a single subject or specialized subject area. Databases can operate through automated files, libraries, or computer disks. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, FACTUAL which is used for collections of data and facts apart from bibliographic references to them.Flavobacterium: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in SOIL and WATER. Its organisms are also found in raw meats, MILK and other FOOD, hospital environments, and human clinical specimens. Some species are pathogenic in humans.Spores, Bacterial: Heat and stain resistant, metabolically inactive bodies formed within the vegetative cells of bacteria of the genera Bacillus and Clostridium.Hyphomicrobiaceae: A family in the order Rhizobiales, class ALPHAPROTEOBACTERIA comprised of many genera of budding or appendaged bacteria.PeptidoglycanBacillus: A genus of BACILLACEAE that are spore-forming, rod-shaped cells. Most species are saprophytic soil forms with only a few species being pathogenic.Phospholipids: Lipids containing one or more phosphate groups, particularly those derived from either glycerol (phosphoglycerides see GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS) or sphingosine (SPHINGOLIPIDS). They are polar lipids that are of great importance for the structure and function of cell membranes and are the most abundant of membrane lipids, although not stored in large amounts in the system.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.Fermentation: Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Unified Medical Language System: A research and development program initiated by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE to build knowledge sources for the purpose of aiding the development of systems that help health professionals retrieve and integrate biomedical information. The knowledge sources can be used to link disparate information systems to overcome retrieval problems caused by differences in terminology and the scattering of relevant information across many databases. The three knowledge sources are the Metathesaurus, the Semantic Network, and the Specialist Lexicon.Mice, Inbred C57BLProteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Gram-Positive Endospore-Forming Bacteria: Bacteria that form endospores and are gram-positive. Representative genera include BACILLUS; CLOSTRIDIUM; MICROMONOSPORA; SACCHAROPOLYSPORA; and STREPTOMYCES.Sphingomonas: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria characterized by an outer membrane that contains glycosphingolipids but lacks lipopolysaccharide. They have the ability to degrade a broad range of substituted aromatic compounds.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Antarctic Regions: The continent lying around the South Pole and the southern waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. It includes the Falkland Islands Dependencies. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p55)Actinobacteria: Class of BACTERIA with diverse morphological properties. Strains of Actinobacteria show greater than 80% 16S rDNA/rRNA sequence similarity among each other and also the presence of certain signature nucleotides. (Stackebrandt E. et al, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. (1997) 47:479-491)Caulobacteraceae: A family of stalked bacteria that reproduces by budding. There are four genera: CAULOBACTER, Asticcacaulis, Brevundimonas, and Phenylobacterium.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Neisseriaceae: A family of gram-negative, parasitic bacteria including several important pathogens of man.Vocabulary: The sum or the stock of words used by a language, a group, or an individual. (From Webster, 3d ed)Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Comamonadaceae: A family of gram-negative aerobic bacteria in the class BETA PROTEOBACTERIA, encompassing the acidovorans rRNA complex. Some species are pathogenic for PLANTS.Pacific OceanGenotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.JapanGene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Mediterranean SeaBacteriochlorophyll A: A specific bacteriochlorophyll that is similar in structure to chlorophyll a.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Recognition (Psychology): The knowledge or perception that someone or something present has been previously encountered.Motor Neurons: Neurons which activate MUSCLE CELLS.Animals, Genetically Modified: ANIMALS whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING, or their offspring.Rhizosphere: The immediate physical zone surrounding plant roots that include the plant roots. It is an area of intense and complex biological activity involving plants, microorganisms, other soil organisms, and the soil.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Heterotrophic Processes: The processes by which organisms utilize organic substances as their nutrient sources. Contrasts with AUTOTROPHIC PROCESSES which make use of simple inorganic substances as the nutrient supply source. Heterotrophs can be either chemoheterotrophs (or chemoorganotrophs) which also require organic substances such as glucose for their primary metabolic energy requirements, or photoheterotrophs (or photoorganotrophs) which derive their primary energy requirements from light. Depending on environmental conditions some organisms can switch between different nutritional modes (AUTOTROPHY; heterotrophy; chemotrophy; or PHOTOTROPHY) to utilize different sources to meet their nutrients and energy requirements.Artificial Intelligence: Theory and development of COMPUTER SYSTEMS which perform tasks that normally require human intelligence. Such tasks may include speech recognition, LEARNING; VISUAL PERCEPTION; MATHEMATICAL COMPUTING; reasoning, PROBLEM SOLVING, DECISION-MAKING, and translation of language.Ubiquinone: A lipid-soluble benzoquinone which is involved in ELECTRON TRANSPORT in mitochondrial preparations. The compound occurs in the majority of aerobic organisms, from bacteria to higher plants and animals.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Mycolic AcidsCell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Anomia: A language dysfunction characterized by the inability to name people and objects that are correctly perceived. The individual is able to describe the object in question, but cannot provide the name. This condition is associated with lesions of the dominant hemisphere involving the language areas, in particular the TEMPORAL LOBE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p484)Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Alcaligenaceae: A family of gram-negative, aerobic, non-spore forming rods or cocci. Well known genera include ACHROMOBACTER; ALCALIGENES; and BORDETELLA.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Data Mining: Use of sophisticated analysis tools to sort through, organize, examine, and combine large sets of information.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Databases, Protein: Databases containing information about PROTEINS such as AMINO ACID SEQUENCE; PROTEIN CONFORMATION; and other properties.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Industrial Waste: Worthless, damaged, defective, superfluous or effluent material from industrial operations.Gordonia Bacterium: A genus of gram-positive BACTERIA in the family Gordoniaceae, isolated from soil and from sputa of patients with chest disorders. It is also used for biotransformation of natural products.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Bacillales: An order of gram-positive bacteria in the class Bacilli, phylum Firmicutes.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Micromonosporaceae: A family of gram-positive, saprophytic bacteria occurring in soil and aquatic environments.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Directories as Topic: Lists of persons or organizations, systematically arranged, usually in alphabetic or classed order, giving address, affiliations, etc., for individuals, and giving address, officers, functions, and similar data for organizations. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Indian Ocean: A body of water covering approximately one-fifth of the total ocean area of the earth, extending amidst Africa in the west, Australia in the east, Asia in the north, and Antarctica in the south. Including the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf, it constitutes the third largest ocean after the ATLANTIC OCEAN and the PACIFIC OCEAN. (New Encyclopaedia Britannica Micropaedia, 15th ed, 1990, p289)Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Flagella: A whiplike motility appendage present on the surface cells. Prokaryote flagella are composed of a protein called FLAGELLIN. Bacteria can have a single flagellum, a tuft at one pole, or multiple flagella covering the entire surface. In eukaryotes, flagella are threadlike protoplasmic extensions used to propel flagellates and sperm. Flagella have the same basic structure as CILIA but are longer in proportion to the cell bearing them and present in much smaller numbers. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Pharmaceutical Preparations: Drugs intended for human or veterinary use, presented in their finished dosage form. Included here are materials used in the preparation and/or formulation of the finished dosage form.Green Fluorescent Proteins: Protein analogs and derivatives of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein that emit light (FLUORESCENCE) when excited with ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. They are used in REPORTER GENES in doing GENETIC TECHNIQUES. Numerous mutants have been made to emit other colors or be sensitive to pH.Nocardia: A genus of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria whose species are widely distributed and are abundant in soil. Some strains are pathogenic opportunists for humans and animals.Drug Labeling: Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a drug container or wrapper. It includes contents, indications, effects, dosages, routes, methods, frequency and duration of administration, warnings, hazards, contraindications, side effects, precautions, and other relevant information.Petroleum: Naturally occurring complex liquid hydrocarbons which, after distillation, yield combustible fuels, petrochemicals, and lubricants.Oxalobacteraceae: A family of gram-negative bacteria in the class BETAPROTEOBACTERIA. There are at least eight genera.Propionibacteriaceae: A family of gram-positive bacteria found in dairy products or in the intestinal tracts of animals.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Republic of Korea: The capital is Seoul. The country, established September 9, 1948, is located on the southern part of the Korean Peninsula. Its northern border is shared with the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.Sphingobacterium: A genus of gram-negative, chemoorganotrophic bacteria in the family Sphingobacteriaceae. They lack FLAGELLA but some species exhibit sliding motility.Cell Wall: The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Marine Biology: The study of the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of organisms which inhabit the OCEANS AND SEAS.Environmental Microbiology: The study of microorganisms living in a variety of environments (air, soil, water, etc.) and their pathogenic relationship to other organisms including man.Thiosulfates: Inorganic salts of thiosulfuric acid possessing the general formula R2S2O3.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Microscopy, Electron, Transmission: Electron microscopy in which the ELECTRONS or their reaction products that pass down through the specimen are imaged below the plane of the specimen.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.Dictionaries, PharmaceuticSex Ratio: The number of males per 100 females.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Acetobacteraceae: A family of gram-negative aerobic bacteria consisting of ellipsoidal to rod-shaped cells that occur singly, in pairs, or in chains.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
Asano, Tamaki (1990). "Women's Hairdressing". In Dr. Junichi Saga. Memories of Silk and Straw: a Self-Portrait of Small-Town ...
"Dr Pita Sharples". New Zealand Parliament. 21 July 2014. Retrieved 20 September 2014. Connew, Bruce (Spring 2004). "Main ... Tamaki Makaurau results 2008. Trevett, Claire (17 November 2008). "Maori Party takes 'sensible position'". The New Zealand ... subscription required) "Hon Dr Pita Sharples". beehive.govt.nz. Retrieved 20 September 2014. "Appointment of Ministers" (21 ... In the 2005 general election Sharples contested and won the urban Auckland seat of Tamaki Makaurau displacing former Labour MP ...
Tiffen, Rachel (26 October 2009). "Team to tackle safety issues on Tamaki Drive". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 26 ... such as Tamaki Drive (one of the major cycling routes of Auckland, which also saw some high-profile accidents), working with ...
The Kohimarama Yacht Club is located on Tamaki Drive. This club was set up in 1939 for young people and the construction of the ... Today, Kohimarama is one of the quieter beaches along Tamaki Drive with some cosy cafes present along the beach front. ... Kohimarama Kohimarama beach and Tamaki Drive Sunrise on 1 May 2009 Kohimarama "QuickStats About Kohimarama West & East", ... had to walk around the rocks to and from the wharf which ultimately led to the building of the road now known as Tamaki Drive. ...
"The Venerable Dr Hone Kaa, Archdeacon of Tamaki Makaurau". 2012. Retrieved 31 March 2012. "beehive.govt.nz - Minister ... "Greens saddened by death of Dr Hone Kaa". greens.org.nz. 2012. Retrieved 31 March 2012. "Remembering Rev'd Dr Hone Kaa « White ... "Ven Rev Dr Hone Kaa". 2012. Retrieved 31 March 2012. [permanent dead link] "Do Your Thing! : AMP Scholarship". doyourthing.co. ... "He aitua , Dr Hone Kaa , TangataWhenua.com". news.tangatawhenua.com. 2012. Retrieved 31 March 2012. "Labour pays tribute to ...
The suburb's beach is a popular resort, located alongside Tamaki Drive. The area also has a wide range of eateries. Mission Bay ... Selwyn Reserve - This is the open green space between Tamaki Drive and Mission Bay Beach, often referred to as Mission Bay ...
The marathon then returns along Tamaki Drive and back to Victoria Park. The first Auckland Marathon was held in June 1936, ... those competing in the full marathon continue eastward through Viaduct Harbour and along Tamaki Drive to the turn-around point ...
The electorate covers the Auckland area and was first held by Labour's John Tamihere before going to Dr Pita Sharples of the ... "Official Count Results -- Tamaki Makaurau". Wellington: New Zealand Electoral Commission. Retrieved 24 December 2017. "Official ... chapter= ignored (help) "Hon Dr Pita Sharples". New Zealand Parliament. 22 September 2014. Retrieved 2 October 2014. Ropiha, ...
Heliers / Tamaki Drive Services. In service with the ATB/ARA 1953-1969, then the NST 1969-1971 and back to the ARA 1971-1977. ... Four-cylinder paxman Ricardo diesel chain drive. Briggs and Stratton auxiliary starter motor turning flywheel. NZR TR class No. ...
The collection and bacteriology laboratory suite at Landcare in Tamaki was named after him in 2004. He attended the naming ... "NZ university graduates, 1870-1961: Dr-E". Shadows of Time. Retrieved 17 April 2014. New Zealand Microbiological Society ... Tamaki. He retired in December 1983, and was made an Honorary Member of the New Zealand Microbiological Society the following ...
He met and married his wife Yoshi Tamaki in Japan. After returning to New Orleans he studied at the Gateway School of Music. He ... The concept of the show started with 'Dr. Ike' Padnos and the Ponderosa Stomp crew. A nine-piece band was assembled from New ... The album featured Dr. John, Bettye LaVette, bassist Jimmy Haslip, guitarist Leo Nocentelli, drummer Bernard "Bunchy" Johnson ... In 1992 he produced and arranged Dr. John's Grammy Award-winning album Goin' Back to New Orleans. In late 1990s he produced ...
At the same time a new road, Tamaki Drive, was built alongside part of the railway line. A notable feature of the deviation is ...
Located at 23 Tamaki Drive, it was the brainchild of New Zealand marine archeologist and diver Kelly Tarlton (1937-1985). Built ... The tanks are located below the suburb of Orakei, on Tamaki Drive and overlooking the Waitematā Harbour. Once the tunnels were ...
... /ˈfɪʃər.ænd.ˈpaɪkəl/ is a major appliance manufacturing company based in East Tamaki, New Zealand. Originally ... The company's trademarked brushless motor-based performance features include Smart Drive washing machines, SmartLoad Dryers and ... The company's trademarked appliances include Active Smart refrigerators, AeroTech ovens, DishDrawer dishwashers, Smart Drive ... resulting in the development of the ECS direct drive mechanism washing machine and highly automated production lines. In 1989, ...
There is a T2 transit lane in Tamaki Drive, in a short stretch between Glendowie and downtown Auckland. There are also T2 ... Quinn DJ, Gilson DR, Dixon MT (1998). "Britain's first high occupancy vehicle lane - the A647, Leeds". ETC Proceedings. ... According to 2009 data from the U.S. census, 76% drive to work alone and only 10% rideshare; for suburban commuters working in ... Starting from September 20, 2017, commuters can opt to drive in HOV lane on Northeast Expressway during the morning peak hours ...
After Tamaki Drive was opened in 1931 St. Heliers became a commuter suburb and a destination for Sunday drives. The wharf is ... Heliers is located at the eastern end of Tamaki Drive, and used to be the place where the Tamaki estuary formally divided ... The run is 8.4 km long over Tamaki Drive, the flat road following the contours of the Waitematā Harbour, passing Hobson Bay, ... whenever Tamaki Drive is gridlocked with traffic. Achilles Point is regarded as the rocky promontory on the east side of Ladies ...
9 November - Marsden again visits Tamaki Makaurau, this time with Butler. They visit Tamaki River and cross the isthmus to ... 3 May - A plough is used for the first time in New Zealand when John Gare Butler drives a team of six bullocks at Kerikeri. 14 ... 27 August - Captain R.A. Cruise of the 84th Regiment visits Tamaki Makaurau on the colonial schooner Prince Regent. ... July - Marsden's second visit to Tamaki Makaurau (Auckland), on HMS Coromandel. He climbs Maungarei / Mount Wellington and is ...
SH 16 begins in Central Auckland at the corner of The Strand, Tamaki Drive and Quay Street, directly opposite the Port of ... The Northwestern Motorway terminates at the roundabout with Brigham Creek Road and Fred Taylor Drive. From here SH 16 reverts ...
Sometimes the bay formed between Tamaki Drive and the western reclamation edge of Fergusson container terminal is also referred ... Dr Nerida Campbell. Heart of the City 2005. The Lively Capital, Auckland 1840-1865. Una Platts. Avon Fine Prints Limited New ...
... was established at the University of Auckland in the Library of the Tamaki Campus in 1994. Poet Alan Loney was ... printed and bound by Tara McLeod under the direction of Dr. Peter Simpson. The Holloway Press has received assistance from the ...
It is situated at the corner of Ti Rakau Drive and Chapel Road in the suburb of East Tamaki, and was opened in 2001. The centre ...
Where the cables cross the Tamaki River and Pakuranga Creek they are attached to the relevant road bridge. The original ... From Wairau Road, the cable route again follows the Northern Busway to Constellation Drive. The NAaN cables leave the Northern ... The 9 km long route of the underground cables between Pakuranga and Penrose is mainly in the road carriageway of Ti Rakau Drive ... between the Auckland Harbour Bridge and Constellation Drive. 21 September 2007 - Transpower submitted a Grid Upgrade Plan ...
Depending on the connection to the CBD, the scheme would have either entered the city on a widened western Tamaki Drive section ... and the benefit it would have on the traffic volumes on Tamaki Drive.[citation needed] John Banks proposed to underground large ... as well as areas like Tamaki Drive, the Parnell Baths and several environmentally sensitive areas. However, there were also ...
September 29: Yasuaki Uwabe drives a car into Shimonoseki Station and then stabs people, killing five, before being arrested. ... from DVL) and actress February 7: Tamaki Matsumoto, child actress. March 12 : Sakura Oda, singer. April 23 : Sumire Morohoshi, ...
... the Wintergardens in Auckland Domain and the construction of Tamaki Drive. In later public life, he was responsible for the ...
1998: P. Craig Russell, Elric: Stormbringer (Dark Horse/Topps); Dr. Strange: What Is It That Disturbs You, Stephen? (Marvel) ... 2016: SuperMutant Magic Academy, door Jillian Tamaki (Drawn & Quarterly). *2017: The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl, door Ryan North ... 2003: Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde door Robert Louis Stevenson, bewerkt door Jerry Kramsky en Lorenzo Mattotti (NBM) ... 2018: Boundless, door Jillian Tamaki (Drawn & Quarterly). *2019: The Vision hardcover, door Tom King, Gabriel Hernandez Walta ...
Tamaki Drive Sweeping Close to the Water Tamaki Drive Cycleway on a Sunny Day Kelly Tarltons Entrance and Shark Bus Scorpion ... The name Tamaki Drive has since been given to the road which follows the coastline of the southern shore of the Harbour. At the ... Tamaki Drive is a flat road around 8 km (5 miles) long and popular with walkers, runners and roller skaters, and includes a ... When crossing Tamaki Drive to the landward side Ōkahu Bay borders onto the Orākei Domain. This park has a sports ground located ...
This information is reviewed and edited by East Tamaki Healthcare (ETHC) - Mangere East. ...
Dr. Hisao Tamaki. Home Institution: Meiji University. Area: Algorithmic Graph Theory.. Dates of Visit: August 24 - September 23 ... Contact Information: tamaki@cs.meiji.ac.jp Host: Gu, Qianping. Ebco/Epic Seminar Title: A polynomial time algorithm for bounded ... Dr. Mi-Yeh Yen. Home Institution: Institute of Information Science. Area: Data stream mining and management, time series mining ... Dr. Jean-Pierre Lozi. Area: Operating systems, multiprocessors, transactional memory. Dates of Visit: June 1, 2014 - May 31, ...
1 more classification in East Tamaki Auckland. View all our vacancies now with new jobs added daily! ... Opportunity to drive transformational change. *Work with a highly engaged and passionate team ... Community Services & Development, Compliance & Risk Jobs in East Tamaki Auckland. Skip to content. Try the SEEK app to find ...
Contact St Heliers Dental Centre in St Heliers, Auckland to have your dental needs met! We offer a wide range of dental and cosmetic services to suit your smile
Asano, Tamaki (1990). "Womens Hairdressing". In Dr. Junichi Saga. Memories of Silk and Straw: a Self-Portrait of Small-Town ...
NORTHRIDGE : Transient Dies in Office Break-In JULIE TAMAKI. *. A Divinity That Ends Our Shapes : Life is too short never to ... The gathering at the youth club where Tiffany Dozier died in a drive-by shooting cheers news of two arrests. ALICIA DI RADO, ... SUN VALLEY : Bar Customer Shot and Killed JULIE TAMAKI. *. LOS ANGELES COUNTY : Molina, Sheriffs Officials Clash on $2-Million ... BURBANK : Police Arrest 2 After Finding Guns in Car JULIE TAMAKI. *. City Clerk Denies Harassment Charges : Government: Elias ...
29 Neilpark Drive, East Tamaki, Manukau City, Auckland. Physical address. SuperCharge Batteries has been distributing ...
PDGFRα signaling drives adipose tissue fibrosis by targeting progenitor cell plasticity. Genes Dev. 29, 1106-1119 (2015).. ... Heme drives hemolysis-induced susceptibility to infection via disruption of phagocyte functions. Nat. Immunol. 17, 1361-1372 ( ... In this work, we show that late stage wound macrophages phagocytize and degrade wound Wnt inhibitor SFRP4 to drive chronic Wnt ... Phagocytosis of Wnt inhibitor SFRP4 by late wound macrophages drives chronic Wnt activity for fibrotic skin healing ...
Address: 23 Tamaki Drive, Auckland. Web: www.kellytarltons.co.nz 5. New Zealand National Maritime Museum Dedicated to one of ... Address: 12 Tom Pearce Drive, Auckland. Web: www.butterflycreek.co.nz 3. Rangitito Island A dormant volcanic island - only a 45 ... Address: 103-113 Westhaven Drive, Westhaven Marina, Auckland. Web: www.sailsrestaurant.co.nz ...
Bradbury, M.A. (2015). Urban Heirloom East Tamaki. Landscape Architecture New Zealand (Vol. Winter).. ...
Tamaki Yuri2,5. *. 1 Zoology Department, Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605, USA. ...
Tamaki Drive full closure this weekend 10:23 AM , Auckland Transport More  RSS ...
Mantells Tamaki Drive, Auckland #Health #Seminar Share this event NZ$50 Sun., 18 Oct. 1:45 pm Pause for Mental Health ...
23 Tamaki Drive, Ōrākei. Auckland 1071. New Zealand. Getting Here Contact Us ...
The study Dr. Zimmerman and colleagues was supported by the Tamaki Foundation. The study by Dr. Vandewater and colleagues was ... The study by Dr. Johnson and colleagues was supported by grants from the National Institute of Mental Health and National ... Dr. Zimmerman and colleagues wrote. A second survey of viewing habits, by Elizabeth A. Vandewater, Ph.D., of the University of ... Dr. Vandewater and colleagues wrote in the May issue of Pediatrics. "Media and technology are here to stay and are virtually ...
East Tamaki 1706. 64 9 273 3701. *. Chilly Willee. 1982 Belford North Dr. ...
Cyclists will push for a lower speed limit on Tamaki Drive after a young driver ploughed into a pack of riders, critically ... "It [Tamaki Drive] is such a gorgeous part of Auckland, we all want to use it. It seems like cyclists are put at the bottom of ... Ms Cuthbert said the group would push for a reduced speed limit of 40km/h along Tamaki Drive and the introduction of a ... Cyclists will push for a lower speed limit on Aucklands Tamaki Drive after a young driver ploughed into a pack of riders, ...
Tamaki, West, near St. Johns College, Auckland, July 23, 1880. Dr Grant has greatly improved my hearing during the; time :I ... Dr. Grant. -Dear sir,-l have to give you thanks for the great benefit to my hearing since I have been under your care.-l am, &c ... I applied to Dr. Grant, who has removed a great quantity of obstruction from my ears; before I left his surgery I could hear ... Dr. Gran* has this morning removed a polypus fron. my ear. I am greatly relieved, and can hear much better.- Rachel Rountree. ...
Barmy ideas can gain a foothold just because of the prominence of the person voicing them.Photograph by Tamaki Sono / FlickrThe ... Barmy ideas can gain a foothold just because of the prominence of the person voicing them.Photograph by Tamaki Sono / Flickr. ... "Hey, Dr S! Were getting a few KOLs together to give us some advice about how to develop our new compound," began the friendly ... Several years ago, Dr Rai began a "Meet-the-Expert" session at the American Society of Hematology annual meeting with a ...
1926 Sunset Dr, Raleigh Tel: 919-296-5743 Theres No Damage We Cant Manage!" Fully accredited with the Better Business Bureau ... Timber Dealers is a family-owned and operated timber provider in East Tamaki. We offer all kinds of timber for your decking, ...
Japans leading hikikomori psychiatrist, Dr Tamaki Saito, believes the cause of the problem lies within Japanese history and ... Dr Grubb is also surprised by the passive, softly, softly approach followed by parents and counsellors in Japan. "If my child ... Dr Henry Grubb, a psychologist from the University of Maryland in the United States, is preparing the first academic study to ... More recently, Dr Saito points to the relationship between mothers and their sons. Most hikikomori sufferers are male, often ...
Sato, Tamaki and Glenn W. Storrs. 2000. An early polycotylid plesiosaur (Reptilia: Sauropterygia) from the Cretaceous of ...
Tamaki West, near St. Johns College, Auckland, July 23, 1880. Dr Grant has greatly improved my hearing during the time I have ... Dr. Grant. -Dear sir,-l have to give you thanks for the great benefit to my hearing since I have been under your care.-l am, Ac ... Dr. Grant operated upon me on Saturday last, and I am now quite well, although I had been in an ill state of health for four- ... Dr. Grant has just cured me of a long-standing deafness of more than ten years, for which I am very thankful, having tried many ...
We thank Dr Y Nakao for his suggestions during this study; Professors M Amatsu, M Ichihashi, and N Tamaki and Dr M Inoue for ... permission to include their patients; and Dr Y Hayashi for his comments on pathology. ...
  • New Zealand is undergoing huge changes to land use and decision makers need to be aware of the consequences for the future, says the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment, Dr Jan Wright. (scoop.co.nz)
  • Police will today speak with the 20-year-old woman who appeared to drive through a compulsory stop near Vale Rd in St Heliers Bay before hitting the group of 20 middle-aged riders on Saturday morning. (nzherald.co.nz)
  • Detective Sergeant Nathan Reid said police observed the vehicle on Te Irirangi Drive and activated their red and blue lights in an attempt to stop the vehicle. (times.co.nz)
  • Dr Henry Grubb, a psychologist from the University of Maryland in the United States, is preparing the first academic study to be published outside Japan. (bbc.co.uk)
  • My name is Dr Ocean Mercier, and I'm a lecturer in pūtaiao Māori at the Victoria University of Wellington. (sciencelearn.org.nz)
  • The atomic structure underwent significant changes over the medium-range length scales as large as 18Å," explains Dr. Tamaki Shibayama of Hokkaido University. (hokudai.ac.jp)
  • DR. GRANT has arrived in Christchurch, and may be CONSULTED at his. (natlib.govt.nz)
  • I beg to state that Dr. Grant has operated on my daughter for squinting, and she is now seeing as straight as possible, with both eyes. (natlib.govt.nz)
  • DR.. GRANT has arrived in Christchurch, and may be CONSULTED at his Consulting Rooms, 4 HEREFORD TERRACE, Hereford Street East, Christchurch, Near St. John's Church. (natlib.govt.nz)
  • Dr. Grant. (natlib.govt.nz)
  • Dr Grant has greatly improved my hearing during the time I have been under his care. (natlib.govt.nz)
  • I would earnestly recommend any persons suffering from diseases of the eyes to make a trial of Dr Grant, feeling sure that he would benefit them as he has done me. (natlib.govt.nz)
  • Dr. Grant " has removed a large and small polypus from my years, and I can hear much better, having greatly improved under his care, for which I am very thankful. (natlib.govt.nz)
  • Dr. Grant operated upon me on Saturday last, and I am now quite well, although I had been in an ill state of health for four-years. (natlib.govt.nz)
  • Dr. Grant has just cured me of a long-standing deafness of more than ten years, for which I am very thankful, having tried many other doctors without success. (natlib.govt.nz)
  • On August 2 I was treated by Dr. Grant, and am now quite well, being able to hear as well as ever I did. (natlib.govt.nz)
  • In addition, the Neurological Foundation Douglas Clinical Fellowship and Dr Suzanne Ackerley, Clinical Neuroscience Research Fellow, complete the team. (auckland.ac.nz)
  • Dr Grubb is also surprised by the passive, softly, softly approach followed by parents and counsellors in Japan. (bbc.co.uk)
  • His three graduate students included a young lady from Japan, Tamaki Sato. (oceansofkansas.com)
  • Dr. Ikuse is a pediatric gastroenterlorogist and a leading expert in the study of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood in Japan. (umaryland.edu)
  • Then things get stranger: Linda's ghost catches up with an old lover Victor (Sinclair) and faces a life-changing dilemma, while her body - awol with a tennis player on Tamaki Drive - has other plans. (nzonscreen.com)
  • iASPP is an antioxidative factor and drives cancer growth and drug resistance by competing with Nrf2 for Keap1 binding. (springer.com)
  • Tamaki R, Kanai-Mori A, Morishige Y, Koike A, Yanagihara K, Amano F. Effects of 5-fluorouracil, adriamycin and irinotecan on HSC-39, a human scirrhous gastric cancer cell line. (springer.com)
  • Tamaki Drive was completed in 1932 and incorporates The Strand, Bice Esplanade and, what was once part of the old Kohimarama Road. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mansions in Paritai Dr, which sell for millions of dollars, have lost their single-house status and can be replaced with as many two-storey townhouses as developers can squeeze on to large sections. (nzherald.co.nz)
  • Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes have also been implicated in PD, and large numbers of HLA-DR-positive reactive microglia were detected in the substantia nigra (SN) and the nigrostriatal tract in PD patients [ 7 , 8 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • He lives happily alongside the Tamaki estuary, with this wife Hilary and daughter Charlotte, and for some reason enjoys a consistently warm welcome from Ed, the local bottle-shop owner. (google.no)
  • Since this time, the NRU has expanded with the appointments of Dr Cathy Stinear, movement neuroscientist, and Dr Jennifer Pereira, clinical neurologist, as senior lecturers. (auckland.ac.nz)
  • HLA-DR-positive microglia have also been found in these regions in a case of Parkinson's-associated dementia in Guam [ 8 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Dr. Bailes has been instrumental in the understanding of the clinical evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a progressive degenerative disease found in individuals who have been subjected to multiple concussions and other forms of head injury. (snmmi.org)
  • n = 33) DR. Age, gender, LV end-diastolic dimension, EF, E/A ratio of the transmitral flow velocity curves, E', and E/E' were not different between DM-N and DM-DR. However, CK-DI was significantly lower in DM-DR than DM-N. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Dr Stanley Bellgard has been working on ways to detect the disease in the soil as the trees themselves may show no symptoms of the disease for years after infection. (sciencelearn.org.nz)
  • The real world continues to drive this writing, even after nine books for Wiley in twelve years. (google.no)
  • Those travelling along Tamaki Drive can find scenic highlights and peaceful views across the harbour to the volcanic island Rangitoto. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pit Stop on Nevada Border Now a Hot Spot : Gambling: Stateline, once a drive-through, becomes a destination. (latimes.com)
  • In a television program aired Sunday, DPP leader Yuichiro Tamaki told NHK, "We'd rather avoid being hasty by making the start of the Diet session, on Jan. 20, as the deadline," according to a report by the Asahi daily. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • A youtube video of Dr Wright summarising the report is available here . (scoop.co.nz)
  • Voor iedere prijs worden comics genomineerd door een panel van vijf personen, en hierop wordt dan gestemd door mensen uit de comicbookindustrie, en de prijs wordt uitgereikt tijdens het festival San Diego Comic-Con International in San Diego , Californië. (wikipedia.org)
  • BACKGROUND: Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is an independent predictor of heart failure (HF) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). (biomedsearch.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS: DR is associated with LV diastolic dysfunction, and this may at least in part explain the increased incidence of HF in DM patients with DR. (biomedsearch.com)
  • To test the hypothesis that TLR4 and its coreceptor myeloid differentiation 2 (MD2) drive fibrosis persistence, we measured MD2/TLR4 signaling in tissues from patients with fibrotic SSc, and we examined the impact of MD2 targeting using a potentially novel small molecule. (jci.org)