Mycology: The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of fungi, and MYCOSES.MycosesConsensus Development Conferences, NIH as Topic: Articles on conferences sponsored by NIH presenting summary statements representing the majority agreement of physicians, scientists, and other professionals convening for the purpose of reaching a consensus on a subject of interest. This heading is used for NIH consensus conferences as a means of scientific communication. In indexing it is viewed as a type of review article and as a tag for any article appearing in any publication of the NIH Office of Medical Applications of Research (OMAR).Onychomycosis: A fungal infection of the nail, usually caused by DERMATOPHYTES; YEASTS; or nondermatophyte MOLDS.Arthrodermataceae: A family of ascomycetous fungi, order Onygenales, characterized by smooth ascospores. Genera in the family include Arthroderma, Keratinomyces, and Ctenomyces. Several well-known anamorphic forms are parasitic upon the skin.Fungi: A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.Dermatomycoses: Superficial infections of the skin or its appendages by any of various fungi.Microbiological Techniques: Techniques used in microbiology.Societies: Organizations composed of members with common interests and whose professions may be similar.Mycological Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of fungi.Human Genome Project: A coordinated effort of researchers to map (CHROMOSOME MAPPING) and sequence (SEQUENCE ANALYSIS, DNA) the human GENOME.Penicillium: A mitosporic Trichocomaceae fungal genus that develops fruiting organs resembling a broom. When identified, teleomorphs include EUPENICILLIUM and TALAROMYCES. Several species (but especially PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM) are sources of the antibiotic penicillin.Candida: A genus of yeast-like mitosporic Saccharomycetales fungi characterized by producing yeast cells, mycelia, pseudomycelia, and blastophores. It is commonly part of the normal flora of the skin, mouth, intestinal tract, and vagina, but can cause a variety of infections, including CANDIDIASIS; ONYCHOMYCOSIS; vulvovaginal candidiasis (CANDIDIASIS, VULVOVAGINAL), and thrush (see CANDIDIASIS, ORAL). (From Dorland, 28th ed)Fungemia: The presence of fungi circulating in the blood. Opportunistic fungal sepsis is seen most often in immunosuppressed patients with severe neutropenia or in postoperative patients with intravenous catheters and usually follows prolonged antibiotic therapy.Antifungal Agents: Substances that destroy fungi by suppressing their ability to grow or reproduce. They differ from FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL because they defend against fungi present in human or animal tissues.Laboratories: Facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.Itraconazole: A triazole antifungal agent that inhibits cytochrome P-450-dependent enzymes required for ERGOSTEROL synthesis.Candidiasis: Infection with a fungus of the genus CANDIDA. It is usually a superficial infection of the moist areas of the body and is generally caused by CANDIDA ALBICANS. (Dorland, 27th ed)Yeasts: A general term for single-celled rounded fungi that reproduce by budding. Brewers' and bakers' yeasts are SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE; therapeutic dried yeast is YEAST, DRIED.DNA, Fungal: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of fungi.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Tympanic Membrane: An oval semitransparent membrane separating the external EAR CANAL from the tympanic cavity (EAR, MIDDLE). It contains three layers: the skin of the external ear canal; the core of radially and circularly arranged collagen fibers; and the MUCOSA of the middle ear.Hearing Loss, Conductive: Hearing loss due to interference with the mechanical reception or amplification of sound to the COCHLEA. The interference is in the outer or middle ear involving the EAR CANAL; TYMPANIC MEMBRANE; or EAR OSSICLES.Ear Ossicles: A mobile chain of three small bones (INCUS; MALLEUS; STAPES) in the TYMPANIC CAVITY between the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE and the oval window on the wall of INNER EAR. Sound waves are converted to vibration by the tympanic membrane then transmitted via these ear ossicles to the inner ear.Bone Conduction: Transmission of sound waves through vibration of bones in the SKULL to the inner ear (COCHLEA). By using bone conduction stimulation and by bypassing any OUTER EAR or MIDDLE EAR abnormalities, hearing thresholds of the cochlea can be determined. Bone conduction hearing differs from normal hearing which is based on air conduction stimulation via the EAR CANAL and the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE.Ear, Middle: The space and structures directly internal to the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE and external to the inner ear (LABYRINTH). Its major components include the AUDITORY OSSICLES and the EUSTACHIAN TUBE that connects the cavity of middle ear (tympanic cavity) to the upper part of the throat.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Fagopyrum: A plant genus of the family POLYGONACEAE that is used as an EDIBLE GRAIN. Although the seeds are used as cereal, the plant is not one of the cereal grasses (POACEAE).Medical Staff: Professional medical personnel who provide care to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.Congresses as Topic: Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Coriolaceae: A family of fungi, order POLYPORALES, found on decaying wood.Armillaria: A genus of root and butt rot fungi in the family Tricholomataceae that produce rhizomorphs and are facultatively parasitic. Many species are pathogenic to trees causing Armillaria root disease.Wood: A product of hard secondary xylem composed of CELLULOSE, hemicellulose, and LIGNANS, that is under the bark of trees and shrubs. It is used in construction and as a source of CHARCOAL and many other products.Polyporaceae: A family of bracket fungi, order POLYPORALES, living in decaying plant matter and timber.Agaricales: An extensive order of basidiomycetous fungi whose fruiting bodies are commonly called mushrooms.Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Aspergillosis: Infections with fungi of the genus ASPERGILLUS.Colletotrichum: A genus of mitosporic Phyllachoraceae fungi which contains at least 40 species of plant parasites. They have teleomorphs in the genus Glomerella (see PHYLLACHORALES).Ascomycota: A phylum of fungi which have cross-walls or septa in the mycelium. The perfect state is characterized by the formation of a saclike cell (ascus) containing ascospores. Most pathogenic fungi with a known perfect state belong to this phylum.Directories as Topic: Lists of persons or organizations, systematically arranged, usually in alphabetic or classed order, giving address, affiliations, etc., for individuals, and giving address, officers, functions, and similar data for organizations. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Serial Publications: Publications in any medium issued in successive parts bearing numerical or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p203)DirectoryBook Classification: A general term covering bibliographical and bibliothecal classifications. It mostly refers to library CLASSIFICATION for arrangement of books and documents on the shelves. (Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed, p85)Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Journalism, Medical: The collection, writing, and editing of current interest material on topics related to biomedicine for presentation through the mass media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, or television, usually for a public audience such as health care consumers.

Continuous axenic cultivation of Pneumocystis carinii. (1/431)

Continuous axenic culture of Pneumocystis carinii has been achieved. A culture vessel is used that allows for frequent medium exchange without disturbance of organisms that grow attached to a collagen-coated porous membrane. The growth medium is based on Minimal Essential Medium with Earle's salt supplemented with S-adenosyl-L-methionine, putrescine, ferric pyrophosphate, N-acetyl glucosamine, putrescine, p-aminobenzoic acid, L-cysteine and L-glutamine, and horse serum. Incubation is in room air at 31 degrees C. The pH of the medium begins at 8.8 and rises to approximately 9 as the cells grow. Doubling times calculated from growth curves obtained from cultures inoculated at moderate densities ranged from 35 to 65 hours. With a low-density inoculum, the doubling time is reduced to 19 hours. The morphology of cultured organisms in stained smears and in transmission electron micrographs is that of P. carinii, and P. carinii-specific mAbs label the cultured material. Cultured organisms are infective for immunosuppressed rats and can be stored frozen and used to reinitiate culture.  (+info)

Species identification and strain differentiation of dermatophyte fungi by analysis of ribosomal-DNA intergenic spacer regions. (2/431)

Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) identified in the ribosomal-DNA (rDNA) repeat were used for molecular strain differentiation of the dermatophyte fungus Trichophyton rubrum. The polymorphisms were detected by hybridization of EcoRI-digested T. rubrum genomic DNAs with a probe amplified from the small-subunit (18S) rDNA and adjacent internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. The rDNA RFLPs mapped to the nontranscribed spacer (NTS) region of the rDNA repeat and appeared similar to those caused by short repetitive sequences in the intergenic spacers of other fungi. Fourteen individual RFLP patterns (DNA types A to N) were recognized among 50 random clinical isolates of T. rubrum. A majority of strains (19 of 50 [38%]) were characterized by one RFLP pattern (DNA type A), and four types (DNA types A to D) accounted for 78% (39 of 50) of all strains. The remaining types (DNA types E to N) were represented by one or two isolates only. A rapid and simple method was also developed for molecular species identification of dermatophyte fungi. The contiguous ITS and 5.8S rDNA regions were amplified from 17 common dermatophyte species by using the universal primers ITS 1 and ITS 4. Digestion of the amplified ITS products with the restriction endonuclease MvaI produced unique and easily identifiable fragment patterns for a majority of species. However, some closely related taxon pairs, such as T. rubrum-T. soudanense and T. quinkeanum-T. schoenlenii could not be distinguished. We conclude that RFLP analysis of the NTS and ITS intergenic regions of the rDNA repeat is a valuable technique both for molecular strain differentiation of T. rubrum and for species identification of common dermatophyte fungi.  (+info)

Aspergillus meningitis: diagnosis by non-culture-based microbiological methods and management. (3/431)

The performance of antibody detection, antigen detection, and Aspergillus genus-specific PCR for diagnosing Aspergillus meningitis was investigated with 26 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from a single patient with proven infection caused by Aspergillus fumigatus. Immunoglobulin G antibodies directed against Aspergillus were not detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in CSF or serum. The antigen galactomannan was detected in the CSF 45 days before a culture became positive, and Aspergillus DNA was detected 4 days prior to culture. Decline of the galactomannan antigen titer in the CSF during treatment with intravenous and intraventricular amphotericin B and intravenous voriconazole corresponded with the clinical response to treatment.  (+info)

A sandwiched-culture technique for evaluation of heterologous protein production in a filamentous fungus. (4/431)

Aspergillus niger is known for its efficient excretion machinery. However, problems have often arisen in obtaining high amounts of heterologous proteins in the culture medium. Here we present a quick method using sandwiched colonies to evaluate transgenic strains for secretion of heterologous proteins. Expressing the ABH1 hydrophobin of Agaricus bisporus in A. niger, we showed that low production levels of the heterologous protein are probably due to extracellular proteolytic degradation of the protein.  (+info)

Controlled clinical comparison of bioMerieux VITAL and BACTEC NR-660 blood culture systems for detection of bacteremia and fungemia in adults. (5/431)

A total of 9,446 blood cultures were collected from adult patients at three university-affiliated hospitals. Of these, 8,943 cultures were received with both aerobic bottles filled adequately; 885 yielded 1,016 microorganisms, including 622 isolates (61%) that were the cause of sepsis, 337 isolates (33%) that were contaminants, and 57 isolates (6%) that were indeterminate as the cause of sepsis. With the exception of Staphylococcus aureus, which was recovered more often from VITAL aerobic bottles, more pathogenic microorganisms were recovered from BACTEC NR6 (aerobic) bottles than from VITAL aerobic bottles. Growth of pathogenic microorganisms was detected earlier in VITAL aerobic bottles. A total of 8,647 blood cultures were received with both anaerobic bottles filled adequately; 655 yielded 740 microorganisms, including 486 isolates (66%) that were the cause of sepsis, 215 isolates (29%) that were contaminants, and 39 isolates (6%) that were indeterminate as the cause of sepsis. More pathogenic microorganisms were recovered from VITAL anaerobic bottles than from BACTEC NR7 (anaerobic) bottles. Growth of pathogenic microorganisms was detected earlier in VITAL anaerobic bottles. In 8,500 sets all four bottles were received adequately filled. When paired aerobic and anaerobic bottle sets (systems) were compared, more pathogenic microorganisms (again with the exception of S. aureus) were recovered from the BACTEC system. For the 304 septic episodes (253 unimicrobial and 51 polymicrobial), significantly more were detected by the BACTEC system. We conclude that VITAL requires modification to improve recovery of pathogenic microorganisms to make it competitive with other commercially available blood culture systems.  (+info)

PCR-restriction enzyme analysis for detection of Candida DNA in blood from febrile patients with hematological malignancies. (6/431)

Blood samples were drawn daily from 72 patients who had hematological malignancies, neutropenia, and fever and who had failed to respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics. Each sample was used for conventional fungal blood cultures and for detection and identification of Candida DNA by a PCR method with subsequent restriction enzyme analysis (REA) recently developed in our laboratory. The PCR method was able to detect five CFU of Candida spp. per ml of blood, and subsequent REA of the amplicons allowed the identification of the Candida species most commonly implicated in cases of candidiasis. Thirty-one patients were PCR-REA positive, and four of these patients were also culture positive. The ultimate diagnosis for 13 of these patients and 1 patient who was PCR-REA negative was disseminated candidiasis (confirmed by clinical data, multiple cultures, histology, autopsy, and/or ultrasonographic evidence of hepatosplenic candidiasis). The molecular method is significantly more sensitive than conventional fungal blood cultures and has a high negative predictive value (97.5%) for the development of disseminated candidiasis in neutropenic patients.  (+info)

Comparison of three commercial systems for identification of yeasts commonly isolated in the clinical microbiology laboratory. (7/431)

We evaluated three commercial systems (RapID Yeast Plus System; Innovative Diagnostic Systems, Norcross, Ga.; API 20C Aux; bioMerieux-Vitek, Hazelwood, Mo.; and Vitek Yeast Biochemical Card, bioMerieux-Vitek) against an auxinographic and microscopic morphologic reference method for the ability to identify yeasts commonly isolated in our clinical microbiology laboratory. Two-hundred one yeast isolates were compared in the study. The RapID Yeast Plus System was significantly better than either API 20C Aux (193 versus 167 correct identifications; P < 0.0001) or the Vitek Yeast Biochemical Card (193 versus 173 correct identifications; P = 0.003) for obtaining correct identifications to the species level without additional testing. There was no significant difference between results obtained with API 20C Aux and the Vitek Yeast Biochemical Card system (P = 0.39). The API 20C Aux system did not correctly identify any of the Candida krusei isolates (n = 23) without supplemental testing and accounted for the major differences between the API 20C Aux and RapID Yeast Plus systems. Overall, the RapID Yeast Plus System was easy to use and is a good system for the routine identification of clinically relevant yeasts.  (+info)

Times to detection of bacteria and yeasts in BACTEC 9240 blood culture bottles. (8/431)

A 7-day incubation protocol was instituted with the BACTEC 9240 system for a 1-year period to determine the times to detection of clinically relevant organisms. A total of 23,686 blood and 693 sterile body fluid cultures were received; some cultures were held longer by special request. Of 1,609 likely skin contaminants, 42 were recovered on day 5, 34 on day 6, 16 on day 7, and 5 on day 8. Of 2,803 usual pathogens, 34 were recovered on day 5, 24 on day 6, 15 on day 7 and 1 on day 8. Twenty-one of the latter organisms were considered significant laboratory isolates because they were the first isolates from the respective patients. Chart review showed that 10 of 21 were considered clinically significant, but only 3 (all yeasts) affected the treatment of the patient. Our data show that 4 days of incubation were sufficient to recover all clinically relevant bacteria and 6 days were required to recover all clinically relevant yeasts.  (+info)

  • Finnish terms related to mycology , the study of fungi . (wiktionary.org)
  • Mycology is the branch of biology concerned with the study of fungi, including their genetic and biochemical properties, their taxonomy and their use to humans as a source for tinder, medicine, food, and entheogens, as well as their dangers, such as toxicity or infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mycology branches into the field of phytopathology, the study of plant diseases, and the two other disciplines that remain closely related because the vast majority of "plant" pathogens are fungi. (wikipedia.org)
  • Historically, mycology was a branch of botany because, although fungi are evolutionarily more closely related to animals than to plants, this was not recognized until a few decades ago. (wikipedia.org)
  • The study of pathogenic fungi is referred to as medical mycology. (wikipedia.org)
  • M artin Bidartondo discovered mycology as a teenager in his native Uruguay when he saw an illustration of a root covered with fungi in a botany book. (sciencemag.org)
  • Mycology--the study of fungi--is often just a chapter in high school biology textbooks, and it's a specialist field even at universities. (sciencemag.org)
  • Kew's mission in mycology is to increase knowledge about fungi by identifying and describing new families, genera, and species in the United Kingdom and overseas. (sciencemag.org)
  • In addition to the taxonomical goals, Kew's mycologists provide expert opinion and offer assistance to public authorities and the general public about practical aspects of mycology, from poisonings to advice on wood-rotting fungi. (sciencemag.org)
  • Some fungi can cause disease in humans and other animals - The study of pathogenic fungi that infect animals is referred to as medical mycology . (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies in Mycology is an international peer-reviewed journal which publishes systematic monographs on the biodiversity of filamentous fungi and yeasts. (elsevier.com)
  • Medical Mycology Case Reports is an online journal devoted to the publication of case reports that concern medical or veterinary diseases caused by fungi. (elsevier.com)
  • However, knowledge of Arctic fungi is still scarce, making Arctic mycology an exciting topic. (unis.no)
  • With a cultural view that fears fungi, a schooling system that undervalues them, and only a small number of courses on advanced mycology worldwide, it is easy to see why the fifth kingdom is so disregarded and misunderstood. (indymedia.org)
  • As one of the youngest natural sciences, mycology (the study of fungi) has largely been kept in the hands of professionals since its development with much of the official work focusing simply on taxonomy and species edibility/toxicity. (indymedia.org)
  • Peter has studied mycology for over 13 years with a focus on the uses of fungi for healing the minds, bodies, and ecosystems of the earth's inhabitants. (thesurvivalpodcast.com)
  • Mycology is concerned with the systematic study of fungi, including their genetic and biochemical properties, their use to humans as a source of medicine and food, as well as their dangers, such as poisoning and infections. (springer.com)
  • This book contains a thorough discussion of molecular characterization and detection of different groups of fungi by using PCR-based markers and provides a comprehensive view of the applications and uses of different molecular markers in molecular mycology. (springer.com)
  • Radical Mycology radicalmycology.com/ is a grassroots movement and social philosophy based on teaching the importance of working with mushrooms and other fungi for personal, societal, and ecological resilience. (a-n.co.uk)
  • It differs from classical mycology in that, rather than focusing on taxonomy, identification, study and mycophagy (eating mushrooms), Radical Mycology works to build relationships between humans and fungi for the benefit of larger communities and the wider world. (a-n.co.uk)
  • The principal concerns of mycology are the study of the morphology, taxonomy, biology, physiology, biochemistry, ecology, geography, and phylogeny of fungi, as well as of their role in nature and in the life of man. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Mycology has applications in plant pathology (a considerable number of infectious plant diseases are caused by fungi), medicine and veterinary medicine (parasitic fungi are the causative agents of such human and animal diseases as dermatomycoses and mycotoxicoses), and industry (including the microbiological industry). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The first period, which covers all work in mycology before the 19th century, included descriptions of various fungi and attempts to classify them. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Mycology: Yeasts and Dimorphic Pathogens uses an interrogative, question-and-answer, approach to direct and instruct the participant in identifying yeasts and dimorphic fungi. (labce.com)
  • Mycology: Hyaline and Dematiaceous Fungi uses an interrogative, question-and-answer, approach to direct and instruct the participant in identifying hyaline and dematiaceous fungi. (labce.com)
  • In mycology-the study of fungi-DNA sequence data is playing a critical role in answering challenging questions about the identification, distribution, and relationships of fungus species. (burkemuseum.org)
  • From mycology arose the field of phytopathology, the study of plant diseases, and the two disciplines remain closely related because the vast majority of "plant" pathogens are fungi. (academic.ru)
  • The editors have built Issues in Medical Microbiology, Mycology, Virology, and Molecular Medicine: 2011 Edition on the vast information databases of ScholarlyNews. (google.com)
  • You can expect the information about Medical Microbiology, Mycology, Virology, and Molecular Medicine in this eBook to be deeper than what you can access anywhere else, as well as consistently reliable, authoritative, informed, and relevant. (google.com)
  • The extensive digitalisation of the mycological collection is owed to the former head of Section Mycology, H. Boyle. (senckenberg.de)
  • ICM 2022 has teamed up with the Special Journal Issue on Mycology . (waset.org)
  • The website of this amateur society of Quebec (Canada) includes information on meetings and forays, a list of French names for mushroom species, and an archive of old bulletins (en Francais). (cornell.edu)
  • Currently, microfungi isolated from necrotic wood of fruit trees as well as species of the genus Colletotrichum are studied taxonomically by the section Mycology. (senckenberg.de)
Mycology
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Infectious Disease|omicsgroup|Virology And Mycology (omicsonline.org)
Fungi (Mycology) - Microbiology Online Course
Fungi (Mycology) - Microbiology Online Course (lecturio.com)
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Anastomosis - Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org)
Answers - The Most Trusted Place for Answering Life's Questions
Answers - The Most Trusted Place for Answering Life's Questions (answers.com)
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Guidelines for Safe Work Practices in Human and Animal Medical Diagnostic Laboratories (cdc.gov)
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Donald Sheppard | Microbiology & Immunology - McGill University (mcgill.ca)
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Emeritus - Western Illinois University (wiu.edu)
Cryptococcosis: Practice Essentials, Background, Pathophysiology
Cryptococcosis: Practice Essentials, Background, Pathophysiology (emedicine.medscape.com)
Anaerobic Fungi: Biology: Ecology, and Function, 1st Edition (Hardback) - Routledge
Anaerobic Fungi: Biology: Ecology, and Function, 1st Edition (Hardback) - Routledge (routledge.com)
Race (biology) - Wikipedia
Race (biology) - Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org)
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Table of Contents | Journal of Clinical Microbiology
Table of Contents | Journal of Clinical Microbiology (jcm.asm.org)
Table of Contents | Journal of Clinical Microbiology
Table of Contents | Journal of Clinical Microbiology (jcm.asm.org)
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Table of Contents | Journal of Clinical Microbiology
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Mycology Heart Men's Longsleeve Shirt | Spreadshirt
Mycology Heart Men's Longsleeve Shirt | Spreadshirt (spreadshirt.com)
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Life Sciences Archives - Page 46 of 46 - Nova Science Publishers (novapublishers.com)
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Keynote lectures/Botany - Wikiversity (en.wikiversity.org)
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Lorinda.leonardi | The New York State Museum (nysm.nysed.gov)
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New Insights in Medical Mycology, Book by Kevin Kavanagh (Paperback) | chapters.indigo.ca (chapters.indigo.ca)
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MucoGest™ - for TB and Mycology Specimen Digestion - decontamination reagents (catalog.hardydiagnostics.com)