Mycobacterium ulcerans: A slow-growing mycobacterium that infects the skin and subcutaneous tissues, giving rise to indolent BURULI ULCER.Buruli Ulcer: A lesion in the skin and subcutaneous tissues due to infections by MYCOBACTERIUM ULCERANS. It was first reported in Uganda, Africa.Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous: Infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria (atypical mycobacteria): M. kansasii, M. marinum, M. scrofulaceum, M. flavescens, M. gordonae, M. obuense, M. gilvum, M. duvali, M. szulgai, M. intracellulare (see MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX;), M. xenopi (littorale), M. ulcerans, M. buruli, M. terrae, M. fortuitum (minetti, giae), M. chelonae.Skin UlcerMycobacterium: A genus of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria. Most species are free-living in soil and water, but the major habitat for some is the diseased tissue of warm-blooded hosts.Mycobacterium marinum: A moderate-growing, photochromogenic species found in aquariums, diseased fish, and swimming pools. It is the cause of cutaneous lesions and granulomas (swimming pool granuloma) in humans. (Dorland, 28th ed)Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A species of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria that produces TUBERCULOSIS in humans, other primates, CATTLE; DOGS; and some other animals which have contact with humans. Growth tends to be in serpentine, cordlike masses in which the bacilli show a parallel orientation.Mycobacterium Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus MYCOBACTERIUM.Skin Diseases, Bacterial: Skin diseases caused by bacteria.Nontuberculous Mycobacteria: So-called atypical species of the genus MYCOBACTERIUM that do not cause tuberculosis. They are also called tuberculoid bacilli, i.e.: M. buruli, M. chelonae, M. duvalii, M. flavescens, M. fortuitum, M. gilvum, M. gordonae, M. intracellulare (see MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX;), M. kansasii, M. marinum, M. obuense, M. scrofulaceum, M. szulgai, M. terrae, M. ulcerans, M. xenopi.Benin: A republic in western Africa, south of NIGER and between TOGO and NIGERIA. Its capital is Porto-Novo. It was formerly called Dahomey. In the 17th century it was a kingdom in the southern area of Africa. Coastal footholds were established by the French who deposed the ruler by 1892. It was made a French colony in 1894 and gained independence in 1960. Benin comes from the name of the indigenous inhabitants, the Bini, now more closely linked with southern Nigeria (Benin City, a town there). Bini may be related to the Arabic bani, sons. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p136, 310 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p60)Macrolides: A group of often glycosylated macrocyclic compounds formed by chain extension of multiple PROPIONATES cyclized into a large (typically 12, 14, or 16)-membered lactone. Macrolides belong to the POLYKETIDES class of natural products, and many members exhibit ANTIBIOTIC properties.Rifampin: A semisynthetic antibiotic produced from Streptomyces mediterranei. It has a broad antibacterial spectrum, including activity against several forms of Mycobacterium. In susceptible organisms it inhibits DNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity by forming a stable complex with the enzyme. It thus suppresses the initiation of RNA synthesis. Rifampin is bactericidal, and acts on both intracellular and extracellular organisms. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p1160)Ghana: A republic in western Africa, south of BURKINA FASO and west of TOGO. Its capital is Accra.Mycobacterium bovis: The bovine variety of the tubercle bacillus. It is called also Mycobacterium tuberculosis var. bovis.Streptomycin: An antibiotic produced by the soil actinomycete Streptomyces griseus. It acts by inhibiting the initiation and elongation processes during protein synthesis.Mycobacterium avium: A bacterium causing tuberculosis in domestic fowl and other birds. In pigs, it may cause localized and sometimes disseminated disease. The organism occurs occasionally in sheep and cattle. It should be distinguished from the M. avium complex, which infects primarily humans.Mycobacterium smegmatis: A rapid-growing, nonphotochromogenic species of MYCOBACTERIUM originally isolated from human smegma and found also in soil and water. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Foot: The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Democratic Republic of the Congo: A republic in central Africa, east of the REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO, south of the CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC and north of ANGOLA and ZAMBIA. The capital is Kinshasa.Mycobacterium leprae: A species of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria that causes LEPROSY in man. Its organisms are generally arranged in clumps, rounded masses, or in groups of bacilli side by side.Mycobacteriophages: Viruses whose host is one or more Mycobacterium species. They include both temperate and virulent types.Mycobacterium avium Complex: A complex that includes several strains of M. avium. M. intracellulare is not easily distinguished from M. avium and therefore is included in the complex. These organisms are most frequently found in pulmonary secretions from persons with a tuberculous-like mycobacteriosis. Strains of this complex have also been associated with childhood lymphadenitis and AIDS; M. avium alone causes tuberculosis in a variety of birds and other animals, including pigs.Heteroptera: A suborder of HEMIPTERA, called true bugs, characterized by the possession of two pairs of wings. It includes the medically important families CIMICIDAE and REDUVIIDAE. (From Dorland, 28th ed)DNA Transposable Elements: Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom.Environmental Microbiology: The study of microorganisms living in a variety of environments (air, soil, water, etc.) and their pathogenic relationship to other organisms including man.Mycobacterium fortuitum: A rapid-growing, nonphotochromogenic species that is potentially pathogenic, producing lesions of lung, bone, or soft tissue following trauma. It has been found in soil and in injection sites of humans, cattle, and cold-blooded animals. (Dorland, 28th ed)Endemic Diseases: The constant presence of diseases or infectious agents within a given geographic area or population group. It may also refer to the usual prevalence of a given disease with such area or group. It includes holoendemic and hyperendemic diseases. A holoendemic disease is one for which a high prevalent level of infection begins early in life and affects most of the child population, leading to a state of equilibrium such that the adult population shows evidence of the disease much less commonly than do children (malaria in many communities is a holoendemic disease). A hyperendemic disease is one that is constantly present at a high incidence and/or prevalence rate and affects all groups equally. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed, p53, 78, 80)Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Scrophulariaceae: The figwort plant family of the order Lamiales. The family is characterized by bisexual flowers with tubular corollas (fused petals) that are bilaterally symmetrical (two-lips) and have four stamens in most, two of which are usually shorter.Bacterial Toxins: Toxic substances formed in or elaborated by bacteria; they are usually proteins with high molecular weight and antigenicity; some are used as antibiotics and some to skin test for the presence of or susceptibility to certain diseases.Mycobacterium chelonae: A species of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria commonly found in soil and occasionally isolated from sputum. It causes postoperative wound infections as well as gluteal abscesses.Tuberculosis, Cutaneous: Tuberculosis of the skin. It includes scrofuloderma and tuberculid, but not LUPUS VULGARIS.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Victoria: A state in southeastern Australia, the southernmost state. Its capital is Melbourne. It was discovered in 1770 by Captain Cook and first settled by immigrants from Tasmania. In 1851 it was separated from New South Wales as a separate colony. Self-government was introduced in 1851; it became a state in 1901. It was named for Queen Victoria in 1851. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1295 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, p574)Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis: A subspecies of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria. It is the etiologic agent of Johne's disease (PARATUBERCULOSIS), a chronic GASTROENTERITIS in RUMINANTS.Tuberculosis: Any of the infectious diseases of man and other animals caused by species of MYCOBACTERIUM.BCG Vaccine: An active immunizing agent and a viable avirulent attenuated strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, var. bovis, which confers immunity to mycobacterial infections. It is used also in immunotherapy of neoplasms due to its stimulation of antibodies and non-specific immunity.Bacteriological Techniques: Techniques used in studying bacteria.Mycobacterium kansasii: A slow-growing, photochromogenic species that is the etiologic agent of a tuberculosis-like disease in humans and is frequently isolated from human pulmonary secretions or tubercles. The incidence of infection is sharply increased among immunocompromised individuals. (Dorland, 28th ed)Corynebacterium: A genus of asporogenous bacteria that is widely distributed in nature. Its organisms appear as straight to slightly curved rods and are known to be human and animal parasites and pathogens.Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Infection: A nontuberculous infection when occurring in humans. It is characterized by pulmonary disease, lymphadenitis in children, and systemic disease in AIDS patients. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection of birds and swine results in tuberculosis.OsteomyelitisMycobacterium phlei: A saprophytic bacterium widely distributed in soil and dust and on plants.Minisatellite Repeats: Tandem arrays of moderately repetitive, short (10-60 bases) DNA sequences which are found dispersed throughout the GENOME, at the ends of chromosomes (TELOMERES), and clustered near telomeres. Their degree of repetition is two to several hundred at each locus. Loci number in the thousands but each locus shows a distinctive repeat unit.Culicidae: A family of the order DIPTERA that comprises the mosquitoes. The larval stages are aquatic, and the adults can be recognized by the characteristic WINGS, ANIMAL venation, the scales along the wing veins, and the long proboscis. Many species are of particular medical importance.Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.Clarithromycin: A semisynthetic macrolide antibiotic derived from ERYTHROMYCIN that is active against a variety of microorganisms. It can inhibit PROTEIN SYNTHESIS in BACTERIA by reversibly binding to the 50S ribosomal subunits. This inhibits the translocation of aminoacyl transfer-RNA and prevents peptide chain elongation.Antitubercular Agents: Drugs used in the treatment of tuberculosis. They are divided into two main classes: "first-line" agents, those with the greatest efficacy and acceptable degrees of toxicity used successfully in the great majority of cases; and "second-line" drugs used in drug-resistant cases or those in which some other patient-related condition has compromised the effectiveness of primary therapy.Antigens, Bacterial: Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.Antibiotics, Antitubercular: Substances obtained from various species of microorganisms that are, alone or in combination with other agents, of use in treating various forms of tuberculosis; most of these agents are merely bacteriostatic, induce resistance in the organisms, and may be toxic.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Genome, Bacterial: The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.

Identification and characterization of IS2404 and IS2606: two distinct repeated sequences for detection of Mycobacterium ulcerans by PCR. (1/253)

Molecular analysis of Mycobacterium ulcerans has revealed two new insertion sequences (ISs), IS2404 and IS2606. IS2404 was identified by complete sequencing of a previously described repetitive DNA segment from M. ulcerans. This element is 1,274 bp long, contains 12-bp inverted repeats and a single open reading frame (ORF) potentially encoding a protein of 327 amino acids (aa), and apparently generates 7-bp direct repeats upon transposition. Amino acid similarity was found between the putative transposase and those encoded by ISs in other bacterial sequences from Aeromonas salmonicida (AsIs1), Escherichia coli (H repeat element), Vibrio cholerae (VcIS1), and Porphyromonas gingivalis (PGIS2). The second IS, IS2606, was discovered by sequence analysis of a HaeIII fragment of M. ulcerans genomic DNA containing a repetitive sequence. This element is 1,404 bp long, with 12-bp inverted repeats and a single ORF potentially encoding a protein of 445 aa. Database searches revealed a high degree of amino acid identity (70%) with the putative transposase of IS1554 from M. tuberculosis. Significant amino acid identity (40%) was also observed with transposases from several other microorganisms, including Rhizobium meliloti (ISRm3), Burkholderia cepacia (IS1356), Corynebacterium diphtheriae, and Yersinia pestis. PCR screening of DNA from 45 other species of mycobacteria with primers for IS2404 confirm that this element is found only in M. ulcerans. However, by PCR, IS2606 was also found in Mycobacterium lentiflavum, another slow-growing member of the genus Mycobacterium that is apparently genetically distinct from M. ulcerans. Testing the sensitivity of PCR based on IS2404 and IS2606 primers demonstrated the ability to detect 0.1 and 1 M. ulcerans genome equivalents, respectively. The ability to detect small numbers of cells by using two gene targets will be particularly useful for analyzing environmental samples, where there may be low concentrations of M. ulcerans among large numbers of other environmental mycobacteria.  (+info)

The inhibitory action of Mycobacterium ulcerans soluble factor on monocyte/T cell cytokine production and NF-kappa B function. (2/253)

Buruli ulcer is a chronic and progressive necrotizing ulcer for which there is no medical treatment. Historically, a soluble toxin (factor) derived from the causative Mycobacterium ulcerans was found to induce the massive necrosis of skin and s.c. tissue seen in this condition. However, the persistence of the disease is thought to be caused by a lack of any immune response. We therefore investigated whether the factor was related to immunosuppression. A protocol to partially purify the factor was developed, and its effects on immune competent cells were tested. The factor produced >95% inhibition of LPS-induced release of TNF and IL-10 from human monocytes and caused a loss of adherence of these cells without cell death. The factor also blocked the production of IL-2 from activated T lymphocytes. The factor had no effect on TNF-induced cytotoxicity, but abrogated TNF-induced NF-kappa B activation. Surprisingly, a synergy was observed between the factor and phorbol ester-directed NF-kappa B activation. The factor had no effect on IL-1- or LPS-induced NF-kappa B activity, indicating selective activity of the factor. The factor did not inhibit the degradation of I kappa B alpha induced by TNF, indicating that the target for its activity lies within an undefined part of the TNF signaling mechanism. The data indicate that the localized immunosuppression associated with Buruli ulcer relates to the activity of the released factor, and this may provide a target for future therapeutic strategies for this intractable disease.  (+info)

Mycobacterium ulcerans infection (Buruli ulcer): first reported case in a traveler. (3/253)

A chronic, painless sore developed over a 2-month period on the left calf of a Canadian man traveling for 8 months in Africa. A presumptive diagnosis of a Mycobacterium spp. infection was made despite initially negative biopsy and culture results, after failure of several courses of anti-bacterial antibiotics. Mycobacterium ulcerans was eventually isolated and the lesion progressed despite treatment with multiple anti-mycobacterial agents. The lesion finally responded to wide and repeated excision, aggressive treatment with anti-mycobacterial antibiotics, and split-thickness skin grafting. The isolation and treatment of this unusual organism are discussed.  (+info)

Transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans to the nine-banded armadillo. (4/253)

Animal models for Mycobacterium ulcerans infections (Buruli ulcer) include guinea pigs, rats, and mice, but each has limitations in replicating the spectrum of human disease. Here, 19 adult nine-banded armadillos were inoculated intradermally with M. ulcerans. Injection sites were examined and skin samples obtained for histologic and microbiology studies. Necropsies were conducted to assess systemic involvement. In group 1 (n = 4), 2 animals developed progressive skin ulcers with undermined borders at the injection sites within 6-10 weeks. Biopsies showed features similar to human disease including extensive necrosis in the deep dermis and subcutaneous fat, mixed cellular infiltrates, and acid-fast bacilli (AFB). In group 2 (n = 15), 5 animals developed progressive skin ulcers, 3 had evanescent papulo-nodules, 3 died shortly after inoculation of unknown causes, and 4 showed no signs of infection. Lesion samples from 3 animals with progressive ulcers were culture positive for AFB. Our findings indicate that nine-banded armadillos are susceptible to M. ulcerans and may develop cutaneous lesions that closely mimic Buruli ulcer.  (+info)

A Mycobacterium ulcerans toxin, mycolactone, causes apoptosis in guinea pig ulcers and tissue culture cells. (5/253)

Mycobacterium ulcerans is the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, a tropical ulcerative skin disease. One of the most intriguing aspects of this disease is the presence of extensive tissue damage in the absence of an acute inflammatory response. We recently purified and characterized a macrolide toxin, mycolactone, from M. ulcerans. Injection of this molecule into guinea pig skin reproduced cell death and lack of acute inflammatory response similar to that seen following the injection of viable bacteria. We also showed that mycolactone causes a cytopathic effect on mouse fibroblast L929 cells that is characterized by cytoskeletal rearrangements and growth arrest within 48 h. However, these results could not account for the extensive cell death which occurs in Buruli ulcer. The results presented here demonstrate that L929 and J774 mouse macrophage cells die via apoptosis after 3 to 5 days of exposure to mycolactone. Treatment of cells with a pan-caspase inhibitor can inhibit mycolactone-induced apoptosis. We demonstrate that injection of mycolactone into guinea pig skin results in cell death via apoptosis and that the extent of apoptosis increases as the lesion progresses. These results may help to explain why tissue damage in Buruli ulcer is not accompanied by an acute inflammatory response.  (+info)

In vitro activity of ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, ofloxacin, amikacin and rifampicin against Ghanaian isolates of Mycobacterium ulcerans. (6/253)

MICs of ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, ofloxacin, amikacin and rifampicin were determined for 14 primary clinical isolates and three reference isolates of Mycobacterium ulcerans by modifying a standard agar dilution method for testing Mycobacterium tuberculosis sensitivity. All these antimicrobials were active against every isolate of M. ulcerans. Sparfloxacin exhibited the highest activity and ofloxacin was the least effective. Rifampicin exhibited the broadest range of activity.  (+info)

A simple PCR method for rapid genotype analysis of Mycobacterium ulcerans. (7/253)

Two high-copy-number insertion sequences, IS2404 and IS2606, were recently identified in Mycobacterium ulcerans and were shown by Southern hybridization to possess restriction fragment length polymorphism between strains from different geographic origins. We have designed a simple genotyping method that captures these differences by PCR amplification of the region between adjacent copies of IS2404 and IS2606. We have called this system 2426 PCR. The method is rapid, reproducible, sensitive, and specific for M. ulcerans, and it has confirmed previous studies suggesting a clonal population structure of M. ulcerans within a geographic region. M. ulcerans isolates from Australia, Papua New Guinea, Malaysia, Surinam, Mexico, Japan, China, and several countries in Africa were easily differentiated based on an array of 4 to 14 PCR products ranging in size from 200 to 900 bp. Numerical analysis of the banding patterns suggested a close evolutionary link between M. ulcerans isolates from Africa and southeast Asia. The application of 2426 PCR to total DNA, extracted directly from M. ulcerans-infected tissue specimens without culture, demonstrated the sensitivity and specificity of this method and confirmed for the first time that both animal and human isolates from areas of endemicity in southeast Australia have the same genotype.  (+info)

Serologic response to culture filtrate antigens of Mycobacterium ulcerans during Buruli ulcer disease. (8/253)

Buruli ulcer (BU) is an emerging necrotic skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. To assess the potential for a serodiagnostic test, we measured the humoral immune response of BU patients to M. ulcerans antigens and compared this response with delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to both Burulin and PPD. The delayed-type hypersensitivity response generally supported the diagnosis of BU, with overall reactivity to Burulin in 28 (71.8%) of 39 patients tested, compared with 3 (14%) of 21 healthy controls. However, this positive skin test response was observed primarily in patients with healed or active disease, and rarely in patients with early disease (p=0.009). When tested for a serologic response to M. ulcerans culture filtrate, 43 (70.5%) of 61 BU patients had antibodies to these antigens, compared with 10 (37.0%) of 27 controls and 4 (30. 8%) of 13 tuberculosis patients. There was no correlation between disease stage and the onset of this serum antibody response. Our findings suggest that serologic testing may be useful in the diagnosis and surveillance of BU.  (+info)

*Tropical ulcer

Mycobacterium ulcerans has recently been isolated from lesions and is unique to tropical ulcers. Early lesions may be colonized ... including mycobacteria. It is common in tropical climates. Ulcers occur on exposed parts of the body, primarily on ...

*Mycobacterium ulcerans

... (M. ulcerans) is a slow-growing mycobacterium that classically infects the skin and subcutaneous tissues ... "Characterization of an unusual Mycobacterium: a possible missing link between Mycobacterium marinum and Mycobacterium ulcerans ... "Diagnostic potential of a serological assay for the diagnosis of ulcerans disease based on the putative Mycobacterium ulcerans ... "Buruli ulcer (Mycobacterium ulcerans infection)". Fact Sheet. World Health Organization. July 2014. N°199. MacCallum, P.; J. C ...

*Mycobacterium ulcerans liflandii

KT1 is characterized and differentiated from its closest relatives, Mycobacterium ulcerans and Mycobacterium marinum, by the ... Mycobacterium ulcerans liflandii has been isolated from Xenopus tropicalis and Xenopus laevis in a laboratory in the US and ... June 2004). "Characterization of a Mycobacterium ulcerans-like infection in a colony of African tropical clawed frogs (Xenopus ... ulcerans. KT1 is a non-photochromogenic acid-fast mycobacterium. On Middlebrook 7H11 media supplemented with OADC, colonies are ...

*Buruli ulcer

"Mycobacterium ulcerans toxic macrolide, mycolactone modulates the host immune response and cellular location of M. ulcerans in ... ulcerans but not those of other mycobacteria. Surprisingly, infiltration of the salivary glands of Naucoridae by M. ulcerans ... "Buruli ulcer disease -Mycobacterium ulcerans infection". Health Topics A TO Z. Archived from the original on 2010-12-04. ... Mycobacterium ulcerans was first cultivated and characterized from the environment in 2008. The disease is primarily an ...

*Neglected tropical diseases

Buruli ulcer is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium ulcerans. It is related to the family of organisms that cause ... but Mycobacterium ulcerans produces a toxin, mycolactone, that destroys tissue. The prevalence of Buruli ulcer is unknown. The ...

*Leprostatic agent

Ulcerative lesions caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans respond well to clofazimine. It also has some activity against M. ... ethionamide rifampicin rifapentine sulfameter thalidomide Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium ...

*Mycolactone

March 2007). "Evolution of "Mycobacterium ulcerans" and other mycolactone-producing mycobacteria from a common "Mycobacterium ... February 2004). "Giant plasmid-encoded polyketide synthases produce the macrolide toxin of "Mycobacterium ulcerans"". PNAS. 101 ... These mycobacteria are collectively referred to as mycolactone-producing mycobacteria or MPM. In humans, mycolactone is the ... "Mycobacterium ulcerans" macrolide toxin". Infect. Immun. 73 (6): 3307-12. doi:10.1128/IAI.73.6.3307-3312.2005. PMC 1111873 . ...

*Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii

Insertion sequences associated with Mycobacterium ulcerans, IS2404 and IS2606, were detected by PCR. These isolates could be ... "Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii". NCBI Taxonomy Browser. 265949. Type strain of Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii at BacDive - the ... May 2005). "Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii sp. nov., a slowly growing chromogenic species isolated from Chesapeake Bay striped ... Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii, a slowly growing chromogenic species was isolated from Chesapeake Bay striped bass (Morone ...

*Mycobacterium marinum

March 2007). "Evolution of Mycobacterium ulcerans and other mycolactone-producing mycobacteria from a common Mycobacterium ... Simple Symptoms Turn Threatening on IMDb "Mycobacterium marinum". NCBI Taxonomy Browser. 1781. Type strain of Mycobacterium ... M. ulcerans isolates are positive for both insertion sequences. It was previously thought that IS2404 and IS2606 were specific ... Although Aronson isolated this mycobacterium in 1926 from a fish, it was not until 1951 that it was found to be the cause of ...

*Mycolactone-producing mycobacteria

Unveil the Phylogenetic Relationship of Environmental and Pathogenic Mycobacteria Related to Mycobacterium ulcerans". Applied ... Mycolactone-producing mycobacteria is a grouping of mycobacteria. As the name indicates, they produce mycolactone. "Large ...

*James Augustus Grant

However, as small compensation, his may be the first recorded case and first description of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection ( ... Reasons for regarding the illness as M. ulcerans infection are:- The explorers passed through an area where the disease is ...

*Koala

... s may also suffer mange from the mite Sarcoptes scabiei, and skin ulcers from the bacterium Mycobacterium ulcerans, but ...

*Mycobacterium shottsii

... gene sequence is unique among species of Mycobacterium and is most similar to those of Mycobacterium ulcerans and Mycobacterium ... Mycobacterium shottsii is a slowly growing, non-pigmented mycobacteria isolated from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) during an ... March 2003). "Mycobacterium shottsii sp. nov., a slowly growing species isolated from Chesapeake Bay striped bass (Morone ... Isolate M175T could be differentiated from other slowly growing, non-pigmented mycobacteria by its inability to grow at 37 °C, ...

*Monash Medical Centre

... including infections due to Mycobacterium avium complex, Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium ulcerans. Along with the ...

*DMOZ - Health: Conditions and Diseases: Infectious Diseases: Mycobacterial

Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection Medical information on diagnosis and treatment of this unusual skin infection know also as ... Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Information on nontuberculous mycobacteria and how it differs from tuberculosis. Includes ... NEJM - Mycobacterium marinum The New England Journal of Medicine presents a case of a pet shop worker. His duties included ...

*Leishmania major

Mycobacterium ulcerans, syphilis, cutaneous sarcoidosis, and leprosy should all be considered as well. The most common ways of ...

*David Barker (epidemiologist)

... to research Mycobacterium ulcerans infection ("Buruli ulcer"), demonstrating that it was caused, not by mosquitos, but by ...

*Wayne M. Meyers

There was a lot of material on other mycobacterial diseases, such as Buruli ulcer, (Mycobacterium ulcerans infections) which is ...

*ICD-10 Chapter I: Certain infectious and parasitic diseases

Cutaneous mycobacterial infection Buruli ulcer Infection due to Mycobacterium marinum Infection due to Mycobacterium ulcerans ( ... Infection due to other mycobacteria (A31.0) Pulmonary mycobacterial infection Infection due to Mycobacterium avium Infection ... due to Mycobacterium intracellulare (Battey bacillus) Infection due to Mycobacterium kansasii (A31.1) ... A31.8) Other mycobacterial infections (A31.9) Mycobacterial infection, unspecified Atypical mycobacterium infection NOS ...

*Glochid

Mycobacterium kansasii (from blackberries), Mycobacterium marinum (from cactus spines), and Mycobacterium ulcerans (from spiky ...

*Slowly growing Mycobacteria

Mycobacterium leprae Mycobacterium tuberculosis Mycobacterium bovis Mycobacterium ulcerans Mycobacterium avium Mycobacterium ... Mycobacterium africanum Mycobacterium bovis Mycobacterium leprae Mycobacterium lacus Mycobacterium lepraemurium Mycobacterium ... Mycobacterium avium silvaticum Mycobacterium genavense Mycobacterium montefiorense Mycobacterium ulcerans Mycobacterium ... Mycobacterium palustre Mycobacterium tusciae Mycobacterium cookii Mycobacterium flavescens Mycobacterium gordonae Mycobacterium ...

*Runyon classification

Mycobacterium ulcerans and numerous other organisms. Runyon IV organisms are rapid growing for mycobacteria (colonies in 5 days ... Mycobacterium fortuitum, Mycobacterium peregrinum, Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium chelonae, Mycobacterium ... The group includes Mycobacterium kansasii, Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium asiaticum, and Mycobacterium simiae. ... The group includes Mycobacterium gordonae and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum, among others. Mycobacterium szulgai is a ...

*Mycobacterium

Ex: M. tuberculosis, M. avium-intra-cellulare, M. bovis, M. ulcerans Ex: M. fortuitum, M. chelonae Mycobacteria are classical ... 2013 A Systems Level Comparison of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium smegmatis Based on ... Structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins MycDB: Mycobacterium database TBDB: Tuberculosis database Mycobacterium ... Mycobacteria are aerobic and nonmotile bacteria (except for the species Mycobacterium marinum, which has been shown to be ...

*Nontuberculous mycobacteria

... ulcerans, M. xenopi, M. malmoense, M. terrae, M. haemophilum and M. genavense. Rapid growers include four well recognized ... Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), also known as environmental mycobacteria, atypical mycobacteria and mycobacteria other than ... Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are all the other mycobacteria which can cause pulmonary disease resembling tuberculosis, ... Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium abscessus (see image). In 1959, botanist Ernest Runyon put these human disease- ...

*List of MeSH codes (B03)

Mycobacterium ulcerans MeSH B03.510.460.400.410.552.552.250.950 --- Mycobacterium xenopi MeSH B03.510.460.400.410.552.552.300 ... Mycobacterium smegmatis MeSH B03.510.024.049.525.500.250.700 --- Mycobacterium ulcerans MeSH B03.510.024.049.525.500.250.950 ... Mycobacterium avium MeSH B03.510.024.049.525.500.402 --- Mycobacterium bovis MeSH B03.510.024.049.525.500.480 --- Mycobacterium ... mycobacteria, atypical MeSH B03.510.460.400.410.552.552.250.100 --- Mycobacterium avium complex MeSH B03.510.460.400.410.552. ...

*Diphtheria

Corynebacterium ulcerans has been found in some animals, which would suggest zoonotic potential Diphtheria toxin is produced by ... Over the period of time, it was called Microsporon diphtheriticum, Bacillus diphtheriae, and Mycobacterium diphtheriae. Current ... "Possible zoonotic transmission of toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans from companion animals in a human case of fatal diphtheria ...
OBrien, DP, Hughes, A, Cheng, A, Rogers, Margaret, Callan, P, McDonald, A, Holten, I, Birrell, M, Sowerby, J, Johnson, PD and Athan, Eugene 2007, Outcomes for mycobacterium ulcerans infection with combined surgery and antibiotic therapy: findings from a south-eastern Australian case series, The Medical journal of Australia. ...
Mycobacterium ulcerans is found in aquatic ecosystems and causes Buruli ulcer in humans, a neglected but devastating necrotic disease of subcutaneous tissue that is rampant throughout West and Central Africa. Here, we report the complete 5.8-Mb genome sequence of M. ulcerans and show that it comprises two circular replicons, a chromosome of 5632 kb and a virulence plasmid of 174 kb. The plasmid is required for production of the polyketide toxin mycolactone, which provokes necrosis. Comparisons with the recently completed 6.6-Mb genome of Mycobacterium marinum revealed ,98% nucleotide sequence identity and genome-wide synteny. However, as well as the plasmid, M. ulcerans has accumulated 213 copies of the insertion sequence IS2404, 91 copies of IS2606, 771 pseudogenes, two bacteriophages, and multiple DNA deletions and rearrangements. These data indicate that M. ulcerans has recently evolved via lateral gene transfer and reductive evolution from the generalist, more rapid-growing environmental ...
Disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. First described by MacCallum in 1948, but the name came from Buruli country in Uganda. The third most common Mycobacterium, that affected more than 30 countries.
Author Summary Vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is used to reduce the risk of childhood tuberculosis and is reported to have efficacy against two other diseases also caused by mycobacteria, leprosy and Buruli ulcer caused by M. ulcerans. We hypothesized that there may be differences in the effectiveness of BCG vaccination in different mouse strains. We vaccinated two mouse strains with BCG eight weeks before infection with three different strains of M. ulcerans. Two of the bacterial strains make a toxin that is critical for Buruli ulcer disease and the third does not. We observed the progression of disease in vaccinated and mock-vaccinated mice and also evaluated the immune response of the mice. We found that the BALB/c mice respond to BCG vaccination with prominent scars, a vigorous immune response, and delayed or no manifestations of M. ulcerans infection. C57BL/6 mice, on the other hand, usually do not have vaccination scars, make a relatively short-lived and/or
Author Summary Mycobacterium ulcerans is the causative agent of Buruli ulcer (BU), a destructive skin disease found predominantly in sub-Saharan Africa and south-eastern Australia. The mode of transmission and environmental reservoir remain unknown, but several studies have explored the role of aquatic insects, such as water bugs, and biting insects, such as mosquitoes. In the present study we investigated possible environmental source(s) of M. ulcerans in Victoria, Australia. Our results revealed that although M. ulcerans DNA could be detected at low levels in a variety of environmental samples, the highest concentrations of M. ulcerans DNA were found in the faeces of two species of possums, common ringtails and common brushtails. Possums are small arboreal marsupial mammals, native to Australia, and these particular species occur in both urban and rural areas. Examination and sampling of live captured possums in an area endemic for BU revealed that 38% of ringtail possums and 24% of brushtail possums,
Eight adult patients (ages 18-58, 5 women) with Buruli ulcer (BU) confirmed by at least 2 diagnostic methods were seen in a 10-year period. Attempts to culture Mycobacterium ulcerans failed. Five patients came from jungle areas, and 3 from the swampy northern coast of Peru. The patients had 1-5 lesions, most of which were on the lower extremities. One patient had 5 clustered gluteal lesions; another patient had 2 lesions on a finger. Three patients were lost to follow-up. All 5 remaining patients had moderate disease. Diverse treatments (antituberculous drugs, World Health Organization [WHO] recommended antimicrobial drug treatment for BU, and for 3 patients, excision surgery) were successful. Only 1 patient (patient 7) received the specific drug treatment recommended by WHO. BU is endemic in Peru, although apparently infrequent. Education of populations and training of health workers are first needed to evaluate and understand the full extent of BU in Peru.
Background: While cultivation of pathogens represents a foundational diagnostic approach in the study of infectious diseases, its value for the confirmation of clinical diagnosis of Buruli ulcer is limited by the fact that colonies of Mycobacterium ulcerans appear only after about eight weeks of incubation at 30°C. However, for molecular epidemiological and drug sensitivity studies, primary isolation of M. ulcerans remains an essential tool. Since for most of the remote Buruli ulcer endemic regions of Africa cultivation laboratories are not easily accessible, samples from lesions often have to be stored for extended periods of time prior to processing. The objective of the current study therefore was to determine which transport medium, decontamination method or other factors decrease the contamination rate and increase the chance of primary isolation of M. ulcerans bacilli after long turnover time. Methods: Swab and fine needle aspirate (FNA) samples for the primary cultivation were collected ...
Results: Eighty-five BU patients recalled their experience. Fifty-three patients were older than 60 years, and 61 permanently resided on the Bellarine Peninsula. The onset of symptoms occurred most frequently in mid winter. Twenty-eight patients had lesions on the arm and 51 on the leg. The median time between onset of symptoms and first medical contact was shorter for those living in the endemic area (3.0 weeks; interquartile range [IQR], 1.0-5.0 weeks) compared with non-endemic areas (5.3 weeks; IQR, 2.0-9.5 weeks) (P = 0.05). Patients who resided in the endemic area had a shorter median time from their first medical appointment to diagnosis (1.0 week; IQR, 0.0-3.9 weeks) than those who resided in non-endemic areas (5.0 weeks; IQR, 1.3-8.0 weeks) (P = 0.001 ...
Mycobacterium Ulcerans is a third-world tropical disease, that just so happens to be running rampant on the Mornington Peninsula. Im trying to persuade the state and federal governments to support research into it. Read on for more details.. Please support my cause and sign my petition. Ever heard of Mycobacterium Ulcerans?. Mycobacterium Ulcerans (Buruli or Bairnsdale Ulcer) is a third world tropical infection, that causes severe pain, inflammation and decomposition of tissue and fat. Its found mostly in African countries such as Uganda, Nigeria and Liberia. So mostly poor countries with poorly developed health systems. Its also found on the Mornington Peninsula. My name is Ella Crofts. Im thirteen years old and I currently have Mycobacterium Ulcerans. I started feeling pain in my knee in early April. Slowly it got worse, with my knee becoming swollen and inflamed, until one day, the skin started breaking down. We tested the tissue, with a dry-swab, for bacteria multiple times. Each time ...
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BACKGROUND: Mycolactone is a macrolide produced by the skin pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans, with cytotoxic, analgesic and immunomodulatory properties. The latter were recently shown to result from mycolactone blocking the Sec61-dependent production of pro-inflammatory mediators by immune cells. Here we investigated whether mycolactone similarly affects the inflammatory responses of the nervous cell subsets involved in pain perception, transmission and maintenance. We also investigated the effects of mycolactone on the neuroinflammation that is associated with chronic pain in vivo.
In the case of non-ulcerative plaque lesions, we observed in half of all patients either an enlargement or ulceration of lesions during antibiotic therapy. Histopathological analysis after completion of antibiotic treatment revealed the persistence of extensive necrotic areas besides hallmarks of successfully treated BU lesions, like infiltration, granuloma formation and loss of solid staining of the mycobacteria. Where removal of the necrotic tissue by the immune system is not efficient enough, lesions are ulcerating, leading to the discharge of necrotic tissue. Based on the clinical and histopathological data it is suggested to support healing of such plaque lesions by surgical débridement. While our data demonstrate that the antibiotic therapy efficiently destroys M. ulcerans infection foci, they also indicate that proper wound management during and after chemotherapy is for advanced BU lesions as important as the antibiotic treatment itself ...
It is more than 60 years since Mycobacterium ulcerans was shown to be the causative agent of Buruli ulcer yet it is still unclear where the bacterium resides in the environment and how it is transmitted to humans. Limited genome comparisons show that M. ulcerans has the characteristics of a niche-adapted microbe, having evolved recently from the fish-associated, opportunistic human pathogen, Mycobacterium marinum by horizontal gene transfer and reductive evolution. To further understand the relationship between these two species of pathogenic mycobacteria and to gain deeper insights into the evolution of M. ulcerans, we have used high throughput short-read DNA sequencing and compared the genomes of 30 strains of M. ulcerans and 5 strains of M. marinum, a strain collection that spans the known genetic diversity of these two species. We used a nucleotide read-mapping approach and objectively defined a 4,362,138 bp M. ulcerans-M. marinum core genome. Pairwise comparisons of every strain against ...
A family of toxins produced by Mycobacterium ulcerans; strains from different geographic areas produce distinct patterns of mycolactone congeners. Mycolactone has significant immunosuppressive effects and inhibits production of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1α), MIP-1β, RANTES, interferon-γ-inducible protein 10, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, but not IL-12, TNFα, or IL-6. See Buruli ulcer. ...
Buruli ulcer (BU) is a neglected emerging infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. BU has become the third most prevalent mycobacteriosis worldwide, after tuberculosis and leprosy. Limited knowledge of the disease and the fact that it affects mainly poor rural communities contribute to underreporting of cases. Nevertheless, there are 6000 reported cases every year, of which more than 50% are children under the age of 15. For these reasons, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recognized BU as an emerging infectious disease with an important public health impact; that is both devastating for the individual and catastrophic for the economy of affected households.. M. ulcerans produces a dermonecrotic toxin, mycolactone, which induces extensive destruction of the skin and soft tissues with the formation of large ulcers, as well as bone and joint lesions. No specific vaccine is currently available for BU and because the disease progresses without pain or fever, treatment is frequently ...
Mycolactone concentration in the serum of BU patients during antibiotic therapy.Mean concentration of mycolactone in serum samples collected before (0 week), du
SWISS-MODEL Repository entry for A0PKB2 (DNAA_MYCUA), Chromosomal replication initiator protein DnaA. Mycobacterium ulcerans (strain Agy99)
Solanky, D. and S. E. Haydel. 2012. Adaptation of the neutral bacterial comet assay to assess antimicrobial-mediated DNA double-strand breaks in Escherichia coli. Journal of Microbiological Methods. 91:257-261. Haydel, S. E., V. Malhotra, G. L. Cornelison, and J. E. Clark-Curtiss. 2012. The prrAB two-component system is essential for Mycobacterium tuberculosis viability and is induced during nitrogen-limiting conditions. Journal of Bacteriology. 194:354-361. Pang, X., G. Cao, P. F. Neuenschwander, S. E. Haydel, G. Hou, and S. T. Howard. 2011. The b-propeller gene Rv1057 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has a complex promoter directly regulated by both the MprAB and TrcRS two-component systems. Tuberculosis (Edinb). 91:S142-S149. Otto, C. C. and S. E. Haydel. 2011. Morphology of mature Mycobacterium ulcerans colonies. ASM MicrobeLibrary 2.0. http://www.microbelibrary.org/index.php/library/resources/3359-mycobacterium-ulcerans-morphology R. Treuer and S. E. Haydel. 2011. Acid-fast staining and ...
ID X8FMI7_MYCUL Unreviewed; 130 AA. AC X8FMI7; DT 11-JUN-2014, integrated into UniProtKB/TrEMBL. DT 11-JUN-2014, sequence version 1. DT 25-OCT-2017, entry version 15. DE SubName: Full=Bacterial dnaA family protein {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EUA93463.1}; GN ORFNames=I551_0056 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EUA93463.1}; OS Mycobacterium ulcerans str. Harvey. OC Bacteria; Actinobacteria; Corynebacteriales; Mycobacteriaceae; OC Mycobacterium. OX NCBI_TaxID=1299332 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EUA93463.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000020681}; RN [1] {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EUA93463.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000020681} RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE [LARGE SCALE GENOMIC DNA]. RC STRAIN=Harvey {ECO:0000313,EMBL:EUA93463.1, RC ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000020681}; RA Dobos K., Lenaerts A., Ordway D., DeGroote M.A., Parker T., RA Sizemore C., Tallon L.J., Sadzewicz L.K., Sengamalay N., Fraser C.M., RA Hine E., Shefchek K.A., Das S.P., Tettelin H.; RL Submitted (JAN-2014) to the EMBL/GenBank/DDBJ databases. CC -!- SIMILARITY: Belongs to the DnaA family. ...
Omansen TF, Porter JL, Johnson PD, van der Werf TS, Stienstra Y, Stinear TP. In-vitro activity of avermectins against Mycobacterium ulcerans. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2015 Mar 5;9(3):e0003549. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0003549. eCollection 2015 Mar. PubMed PMID: 25742173; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4351077.. Coombs GW, Pearson JC, Daly DA, Le TT, Robinson JO, Gottlieb T, Howden BP, Johnson PD, Bennett CM, Stinear TP, Turnidge JD; Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance. Australian Enterococcal Sepsis Outcome Programme annual report, 2013. Commun Dis Intell Q Rep. 2014 Dec 31;38(4):E320-6. PubMed PMID: 25631594.. Abbott IJ, Papadakis G, Kaye M, Opdam H, Hutton H, Angus PW, Johnson PD, Kanellis J, Westall G, Druce J, Catton M. Laboratory identification of donor-derived coxsackievirus b3 transmission. Am J Transplant. 2015 Feb;15(2):555-9. doi: 10.1111/ajt.12986. Epub 2015 Jan 12. PubMed PMID: 25582147.. Coombs GW, Pearson JC, Le T, Daly DA, Robinson JO, Gottlieb T, Howden BP, Johnson PD, Bennett CM, ...
Background: Buruli ulcer may induce severe disabilities impacting on a persons well-being and quality of life. Information about long-term disabilities and participation restrictions is scanty. The objective of this study was to gain insight into participation restrictions among former Buruli ulcer patients in Ghana and Benin. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, former Buruli ulcer patients were interviewed using the Participation Scale, the Buruli Ulcer Functional Limitation Score to measure functional limitations, and the Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue to measure perceived stigma. Healthy community controls were also interviewed using the Participation Scale. Trained native interviewers conducted the interviews. Former Buruli ulcer patients were eligible for inclusion if they had been treated between 2005 and 2011, had ended treatment at least 3 months before the interview, and were at least 15 years of age. Results: In total, 143 former Buruli ulcer patients and 106 community ...
Read "Sequelae of Mycobacterium ulcerans infections (Buruli ulcer), European Journal of Plastic Surgery" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.
The Buruli ulcer disease is due to infection by Mycobacterium ulcerans. This programme describes the basic pathophysiology of the disease, the typical clinical presentations, and the management of cases with complicated features. The program should be informative for both medical students and practitioners who wish to increase their knowledge about this serious tropical disease.. Authors: Richard Phillips, Stephen Sarfo, Emmanuel Adu, Cary Engleberg, Veronica Owusu-Afriyie. Institutions: Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, University of Michigan. ...
The World Health Organization recommends combination antibiotic therapy of rifampicin and streptomycin or rifampicin and clarithromycin with or without surgery (mainly debridement and skin grafting) for treating Buruli ulcer [12]. Since there is currently no specific vaccine against Buruli ulcer [21], an effective topical treatment option that is cost-friendly and easy to use could be welcomed in resource-poor settings where Buruli ulcer is endemic [14, 22]. Several topical therapeutic options for Buruli ulcer have been investigated, including 40 °C heat therapy, phenytoin, clay bandages, and creams containing nitrogen oxides [16, 23-27]. Heat treatment and creams delivering topical nitrogen oxides promoted healing in Buruli ulcer patients [23, 24, 28]. Nitric oxide was also shown to kill M. ulcerans in vitro [24, 25]. When applied therapeutically, phenytoin powder did not kill M. ulcerans but promoted healing through acceleration of fibrogenesis [27]. Hyperbaric oxygen at a partial pressure of ...
Background: Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer (BU), is unique among human pathogens in its capacity to produce a polyketide-derived macrolide called mycolactone, making this molecule an attractive candidate target for diagnosis and disease monitoring. Whether mycolactone diffuses from ulcerated lesions in clinically accessible samples and is modulated by antibiotic therapy remained to be established. Methodology/Principal Finding: Peripheral blood and ulcer exudates were sampled from patients at various stages of antibiotic therapy in Ghana and Ivory Coast. Total lipids were extracted from serum, white cell pellets and ulcer exudates with organic solvents. The presence of mycolactone in these extracts was then analyzed by a recently published, fieldfriendly method using thin layer chromatography and fluorescence detection. This approach did not allow us to detect mycolactone accurately, because of a high background due to co-extracted human lipids. We thus used a ...
Buruli ulcer - one of the most neglected among the NTDs - is a debilitating and stigmatising disease. Affecting mainly children in West and Central Africa, the chronic disease results in devastating skin lesions and can lead to permanent disfigurement and long-term disabilities. Buruli ulcer is caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans which belongs to the same family of bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB) and leprosy. M. ulcerans is found in the environment and, despite considerable research efforts, the mode of transmission of the bacteria to humans remains unclear.. Difficult treatment with adverse side effects. Traditionally, the skin lesions caused by Buruli ulcer have been removed by wide surgical excision. Since 2004, the World Health Organization (WHO) also recommends treatment with a combination of antibiotics: oral rifampicin and injected streptomycin. Surgery is often not an accessible option in low-income settings and the combination therapy requires daily visits in health centres over an ...
Understanding disease ecology is vital in preventing future outbreaks of established infections and to predict the emergence of new pathogens. In recent decades there have been a number of high profile infectious diseases which have swept across countries and in some cases the world. Many of these begin as generalist emerging infections; such microbes are difficult to study in the wild due to their inherently ambiguous life histories and complex associations with numerous hosts and the environment. In this PhD a number of techniques are used to pinpoint and further understand the life history of one such pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, in the hope that this data can be used to predict and prevent future outbreaks and can be applied to other emerging infections. The results of this study include the first identification of the pathogen in the environment for a whole new continent, South America. Further to this it has led to the discovery of the likely ...
... is a chronic (long-term) skin infection caused by a bacteria called Mycobacterium ulcerans. This bacteria releases a harmful substance that weakens the bodys immune system and causes tissue damage. Though it has been reported in 33 countries, it is most common in tropical and sub-tropical climates and especially in poor, rural regions in Africa. Buruli ulcers can affect any race, age or age but is most commonly found in children ages 5-15 except in Australia where the average age is over 50. Initially, symptoms typically include a painless bump usually with additional swelling around it. It can also present as widespread painless swelling of the arms and legs. As the infection progresses, the skin bumps (nodules) turn into an ulcer, which can be larger under the skin than is visible by the swelling. In the most severe cases, bone can be involved. Arms and legs are most common sites of infection.. It is not known how this disease is contracted or spread. Therefore, prevention ...
This case demonstrates that successful treatment of M. ulcerans osteomyelitis and septic arthritis can be achieved with limited surgical debridement and 6 months of oral rifampicin and ciprofloxacin; this is, to the best of the authors knowledge, the first time that this has been reported. Our patients osteomyelitis progressed radiologically despite initial surgical debridement, but then resolved following the commencement of rifampicin and ciprofloxacin without further surgery, and with no local or distal recurrences in the 36-month follow-up period. Thus, we believe that this combination of antibiotics resulted in cure of the osteomyelitis in our case, and prevented the development of further metachronous M. ulcerans lesions. This raises the possibility that this simple and well-tolerated oral combination has the potential to reduce significantly the morbidity and disability that results worldwide in the surgical treatment of M. ulcerans osteomyelitis, and warrants further study.. M. ...
Abstract Recent reports have suggested increases in Buruli ulcer (BU), an infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans in west Africa. In 1991, we conducted surveillance for BU in a rural area of Cote d'Ivoire and identified 312 cases of active or healed ulceration. A case-control study was then performed to investigate risk factors for this infection. The rate of illness did not appear to differ between males and females (5.2% versus 7.5%; P = 0.11). The highest rate of illness was seen in the 10-14-year-old age group (143 cases per 1,000 population). New cases increased more than three-fold between 1987 and 1991, and local prevalence of BU was as high as 16.3%. Twenty-six percent of persons with healed ulcers had chronic functional disability. Participation in farming activities near the main river in the region was identified in the case-control study as a risk factor for infection (odds ratio [OR] for each 10-min decrease in walking distance between the fields and the river = 1.52, 95% confidence
A total of 415 patients in whom Buruli ulcer has been clinically diagnosed will be included in the study, which will consist of 332 cases of category I and II Buruli ulcers (,10 cm) confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), plus 83 non PCR-confirmed Buruli ulcers. Patients will be randomized to receive treatment with the two antibiotic regimens as follows:. (i) Regimen I (SR8): 15 mg/kg streptomycin per day intramuscular injection for 8 weeks plus 10 mg/kg per day oral rifampicin for 8 weeks; (ii) Regimen II (CR8): 15 mg/kg per day oral extended-release clarithromycin for 8 weeks plus 10 mg/kg per day oral rifampicin for 8 weeks.. Assessments before, during and after the course of antibiotic treatment will include full medical history, clinical assessments and monitoring of vital signs, assessment of the lesion, laboratory investigations, hearing test, electrocardiogram, pregnancy test, voluntary HIV counseling and testing, and functional limitation assessment. The primary efficacy ...
Buruli ulcer, also known as Bairnsdale ulcer, Daintree ulcer, Mossman ulcer, and Searl ulcer, is a chronic, indolent, necrotizing disease of the skin and soft tissue. Buruli ulcer is the third most common mycobacterial disease of the immunocompetent host, after tuberculosis and leprosy It is caused by a toxin-producing mycobacteria, Mycobacte...
Background: Buruli ulcer (BU) is a skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Its exact mode of transmission is not known. Previous studies have identified demographic, socio-economic, health and hygiene as well as environment related risk factors. We investigated whether the same factors pertain in Suhum-Kraboa-Coaltar (SKC) and Akuapem South (AS) Districts in Ghana which previously were not endemic for BU. Methods: We conducted a case control study. A case of BU was defined as any person aged 2 years or more who resided in study area (SKC or AS District) diagnosed according to the WHO clinical case definition for BU and matched with age-(+/-5 years), gender-, and community controls. A structured questionnaire on host, demographic, environmental, and behavioural factors was administered to participants. Results: A total of 113 cases and 113 community controls were interviewed. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis identified presence of wetland in the neighborhood (OR = 3.9, ...
Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), particularly mycolactone producing mycobacteria (MPM), are bacteria found in aquatic environments causing skin diseases in humans like Buruli ulcer (BU). Although the causative agent for BU, Mycobacterium ulcerans has been identified and associated with slow-moving water bodies, the real transmission route is still unknown. This study aimed to characterize MPMs from environmental aquatic samples collected in a BU non-endemic community, Adiopodoumé, in Côte dIvoire. Sixty samples were collected in four types of matrices (plant biofilms, water filtrate residues, plant detritus and soils) from three water bodies frequently used by the population. Using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), MPMs were screened for the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) mycobacterial gene, the IS2404 insertion sequence, and MPM enoyl reductase (ER) gene. Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) typing with loci 6, 19, mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit 1 (MIRU1) and sequence type 1(ST1
The pathogenesis of Buruli ulcers is thought to be essentially mediated by the production of mycolactone at the site of infection (6). The extensive tissue necrosis and minimal inflammation in Buruli ulcers constitute the hallmarks of these lesions, and reflect the cytocidal and immunosuppressive properties of this original macrolide (1). Mycolactone is able to diffuse rapidly within target cells, as shown by the cytosolic accumulation of fluorescent derivatives (31). Mycolactone then triggers diverse cytopathic effects, including cytoskeletal rearrangements and cell cycle arrest, eventually culminating in apoptotic/necrotic cell death (9). The manifestations and levels of mycolactone cytotoxicity vary extensively among cell types, suggesting that the molecular target of mycolactone may be differentially expressed or have different functions in different cells. At noncytostatic and cytotoxic concentrations, mycolactone displays immunomodulatory properties on human primary monocytes and dendritic ...
The World Health Organization (WHO) in collaboration with the Ministry of Health of Ghana organized a four-week training course on the management of Buruli ulcer for 21 doctors from 11 countries at the Agogo Presbyterian Hospital, Agogo in the Ashanti Akim North district. The participants were from Benin, Cameroon, Congo, Côte dIvoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Guinea, Sudan, Uganda, Papua New Guinea and Togo. The course was facilitated by plastic surgeons from Australia, Côte dIvoire, Ghana, Switzerland and France. The Minister of Health, Major Courage E. K. Quashigah (Rtd), opened the course under the chairmanship of Nana Kwame Akuoko Sarpong, Paramount Chief of Agogo Traditional Council. The main objective of the course was to train doctors working in endemic areas to improve their capacities to manage of Buruli ulcer and its complications. Those trained will support their national programmes to train health workers in their respective countries in a standardized manner. It ...
This documentary is about Buruli ulcer, one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases. It includes the views and testimonies of patients, community members, health workers, researchers and partners. Since 2005, the WHO strategy of early detection and antibiotic treatment has revolutionized the management of patients. The overall picture that emerges is one of steady and impressive progress, changing the face of Buruli ulcer from a devastating, debaliating disease to one that can be treated and cured - A message of hope. ...
In the present study, we used a model of acute lung inflammation to investigate whether increased protein degradation by the UPS and NF-κB activation in diaphragm muscle are required for inflammation-induced diaphragm atrophy. We have demonstrated that LPS-induced lung inflammation decreased diaphragm fiber CSA in a NF-κB-dependent manner and requires poly-Ub conjugation. In our study, diaphragm muscle function was not measured, but it is very likely that the decrease in fiber CSA observed in response to pulmonary inflammation has functional consequences, as ample studies demonstrate clearly that reduced muscle fiber CSA correlates with a loss of muscle strength. A recent publication by Jaber et al. (19) describes a reduction in diaphragm CSA of 40% in patients who receive mechanical ventilation. This reduction in CSA was accompanied by an even greater reduction (−50%) in diaphragm function (19). In a mycobacterium ulcerans infection model, reductions of biceps muscle CSA of −29 and −17% ...
Study lays the groundwork for development of a cost-effective tool for studying the population structure and spread of Mycobacterium ulcerans
A flesh-eating bacteria is now reaching epidemic levels, spreading to 30 countries. Most cases of Buruli Ulcers come from sub-Saharan Africa, but Australia has dealt with the disease for years. While we know some methods to treat the disease, scientists are still unsure about its history or how to stop the spread.
We report a case of Buruli ulcer in a tourist from the United Kingdom. The disease was almost certainly acquired in Brazil, where only 1 case had previously been reported. The delay in diagnosis highlights the need for physicians to be aware of the disease and its epidemiology.
Background Buruli ulcer is a serious individual skin disease due to species remains to be a matter of controversy, and relevant interventions to avoid this disease lack (we) the correct understanding of the life span history attributes in its organic aquatic ecosystem and (ii) immune system signatures that might be correlates of security. within a Buruli ulcerCendemic region (in the Republic of Benin, Western world Africa), we assayed sera gathered from either ulcer-free people or sufferers with Buruli ulcers for the titre of IgGs that bind to insect predator SGH, concentrating on those substances been shown to be maintained by colonies otherwise. IgG titres had been low in the Buruli ulcer individual group than in the ulcer-free group. Conclusions These data shall help framework potential investigations in Buruli ulcerCendemic areas, offering a rationale for analysis into individual immune system signatures of contact SAT1 with predatory aquatic pests, with special focus on those insect saliva ...
Recognizing and managing paradoxical reactions from benzodiazepines & propofol. In retrospect, he may have been having a paradoxical reaction to
My research interests concern the pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. ulcerans, in humans and experimental animal hosts. Studies in tuberculosis, principally in the mouse model, concern the response to chemotherapeutic agents, including novel compounds and novel combinations of drugs, and their modulation due to innate host factors and those involving the immune system after immunotherapeutic vaccination. Studies on M. ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, have focused on the differential response to vaccination in different mouse strains and the evaluation of novel chemotherapy regimens in comparison with the WHO standard of rifampin and streptomycin. We are also involved in studies to develop appropriate assays to detect mycolactone, the toxin that is the principal virulence factor of M. ulcerans.. ...
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Launched in July 2015, Africa Times is an independent participative online news site for Sub-Saharan Africa. We aim to empower all African voices through publishing content by a range of people, from academics to bloggers. We are dedicated to bringing the world an African view on life, up-to-date African news and analysis. ...
Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment of Bacterial Skin Infections from the Home Version of the Merck Manuals.
Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment of Bacterial Skin Infections from the Home Version of the Merck Manuals.
The immune response to mycobacterial infection is complex, involving several arms of the immune system. Organs are damaged by mycobacteria directly and also by the necrotic granulomatous immune response of the host to this pathogen. Ideally, mycobacterial infection is met with a balanced immune response that is sufficient to kill organisms but not so severe as to cause excessive tissue injury. Immunosuppression may promote growth of mycobacteria while decreasing tissue injury by the host response to the infection. Conversely, enhancement of the hosts immune response may kill more organisms but may also result in more organ damage.
A community based study on the mode of transmission, prevention and treatment of Buruli ulcers in Southwest Cameroon: knowledge, attitude and practices ...
Ishinimenki, kopinchimiz bu naxshini tunji qitim anglighanda choqum bashqa tilda anglighan BU esli nusqisi iken, kichik waqtimizdin qalghan eslimiler
Genetic polymorphisms in drug-metabolizing enzymes have been linked to inter-individual differences in the efficacy and toxicity of many medications. The aim of our study was to reveal the association of MTHFR and GSTP1 gene polymorphisms with toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant anthracycline-based treatment. The case group comprised 74 patients with breast cancer (median age: 48.9, range: 2769 years; stage: II-III). All patients received 6 cycles of adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy regimen with 5-fluorouracil, adriamycin, and cyclophosphamide (FAC). Toxicity was assessed using NCI-CTC. The polymorphic variants of the MTHFR (c. 677 C>T) and GSTP1 (c. 313 A>G) were analyzed by Allelic Discrimination Real Time PCR using specific primers and TaqMan MGB probes. The genotypes distributions observed were similar to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations. The association between genotypes and toxicity was tested using univariate logistic regression and logistic regression ...
Background: Toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans can cause a diphtheria-like illness in humans and have been found in domestic animals, which were suspected to serve as reservoirs for a zoonotic transmission. Additionally, toxigenic C. ulcerans were reported to take over the leading role in causing diphtheria in the last years in many industrialized countries. Methods: To gain deeper insights into the tox gene locus and to understand the transmission pathway in detail, we analyzed nine isolates derived from human patients and their domestic animals applying next generation sequencing and comparative genomics. Results: We provide molecular evidence for zoonotic transmission of C. ulcerans in four cases and demonstrate the superior resolution of next generation sequencing compared to multi-locus sequence typing for epidemiologic research. Additionally, we provide evidence that the virulence of C. ulcerans can change rapidly by acquisition of novel virulence genes. This mechanism is exemplified by an ...
Aeschbacher, S., Santschi, E., Gerber, V., Stalder, H.P., and Zanoni, R.G. (2015) Entwicklung einer real-time RT-PCR zum Nachweis von equinem Influenzavirus. Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde 157:4, 191-201. (Link). Balmer, S., Gobet, H., Nenniger, C., Hadorn, D., Schwermer, H., and Vögtlin, A. (2015) Schmallenberg virus activity in cattle in Switzerland in 2013. Veterinary Record 177:11, 289. (Link). Bolz, M., Kerber, S., Zimmer, G., and Pluschke, G. (2015) Use of recombinant virus replicon particles for vaccination against Mycobacterium ulcerans disease. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 9:8, e0004011. (Link). Braun, U., Frei, S., Schweizer, M., Zanoni, R., and Janett, F. (2015) Transmission of border disease virus to seronegative cows inseminated with infected semen. Research in Veterinary Science 100, 297-298. (Link). Braun, U., Hilbe, M., Janett, F., Hässig, M., Zanoni, R., Frei, S., and Schweizer, M. (2015) Transmission of border disease virus from a persistently infected calf to ...
The incidence and geographic distribution of disease is not well known. Most cases are in rural populations and many may not present to medical services or present late in the disease course3.. Around four new patients a month undergo operations at the Reconstructive Plastic Surgery and Burns Centre, Korle Bu Hospital, to combat disfigurement and disability caused by buruli. Many people do not consult medical services due to the stigma associated with this ulcerative disease. Within populations where buruli ulcer is endemic the belief that witchcraft and curses are the main causative agents is still strong1. People often hide their ulcer, feeling it represents a previous misdemeanor. There is also a degree of underreporting due to lack of disease recognition by rural health providers. Lack of financial resources and adequate transportation were stated as further deterrents to patients seeking surgical intervention in the city hospital. This is highly frustrating as this is a treatable condition. ...
Abstract Ninety-seven cases of skin ulcers due to Mycobacterium ulcerans were seen at two mission hospitals in the Lower Congo between 1961 and 1968. There were more cases than expected among those 5.0 to 14.0 years old and fewer than expected in those 15 years old or older. No secular changes were noted during the 7-year study period. There was no association of the disease with nationality, nor was there significant familial clustering of cases. The geographic distribution of cases appeared to approximate the population distribution, and there was no temporal relation between geographically clustered cases. The anatomic distribution of skin ulcers differed from that found in Uganda in that there were more lesions on the arms. Comparison of the anatomic distribution of ulcers with the distribution of total skin area among the body parts showed an excess of lesions on the arms and a deficit on the head-neck-trunk. There was no association between climatic variables and the date of onset or presumed date
We identified risk factors for Buruli ulcer (BU) in Benin in an unmatched case-control study at the Centre Sanitaire et Nutritionnel Gbemoten in southern Benin. A total of 2,399 persons admitted from 1997 through 2003 and 1,444 unmatched patients wit ...
Bacteriophages, or phages, are viruses that infect bacteria. Mycobacteriophages are bacteriophages that specifically infect the genus Mycobacterium. This genus of bacteria includes human pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium ulcerans, which cause tuberculosis, leprosy and Buruli ulcer, respectively. The full genome sequences of 654 mycobacteriophages are currently available. Collectively, these 654 phages encode 69,581 genes. Only 20.25% of these genes have at least one known homologue in NCBI, the National Center for Biotechnology Information, leaving roughly 80% of all known mycobacteriophage genes without even a predicted function. Bacteriophages are highly host-specific and typically only infect a small number of bacterial hosts. The host range of 204 mycobacteriophages, initially isolated on Mycobacterium smegmatis strain mc2 155, was recently determined on three other bacterial hosts: M. tuberculosis and two M. smegmatis strains, Jucho and MKD8. The
Pyoderma gangrenosum is a noninfectious, progressive necrotizing skin condition. The etiology of pyoderma gangrenosum is unclear.
Anyone have a dog thats experienced a paradoxical reaction to Xanax? Today I learned that Button, apparently, is one of the small percentage of dogs that become extremely excited and hyper on the stuff ... hes taken it before, but I never remembered him having any negative response to it. Last time we were at the vet, they gave us a slightly higher dose to use before we visit the office because were trying to make the vets office a bit less horrifying for him. So I gave him the meds, waited half an hour, put him in the car and we got there, and instead of being relaxed, he was pumped. Totally into everything and more interested in the dogs and people than usual ... it was sort of weird, but not that dramatic until we got home. From about 2 PM until 4, it was like Button was on cocaine. He tore around the house, barked his fool head off almost nonstop, forgot he had any manners and jumped up on the counters looking for food, grabbed things out of my hands, raced in and out of the backyard, ...
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
The World Health Organization (WHO) is building a better future for people everywhere. Health lays the foundation for vibrant and productive communities, stronger economies, safer nations and a better world. Our work touches lives around the world every day - often in invisible ways. As the lead health authority within the United Nations (UN) system, we help ensure the safety of the air we breathe, the food we eat, the water we drink and the medicines and vaccines that treat and protect us. The Organization aims to provide every child, woman and man with the best chance to lead a healthier, longer life.
At present, control strategies for BU in countries of endemicity are limited to early case detection through improved active surveillance and surgical treatment. A diagnostic gold standard for the laboratory confirmation of BU has not yet been established, and sensitive diagnostic techniques like PCR and histopathology are often not available in areas of endemicity (6). Thus, misclassification and delayed diagnosis may occur frequently. According to a retrospective study carried out in Ashanti Region, Ghana, in 1994 to 1996, the average total treatment costs for a BU patient with advanced ulcerative disease requiring prolonged hospitalization were determined to be U.S.$780 as opposed to U.S.$20 to $30 for early cases. Thus, early case detection and subsequent surgical treatment reduce patient-related treatment costs (2).. In order to respond to the urgent need to develop reliable tools for early case detection, a dry-reagent-based PCR formulation for the detection of M. ulcerans in diagnostic ...
Scientists in Australia have voiced concern about an apparent outbreak of Buruli ulcer, a flesh-eating disease that usually occurs in West and central Africa.
Kwasi Boakye was 8 years old when he was brought to the Reconstructive Plastic Surgery and Burns Unit in Accra in April 2005. Buruli Ulcer had started near his eye.... Read More » ...
Giant Water Bugs live up to their name-most measure more than 2 inches long-and they arent afraid to hunt prey much larger than themselves!
Background: Basidiobolomycosis is a rare subcutaneous mycosis, which can be mistaken for several other diseases, such as soft tissue tumors, lymphoma, or Buruli ulcer in the preulcerative stage. Microbiological confirmation by PCR for and culture yield the most specific diagnosis, yet they are not widely available in endemic areas and with varying sensitivity. A combination of histopathological findings, namely, granulomatous inflammation with giant cells, septate hyphal fragments, and the Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon, can confirm basidiobolomycosis in patients presenting with painless, hard induration of soft tissue.. Case Presentations: We report on three patients misdiagnosed as suffering from Buruli ulcer, who did not respond to Buruli treatment. Histopathological review of the tissue sections from these patients suggests basidiobolomycosis. All patients had been lost to follow-up, and none received antifungal therapy. On visiting the patients at their homes, two were reported to have died ...
The Buruli ulcer disease mainly affects children under the age of 15, the reason for which is unknown and no research has been conducted about this, nor indeed into the methods of infection of this rare disease.In Africa, DAHW,Germany in partnership with Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine in Hamburg and long term partner Fondation Follereau Luxembourg (FFL)is working to achieve better diagnosis for patients and to finally find the causes of Buruli Ulcer.. More than 500 million people in India are at risk for one or more of the worlds five most prevalent NTDs: Lymphatic Filariasis (LF), Trachoma, and Soil transmitted Helminths (STHs) including Hookworm, Roundworm and Whipworm.. India has some of the largest and longstanding NTD programs in the world, but an additional 300 million people are in need of treatment. Global progress on NTDs hinges on Indias efforts and successes. India can scale up its efforts and serve as a model of success ...
Crohns disease is a granulomatous form of enteritis superficially similar to Johnes disease (paratuberculosis) of ruminants. Recently, a Mycobacterium sp closely related to Mycobacterium paratuberculosis was cultured from tissues of patients with Crohns disease suggesting that M paratuberculosis may be the aetiologic agent in some cases. In addition, greater seroreactivity to M paratuberculosis has been reported in patients with Crohns disease. In the present study, we have evaluated the serum antibody response to disrupted M paratuberculosis using ELISA and serum specimens from 33 people with Crohns disease, 21 with ulcerative colitis, and 12 non-inflammatory bowel disease controls. We failed to find a consistent IgG, IgM, or IgA antibody response to Mycobacterium paratuberculosis. The results indicate that, as in bovine paratuberculosis, serum seroreactivity is not a reliable tool for examining the relationship between human intestinal disease and mycobacteria.. ...
IFN-a: interferon alfa LTT: lymphocyte transportation test TNF-a: tumor necrosis factorealfa T umor necrosis factor alfa (TNF-a) antagonists are commonly used to treat inflammatory disorders and are considered particularly effective in the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis. Paradoxically, however, new-onset occurrence orworsening of psoriasis has been increasingly recognized among patients treated with TNF-a antagonists. We report on a 60-year-old man who developed a severe psoriatic condition with diffuse alopecia during infliximab therapy for psoriasis, resulting in the discontinuation of infliximab. Lymphocyte transportation test (LTT) results were positive. Currently, there are few reports of LTTpositive cases that are related to paradoxical reactions by TNF-a antagonists. We discuss the relationship between paradoxical reaction and the mechanisms of LTT.
Rod Hay lectures on infectious diseases and the skin. He covers diseases such as leprosy, lupus and buruli ulcer, and then focuses on tuberculosis. Hay talks about the diagnosis of these conditions and different techniques of management, as well how drug resistance affects treatment around the world. This lecture was part of an event called SECs sells: Skin, eyes and chests at The Royal Society of Medicine in London.. Date of lecture: 13th March 2014. This video is available for iPad via Safari. Length: 00:20:12 ...
Tropical Diseases News From Medical News Today comments, Description: Tropical diseases are diseases that are prevalent in or unique to tropical and subtropical regions. Tropical diseases include Chagas disease, schistosomiasis, malaria, dengue, leprosy, Buruli ulcer, d, ID: 12968, By: Feedage Forager
ray ban aviators 29.99 - Discount Hot Ray Ban Caribbean RB4148 Sunglasses Black Frame Purple Lens outlet online store - Ray Ban Justin Buruli ulcer Documents compiled up in.
Latest publications (see download options at this link): - Diabetes & Metabolism (Diabetic Foot Ulcers) - Angéiologie (Ulcère de Buruli)...
Latest publications (see download options at this link): - Diabetes & Metabolism (Diabetic Foot Ulcers) - Angéiologie (Ulcère de Buruli)...
İYONLAŞAMAYAN RADYASYON 1.Optik Radyasyonlar: Ultraviyole ışınları: Asıl kaynağı güneştir. UV ışınları güneş tam doğarken bolca yayılmaktadır. Bu nedenle deri kanserlerinin %80i UV ışınlarından kaynaklanmaktadır. 2.EMR Nitelikli Radyasyonlar: Radyo dalgaları, mikrodalgalar, mobil ve cep telefonları, radyo FM ve TV vericileri, radarlar, trafolar, bilgisayarlar, akım taşıyan kablolar bu gruba girmektedirler.
Graduate Research Scheme. The Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research has established a training fellowship program in infectious diseases at the Post-Doctoral level. The program seeks to enroll ambitious, talented and highly motivated young Africans to work on innovative approaches to the control of the following diseases: Malaria, HIV/AIDS, TB, Buruli Ulcer, Neglected Tropical Diseases and other relevant research topics that will contribute toinfectious diseases control efforts on the continent. The training fellowship is intended to stimulate innovation and as such fellows are allowed much room to explore their ideas in the arear of infectious diseases control. To expand the reach of the program, a Graduate Research Scheme (GRS) centered onthe program has been establishedfor graduate students at the Master of Philosophy (M.Phil) level. Suitable candidates are being invited for the 2016/2017 academic year. Candidates will be recruited on a competitive basis and will be required to ...
Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTD) are a selection of diseases which attract little attention globally, despite infecting up to a million people globally. The reason for this is they effect the worlds ruralist and poorest areas; contributing a significant factor into the cycle of poverty and disease, that limits a community due to the physical cognitive impairment they cause.. The diseases that fall under this category include Dracunculiasis, Buruli Ulcers and African Sleeping Sickness; cause by pathogens with a fascinating biology and epidemiology. And I discovered the category when reading around one of my new modules Human Parasitology at university. I decided to research more into them and post some research articles in order to promote NTD and how dangerous they can be if untreated. It is clear that NTDs are an important topic of discussion and action of multiple non government organisations and hopefully I can inspire some interest into people.. Look out for some pretty interesting ...
COOMA, Australia -- Firefighters battled scores of wildfires raging across southeastern Australia on Tuesday as authorities evacuated national parks and warned that blistering temperatures and high...
By now, most of us would have felt the colder temperatures and hopefully by now, we would know that this is due to a cold, polar airmass that moved over southeastern Australia over the weekend.
The population of Benin is 99% African. However, although several of the larger groups in southern Benin are culturally and socially closely related, Benin is not ethnically or linguistically homogeneous, and there is a particularly marked division between the peoples of the south and those of the north. The largest ethnic group is that of the Fon or Dahomeyans (about 25%), the closely related Adja (about 6%), and the Aizo (about 5%), who live in the south of the country and are predominantly farmers. The Goun (about 11%), who are related to the Adja, are concentrated around Porto-Novo. The Bariba (about 12%) are the dominant people in northern Benin. The Yoruba (more than 12%), essentially a farming people, came from Nigeria and are settled along the eastern boundary of the country. In the northeast, the Somba (more than 4%) subdivide into a number of distinct groups. The Fulani (about 6%), traditionally nomadic herders, gradually are becoming sedentary. Other groups include the Holli, the ...
10 40m ty1tt dx pedition to benin 2014. This resource is listed under DX Resources/DX Peditions/2014 DXpeditions, at TY1TT Benin resource page via dxzone.com ham radio guide
When you talk about Benin, no one knows what youre talking about. Its a whole new world; its a dream I begin to doubt I even dreamt. Its a lonely pl...
funkční stav živé buňky nebo organismu po vystavení stresorům a obranné reakce, které mají za cíl zachovat homeostázu a zabránit poškození nebo smrti = Stres
maz bolsa buningdinmu öte bolmas emdi!!! bu zadi wetendiki ishlarmu ya weten sirtidiki ishlarmu? terbiye körmigen adem bay bolsa mushundaq bolidu, ata-anisi qan
This Histri was built automatically but not manually verified. As a consequence, the Histri can be incomplete or can contain errors ...
The identification of mycobacteria can be a complicated, expensive, and difficult process; many laboratories are now referring uncommon organisms to laboratories that have the capability of using additional technology. Nucleic acid probes have offered laboratories the ability to rapidly and accurately identify four of the most common mycobacterial species, and they have rarely misidentified an organism (3).. A more important issue is the inaccuracy of phenotypic methods in providing a reliable and timely identification of the other mycobacteria (14). Nucleic acid sequencing of 16S rDNA has been investigated as a definitive method for the identification of many microorganisms, including mycobacteria (3, 5, 8, 11, 12, 16-18, 23), and its use is becoming more extensive. Most of the studies used a small number of organisms for evaluation or included only common species and/or the type species from culture collections.. We sought to determine whether 16S rDNA sequencing with a commercially available ...
For example, in the recently held meeting of the Disease Reference Group (DRG) for Research on Tuberculosis (TB), Leprosy and Buruli Ulcer, leprosy group was invited to a one day activity in a 3-day meeting wherein TB had the full agenda. We are just lucky that Dr Diana Lockwood was there, otherwise, no other leprosy expert was around to discuss with us. I do appreciate though the support I am getting from Dr Steve Lyons as far as multi-drug therapy drug supply is concerned but even if there is a Global NTD meetings, leprosy programme is not equally represented, from our end it is the Filaria programme which is given priority and called upon on these meetings ...
The primary research focus in my laboratory is translational research related to TB drug development. Using established animal and in vitro models of active and latent TB infection and relying on pharmacodynamic principles, our major goal is to identify and optimize new drugs and drug combinations to shorten and/or simplify TB treatment and restrict the emergence of drug resistance. Over the past 15 years, our work has informed the development of a number of new and repurposed drugs, including moxifloxacin, rifapentine, bedaquiline, PA-824, and the oxazolidinones sutezolid and linezolid, as well as novel combinations containing these drugs. We continue to refine existing models and develop new models for pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, including murine models of cavitary TB and a flow-controlled in vitro system for studying the pharmacodynamics of new drugs and combinations. A second research interest is applying similar approaches to improve the treatment of Buruli ulcer, an emerging yet ...
Lupines (Lupinus spp.) are annual or perennial blooming flowers. They are native to North and South Americas and the Mediterranean. It has been naturalized in the cooler temperate regions of southeastern Australia, New Zealand, eastern Canada, and throughout Europe. Lupinus are considered troublesome weeds in Australia. Lupinus are a large and varied group in the pea family. Large clusters of
For the week to 21 November, rainfall was recorded in all States and Territories, except in the Pilbara, northern Gascoyne and central interior districts of WA. At the beginning of the week, a large cloudband associated with a cold front and surface trough tracked across southeastern Australia. Thunderstorms and showers produced moderate to locally heavy falls in the eastern half of SA, VIC, southwestern NSW and parts of southern Tasmania. The post Weekly rainfall wrap, 22 Nov 2017 appeared first on Beef Central ...
Flowers form from September to April. The three-petalled flowers are purple, with frilly edges, and only last for one day. They are among the more colourful wildflowers in Southeastern Australia. There two sub-species: The tepals are somewhat longer and wider in subsp. tuberosus, being 10 to 19 mm long, and around 10 mm wide. In subsp. parviflorus the inner anthers are smaller, and straight to slightly curved. ...
All there is to know about Benin gambling. Includes casino details, Benin gambling news and tweets, Benin entertainment schedules, organized by name...
Muğla Sıtkı Koçman Üniversitesi tanıtımı, tarihçesi ile üniversiteden haberler, duyurular ve etkinliklere erişebilirsiniz
Authorities in Ghana have detained a municipal works official accused of allowing a building that collapsed to be built without a construction permit.
Dear Sir,. Paradoxical worsening in tuberculosis is an exuberant inflammatory reaction characterised by clinical or radiological worsening after initiation of antitubercular therapy in the absence of disease relapse or presence of another diagnosis.1 With no defined diagnostic criteria, this entity is diagnosed purely clinically after ruling out drug resistance, poor drug compliance and disease relapse. Described prevalence is varied across literature ranging from 2.3% to 23%.2 ,3 We here did a retrospective chart review of patients with tuberculous lymphadenitis to determine the incidence of this phenomenon and also to determine the clinical and laboratory risk factors for the same. Description of this entity in Indian literature has been scarce and … ...
The chances are that if you turn on your television or scan your local news sources, you will hear about infectious diseases like HIV/AIDS, Ebola, Tuberculosis, Hepatitis and Measles. Now, can you say the same for Buruli ulcers? How about Guinea Worm disease? Chagas disease? Yaws or Schistosomiasis? Your response might not be as certain.. This is not because the diseases only infect a few people each year or are not as dangerous. Actually, combined, these diseases categorized as Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) impact more than one billion people every year [1]. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), NTDs include communicable diseases that exist in tropical and subtropical climates of nearly 150 countries, and mostly impact those living in poverty with close proximity to infectious vectors [1]. The WHO has created a roadmap to treat, prevent and eliminate the burden of NTDs, which includes five strategies of control: Preventative chemotherapy; Vector and intermediate host control; ...
News Release Date: August 7, 2015 How many times have you heard the words: "Look at this cool bug!"? Thousands of interesting species of aquatic insects inhabit our lakes, marshes, and streams. They feed fish, birds, reptiles, and amphibians-recycling nutrients back to land in the process. Aquatic insects mostly live in water during their immature stages and then later mostly move to land as adults. But very little is known about the insects in upper Great Lakes national parks like Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore-including what species live there and how well parks are preserving these insect communities. Researchers have recently been trying to fill these knowledge gaps.. To highlight these research efforts, Dr. R. Edward Dewalt (Illinois Natural History Survey, University of Illinois) will present a program entitled Parks as Natural Laboratories: Water Bugs of the Upper Great Lakes National Parks on August 13 at 9:30 a.m. at the Philip A. Hart Visitor Center Auditorium in Empire, ...
Responses to four new tuberculins were found to be significantly reduced in 46 patients with rheumatoid arthritis in comparison with a control group of 79. Except for tuberculin itself, the same was found in 111 patients with tuberculosis. In common with patients with tuberculosis and leprosy, those with rheumatoid arthritis did not respond to common mycobacterial (group i) antigen. Three DR haplotypes were found to have significant effects on skin test responsiveness of the rheumatoid patients but had little or no effect on that of the patients with tuberculosis and none on that of the healthy control group. Rheumatoid patients with the HLA-DR4 haplotype had significantly greater responses to all four reagents than did non-DR4 patients, but their responses to leprosin A and scrofulin remained significantly lower than those of the control group. Possession of HLA-DR3 haplotype was associated with skin test positivity approaching normal, but the sizes of responses were reduced. Possession of DR7 ...
Tropical ulcer, more commonly known as jungle rot, is a chronic ulcerative skin lesion thought to be caused by polymicrobial infection with a variety of microorganisms, including mycobacteria. It is common in tropical climates. Ulcers occur on exposed parts of the body, primarily on anterolateral aspect of the lower limbs and may erode muscles and tendons, and sometimes, the bones. These lesions may frequently develop on preexisting abrasions or sores sometimes beginning from a mere scratch. The vast majority of the tropical ulcers occur below the knee, usually around the ankle. They may also occur on arms. They are often initiated by minor trauma, and subjects with poor nutrition are at higher risk. Once developed, the ulcer may become chronic and stable, but also it can run a destructive course with deep tissue invasion, osteitis, and risk of amputation. Unlike Buruli ulcer, tropical ulcers are very painful. Lesions begin with inflammatory papules that progress into vesicles and rupture with ...
Introduction: Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare inflammatory disorder with an incidence of 0.63 per 100,000 person years1 . It is a sterile inflammatory neutrophilic dermatosis2,5, associated with recurrent cutaneous ulcerations with mucopurulent or haemorrhagic exudate. The peak age of incidence is from 20 to 50 with a female preponderance2,3. Although the lower legs are common sites for PG, other sites including breast, hand, trunk and peristomal skin have been reported2 .. Case Presentation: A 36 year old waiter was referred to the dermatology outpatient clinic in 2011 with an 18 month history of non-healing ulcer of his right malleolus measuring 2cm in diameter sustained post trauma. Differential diagnoses included Buruli ulcer and Madura foot. MRI scans excluded osteomyelitis. Biopsies of several sites including the skin of the tibial malleolus and posterior aspect of the ankle revealed necrosis of the underlying dermis and deep tissue. Stains for fungi and Acid Fast Bacilli were ...

Buruli Ulcer Disease (Mycobacterium Ulcerans Infection) | Open MichiganBuruli Ulcer Disease (Mycobacterium Ulcerans Infection) | Open Michigan

The Buruli ulcer disease is due to infection by Mycobacterium ulcerans. This programme describes the basic pathophysiology of ... Buruli Ulcer Disease: Fine Needle Aspiration for Diagnosis of M. Ulcerans Infection ... Buruli Ulcer Disease: Obtaining Swab Specimens for Diagnosis of M. Ulcerans Infection ... Buruli Ulcer Disease (Mycobacterium Ulcerans Infection). Buruli Ulcer Disease (Mycobacterium Ulcerans Infection). *Overview ...
more infohttps://open.umich.edu/find/open-educational-resources/global-health/buruli-ulcer-disease-mycobacterium-ulcerans-infection

PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases: BCG-Mediated Protection against Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection in the MousePLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases: BCG-Mediated Protection against Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection in the Mouse

... ulcerans infection. We conclude that the efficacy of BCG against M. ulcerans, and possibly other diseases, depends on the ... We vaccinated two mouse strains with BCG eight weeks before infection with three different strains of M. ulcerans. Two of the ... ulcerans infection. C57BL/6 mice, on the other hand, usually do not have vaccination scars, make a relatively short-lived and/ ... ulcerans. We hypothesized that there may be differences in the effectiveness of BCG vaccination in different mouse strains. ...
more infohttp://journals.plos.org/plosntds/article/authors?id=10.1371/journal.pntd.0000985&imageURI=info:doi/10.1371/journal.pntd.0000985.g004

Sequelae of Mycobacterium ulcerans infections (Buruli ulcer), European Journal of Plastic Surgery | 10.1007/s002389900111 |...Sequelae of Mycobacterium ulcerans infections (Buruli ulcer), European Journal of Plastic Surgery | 10.1007/s002389900111 |...

"Sequelae of Mycobacterium ulcerans infections (Buruli ulcer), European Journal of Plastic Surgery" on DeepDyve, the largest ... Sequelae of Mycobacterium ulcerans infections (Buruli ulcer). Sequelae of Mycobacterium ulcerans infections (Buruli ulcer) ... Sequelae of Mycobacterium ulcerans infections (Buruli ulcer). Agbenorku, P.; Akpaloo, J.; Amofa, G. K. ... www.deepdyve.com/lp/springer-journals/sequelae-of-mycobacterium-ulcerans-infections-buruli-ulcer-0AnjW0qJDH ...
more infohttps://www.deepdyve.com/lp/springer_journal/sequelae-of-mycobacterium-ulcerans-infections-buruli-ulcer-0AnjW0qJDH

Buruli Ulcer Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection Prepared by: A. Elkader Y. Elottol Supervisor: Prof M. Shubir. -  ppt downloadBuruli Ulcer Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection Prepared by: A. Elkader Y. Elottol Supervisor: Prof M. Shubir. - ppt download

The third most common Mycobacterium, that affected more than 30 countries. ... Disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. First described by MacCallum in 1948, but the name came from Buruli country in Uganda ... Buruli Ulcer Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection Prepared by: A. Elkader Y. Elottol Supervisor: Prof M. Shubir.. Published by ... 1 Buruli Ulcer Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection Prepared by: A. Elkader Y. Elottol Supervisor: Prof M. Shubir ...
more infohttp://slideplayer.com/slide/4372537/

Buruli Ulcer: Promising New Drug Candidate Against a Forgotten DiseaseBuruli Ulcer: Promising New Drug Candidate Against a Forgotten Disease

Targeting the Mycobacterium ulcerans cytochrome bc1:aa3 for the treatment of Buruli ulcer. (2018) Nature Communications. https ... Buruli ulcer is caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans which belongs to the same family of bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB) and ... M. ulcerans is found in the environment and, despite considerable research efforts, the mode of transmission of the bacteria to ... While respiration of the less sensitive TB bacteria relies on two pathways, with only one being blocked by Q203, M. ulcerans ...
more infohttps://news.idw-online.de/2018/12/18/buruli-ulcer-promising-new-drug-candidate-against-a-forgotten-disease/

Mycobacterium chelonae infectionMycobacterium chelonae infection

Other atypical mycobacteria:. *Mycobacterium marinum - associated with contaminated aquarium water.. *Mycobacterium ulcerans ... Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium fortuitum are often grouped with M. chelonae as the "M. fortuitum complex.". * ... Mycobacterium fortuitum has been associated with footbaths at nail salons.. *Mycobacterium abscessus must be differentiated by ... Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex and Mycobacterium kansasii more commonly infect immunosuppressed patients. ...
more infohttps://www.visualdx.com/visualdx/diagnosis/mycobacterium%20chelonae%20infection?diagnosisId=54657&moduleId=101

Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease with Unusual Sites Not to Be IgnoredMycobacterium ulcerans Disease with Unusual Sites Not to Be Ignored

... Sangaré Abdoulaye, Kourouma Sarah Hamdan, Kouassi Yao ... "Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease with Unusual Sites Not to Be Ignored," Dermatology Research and Practice, vol. 2014, Article ID ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/drp/2014/639374/cta/

KEGG PATHWAY: Non-homologous end-joining - Mycobacterium ulceransKEGG PATHWAY: Non-homologous end-joining - Mycobacterium ulcerans

Non-homologous end-joining - Mycobacterium ulcerans [ Pathway menu , Organism menu , Pathway entry , Download KGML , Show ...
more infohttp://www.genome.jp/kegg-bin/show_pathway?mul03450+MUL_4434

Mycobacterium ulcerans - WikipediaMycobacterium ulcerans - Wikipedia

Mycobacterium ulcerans (M. ulcerans) is a slow-growing mycobacterium that classically infects the skin and subcutaneous tissues ... "Characterization of an unusual Mycobacterium: a possible missing link between Mycobacterium marinum and Mycobacterium ulcerans ... "Diagnostic potential of a serological assay for the diagnosis of ulcerans disease based on the putative Mycobacterium ulcerans ... "Buruli ulcer (Mycobacterium ulcerans infection)". Fact Sheet. World Health Organization. July 2014. N°199. MacCallum, P.; J. C ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mycobacterium_ulcerans

Drugs for treating Buruli ulcer (Mycobacterium ulcerans disease) | CochraneDrugs for treating Buruli ulcer (Mycobacterium ulcerans disease) | Cochrane

Drugs for treating Buruli ulcer (Mycobacterium ulcerans disease). What was the aim of this review? ... Buruli ulcer is a necrotizing cutaneous infection caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans bacteria that occurs mainly ... Buruli ulcer is a disease caused by mycobacterium (tuberculosis and leprosy are other types of diseases caused by mycobacterium ... Paradoxical reactions (clinical deterioration after treatment caused by enhanced immune response to M ulcerans) were evaluated ...
more infohttps://www.cochrane.org/CD012118/INFECTN_drugs-treating-buruli-ulcer-mycobacterium-ulcerans-disease

Mycobacterium ulcerans infection: factors influencing diagnostic delay | The Medical Journal of AustraliaMycobacterium ulcerans infection: factors influencing diagnostic delay | The Medical Journal of Australia

Mycobacterium ulcerans infection: factors influencing diagnostic delay. Tricia Y J Quek, Margaret J Henry, Julie A Pasco, ... Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer) in rural hospital, Southern Benin, 1997-2001. Emerg Infect Dis 2004; 10: 1391- ... Outcomes for Mycobacterium ulcerans infection with combined surgery and antibiotic therapy: findings from a south-eastern ... Mycobacterium ulcerans in mosquitoes captured during outbreak of Buruli ulcer, southeastern Australia. Emerg Infect Dis 2007; ...
more infohttps://www.mja.com.au/journal/2007/187/10/mycobacterium-ulcerans-infection-factors-influencing-diagnostic-delay

Mycobacterium ulcerans liflandii - WikipediaMycobacterium ulcerans liflandii - Wikipedia

KT1 is characterized and differentiated from its closest relatives, Mycobacterium ulcerans and Mycobacterium marinum, by the ... Mycobacterium ulcerans liflandii has been isolated from Xenopus tropicalis and Xenopus laevis in a laboratory in the US and ... June 2004). "Characterization of a Mycobacterium ulcerans-like infection in a colony of African tropical clawed frogs (Xenopus ... ulcerans. KT1 is a non-photochromogenic acid-fast mycobacterium. On Middlebrook 7H11 media supplemented with OADC, colonies are ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mycobacterium_ulcerans_liflandii

deoC - Deoxyribose-phosphate aldolase - Mycobacterium ulcerans (strain Agy99) - deoC gene & proteindeoC - Deoxyribose-phosphate aldolase - Mycobacterium ulcerans (strain Agy99) - deoC gene & protein

Mycobacterium ulcerans subsp. shinshuense. Mycobacterium ulcerans str. Harvey. Mycobacterium marinum. Mycobacterium sp. 012931 ... Mycobacterium ulcerans subsp. shinshuense. Mycobacterium sp. 012931. Mycobacterium ulcerans str. Harvey. Mycobacterium marinum ... Mycobacterium marinum (strain ATCC BAA-535 / M). Mycobacterium ulcerans subsp. shinshuense. 226. UniRef100_B2HQU3. Cluster: ... sp,A0PVY3,DEOC_MYCUA Deoxyribose-phosphate aldolase OS=Mycobacterium ulcerans (strain Agy99) OX=362242 GN=deoC PE=3 SV=1 ...
more infohttp://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/A0PVY3

thrS - Threonine--tRNA ligase - Mycobacterium ulcerans (strain Agy99) - thrS gene & proteinthrS - Threonine--tRNA ligase - Mycobacterium ulcerans (strain Agy99) - thrS gene & protein

sp,A0PSZ4,SYT_MYCUA Threonine--tRNA ligase OS=Mycobacterium ulcerans (strain Agy99) OX=362242 GN=thrS PE=3 SV=1 ... Mycobacterium ulcerans (strain Agy99). ,p>This subsection of the ,a href="http://www.uniprot.org/help/names_and_taxonomy_ ...
more infohttps://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/A0PSZ4

Aquatic snails, passive hosts of Mycobacterium ulcerans - InfoscienceAquatic snails, passive hosts of Mycobacterium ulcerans - Infoscience

A novel intermediate link in the transmission chain of M. ulcerans becomes likely with predator aquatic insects in addition to ... Water bugs, such as Naucoris cimicoides, a potential vector of M. ulcerans, were shown to be infected specifically by this ... We report that snails could transitorily harbor M. ulcerans without offering favorable conditions for its growth and ... bacterium after feeding on snails experimentally exposed to M. ulcerans. Marsollier, Laurent; Sévérin, Tchibozo; Aubry, Jacques ...
more infohttps://infoscience.epfl.ch/record/151235/usage

TropicalMed  | Free Full-Text | Potential Animal Reservoir of Mycobacterium ulcerans: A Systematic Review | HTMLTropicalMed | Free Full-Text | Potential Animal Reservoir of Mycobacterium ulcerans: A Systematic Review | HTML

This remains valid for M. ulcerans. Possums have been suggested as one of the reservoir of M. ulcerans in south-eastern ... The precise mode of transmission of M. ulcerans is yet to be elucidated. Nevertheless, it is possible that the mode of ... The knowledge about the possible routes of transmission and potential animal reservoirs of M. ulcerans is poorly understood and ... ulcerans infection. Taken together, from the selected studies in this systematic review, it is clear that exotic wildlife and ...
more infohttps://www.mdpi.com/2414-6366/3/2/56/htm

Prevalence of Aquatic Insects and Arsenic Concentration Determine the Geographical Distribution of Mycobacterium ulcerans...Prevalence of Aquatic Insects and Arsenic Concentration Determine the Geographical Distribution of Mycobacterium ulcerans...

A modified SIR model is used to explain the transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU) and its dependence on arsenic (As) ... Prevalence of Aquatic Insects and Arsenic Concentration Determine the Geographical Distribution of Mycobacterium ulcerans ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/cmmm/2007/873536/abs/

Profiling Mycobacterium ulcerans with hsp65 - Volume 11, Number 11-November 2005 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDCProfiling Mycobacterium ulcerans with hsp65 - Volume 11, Number 11-November 2005 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDC

Genotyping Mycobacterium ulcerans and Mycobacterium marinum using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units. J Bacteriol. ... A taxonomic study on a mycobacterium which caused a skin ulcer in a Japanese girl and resembled Mycobacterium ulcerans]. ... Profiling Mycobacterium ulcerans with hsp65. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2005;11(11):1795-1796. doi:10.3201/eid1111.050234.. ... To the Editor: Mycobacterium ulcerans is an emerging human pathogen responsible for Buruli ulcer, a necrotizing skin disease ...
more infohttps://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/11/11/05-0234_article

PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases: A Major Role for Mammals in the Ecology of Mycobacterium ulceransPLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases: A Major Role for Mammals in the Ecology of Mycobacterium ulcerans

... ulcerans lesions and/or M. ulcerans PCR-positive faeces. The finding that large numbers of possums in a BU-endemic area are ... Our results revealed that although M. ulcerans DNA could be detected at low levels in a variety of environmental samples, the ... In the present study we investigated possible environmental source(s) of M. ulcerans in Victoria, Australia. ... infected with M. ulcerans raises the possibility that mammals are an environmental reservoir for M. ulcerans. ...
more infohttp://journals.plos.org/plosntds/article/related?id=10.1371/journal.pntd.0000791&imageURI=info:doi/10.1371/journal.pntd.0000791.g005

In vitro activity of ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, ofloxacin, amikacin and rifampicin against Ghanaian isolates of Mycobacterium...In vitro activity of ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, ofloxacin, amikacin and rifampicin against Ghanaian isolates of Mycobacterium...

... and three reference isolates of Mycobacterium ulcerans by modifying a standard agar dilution method for testing Mycobacterium ... amikacin and rifampicin against Ghanaian isolates of Mycobacterium ulcerans.. Thangaraj HS1, Adjei O, Allen BW, Portaels F, ... All these antimicrobials were active against every isolate of M. ulcerans. Sparfloxacin exhibited the highest activity and ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10660507?dopt=Abstract

Management of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection in a pregnant woman in Benin using rifampicin and clarithromycin.  - PubMed -...Management of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection in a pregnant woman in Benin using rifampicin and clarithromycin. - PubMed -...

Management of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection in a pregnant woman in Benin using rifampicin and clarithromycin.. Dossou AD, ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18976206?dopt=Abstract

Effect of Oxygen on Growth of Mycobacterium ulcerans in the BACTEC System | Journal of Clinical MicrobiologyEffect of Oxygen on Growth of Mycobacterium ulcerans in the BACTEC System | Journal of Clinical Microbiology

Effect of Oxygen on Growth of Mycobacterium ulcerans in the BACTEC System. J. C. Palomino, A. M. Obiang, L. Realini, W. M. ... 1995) Mycobacterium ulcerans infection in Australian children: report of eight cases and review. Clin. Infect. Dis. 21:1186- ... 1979) Mycobacterium ulcerans infection: treatment with rifampin, hyperbaric oxygenation and heat. Aviat. Space Environ. Med. 50 ... Isolation of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the etiologic agent of Buruli ulcer (BU), in primary culture remains difficult. Some ...
more infohttps://jcm.asm.org/content/36/11/3420?ijkey=18dc67cb3b5ff622810e475441e1124114ffc5f3&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

Figure 2 - Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease, Peru - Volume 14, Number 3-March 2008 - Emerging Infectious Disease journal - CDCFigure 2 - Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease, Peru - Volume 14, Number 3-March 2008 - Emerging Infectious Disease journal - CDC

Attempts to culture Mycobacterium ulcerans failed. Five patients came from jungle areas, and 3 from the swampy northern coast ... Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease, Peru Humberto Guerra*, Juan Carlos Palomino†, Eduardo Falconí*‡, Francisco Bravo*, Ninoska ...
more infohttps://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/14/3/07-0904-f2

Frontiers | Susceptibility to Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease (Buruli ulcer) Is Associated with IFNG and iNOS Gene Polymorphisms...Frontiers | Susceptibility to Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease (Buruli ulcer) Is Associated with IFNG and iNOS Gene Polymorphisms...

The causative agent, Mycobacterium ulcerans, produces mycolactone, a macrolide toxin, which causes apoptosis of mammalian cells ... Only a small proportion of individuals exposed to M. ulcerans develop clinical disease, as surrounding macrophages may control ... Only a small proportion of individuals exposed to M. ulcerans develop clinical disease, as surrounding macrophages may control ... Altogether, these data reflect the importance of IFNG signaling in early defense against M. ulcerans infection. ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2017.01903/full

Giant plasmid-encoded polyketide synthases produce the macrolide toxin of Mycobacterium ulcerans - InfoscienceGiant plasmid-encoded polyketide synthases produce the macrolide toxin of Mycobacterium ulcerans - Infoscience

This is a previously uncharacterized example of plasmid-mediated virulence in a Mycobacterium, and the emergence of MU as a ... Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), an emerging human pathogen harbored by aquatic insects, is the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, a ... Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), an emerging human pathogen harbored by aquatic insects, is the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, a ... Giant plasmid-encoded polyketide synthases produce the macrolide toxin of Mycobacterium ulcerans Stinear, Timothy P ; Mve- ...
more infohttps://infoscience.epfl.ch/record/151241?ln=en
  • Buruli ulcer is caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans which belongs to the same family of bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB) and leprosy. (idw-online.de)
  • M. ulcerans is found in the environment and, despite considerable research efforts, the mode of transmission of the bacteria to humans remains unclear. (idw-online.de)
  • While respiration of the less sensitive TB bacteria relies on two pathways, with only one being blocked by Q203, M. ulcerans has lost the alternative Q203 resistant pathway and cannot persist for longer times in the presence of the drug. (idw-online.de)
  • Comparison of the M. ulcerans genome with other mycobacterial genomes provided an explanation for why this bacterium is so sensitive to Q203. (idw-online.de)
  • We had previously screened hundreds of compounds that were originally intended for TB drug development and none of the others showed promising activity against Mycobacterium ulcerans," said Gerd Pluschke, Head of the Molecular Immunology Unit at Swiss TPH. (idw-online.de)
  • The strain was unofficially titled under its own species name until it was renamed to be a ecovariation of Mycobacterium ulcerans. (wikipedia.org)
  • 6 ) described the PRA- hsp65 pattern of 1 M. ulcerans strain ATCC 33728 that originated in Japan. (cdc.gov)
  • Possums have been suggested as one of the reservoir of M. ulcerans in south-eastern Australia, where possums ingest M. ulcerans from the environment, amplify them and shed the organism through their faeces. (mdpi.com)
  • Reduced oxygen tension enhanced the growth of M. ulcerans , suggesting that this organism has a preference for microaerobic environments. (asm.org)
  • M. ulcerans is an ubiquitous micro-organism and is harboured by fish, snails, and water insects. (who.int)
  • 5 The World Health Organization now recommends combined antibiotic treatment for 8 weeks as first-line therapy for all M. ulcerans lesions, with surgery reserved to remove necrotic tissue, cover large skin defects and correct deformities. (mja.com.au)
  • Application of this observation may improve rates of isolation of M. ulcerans in primary culture from clinical samples and promote isolation of the bacterium from environmental sources. (asm.org)
  • The congruence of M. ulcerans in the environment and human infection raises the possibility that humans play a role in the ecology of M. ulcerans. (ku.edu)
  • showed enhanced growth of Mycobacterium genavense under microaerophilic conditions ( 16 ). (asm.org)
  • The majority of studies included in this review identified animal reservoirs as predisposing to the emergence and reemergence of M. ulcerans infection. (mdpi.com)
  • Taken together, from the selected studies in this systematic review, it is clear that exotic wildlife and native mammals play a significant role as reservoirs for M. ulcerans. (mdpi.com)
  • M. shinshuense , initially isolated from a child in Japan, is phenotypically and genetically related but biochemically distinct from M. ulcerans ( 3 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Most individuals infected with M. ulcerans initially develop a small, painless, preulcerative skin nodule with larger areas of indurated skin and edema (13). (asmscience.org)
  • In order to respond to the urgent need to develop reliable tools for early case detection and to overcome technical difficulties accompanying the implementation of diagnostic PCR procedures in tropical countries, a dry-reagent-based PCR formulation for the detection of M. ulcerans in diagnostic specimens has been developed at the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine. (asm.org)
  • This study provides the first spatial data on the overlap of M. ulcerans in the environment and BU cases in Benin where case data are based on active surveillance. (ku.edu)
  • These conditions are probably favorable for the development of M. ulcerans, because of the concentration of possible vectors in areas that are frequently visited by humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Results show a significant association between M. ulcerans in environmental samples and Buruli ulcer cases in a village (p = 0.0001). (ku.edu)
  • Prospective observational cohort study of all M. ulcerans cases managed with surgery alone at Barwon Health, a tertiary referral hospital, from 1 January 1998 to 31 December 2011. (mja.com.au)
  • Mycobacterium ulcerans infection: an overview of reported cases globally. (ajtmh.org)
  • Sir Albert Cook, a British missionary doctor appointed at the Mengo Hospital in Kampala, Uganda, first noted the skin ulcer caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans in 1896. (mdpi.com)
  • Of 192 patients with M. ulcerans infection, 50 (26%) had exclusive surgical treatment. (mja.com.au)
  • Using data from an Australian observational cohort of patients with M. ulcerans infection from Victoria's Bellarine Peninsula, we performed a multivariable analysis to further describe risk factors for recurrence after exclusive surgical treatment. (mja.com.au)
  • The precise mode of transmission of M. ulcerans is yet to be elucidated. (mdpi.com)
  • A modified SIR model is used to explain the transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU) and its dependence on arsenic (As) environments. (hindawi.com)