Chemical agents that increase the rate of genetic mutation by interfering with the function of nucleic acids. A clastogen is a specific mutagen that causes breaks in chromosomes.
Tests of chemical substances and physical agents for mutagenic potential. They include microbial, insect, mammalian cell, and whole animal tests.
Agents that reduce the frequency or rate of spontaneous or induced mutations independently of the mechanism involved.
Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.
A nitrosourea compound with alkylating, carcinogenic, and mutagenic properties.
An antineoplastic agent with alkylating properties. It also acts as a mutagen by damaging DNA and is used experimentally for that effect.
Used formerly as antimicrobial food additive. It causes mutations in many cell cultures and may be carcinogenic.
A serotype of Salmonella enterica that is a frequent agent of Salmonella gastroenteritis in humans. It also causes PARATYPHOID FEVER.
The art or practice of preparing food. It includes the preparation of special foods for diets in various diseases.
A potent mutagen and carcinogen. This compound and its metabolite 4-HYDROXYAMINOQUINOLINE-1-OXIDE bind to nucleic acids. It inactivates bacteria but not bacteriophage.
A nitrosoguanidine derivative with potent mutagenic and carcinogenic properties.
The chemical alteration of an exogenous substance by or in a biological system. The alteration may inactivate the compound or it may result in the production of an active metabolite of an inactive parent compound. The alterations may be divided into METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE I and METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE II.
7,8,8a,9a-Tetrahydrobenzo(10,11)chryseno (3,4-b)oxirene-7,8-diol. A benzopyrene derivative with carcinogenic and mutagenic activity.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
A highly fluorescent anti-infective dye used clinically as a topical antiseptic and experimentally as a mutagen, due to its interaction with DNA. It is also used as an intracellular pH indicator.
Ring compounds having atoms other than carbon in their nuclei. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A group of compounds derived from ammonia by substituting organic radicals for the hydrogens. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Carcinogenic substances that are found in the environment.
Induction and quantitative measurement of chromosomal damage leading to the formation of micronuclei (MICRONUCLEI, CHROMOSOME-DEFECTIVE) in cells which have been exposed to genotoxic agents or IONIZING RADIATION.
Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.
Quinolines are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds consisting of a two-nitrogened benzene ring fused to a pyridine ring, which have been synthesized and used as building blocks for various medicinal drugs, particularly antibiotics and antimalarials.
A potent mutagen and carcinogen. It is a public health concern because of its possible effects on industrial workers, as an environmental pollutant, an as a component of tobacco smoke.
A group of pyrido-indole compounds. Included are any points of fusion of pyridine with the five-membered ring of indole and any derivatives of these compounds. These are similar to CARBAZOLES which are benzo-indoles.
The products of chemical reactions that result in the addition of extraneous chemical groups to DNA.
Compounds having the nitro group, -NO2, attached to carbon. When attached to nitrogen they are nitramines and attached to oxygen they are NITRATES.
The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.
Highly reactive chemicals that introduce alkyl radicals into biologically active molecules and thereby prevent their proper functioning. Many are used as antineoplastic agents, but most are very toxic, with carcinogenic, mutagenic, teratogenic, and immunosuppressant actions. They have also been used as components in poison gases.
The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.
1,2-Benzphenanthrenes. POLYCYCLIC COMPOUNDS obtained from coal tar.
A family of diphenylenemethane derivatives.
Potentially toxic, but effective antischistosomal agent, it is a metabolite of LUCANTHONE.
Compounds consisting of two or more fused ring structures.
Injuries to DNA that introduce deviations from its normal, intact structure and which may, if left unrepaired, result in a MUTATION or a block of DNA REPLICATION. These deviations may be caused by physical or chemical agents and occur by natural or unnatural, introduced circumstances. They include the introduction of illegitimate bases during replication or by deamination or other modification of bases; the loss of a base from the DNA backbone leaving an abasic site; single-strand breaks; double strand breaks; and intrastrand (PYRIMIDINE DIMERS) or interstrand crosslinking. Damage can often be repaired (DNA REPAIR). If the damage is extensive, it can induce APOPTOSIS.
An exchange of segments between the sister chromatids of a chromosome, either between the sister chromatids of a meiotic tetrad or between the sister chromatids of a duplicated somatic chromosome. Its frequency is increased by ultraviolet and ionizing radiation and other mutagenic agents and is particularly high in BLOOM SYNDROME.
An alkylating agent in cancer therapy that may also act as a mutagen by interfering with and causing damage to DNA.
The reconstruction of a continuous two-stranded DNA molecule without mismatch from a molecule which contained damaged regions. The major repair mechanisms are excision repair, in which defective regions in one strand are excised and resynthesized using the complementary base pairing information in the intact strand; photoreactivation repair, in which the lethal and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light are eliminated; and post-replication repair, in which the primary lesions are not repaired, but the gaps in one daughter duplex are filled in by incorporation of portions of the other (undamaged) daughter duplex. Excision repair and post-replication repair are sometimes referred to as "dark repair" because they do not require light.
A group of alkylating agents derived from mustard gas, with the sulfur replaced by nitrogen. They were formerly used as toxicants and vesicants, but now function as antineoplastic agents. These compounds are also powerful mutagens, teratogens, immunosuppressants, and carcinogens.
Measurement and evaluation of the components of substances to be taken as FOOD.
Acridines are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds containing two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 3 of a planar, unsaturated ring system, which have been widely used in chemotherapy and have also found applications in dye industries and fluorescence microscopy.
Nitrosoguanidines are organic compounds containing a nitroso group (-NO) and a guanidine group (-R1R2N-CN-), known for their alkylating properties and potential use as therapeutic agents or carcinogenic substances, depending on the specific compound and context.
Abnormal number or structure of chromosomes. Chromosome aberrations may result in CHROMOSOME DISORDERS.
White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.
A potent hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic mycotoxin produced by the Aspergillus flavus group of fungi. It is also mutagenic, teratogenic, and causes immunosuppression in animals. It is found as a contaminant in peanuts, cottonseed meal, corn, and other grains. The mycotoxin requires epoxidation to aflatoxin B1 2,3-oxide for activation. Microsomal monooxygenases biotransform the toxin to the less toxic metabolites aflatoxin M1 and Q1.
A genotoxicological technique for measuring DNA damage in an individual cell using single-cell gel electrophoresis. Cell DNA fragments assume a "comet with tail" formation on electrophoresis and are detected with an image analysis system. Alkaline assay conditions facilitate sensitive detection of single-strand damage.
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum immediately below the visible range and extending into the x-ray frequencies. The longer wavelengths (near-UV or biotic or vital rays) are necessary for the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D and are also called antirachitic rays; the shorter, ionizing wavelengths (far-UV or abiotic or extravital rays) are viricidal, bactericidal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic and are used as disinfectants.
Either of the two longitudinally adjacent threads formed when a eukaryotic chromosome replicates prior to mitosis. The chromatids are held together at the centromere. Sister chromatids are derived from the same chromosome. (Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
Nitrous acid (HNO2). A weak acid that exists only in solution. It can form water-soluble nitrites and stable esters. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
A group of condensed ring hydrocarbons.
A method of measuring the effects of a biologically active substance using an intermediate in vivo or in vitro tissue or cell model under controlled conditions. It includes virulence studies in animal fetuses in utero, mouse convulsion bioassay of insulin, quantitation of tumor-initiator systems in mouse skin, calculation of potentiating effects of a hormonal factor in an isolated strip of contracting stomach muscle, etc.
Four fused benzyl rings with three linear and one angular, that can be viewed as a benzyl-phenanthrenes. Compare with NAPHTHACENES which are four linear rings.
Substances or organisms which pollute the water or bodies of water. Use for water pollutants in general or those for which there is no specific heading.
A subdiscipline of genetics that studies RADIATION EFFECTS on the components and processes of biological inheritance.
Products of the hydrolysis of chlorophylls in which the phytic acid side chain has been removed and the carboxylic acids saponified.
Defective nuclei produced during the TELOPHASE of MITOSIS or MEIOSIS by lagging CHROMOSOMES or chromosome fragments derived from spontaneous or experimentally induced chromosomal structural changes.
Quinoxalines are heterocyclic organic compounds consisting of a benzene fused to a pyrazine ring, which have been studied for their potential antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer properties.
A cytochrome P450 enzyme subtype that has specificity for relatively planar heteroaromatic small molecules, such as CAFFEINE and ACETAMINOPHEN.
Organic compounds that include a cyclic ether with three ring atoms in their structure. They are commonly used as precursors for POLYMERS such as EPOXY RESINS.
A nitrosamine derivative with alkylating, carcinogenic, and mutagenic properties. It causes serious liver damage and is a hepatocarcinogen in rodents.
Substances or energies, for example heat or light, which when introduced into the air, water, or land threaten life or health of individuals or ECOSYSTEMS.
An enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of acetyl groups from ACETYL-COA to arylamines. It can also catalyze acetyl transfer between arylamines without COENZYME A and has a wide specificity for aromatic amines, including SEROTONIN. However, arylamine N-acetyltransferase should not be confused with the enzyme ARYLALKYLAMINE N-ACETYLTRANSFERASE which is also referred to as SEROTONIN ACETYLTRANSFERASE.
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
Penetrating, high-energy electromagnetic radiation emitted from atomic nuclei during NUCLEAR DECAY. The range of wavelengths of emitted radiation is between 0.1 - 100 pm which overlaps the shorter, more energetic hard X-RAYS wavelengths. The distinction between gamma rays and X-rays is based on their radiation source.
Organic salts or esters of methanesulfonic acid.
A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.
Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate and hypoxanthine, guanine, or 6-mercaptopurine to the corresponding 5'-mononucleotides and pyrophosphate. The enzyme is important in purine biosynthesis as well as central nervous system functions. Complete lack of enzyme activity is associated with the LESCH-NYHAN SYNDROME, while partial deficiency results in overproduction of uric acid. EC 2.4.2.8.
Compounds with three aromatic rings in linear arrangement with a SULFUR in the center ring.
Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.
Nitroso compounds are organic or inorganic substances containing the nitroso functional group, which consists of a nitrogen atom bonded to an oxygen atom through a single covalent bond, often abbreviated as -NO.
A major group of unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons containing two or more rings. The vast number of compounds of this important group, derived chiefly from petroleum and coal tar, are rather highly reactive and chemically versatile. The name is due to the strong and not unpleasant odor characteristic of most substances of this nature. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed, p96)
An antischistosomal agent that has become obsolete.
Carcinogenic nitrosamine that may be formed from preservatives in meats during their preparation or in the liver during metabolism.

Assaying potential carcinogens with Drosophila. (1/3817)

Drosophila offers many advantages for the detection of mutagenic activity of carcinogenic agents. It provides the quickest assay system for detecting mutations in animals today. Its generation time is short, and Drosophila is cheap and easy to breed in large numbers. The simple genetic testing methods give unequivocal answers about the whole spectrum of relevant genetic damage. A comparison of the detection capacity of assays sampling different kinds of genetic damage revealed that various substances are highly effective in inducing mutations but do not produce chromosome breakage effects at all, or only at much higher concentrations than those required for mutation induction. Of the different assay systems available, the classical sex-linked recessive lethal test deserves priority, in view of its superior capacity to detect mutagens. Of practical importance is also its high sensitivity, because a large number of loci in one fifth of the genome is tested for newly induced forward mutations, including small deletions. The recent findings that Drosophila is capable of carrying out the same metabolic activation reactions as the mammalian liver makes the organism eminently suitable for verifying results obtained in prescreening with fast microbial assay systems. An additional advantage in this respect is the capacity of Drosophila for detecting short-lived activation products, because intracellular metabolic activation appears to occur within the spermatids and spermatocytes.  (+info)

Carcinogenicity of triethanolamine in mice and its mutagenicity after reaction with sodium nitrite in bacteria. (2/3817)

Mice fed a diet containing 0.3 or 0.03% triethanolamine developed malignant tumors. Females showed a high incidence of tumors in lymphoid tissues, while this type was absent in males. Tumors in other tissues were produced at a considerable rate in both sexes, but no hepatoma was found. Triethanolamine was not mutagenic to Bacillus subtilis by itself, but it became mutagenic after reacting with sodium nitrite under acidic conditions or when the mixture was heated. Although N-nitrosodiethanolamine, a known carcinogen and mutagen, was detected in the reaction mixture by thin-layer chromatography, it may not be the main mutagenic product, because the product was a stable and direct mutagen and its mutagenic activity was destroyed by liver enzymes, unlike N-nitrosodiethanolamine. The lethal and mutagenic DNA damages produced by this unidentified product were susceptible to some extent to the repair functions of the bacteria.  (+info)

Phosphorylation of the DNA repair protein APE/REF-1 by CKII affects redox regulation of AP-1. (3/3817)

The DNA repair protein apurinic endonuclease (APE/Ref-1) exerts several physiological functions such as cleavage of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites and redox regulation of the transcription factor AP-1, whose activation is part of the cellular response to DNA damaging treatments. Here we demonstrate that APE/Ref-1 is phosphorylated by casein kinase II (CKII). This was shown for both the recombinant APE/Ref-1 protein (Km=0.55 mM) and for APE/Ref-1 expressed in COS cells. Phosphorylation of APE/Ref-1 did not alter the repair activity of the enzyme, whereas it stimulated its redox capability towards AP-1, thus promoting DNA binding activity of AP-1. Inhibition of CKII mediated phosphorylation of APE/Ref-1 blocked mutagen-stimulated increase in AP-1 binding. It also abrogated the induction of c-Jun protein and rendered cells more sensitive to induced DNA damage. Thus, phosphorylation of APE/Ref-1 appears to be involved in regulating the different physiological activities of the enzyme. CKII mediated phosphorylation of APE/Ref-1 and concomitant increase in AP-1 binding activity appears to be a novel mechanism of cellular stress response, forcing transcription of AP-1 target gene(s) the product(s) of which may exert protective function.  (+info)

Telomeric repeats on small polydisperse circular DNA (spcDNA) and genomic instability. (4/3817)

Small polydisperse circular DNA (spcDNA) is a heterogeneous population of extrachromosomal circular molecules present in a large variety of eukaryotic cells. Elevated amounts of total spcDNA are related to endogenous and induced genomic instability in rodent and human cells. We suggested spcDNA as a novel marker for genomic instability, and speculated that spcDNA might serve as a mutator. In this study, we examine the presence of telomeric sequences on spcDNA. We report for the first time the appearance of telomeric repeats in spcDNA molecules (tel-spcDNA) in rodent and human cells. Restriction enzyme analysis indicates that tel-spcDNA molecules harbor mostly, if not exclusively, telomeric repeats. In rodent cells, tel-spcDNA levels are higher in transformed than in normal cells and are enhanced by treatment with carcinogen. Tel-spcDNA is also detected in some human tumors and cell lines, but not in others. We suggest, that its levels in human cells may be primarily related to the amount of the chromosomal telomeric sequences. Tel-spcDNA may serve as a unique mutator, through specific mechanisms related to the telomeric repeats, which distinguish it from the total heterogeneous spcDNA population. It may affect telomere dynamics and genomic instability by clastogenic events, alterations of telomere size and sequestration of telomeric proteins.  (+info)

The effect of cotinine or cigarette smoke co-administration on the formation of O6-methylguanine adducts in the lung and liver of A/J mice treated with 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) (5/3817)

4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), a tobacco-specific nitrosamine, induces lung adenomas in A/J mice, following a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. However, inhalation of tobacco smoke has not induced or promoted tumors in these mice. NNK-induced lung tumorigenesis is thought to involve O6-methylguanine (O6MeG) formation, leading to GC-->AT transitional mispairing and an activation of the K-ras proto-oncogene in the A/J mouse. NNK can be metabolized by several different cytochromes P450, resulting in a number of metabolites. Formation of the promutagenic DNA adduct O6MeG is believed to require metabolic activation of NNK by cytochrome P450-mediated alpha-hydroxylation of the methylene group adjacent to the N-nitroso nitrogen to yield the unstable intermediate, methanediazohydroxide. Nicotine, cotinine (the major metabolite of nicotine), and aqueous cigarette tar extract (ACTE) have all been shown to effectively inhibit metabolic activation of NNK to its mutagenic form, most likely due to competitive inhibition of the cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in alpha-hydroxylation of NNK. The objective of the current study was to monitor the effects of cotinine and cigarette smoke (CS) on the formation of O6MeG in target tissues of mice during the acute phase of NNK treatment. To test the effect of cotinine, mature female A/J mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of NNK (0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, or 10 mumole/mouse) with cotinine administered at a total dose of 50 mumole/mouse in 3 separate i.p. injections, administered 30 min before, immediately after, and 30 min after NNK treatment. To test the effect of whole smoke exposure on NNK-related O6MeG formation, mice were exposed to smoke generated from Kentucky 1R4F reference cigarettes at 0, 0.4, 0.6, or 0.8 mg wet total particulate matter/liter (WTPM/L) for 2 h, with a single i.p. injection of NNK (0, 3.75, or 7.5 mumole/mouse) midway through the exposure. Cigarette smoke alone failed to yield detectable levels of O6MeG. The number of O6MeG adducts following i.p. injection of NNK was significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in both lung and liver by cotinine and by cigarette smoke exposure. Our results demonstrate that NNK-induced O6MeG DNA adducts in A/J mice are significantly reduced when NNK is administered together with either cotinine, the major metabolite of nicotine, or the parental complex mixture, cigarette smoke.  (+info)

Direct selection for mutators in Escherichia coli. (6/3817)

We have constructed strains that allow a direct selection for mutators of Escherichia coli on a single plate medium. The plate selection is based on using two different markers whose reversion is enhanced by a given mutator. Plates containing limiting amounts of each respective nutrient allow the growth of ghost colonies or microcolonies that give rise to full-size colonies only if a reversion event occurs. Because two successive mutational events are required, mutator cells are favored to generate full-size colonies. Reversion of a third marker allows direct visualization of the mutator phenotype by the large number of blue papillae in the full-size colonies. We also describe plate selections involving three successive nutrient markers followed by a fourth papillation step. Different frameshift or base substitution mutations are used to select for mismatch-repair-defective strains (mutHLS and uvrD). We can detect and monitor mutator cells arising spontaneously, at frequencies lower than 10(-5) in the population. Also, we can measure a mutator cascade, in which one type of mutator (mutT) generates a second mutator (mutHLS) that then allows stepwise frameshift mutations. We discuss the relevance of mutators arising on a single medium as a result of cells overcoming successive growth barriers to the development and progression of cancerous tumors, some of which are mutator cell lines.  (+info)

Reverse genetic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans presenilins reveals redundant but unequal roles for sel-12 and hop-1 in Notch-pathway signaling. (7/3817)

Mutations in the human presenilin genes PS1 and PS2 cause early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans and in mice indicate that one function of presenilin genes is to facilitate Notch-pathway signaling. Notably, mutations in the C. elegans presenilin gene sel-12 reduce signaling through an activated version of the Notch receptor LIN-12. To investigate the function of a second C. elegans presenilin gene hop-1 and to examine possible genetic interactions between hop-1 and sel-12, we used a reverse genetic strategy to isolate deletion alleles of both loci. Animals bearing both hop-1 and sel-12 deletions displayed new phenotypes not observed in animals bearing either single deletion. These new phenotypes-germ-line proliferation defects, maternal-effect embryonic lethality, and somatic gonad defects-resemble those resulting from a reduction in signaling through the C. elegans Notch receptors GLP-1 and LIN-12. Thus SEL-12 and HOP-1 appear to function redundantly in promoting Notch-pathway signaling. Phenotypic analyses of hop-1 and sel-12 single and double mutant animals suggest that sel-12 provides more presenilin function than does hop-1.  (+info)

Functional analysis of the promoter of the yeast SNQ2 gene encoding a multidrug resistance transporter that confers the resistance to 4-nitroquinoline N-oxide. (8/3817)

The yeast gene SNQ2, which encodes a multidrug resistance ABC superfamily protein, is required for resistance to the mutagen 4-nitroquinoline N-oxide (4-NQO). The expression of the SNQ2 gene is under the control of a regulatory network that involves the transcription factor Yrr1p, as well as Pdr1p/Pdr3p (Cui et al., Mol. Microbiol., 29, 1307-1315 (1998)). By 5'-deletion analysis of the promoter by using SNQ2-lacZ fusion constructs, four regions: -745 to -639 (region I), -639 to -578 (region II), -548 to -533 (region III) and -533 to -485 (region IV) were found to be important for SNQ2 expression. Genetic analysis suggested that the site in region IV was responsible for the Yrr1p-mediated SNQ2 expression. A consensus motif known for the binding of Pdr1p/Pdr3p (PDRE) was not found in region IV.  (+info)

Mutagens are physical or chemical agents that can cause permanent changes in the structure of genetic material, including DNA and chromosomes, leading to mutations. These mutations can be passed down to future generations and may increase the risk of cancer and other diseases. Examples of mutagens include ultraviolet (UV) radiation, tobacco smoke, and certain chemicals found in industrial settings. It is important to note that not all mutations are harmful, but some can have negative effects on health and development.

Mutagenicity tests are a type of laboratory assays used to identify agents that can cause genetic mutations. These tests detect changes in the DNA of organisms, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, after exposure to potential mutagens. The most commonly used mutagenicity test is the Ames test, which uses a strain of Salmonella bacteria that is sensitive to mutagens. If a chemical causes an increase in the number of revertants (reversion to the wild type) in the bacterial population, it is considered to be a mutagen. Other tests include the mouse lymphoma assay and the chromosomal aberration test. These tests are used to evaluate the potential genotoxicity of chemicals and are an important part of the safety evaluation process for new drugs, chemicals, and other substances.

Antimutagenic agents are substances that prevent or reduce the frequency of mutations in DNA, which can be caused by various factors such as radiation, chemicals, and free radicals. These agents work by preventing the formation of mutations or by repairing the damage already done to the DNA. They can be found naturally in foods, such as antioxidants, or they can be synthesized in a laboratory. Antimutagenic agents have potential use in cancer prevention and treatment, as well as in reducing the negative effects of environmental mutagens.

Carcinogens are agents (substances or mixtures of substances) that can cause cancer. They may be naturally occurring or man-made. Carcinogens can increase the risk of cancer by altering cellular DNA, disrupting cellular function, or promoting cell growth. Examples of carcinogens include certain chemicals found in tobacco smoke, asbestos, UV radiation from the sun, and some viruses.

It's important to note that not all exposures to carcinogens will result in cancer, and the risk typically depends on factors such as the level and duration of exposure, individual genetic susceptibility, and lifestyle choices. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies carcinogens into different groups based on the strength of evidence linking them to cancer:

Group 1: Carcinogenic to humans
Group 2A: Probably carcinogenic to humans
Group 2B: Possibly carcinogenic to humans
Group 3: Not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans
Group 4: Probably not carcinogenic to humans

This information is based on medical research and may be subject to change as new studies become available. Always consult a healthcare professional for medical advice.

Ethylnitrosourea (ENU) is an alkylating agent, which is a type of chemical compound that has the ability to interact with and modify the structure of DNA. It is commonly used in laboratory research as a mutagen, which is a substance that increases the frequency of mutations or changes in the genetic material of organisms.

ENU is known to cause point mutations, which are small changes in the DNA sequence that can lead to alterations in the function of genes. This property makes ENU a valuable tool for studying gene function and for creating animal models of human diseases caused by genetic mutations.

It is important to note that ENU is a potent carcinogen, meaning it can cause cancer, and should be handled with care in laboratory settings. It is not used as a medical treatment in humans or animals.

Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) is an alkylating agent that is commonly used as a mutagen in genetic research. It works by introducing point mutations into the DNA of organisms, which can then be studied to understand the function of specific genes. EMS modifies DNA by transferring an ethyl group (-C2H5) to the oxygen atom of guanine bases, leading to mispairing during DNA replication and resulting in a high frequency of GC to AT transitions. It is highly toxic and mutagenic, and appropriate safety precautions must be taken when handling this chemical.

Furylfuramide is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a chemical compound that has been used in research and industry. It's a type of antimicrobial agent known as an nitrofuran derivative. However, it is not commonly used in clinical medicine due to concerns about its potential toxicity and the development of resistance in bacteria.

In a medical context, Furylfuramide might be mentioned in relation to laboratory research or in discussions of historical uses of antimicrobial agents. It's important to note that the use of this compound in medicine is not widespread and has largely been replaced by other more effective and safer treatments.

"Salmonella enterica" serovar "Typhimurium" is a subspecies of the bacterial species Salmonella enterica, which is a gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium. It is a common cause of foodborne illness in humans and animals worldwide. The bacteria can be found in a variety of sources, including contaminated food and water, raw meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products.

The infection caused by Salmonella Typhimurium is typically self-limiting and results in gastroenteritis, which is characterized by symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, fever, and vomiting. However, in some cases, the infection can spread to other parts of the body and cause more severe illness, particularly in young children, older adults, and people with weakened immune systems.

Salmonella Typhimurium is a major public health concern due to its ability to cause outbreaks of foodborne illness, as well as its potential to develop antibiotic resistance. Proper food handling, preparation, and storage practices can help prevent the spread of Salmonella Typhimurium and other foodborne pathogens.

"Cooking" is not a medical term, but it generally refers to the process of preparing and cooking food. In a medical or nutritional context, "cooking" may refer to the application of heat to food in order to make it safe and more palatable to eat, as well as to improve its nutritional value and digestibility.

Cooking can also have an impact on the nutrient content of food. For example, cooking certain vegetables can increase their bioavailability, or the amount of a nutrient that is available for absorption by the body. On the other hand, cooking some foods at high temperatures or for long periods of time can lead to the loss of certain nutrients, such as vitamins C and B.

It's important to note that the way food is cooked can also affect its safety. For example, undercooked meat, poultry, and seafood can harbor harmful bacteria, such as Salmonella and E. coli, which can cause foodborne illness. It's essential to cook these foods thoroughly to reduce the risk of infection.

In summary, while "cooking" is not a medical term, it has important implications for food safety, nutrition, and digestion.

4-Nitroquinoline-1-oxide is a chemical compound that is often used in laboratory research as a carcinogenic agent. Its molecular formula is C6H4N2O3, and it is known to cause DNA damage and mutations, which can lead to the development of cancer. It is primarily used in scientific research to study the mechanisms of carcinogenesis and to test the effectiveness of potential cancer treatments.

It is important to note that 4-Nitroquinoline-1-oxide is not a medication or a treatment for any medical condition, and it should only be handled by trained professionals in a controlled laboratory setting.

Methylnitronitrosoguanidine (MNNG) is not typically referred to as a medical term, but it is a chemical compound with potential implications in medical research and toxicology. Therefore, I will provide you with a general definition of this compound.

Methylnitronitrosoguanidine (C2H6N4O2), also known as MNNG or nitroso-guanidine, is a nitrosamine compound used primarily in laboratory research. It is an alkylating agent, which means it can introduce alkyl groups into other molecules through chemical reactions. In this case, MNNG is particularly reactive towards DNA and RNA, making it a potent mutagen and carcinogen.

MNNG has been used in research to study the mechanisms of carcinogenesis (the development of cancer) and mutations at the molecular level. However, due to its high toxicity and potential for causing damage to genetic material, its use is strictly regulated and typically limited to laboratory settings.

Biotransformation is the metabolic modification of a chemical compound, typically a xenobiotic (a foreign chemical substance found within an living organism), by a biological system. This process often involves enzymatic conversion of the parent compound to one or more metabolites, which may be more or less active, toxic, or mutagenic than the original substance.

In the context of pharmacology and toxicology, biotransformation is an important aspect of drug metabolism and elimination from the body. The liver is the primary site of biotransformation, but other organs such as the kidneys, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract can also play a role.

Biotransformation can occur in two phases: phase I reactions involve functionalization of the parent compound through oxidation, reduction, or hydrolysis, while phase II reactions involve conjugation of the metabolite with endogenous molecules such as glucuronic acid, sulfate, or acetate to increase its water solubility and facilitate excretion.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Aminacrine is a type of medication known as an antineoplastic agent or chemotherapeutic drug. It is primarily used in the treatment of certain types of cancer. Aminacrine works by interfering with the DNA replication process within cancer cells, which helps to inhibit the growth and proliferation of these cells.

The chemical name for aminacrine is 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride monohydrate. It has a yellowish crystalline appearance and is typically administered intravenously in a hospital setting. Common side effects of aminacrine include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, mouth sores, and hair loss. More serious side effects can include heart rhythm abnormalities, seizures, and lung or kidney damage.

It's important to note that the use of aminacrine is typically reserved for cases where other cancer treatments have not been effective, due to its potential for serious side effects. As with all medications, it should be used under the close supervision of a healthcare professional.

Heterocyclic compounds are organic compounds that contain at least one atom within the ring structure, other than carbon, such as nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur or phosphorus. These compounds make up a large class of naturally occurring and synthetic materials, including many drugs, pigments, vitamins, and antibiotics. The presence of the heteroatom in the ring can have significant effects on the physical and chemical properties of the compound, such as its reactivity, stability, and bonding characteristics. Examples of heterocyclic compounds include pyridine, pyrimidine, and furan.

Amines are organic compounds that contain a basic nitrogen atom with a lone pair of electrons. They are derived from ammonia (NH3) by replacing one or more hydrogen atoms with alkyl or aryl groups. The nomenclature of amines follows the substitutive type, where the parent compound is named as an aliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbon, and the functional group "amine" is designated as a suffix or prefix.

Amines are classified into three types based on the number of carbon atoms attached to the nitrogen atom:

1. Primary (1°) amines: One alkyl or aryl group is attached to the nitrogen atom.
2. Secondary (2°) amines: Two alkyl or aryl groups are attached to the nitrogen atom.
3. Tertiary (3°) amines: Three alkyl or aryl groups are attached to the nitrogen atom.

Quaternary ammonium salts have four organic groups attached to the nitrogen atom and a positive charge, with anions balancing the charge.

Amines have a wide range of applications in the chemical industry, including pharmaceuticals, dyes, polymers, and solvents. They also play a significant role in biological systems as neurotransmitters, hormones, and cell membrane components.

Carcinogens are agents that can cause cancer. According to the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), environmental carcinogens refer to "cancer-causing agents that people encounter in their daily lives, including substances or exposures in air, water, food, and in the workplace." These carcinogens can increase the risk of cancer by damaging DNA or interfering with cellular processes that control growth.

Examples of environmental carcinogens include:

* Air pollution: Certain pollutants in the air, such as diesel exhaust particles and secondhand smoke, have been linked to an increased risk of lung cancer.
* Radon: A naturally occurring radioactive gas that can accumulate in homes and other buildings, radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States.
* UV radiation: Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning beds can lead to skin cancer.
* Certain chemicals: Some chemicals found in the workplace or in consumer products, such as asbestos, benzene, and vinyl chloride, have been linked to an increased risk of cancer.
* Infectious agents: Certain viruses, bacteria, and parasites can increase the risk of cancer. For example, human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major cause of cervical cancer, and hepatitis B and C viruses are leading causes of liver cancer.

It's important to note that exposure to environmental carcinogens does not guarantee that a person will develop cancer. The risk depends on many factors, including the level and duration of exposure, as well as individual susceptibility. However, reducing exposure to these agents can help reduce the overall risk of cancer.

A micronucleus test is a type of genetic toxicology assay used to detect the presence of micronuclei in cells, which are small chromosomal fragments or whole chromosomes that have been missegregated during cell division. The test measures the frequency of micronuclei in cells exposed to a potential genotoxic agent, such as a chemical or radiation, and compares it to the frequency in untreated control cells.

The assay is typically performed on cultured mammalian cells, such as human lymphocytes or Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and involves exposing the cells to the test agent for a specific period of time, followed by staining and examination of the cells under a microscope. The micronuclei are identified based on their size, shape, and staining characteristics, and the frequency of micronucleated cells is calculated as a measure of genotoxic potential.

Micronucleus tests are widely used in regulatory toxicology to assess the genetic safety of chemicals, drugs, and other substances, and can provide valuable information on potential risks to human health. The test is also used in basic research to study the mechanisms of genotoxicity and chromosomal instability.

Mutagenesis is the process by which the genetic material (DNA or RNA) of an organism is changed in a way that can alter its phenotype, or observable traits. These changes, known as mutations, can be caused by various factors such as chemicals, radiation, or viruses. Some mutations may have no effect on the organism, while others can cause harm, including diseases and cancer. Mutagenesis is a crucial area of study in genetics and molecular biology, with implications for understanding evolution, genetic disorders, and the development of new medical treatments.

Quinolines are a class of organic compounds that consist of a bicyclic structure made up of a benzene ring fused to a piperidine ring. They have a wide range of applications, but they are perhaps best known for their use in the synthesis of various medications, including antibiotics and antimalarial drugs.

Quinolone antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, work by inhibiting the bacterial enzymes involved in DNA replication and repair. They are commonly used to treat a variety of bacterial infections, including urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and skin infections.

Quinoline-based antimalarial drugs, such as chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, work by inhibiting the parasite's ability to digest hemoglobin in the red blood cells. They are commonly used to prevent and treat malaria.

It is important to note that quinolines have been associated with serious side effects, including tendinitis and tendon rupture, nerve damage, and abnormal heart rhythms. As with any medication, it is important to use quinolines only under the supervision of a healthcare provider, and to follow their instructions carefully.

Carbolines are a type of chemical compound that contain a carbazole or dibenzopyrrole structure. These compounds have a variety of uses, including as pharmaceuticals and dyes. Some carbolines have been studied for their potential medicinal properties, such as their ability to act as antioxidants or to inhibit the growth of certain types of cells. However, it is important to note that many carbolines are also known to be toxic and can cause harm if ingested or otherwise introduced into the body. As with any chemical compound, it is essential to use caution when handling carbolines and to follow all safety guidelines to minimize the risk of exposure.

DNA adducts are chemical modifications or alterations that occur when DNA molecules become attached to or bound with certain harmful substances, such as toxic chemicals or carcinogens. These attachments can disrupt the normal structure and function of the DNA, potentially leading to mutations, genetic damage, and an increased risk of cancer and other diseases.

DNA adducts are formed when a reactive molecule from a chemical agent binds covalently to a base in the DNA molecule. This process can occur either spontaneously or as a result of exposure to environmental toxins, such as those found in tobacco smoke, certain industrial chemicals, and some medications.

The formation of DNA adducts is often used as a biomarker for exposure to harmful substances, as well as an indicator of potential health risks associated with that exposure. Researchers can measure the levels of specific DNA adducts in biological samples, such as blood or urine, to assess the extent and duration of exposure to certain chemicals or toxins.

It's important to note that not all DNA adducts are necessarily harmful, and some may even play a role in normal cellular processes. However, high levels of certain DNA adducts have been linked to an increased risk of cancer and other diseases, making them a focus of ongoing research and investigation.

Nitro compounds, also known as nitro derivatives or nitro aromatics, are organic compounds that contain the nitro group (-NO2) bonded to an aromatic hydrocarbon ring. They are named as such because they contain a nitrogen atom in a -3 oxidation state and are typically prepared by the nitration of aromatic compounds using nitric acid or a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids.

Nitro compounds have significant importance in organic chemistry due to their versatile reactivity, which allows for various chemical transformations. They can serve as useful intermediates in the synthesis of other chemical products, including dyes, pharmaceuticals, and explosives. However, some nitro compounds can also be hazardous, with potential health effects such as skin and respiratory irritation, and they may pose environmental concerns due to their persistence and potential toxicity.

It is important to handle nitro compounds with care, following appropriate safety guidelines and regulations, to minimize risks associated with their use.

In a medical context, "meat" generally refers to the flesh of animals that is consumed as food. This includes muscle tissue, as well as fat and other tissues that are often found in meat products. However, it's worth noting that some people may have dietary restrictions or medical conditions that prevent them from consuming meat, so it's always important to consider individual preferences and needs when discussing food options.

It's also worth noting that the consumption of meat can have both positive and negative health effects. On the one hand, meat is a good source of protein, iron, vitamin B12, and other essential nutrients. On the other hand, consuming large amounts of red and processed meats has been linked to an increased risk of heart disease, stroke, and certain types of cancer. Therefore, it's generally recommended to consume meat in moderation as part of a balanced diet.

Alkylating agents are a class of chemotherapy drugs that work by alkylating, or adding an alkyl group to, DNA molecules. This process can damage the DNA and prevent cancer cells from dividing and growing. Alkylating agents are often used to treat various types of cancer, including Hodgkin's lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and solid tumors. Examples of alkylating agents include cyclophosphamide, melphalan, and chlorambucil. These drugs can have significant side effects, including nausea, vomiting, hair loss, and an increased risk of infection. They can also cause long-term damage to the heart, lungs, and reproductive system.

Food contamination is the presence of harmful microorganisms, chemicals, or foreign substances in food or water that can cause illness or injury to individuals who consume it. This can occur at any stage during production, processing, storage, or preparation of food, and can result from various sources such as:

1. Biological contamination: This includes the presence of harmful bacteria, viruses, parasites, or fungi that can cause foodborne illnesses. Examples include Salmonella, E. coli, Listeria, and norovirus.

2. Chemical contamination: This involves the introduction of hazardous chemicals into food, which may occur due to poor handling practices, improper storage, or exposure to environmental pollutants. Common sources of chemical contamination include pesticides, cleaning solvents, heavy metals, and natural toxins produced by certain plants or fungi.

3. Physical contamination: This refers to the presence of foreign objects in food, such as glass, plastic, hair, or insects, which can pose a choking hazard or introduce harmful substances into the body.

Preventing food contamination is crucial for ensuring food safety and protecting public health. Proper hygiene practices, temperature control, separation of raw and cooked foods, and regular inspections are essential measures to minimize the risk of food contamination.

Chrysenes are a group of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are found in the environment as a result of both natural processes and human activities such as combustion of fossil fuels, waste incineration, and cigarette smoke. They consist of four fused benzene rings and are highly stable, making them persistent in the environment. Chrysenes have been shown to have potential toxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic effects on living organisms, including humans. They can accumulate in the food chain and pose a risk to human health through exposure via contaminated air, water, and food.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Fluorenes" is not a medical term, but rather a chemical term referring to organic compounds that contain a fluorene moiety, which is a bicyclic compound made up of two benzene rings fused to a five-membered ring containing two carbon atoms and one double bond.

Fluorenes have various applications in the field of materials science, including organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), organic photovoltaics (OPVs), and organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). They are not typically used in a medical context, although some fluorene derivatives have been explored for potential therapeutic applications.

Therefore, I cannot provide a medical definition of "Fluorenes." However, if you have any questions about the chemical properties or applications of fluorenes, I would be happy to try and answer them.

Hycanthone is not generally considered a medical term, but it is a chemical compound that has been used in medical research and treatment. Hycanthone is a synthetic anti-schistosomal drug, which means it was developed to treat Schistosoma parasitic worm infections, such as schistosomiasis (also known as bilharzia or snail fever).

The substance works by inhibiting the DNA synthesis of the parasite, ultimately leading to its death. However, due to its toxicity and limited therapeutic window, hycanthone is no longer used in clinical settings. It is primarily mentioned in scientific literature related to parasitology and drug development.

Medical definitions typically focus on the relevance of a term to medicine or healthcare, so here's a medical perspective on polycyclic compounds:

Polycyclic compounds are organic substances that contain two or more chemical rings in their structure. While not all polycyclic compounds are relevant to medicine, some can have significant medical implications. For instance, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a type of polycyclic compound that can be found in tobacco smoke and certain types of air pollution. PAHs have been linked to an increased risk of cancer, particularly lung cancer, due to their ability to damage DNA.

Another example is the class of drugs called steroids, which include hormones like cortisol and sex hormones like testosterone and estrogen. These compounds are polycyclic because they contain several interconnected rings in their structure. Steroid medications are used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including inflammation, asthma, and Addison's disease.

In summary, while not all polycyclic compounds are relevant to medicine, some can have important medical implications, either as harmful environmental pollutants or as useful therapeutic agents.

DNA damage refers to any alteration in the structure or composition of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), which is the genetic material present in cells. DNA damage can result from various internal and external factors, including environmental exposures such as ultraviolet radiation, tobacco smoke, and certain chemicals, as well as normal cellular processes such as replication and oxidative metabolism.

Examples of DNA damage include base modifications, base deletions or insertions, single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks, and crosslinks between the two strands of the DNA helix. These types of damage can lead to mutations, genomic instability, and chromosomal aberrations, which can contribute to the development of diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and aging-related conditions.

The body has several mechanisms for repairing DNA damage, including base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, and double-strand break repair. However, if the damage is too extensive or the repair mechanisms are impaired, the cell may undergo apoptosis (programmed cell death) to prevent the propagation of potentially harmful mutations.

Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) is a type of genetic recombination that takes place between two identical sister chromatids during the DNA repair process in meiosis or mitosis. It results in an exchange of genetic material between the two chromatids, creating a new combination of genes on each chromatid. This event is a normal part of cell division and helps to increase genetic variability within a population. However, an increased rate of SCEs can also be indicative of exposure to certain genotoxic agents or conditions that cause DNA damage.

Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) is not a medication, but rather a chemical compound with the formula CH3SO3CH3. It's an alkylating agent that is used in laboratory settings for various research purposes, including as a methylating agent in biochemical and genetic studies.

MMS works by transferring its methyl group (CH3) to other molecules, which can result in the modification of DNA and other biological macromolecules. This property makes it useful in laboratory research, but it also means that MMS is highly reactive and toxic. Therefore, it must be handled with care and appropriate safety precautions.

It's important to note that MMS is not used as a therapeutic agent in medicine due to its high toxicity and potential to cause serious harm if mishandled or misused.

DNA repair is the process by which cells identify and correct damage to the DNA molecules that encode their genome. DNA can be damaged by a variety of internal and external factors, such as radiation, chemicals, and metabolic byproducts. If left unrepaired, this damage can lead to mutations, which may in turn lead to cancer and other diseases.

There are several different mechanisms for repairing DNA damage, including:

1. Base excision repair (BER): This process repairs damage to a single base in the DNA molecule. An enzyme called a glycosylase removes the damaged base, leaving a gap that is then filled in by other enzymes.
2. Nucleotide excision repair (NER): This process repairs more severe damage, such as bulky adducts or crosslinks between the two strands of the DNA molecule. An enzyme cuts out a section of the damaged DNA, and the gap is then filled in by other enzymes.
3. Mismatch repair (MMR): This process repairs errors that occur during DNA replication, such as mismatched bases or small insertions or deletions. Specialized enzymes recognize the error and remove a section of the newly synthesized strand, which is then replaced by new nucleotides.
4. Double-strand break repair (DSBR): This process repairs breaks in both strands of the DNA molecule. There are two main pathways for DSBR: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ directly rejoins the broken ends, while HR uses a template from a sister chromatid to repair the break.

Overall, DNA repair is a crucial process that helps maintain genome stability and prevent the development of diseases caused by genetic mutations.

Nitrogen mustard compounds are a group of chemical agents that have been used historically as chemotherapy drugs and also have potential as military chemical warfare agents. They are alkylating agents, which means they work by modifying DNA in such a way that it can no longer replicate properly, leading to cell death.

In the medical context, nitrogen mustard compounds are used to treat certain types of cancer, including Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. They may also be used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia, multiple myeloma, and other cancers.

The most common nitrogen mustard compounds used in medicine are mechlorethamine, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and melphalan. These drugs are typically administered intravenously or orally, and their use is carefully monitored to minimize side effects such as nausea, vomiting, hair loss, and suppression of the immune system.

It's worth noting that nitrogen mustard compounds can also be highly toxic and dangerous if used as chemical warfare agents. They can cause severe respiratory, skin, and eye damage, as well as potentially fatal systemic effects.

"Food analysis" is not a medical term per se, but it falls under the broader field of food science and nutrition. Food analysis refers to the laboratory methods and techniques used to determine the composition and quality of food products. This can include testing for nutrients (such as proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals), contaminants (like heavy metals, pesticides, or allergens), and other components that may affect the safety, quality, or authenticity of food.

The results of food analysis can be used to ensure compliance with regulatory standards, develop new food products, assess the nutritional value of diets, investigate food-borne illnesses, and monitor trends in food consumption. While not a medical definition, food analysis is an important tool for promoting public health and preventing diet-related diseases.

Acridines are a class of heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds that contain a nucleus of three fused benzene rings and a nitrogen atom. They have a wide range of applications, including in the development of chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer and antibacterial, antifungal, and antiparasitic drugs. Some acridines also exhibit fluorescent properties and are used in research and diagnostic applications.

In medicine, some acridine derivatives have been found to intercalate with DNA, disrupting its structure and function, which can lead to the death of cancer cells. For example, the acridine derivative proflavin has been used as an antiseptic and in the treatment of certain types of cancer. However, many acridines also have toxic side effects, limiting their clinical use.

It is important to note that while acridines have potential therapeutic uses, they should only be used under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional, as they can cause harm if not used properly.

Nitrosoguanidines are a type of organic compound that contain a nitroso (NO) group and a guanidine group. They are known to be potent nitrosating agents, which means they can release nitrous acid or related nitrosating species. Nitrosation is a reaction that leads to the formation of N-nitroso compounds, some of which have been associated with an increased risk of cancer in humans. Therefore, nitrosoguanidines are often used in laboratory studies to investigate the mechanisms of nitrosation and the effects of N-nitroso compounds on biological systems. However, they are not typically used as therapeutic agents due to their potential carcinogenicity.

Chromosome aberrations refer to structural and numerical changes in the chromosomes that can occur spontaneously or as a result of exposure to mutagenic agents. These changes can affect the genetic material encoded in the chromosomes, leading to various consequences such as developmental abnormalities, cancer, or infertility.

Structural aberrations include deletions, duplications, inversions, translocations, and rings, which result from breaks and rearrangements of chromosome segments. Numerical aberrations involve changes in the number of chromosomes, such as aneuploidy (extra or missing chromosomes) or polyploidy (multiples of a complete set of chromosomes).

Chromosome aberrations can be detected and analyzed using various cytogenetic techniques, including karyotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). These methods allow for the identification and characterization of chromosomal changes at the molecular level, providing valuable information for genetic counseling, diagnosis, and research.

Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell that is an essential part of the immune system. They are responsible for recognizing and responding to potentially harmful substances such as viruses, bacteria, and other foreign invaders. There are two main types of lymphocytes: B-lymphocytes (B-cells) and T-lymphocytes (T-cells).

B-lymphocytes produce antibodies, which are proteins that help to neutralize or destroy foreign substances. When a B-cell encounters a foreign substance, it becomes activated and begins to divide and differentiate into plasma cells, which produce and secrete large amounts of antibodies. These antibodies bind to the foreign substance, marking it for destruction by other immune cells.

T-lymphocytes, on the other hand, are involved in cell-mediated immunity. They directly attack and destroy infected cells or cancerous cells. T-cells can also help to regulate the immune response by producing chemical signals that activate or inhibit other immune cells.

Lymphocytes are produced in the bone marrow and mature in either the bone marrow (B-cells) or the thymus gland (T-cells). They circulate throughout the body in the blood and lymphatic system, where they can be found in high concentrations in lymph nodes, the spleen, and other lymphoid organs.

Abnormalities in the number or function of lymphocytes can lead to a variety of immune-related disorders, including immunodeficiency diseases, autoimmune disorders, and cancer.

Aflatoxin B1 is a toxic metabolite produced by certain strains of the fungus Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. It is a potent carcinogen and is classified as a Group 1 carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Aflatoxin B1 contamination can occur in a variety of agricultural products, including grains, nuts, spices, and dried fruits, and is a particular concern in regions with hot and humid climates. Exposure to aflatoxin B1 can occur through the consumption of contaminated food and has been linked to various health effects, including liver cancer, immune suppression, and stunted growth in children.

The Comet Assay, also known as single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE), is a sensitive method used to detect and measure DNA damage at the level of individual cells. The assay gets its name from the comet-like shape that formed DNA fragments migrate towards the anode during electrophoresis, creating a "tail" that represents the damaged DNA.

In this assay, cells are embedded in low melting point agarose on a microscope slide and then lysed to remove the cell membranes and histones, leaving the DNA intact. The slides are then subjected to electrophoresis under neutral or alkaline conditions, which causes the negatively charged DNA fragments to migrate out of the nucleus towards the anode. After staining with a DNA-binding dye, the slides are visualized under a fluorescence microscope and the degree of DNA damage is quantified by measuring the length and intensity of the comet "tail."

The Comet Assay is widely used in genetic toxicology to assess the genotoxic potential of chemicals, drugs, and environmental pollutants. It can also be used to measure DNA repair capacity and oxidative DNA damage.

According to the medical definition, ultraviolet (UV) rays are invisible radiations that fall in the range of the electromagnetic spectrum between 100-400 nanometers. UV rays are further divided into three categories: UVA (320-400 nm), UVB (280-320 nm), and UVC (100-280 nm).

UV rays have various sources, including the sun and artificial sources like tanning beds. Prolonged exposure to UV rays can cause damage to the skin, leading to premature aging, eye damage, and an increased risk of skin cancer. UVA rays penetrate deeper into the skin and are associated with skin aging, while UVB rays primarily affect the outer layer of the skin and are linked to sunburns and skin cancer. UVC rays are the most harmful but fortunately, they are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere and do not reach the surface.

Healthcare professionals recommend limiting exposure to UV rays, wearing protective clothing, using broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30, and avoiding tanning beds to reduce the risk of UV-related health problems.

Chromatids are defined as the individual strands that make up a duplicated chromosome. They are formed during the S phase of the cell cycle, when replication occurs and each chromosome is copied, resulting in two identical sister chromatids. These chromatids are connected at a region called the centromere and are held together by cohesin protein complexes until they are separated during mitosis or meiosis.

During mitosis, the sister chromatids are pulled apart by the mitotic spindle apparatus and distributed equally to each daughter cell. In meiosis, which is a type of cell division that occurs in the production of gametes (sex cells), homologous chromosomes pair up and exchange genetic material through a process called crossing over. After crossing over, each homologous chromosome consists of two recombinant chromatids that are separated during meiosis I, and then sister chromatids are separated during meiosis II.

Chromatids play an essential role in the faithful transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next, ensuring that each daughter cell or gamete receives a complete set of chromosomes with intact and functional genes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Nitrous Acid" is not a term used in medical definitions. Nitrous acid is a chemical compound with the formula HNO2. It is a weak acid and a powerful oxidizing agent. It is used as a reducing agent in organic synthesis and as a laboratory reagent to produce nitric oxide.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, I would be happy to help with those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Pyrenes" is not a medical term. It is a term used in chemistry and materials science, referring to a type of aromatic hydrocarbon molecule that consists of two benzene rings fused together. If you have a different term or concept in mind, please provide it so I can give you an accurate definition or information.

A biological assay is a method used in biology and biochemistry to measure the concentration or potency of a substance (like a drug, hormone, or enzyme) by observing its effect on living cells or tissues. This type of assay can be performed using various techniques such as:

1. Cell-based assays: These involve measuring changes in cell behavior, growth, or viability after exposure to the substance being tested. Examples include proliferation assays, apoptosis assays, and cytotoxicity assays.
2. Protein-based assays: These focus on measuring the interaction between the substance and specific proteins, such as enzymes or receptors. Examples include enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), radioimmunoassays (RIAs), and pull-down assays.
3. Genetic-based assays: These involve analyzing the effects of the substance on gene expression, DNA structure, or protein synthesis. Examples include quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays, reporter gene assays, and northern blotting.

Biological assays are essential tools in research, drug development, and diagnostic applications to understand biological processes and evaluate the potential therapeutic efficacy or toxicity of various substances.

Water pollutants refer to any substances or materials that contaminate water sources and make them unsafe or unsuitable for use. These pollutants can include a wide range of chemicals, microorganisms, and physical particles that can have harmful effects on human health, aquatic life, and the environment as a whole. Examples of water pollutants include heavy metals like lead and mercury, industrial chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxins, agricultural runoff containing pesticides and fertilizers, sewage and wastewater, oil spills, and microplastics. Exposure to water pollutants can cause a variety of health problems, ranging from minor irritations to serious illnesses or even death in extreme cases. Additionally, water pollution can have significant impacts on the environment, including harming or killing aquatic life, disrupting ecosystems, and reducing biodiversity.

Radiation genetics is a field of study that focuses on the effects of ionizing radiation on genetic material, including DNA and chromosomes. It examines how exposure to radiation can cause mutations in genes and chromosomes, which can then be passed down from one generation to the next. This field of study is important for understanding the potential health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, such as those experienced by nuclear industry workers, medical professionals who use radiation in their practice, and people living near nuclear power plants or waste disposal sites. It also has applications in cancer treatment, where radiation is used to kill cancer cells but can also cause genetic damage.

Chlorophyllides are the breakdown products of chlorophyll, which is the green pigment found in plants and algae that is essential for photosynthesis. Chlorophyllides are formed when chlorophyll is broken down by enzymes or through other chemical processes. They differ from chlorophyll in that they lack a phytol tail, which is a long hydrocarbon chain that is attached to the chlorophyll molecule.

Chlorophyllides have been studied for their potential health benefits, as they are thought to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Some research has suggested that chlorophyllides may help protect against certain types of cancer, improve immune function, and reduce the risk of heart disease. However, more research is needed to confirm these potential benefits and to determine the optimal dosages and methods for consuming chlorophyllides.

It's worth noting that chlorophyllides are not typically found in significant quantities in the diet, as they are primarily produced during the breakdown of chlorophyll in plants. However, some supplements and green superfood powders may contain chlorophyllides or chlorophyllin, which is a semi-synthetic form of chlorophyll that is more stable and easier to absorb than natural chlorophyll.

Micronuclei, chromosome-defective, refer to small additional nuclei that form during cell division when the genetic material is not properly divided between the two resulting daughter cells. These micronuclei can contain whole chromosomes or fragments of chromosomes that were not incorporated into either of the main nuclei during cell division. Chromosome-defective micronuclei are often associated with genomic instability, DNA damage, and chromosomal aberrations, which can lead to various health issues, including cancer and developmental defects. They can be used as a biomarker for genetic damage in cells and are commonly observed in response to exposure to mutagenic agents such as radiation or chemicals.

Quinoxalines are not a medical term, but rather an organic chemical compound. They are a class of heterocyclic aromatic compounds made up of a benzene ring fused to a pyrazine ring. Quinoxalines have no specific medical relevance, but some of their derivatives have been synthesized and used in medicinal chemistry as antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral agents. They are also used in the production of dyes and pigments.

Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A2 is a specific isoform of the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system, which is involved in the metabolism of various xenobiotics, including drugs and toxins, in the body. This enzyme is primarily located in the endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes, or liver cells, and plays a significant role in the oxidative metabolism of certain medications, such as caffeine, theophylline, and some antidepressants.

CYP1A2 is induced by various factors, including smoking, charcoal-grilled foods, and certain medications, which can increase its enzymatic activity and potentially affect the metabolism and clearance of drugs that are substrates for this enzyme. Genetic polymorphisms in the CYP1A2 gene can also lead to differences in enzyme activity among individuals, resulting in variable drug responses and potential adverse effects.

In summary, Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A2 is a liver enzyme involved in the metabolism of various drugs and toxins, with genetic and environmental factors influencing its activity and impacting individual responses to medications.

Epoxy compounds, also known as epoxy resins, are a type of thermosetting polymer characterized by the presence of epoxide groups in their molecular structure. An epoxide group is a chemical functional group consisting of an oxygen atom double-bonded to a carbon atom, which is itself bonded to another carbon atom.

Epoxy compounds are typically produced by reacting a mixture of epichlorohydrin and bisphenol-A or other similar chemicals under specific conditions. The resulting product is a two-part system consisting of a resin and a hardener, which must be mixed together before use.

Once the two parts are combined, a chemical reaction takes place that causes the mixture to cure or harden into a solid material. This curing process can be accelerated by heat, and once fully cured, epoxy compounds form a strong, durable, and chemically resistant material that is widely used in various industrial and commercial applications.

In the medical field, epoxy compounds are sometimes used as dental restorative materials or as adhesives for bonding medical devices or prosthetics. However, it's important to note that some people may have allergic reactions to certain components of epoxy compounds, so their use must be carefully evaluated and monitored in a medical context.

Dimethylnitrosamine is a chemical compound with the formula (CH3)2NNO. It is a potent carcinogen, and is classified as a Class 1 carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). It is known to cause cancer in various organs, including the liver, kidney, and lungs.

Dimethylnitrosamine is formed when nitrogen oxides react with secondary amines under conditions that are commonly encountered in industrial processes or in certain food preservation methods. It can also be found as a contaminant in some foods and cosmetics.

Exposure to dimethylnitrosamine can occur through inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact. The toxic effects of this compound are due to its ability to form DNA adducts, which can lead to mutations and cancer. It is important to minimize exposure to this compound and to take appropriate safety measures when working with it.

Environmental pollutants are defined as any substances or energy (such as noise, heat, or light) that are present in the environment and can cause harm or discomfort to humans or other living organisms, or damage the natural ecosystems. These pollutants can come from a variety of sources, including industrial processes, transportation, agriculture, and household activities. They can be in the form of gases, liquids, solids, or radioactive materials, and can contaminate air, water, and soil. Examples include heavy metals, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter, and greenhouse gases.

It is important to note that the impact of environmental pollutants on human health and the environment can be acute (short-term) or chronic (long-term) and it depends on the type, concentration, duration and frequency of exposure. Some common effects of environmental pollutants include respiratory problems, cancer, neurological disorders, reproductive issues, and developmental delays in children.

It is important to monitor, control and reduce the emissions of these pollutants through regulations, technology advancements, and sustainable practices to protect human health and the environment.

Arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) is a group of enzymes involved in the metabolism of aromatic amines, which are found in a variety of substances including tobacco smoke, certain drugs, and environmental contaminants. NAT catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A to the aromatic amine, which can help to detoxify these compounds and make them more water-soluble for excretion. There are two main forms of NAT in humans, known as NAT1 and NAT2, which have different tissue distributions and substrate specificities. Variations in NAT activity due to genetic polymorphisms can affect individual susceptibility to certain chemical exposures and diseases, including cancer.

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the genetic material present in the cells of organisms where it is responsible for the storage and transmission of hereditary information. DNA is a long molecule that consists of two strands coiled together to form a double helix. Each strand is made up of a series of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - that are linked together by phosphate and sugar groups. The sequence of these bases along the length of the molecule encodes genetic information, with A always pairing with T and C always pairing with G. This base-pairing allows for the replication and transcription of DNA, which are essential processes in the functioning and reproduction of all living organisms.

Gamma rays are a type of ionizing radiation that is released from the nucleus of an atom during radioactive decay. They are high-energy photons, with wavelengths shorter than 0.01 nanometers and frequencies greater than 3 x 10^19 Hz. Gamma rays are electromagnetic radiation, similar to X-rays, but with higher energy levels and the ability to penetrate matter more deeply. They can cause damage to living tissue and are used in medical imaging and cancer treatment.

A mesylate is a salt formed when mesylic acid (methanesulfonic acid) reacts with a base. In the context of pharmaceuticals, many drugs are available in mesylate form as it can be more soluble and bioavailable than other forms. Mesylates are commonly used to improve the absorption and effectiveness of medications.

For example, a drug called atenolol (a beta blocker used to treat high blood pressure) is often formulated as atenolol mesylate because the mesylate form is more soluble in water than the free base form, making it easier for the body to absorb and utilize the medication.

It's important to note that mesylates are not a specific medical condition or disease, but rather a type of pharmaceutical preparation.

Cricetinae is a subfamily of rodents that includes hamsters, gerbils, and relatives. These small mammals are characterized by having short limbs, compact bodies, and cheek pouches for storing food. They are native to various parts of the world, particularly in Europe, Asia, and Africa. Some species are popular pets due to their small size, easy care, and friendly nature. In a medical context, understanding the biology and behavior of Cricetinae species can be important for individuals who keep them as pets or for researchers studying their physiology.

In a medical context, "hot temperature" is not a standard medical term with a specific definition. However, it is often used in relation to fever, which is a common symptom of illness. A fever is typically defined as a body temperature that is higher than normal, usually above 38°C (100.4°F) for adults and above 37.5-38°C (99.5-101.3°F) for children, depending on the source.

Therefore, when a medical professional talks about "hot temperature," they may be referring to a body temperature that is higher than normal due to fever or other causes. It's important to note that a high environmental temperature can also contribute to an elevated body temperature, so it's essential to consider both the body temperature and the environmental temperature when assessing a patient's condition.

Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the salvage pathway of nucleotide synthesis. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of hypoxanthine and guanine to their respective nucleotides, inosine monophosphate (IMP) and guanosine monophosphate (GMP), by transferring the phosphoribosyl group from 5-phosphoribosyl-1 pyrophosphate (PRPP) to the purine bases.

HGPRT deficiency is a genetic disorder known as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, which is characterized by mental retardation, self-mutilation, spasticity, and uric acid overproduction due to the accumulation of hypoxanthine and guanine. This disorder is caused by mutations in the HPRT1 gene, leading to a decrease or absence of HGPRT enzyme activity.

Thioxanthenes are a group of heterocyclic organic compounds that contain a thioxanthene nucleus, which is a six-membered ring containing five carbon atoms and one sulfur atom. Thioxanthenes are structurally related to phenothiazines and have been used in the synthesis of various pharmaceutical drugs, particularly antipsychotic medications.

In medical terms, thioxanthenes refer to a class of antipsychotic drugs that are used to treat various psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and related conditions. These drugs work by blocking dopamine receptors in the brain, which helps to reduce the symptoms of psychosis such as hallucinations, delusions, and disordered thinking.

Some examples of thioxanthene antipsychotics include chlorprothixene, thiothixene, and flupenthixol. Like other antipsychotic medications, thioxanthenes can have side effects such as extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), which are movement disorders that can cause stiffness, tremors, or spasms. Other potential side effects of thioxanthenes may include sedation, orthostatic hypotension, and weight gain.

A medical definition of 'food' would be:

"Substances consumed by living organisms, usually in the form of meals, which contain necessary nutrients such as carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water. These substances are broken down during digestion to provide energy, build and repair tissues, and regulate bodily functions."

It's important to note that while this is a medical definition, it also aligns with common understanding of what food is.

Nitroso compounds are a class of chemical compounds that contain a nitroso functional group, which is composed of a nitrogen atom bonded to an oxygen atom with a single covalent bond. The general formula for nitroso compounds is R-N=O, where R represents an organic group such as an alkyl or aryl group.

Nitroso compounds are known to be reactive and can form under various physiological conditions. They have been implicated in the formation of carcinogenic substances and have been linked to DNA damage and mutations. In the medical field, nitroso compounds have been studied for their potential use as therapeutic agents, particularly in the treatment of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. However, their use is limited due to their potential toxicity and carcinogenicity.

It's worth noting that exposure to high levels of nitroso compounds can be harmful to human health, and may cause respiratory, dermal, and ocular irritation, as well as potential genotoxic effects. Therefore, handling and storage of nitroso compounds should be done with caution, following appropriate safety guidelines.

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of organic compounds characterized by the presence of two or more fused benzene rings. They are called "polycyclic" because they contain multiple cyclic structures, and "aromatic" because these structures contain alternating double bonds that give them distinctive chemical properties and a characteristic smell.

PAHs can be produced from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Natural sources include wildfires, volcanic eruptions, and the decomposition of organic matter. Anthropogenic sources include the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, oil, and gasoline, as well as tobacco smoke, grilled foods, and certain industrial processes.

PAHs are known to be environmental pollutants and can have harmful effects on human health. They have been linked to an increased risk of cancer, particularly lung, skin, and bladder cancers, as well as reproductive and developmental toxicity. PAHs can also cause skin irritation, respiratory problems, and damage to the immune system.

PAHs are found in a variety of environmental media, including air, water, soil, and food. They can accumulate in the food chain, particularly in fatty tissues, and have been detected in a wide range of foods, including meat, fish, dairy products, and vegetables. Exposure to PAHs can occur through inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact.

It is important to limit exposure to PAHs by avoiding tobacco smoke, reducing consumption of grilled and smoked foods, using ventilation when cooking, and following safety guidelines when working with industrial processes that produce PAHs.

Niridazole is an anti-parasitic medication that was previously used to treat infections caused by parasites such as schistosomiasis (also known as bilharzia or snail fever) and loiasis (also known as African eye worm). It works by inhibiting the metabolism of the parasites, leading to their death. However, due to its side effects, including neurotoxicity and potential for causing optic neuritis, it is no longer commonly used in clinical practice.

N-Nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) is a chemical compound that falls under the category of nitrosamines. Nitrosamines are potent carcinogens, and NPYR is no exception. It is formed when nitrites, which can be found in certain foods or used as preservatives, come into contact with secondary amines in the digestive system. NPYR has been shown to cause cancer in various animal models, particularly in the liver and pancreas. However, its carcinogenic effects in humans are still a subject of ongoing research.

Such mutagens are called clastogens. Mutagens may also modify the DNA sequence; the changes in nucleic acid sequences by ... Mutagens may therefore be also carcinogens. However, some mutagens exert their mutagenic effect through their metabolites, and ... Different mutagens act on DNA differently. Powerful mutagens may result in chromosomal instability, causing chromosomal ... of the mutagens identified through Ames test may also be carcinogens. Mutagens are not necessarily carcinogens, and vice versa ...
... (MX), or 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-5H-furan-2-one, is a byproduct of the disinfection of water by ...
"Environmental Mutagen Society web site". Archived from the original on 16 April 2011. Retrieved 12 December 2010. Shelby, ... The society, originally founded as the Environmental Mutagen Society (EMS) was formed in the USA in 1969 by Drs. Alexander ... In 1970 the EMS established the book series "Chemical Mutagens: Principles and Methods for Their Detection" and the first ... In 1969, the EMS established the Environmental Mutagen Information Center (EMIC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which ...
Environmental Mutagens, Natl. Res. Council (1979-83) Instructor, Cold Spring Harbor Labs (1970-87) Wander Memorial Lecturer ( ... the effects of chemical mutagens, and the roles of large chromosomal rearrangements. He developed important genetic tools for ...
"CARCINOGENS, MUTAGENS, EMBRYOTOXINS". 2010-06-14. Archived from the original on 2010-06-14. Retrieved 2023-04-10. "Welcome , ...
Some are mutagens. They also have a large chemical oxygen demand (COD). Ascorbic acid and its isomers, and other similar sugar ...
And it yielded mutagens. The extracts were given to unimmunised mice, causing lung reaction and leading to cases of pulmonary ...
Sugimura T, Nagao M, Wakabayashi K (May 1996). "Carcinogenicity of food mutagens". Environmental Health Perspectives. 104 ( ...
Mutagen. 23 (1): 51-63. PMID 8125083. OEHHA Archived 2006-05-12 at the Wayback Machine Inchem.org National Toxocology Program ...
Mutagen., 55: 449 -456. doi:10.1002/em.21860 Group, Schuler. "EST Profile - Hs.445377". www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 2018-05 ...
Mutagen. 36 (3): 201-5. doi:10.1002/1098-2280(2000)36:3. 3.0.CO;2-1. PMID 11044901. S2CID 19391792. Bortoluzzi S, d'Alessi F, ...
Mutagen. 50 (4): 285-90. doi:10.1002/em.20452. PMC 2666781. PMID 19170196. Hosgood HD, Menashe I, He X, Chanock S, Lan Q ( ...
Mutagen. 15 (6): 307-312. doi:10.1002/tcm.1770150607. PMID 8732881. Hepatocarcinogenic potential was assessed by comparing the ...
Mutagen. 50 (4): 285-90. doi:10.1002/em.20452. PMC 2666781. PMID 19170196. Strausberg RL, Feingold EA, Grouse LH, et al. (2002 ...
Mutagen. 50 (4): 285-90. doi:10.1002/em.20452. PMC 2666781. PMID 19170196. Hosgood HD, Menashe I, He X, Chanock S, Lan Q ( ...
Mutagen. 48 (5): 380-94. doi:10.1002/em.20290. PMC 2682332. PMID 17370338. Breitling R (2006). "Biological microarray ...
Mutagen. 56 (6): 491-504. doi:10.1002/em.21944. PMID 25773265. S2CID 32371215. Meyer B, Voss KO, Tobias F, Jakob B, Durante M, ...
Examples of chemical mutagens follow. Sodium bisulfate is effective at mutating G/C rich genomic sequences. This is because ...
The rate of mutation may be increased by mutagens. Mutagens can be physical, such as radiation from UV rays, X-rays or extreme ... Induced mutations are alterations in the gene after it has come in contact with mutagens and environmental causes. Induced ... Whereas in former times mutations were assumed to occur by chance, or induced by mutagens, molecular mechanisms of mutation ... Each of these classes of chemical mutagens has certain effects that then lead to transitions, transversions, or deletions. ...
Possible mutagen. Possible teratogen. Harmful in contact with skin, and if swallowed or inhaled. Irritant. Toxicity data ORL- ...
Klopman G, Kalos A, Frierson M, Rosenkranz HS (1986). "NPPD (spy dust) is predicted to be a mutagen". Environ Mutagen. 8 (4): ...
Nagao M, Fujita Y, Wakabayashi K, Nukaya H, Kosuge T, Sugimura T (August 1986). "Mutagens in coffee and other beverages". ... Methylglyoxal is a by-product of normal biochemistry that is a carcinogen, a mutagen and can chemically damage several ...
"Metabolic activation of carcinogens and mutagens." Molecular Biology of Mutagens and Carcinogens. Springer US, 1983. 97-141. ...
Ames, B. N.; Gold, L. S. (1991). "Endogenous mutagens and the causes of aging and cancer". Mutation Research/Fundamental and ... Environ Mol Mutagen. 45 (5): 442-54. doi:10.1002/em.20119. PMID 15690342. S2CID 32204458. Narayanan, L; Fritzell, JA; Baker, SM ...
Environ Mol Mutagen. 2005 Jun;45(5):442-54. doi: 10.1002/em.20119. PMID 15690342 Stuart GR, Oda Y, Boer JG, Glickman BW. No ...
Environ Mol Mutagen. 44 (4): 329-45. doi:10.1002/em.20053. PMID 15476194. S2CID 7419454.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple ... for the detection of environmental mutagens and carcinogens". Mutation Research. 147 (5): 219-229. doi:10.1016/0165-1161(85) ...
Frantz MC, Wipf P (Jun 2010). "Mitochondria as a target in treatment". Environ Mol Mutagen. 51 (5): 462-75. doi:10.1002/em. ...
Livestock) "Mutagen" (ft. Hangnail & Modulok) "Rain Buckets" "Duplicate Version" (ft. Noah23) "Regime" Tracks 1, 5-10 & 14-16 ...
Environ Mol Mutagen. 1999;33(4):257-265. PMID 10398372 DOI:10.1002/(sici)1098-2280(1999)33:4. 3.0.co;2-0 Royal Society of ... Canada: 104th President Environmental Mutagen Society Genetics Society of Canada: Robert H. Haynes Young Scientist Award (CS1 ...
Environ Mol Mutagen. 13 (3): 271-6. doi:10.1002/em.2850130311. PMID 2651119. S2CID 46535054. Catherine Larkin, "Cloned Animals ...
Such mutagens are called clastogens. Mutagens may also modify the DNA sequence; the changes in nucleic acid sequences by ... Mutagens may therefore be also carcinogens. However, some mutagens exert their mutagenic effect through their metabolites, and ... Different mutagens act on DNA differently. Powerful mutagens may result in chromosomal instability, causing chromosomal ... of the mutagens identified through Ames test may also be carcinogens. Mutagens are not necessarily carcinogens, and vice versa ...
Install python3-mutagenInstalling python3-mutagen package on Debian Unstable (Sid) is as easy as running the following command ... sudo apt-get remove python3-mutagen. Uninstall python3-mutagen and its dependent packages. To remove the python3-mutagen ... Purging python3-mutagen. If you also want to delete configuration and/or data files of python3-mutagen from Debian Sid then ... sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install python3-mutagen. python3-mutagen package information. distro. Debian Unstable (Sid). ...
... and indirect-acting mutagens. Teratog. Carcinog. Mutagen. 1999, 19, 403-413. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] ...
Mutagen Astronomy: Integer overflow in Linuxs create_elf_tables() (CVE-2018-14634). Read the advisory ...
Identifying and estimating the genetic impact of chemical mutagens / Committee on Chemical Environmental Mutagens, Board on ... by National Research Council (U.S..) Committee on Chemical Environmental Mutagens.. Material type: Text; Format: print ... by International Commission for Protection Against Environmental Mutagens and Carcinogens , International Programme on Chemical ... prepared for the IPCS by the International Commission for Protection Against Environmental Mutagens and Carcinogens. ...
Bendamustine is a mutagen and clastogen. In a reverse bacterial mutation assay (Ames assay), bendamustine was shown to increase ...
CAD/CMRD (OELs) Chemical Agents Directive and Carcinogens or Mutagens Directive Occupational exposure limit (OEL) values are ...
Environ Mol Mutagen. 2006 Oct;47(8):594-602. doi: 10.1002/em.20233. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central ...
Mutagen. A substance that causes mutations (genetic damage).. Mutation. A change (damage) to the DNA, genes, or chromosomes of ...
The order of varietal susceptibility to the mutagens (mutagen effectiveness) was White Warangal > Pusa Ratnar > Pusa Red.. ... and the mutagens ethyl methanesulfonate (0.05, 0.1 and 0.2%), N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (0.01, 0.05 and 0.1%) and ethyleneimine ( ...
Mutagen-induced chromosome fragility. * Sunlight (cancer of the lower lip and malignant disease of skin) ...
Teratogenesis Carcinogen Mutagen, 1995: 15:313-337.. .. *. Woollen, B. H.; Marsh, J. R.; Laird, W. J. D.; Lesser, J. E. ...
Cooking meat at high temperatures or by charcoal grilling produces mutagens and carcinogens that are known to lead to cancer.. ...
JID: 101169387; 0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Mutagens); 88847-89-6 (8-oxo-7-hydrodeoxyguanosine); G9481N71RO (Deoxyguanosine); epublish ...
Categories: Mutagens Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, CopyrightRestricted 2 images ...
ET-1 is a very potent vasoconstrictor and smooth muscle mutagen produced primarily by vascular endothelial cells. [57, 58] ...
Mustard agent is not a teratogen, but it is a mutagen. Because HHS accepts that mustard agent is a human carcinogen and because ...
To identify genes responsible for this progression, we carried out a genetic screening by an enhanced retroviral mutagen (ERM)- ...
Since 2 -methylbut-2-ene (2M2B) is concluded to be an invivo mutagen (Cat 2, H341 under GHS/CLP) with no relevant dose-response ... With the strict control measures for a non-threshold mutagen, applying the RMMs/OCs as stipulated for the high hazard category ... it to mutagens. Official Journal of the European Communities, L138, 66-69, 1 June 1999. ...
N-nitrosamines are pro-mutagens that can react with DNA following metabolism to produce ... ... endpoints in somatic tissues and/or level of exposure in gonads would allow classification and labelling as a germ cell mutagen ...
BHT is a suspected mutagen and carcinogen, and has been outlawed as a food preservative in the UK, Japan, Australia, Romania ...
Page 20: Matrix absorbing the mutagen at the very last possible second. Fun times. Hunter saves Dingo, but he smacks into the ...
CMR - Carcinogen, Mutagen, and Reproductive Toxins. This category includes chemicals that may cause cancer, genetic defects, or ...
  • As many mutations can cause cancer in animals, such mutagens can therefore be carcinogens, although not all necessarily are. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first mutagens to be identified were carcinogens, substances that were shown to be linked to cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • A large number of chemical mutagens have since been identified, especially after the development of the Ames test in the 1970s by Bruce Ames that screens for mutagens and allows for preliminary identification of carcinogens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Early studies by Ames showed around 90% of known carcinogens can be identified in Ames test as mutagenic (later studies however gave lower figures), and ~80% of the mutagens identified through Ames test may also be carcinogens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mutagens are not necessarily carcinogens, and vice versa. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1973. Carcinogens are mutagens: A simple test system combining liver homogenates for activation and bacteria for detection. (cdc.gov)
  • Cooking meat at high temperatures or by charcoal grilling produces mutagens and carcinogens that are known to lead to cancer. (cityofhope.org)
  • Chemical mutagens were not demonstrated to cause mutation until the 1940s, when Charlotte Auerbach and J. M. Robson found that mustard gas can cause mutations in fruit flies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Identifying and estimating the genetic impact of chemical mutagens / Committee on Chemical Environmental Mutagens, Board on Toxicology and Environmental Health Hazards, Commission on Life Sciences, National Research Council. (who.int)
  • BHT is a suspected mutagen and carcinogen, and has been outlawed as a food preservative in the UK, Japan, Australia, Romania and Sweden. (wrinklereview.com)
  • In genetics, a mutagen is a physical or chemical agent that permanently changes genetic material, usually DNA, in an organism and thus increases the frequency of mutations above the natural background level. (wikipedia.org)
  • Not all mutations are caused by mutagens: so-called "spontaneous mutations" occur due to spontaneous hydrolysis, errors in DNA replication, repair and recombination. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mutagenic property of mutagens was first demonstrated in 1927, when Hermann Muller discovered that x-rays can cause genetic mutations in fruit flies, producing phenotypic mutants as well as observable changes to the chromosomes, visible due to the presence of enlarged "polytene" chromosomes in fruit fly salivary glands. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mutagen produces mutations in the DNA, and deleterious mutation can result in aberrant, impaired or loss of function for a particular gene, and accumulation of mutations may lead to cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS. (bvsalud.org)
  • All mutagens have characteristic mutational signatures with some chemicals becoming mutagenic through cellular processes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prior to the clas- sification work, the technical guidance for classification of germ cell mutagens was prepared. (cdc.gov)
  • Identifying and estimating the genetic impact of chemical mutagens / Committee on Chemical Environmental Mutagens, Board on Toxicology and Environmental Health Hazards, Commission on Life Sciences, National Research Council. (who.int)
  • by National Research Council (U.S..) Committee on Chemical Environmental Mutagens. (who.int)
  • 2 carcinogen, mutagen and reprotoxin (CMR) definitions and Annex I of the Carcinogens, Mutagens and Reprotoxins Directive (CMRD). (europa.eu)
  • No carcinogens, no mutagens, no toxins. (magicmeltco.com)
  • We genotyped these two polymorphisms in 524 healthy subjects and performed mutagen sensitivity assays using both bleomycin and benzo[a]pyrene-diol-epoxide (BPDE) as challenge mutagens. (nih.gov)
  • Show all available information, eg mutagen, allele class and phenotype linked to each allele. (flymine.org)
  • This study correlated the extent of induced in vitro chromosomal damage, assessed by the mutagen sensitivity assay, with genotypes of the X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1) gene, which encodes for a base excision repair protein. (nih.gov)
  • Updates to audio-convert-mod and fwbackups are coming soon, as 1.43.3 is nearing stability and audio-convert-mod will be released with a simpler interface, two new features and a more robust, pure-python metadata reading/writing system using Mutagen . (diffingo.com)
  • Mutagen is a Python module to handle audio metadata. (haiku-os.org)
  • Kill 2 monsters you have a contract on without using Signs, potions, mutagens, oils or bombs. (psnine.com)
  • Results of search for 'su:{Mutagens. (who.int)
  • ALCHEMISTS GET RESEARCH FIELDS like bomber, chirurgeon, mutagenist (lower level mutagens will be a thing), poisoner. (paizo.com)
  • GHS mutagens, test data to be used, and a practical decision tree for classification. (cdc.gov)
  • Room Sprays are made with Prop 65 compliant materials, toxin-free, mutagen free. (magicmeltco.com)