Paralysis: A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)Respiratory Paralysis: Complete or severe weakness of the muscles of respiration. This condition may be associated with MOTOR NEURON DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVE DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; injury to the PHRENIC NERVE; and other disorders.Botulinum Toxins, Type A: A serotype of botulinum toxins that has specificity for cleavage of SYNAPTOSOMAL-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 25.Succinylcholine: A quaternary skeletal muscle relaxant usually used in the form of its bromide, chloride, or iodide. It is a depolarizing relaxant, acting in about 30 seconds and with a duration of effect averaging three to five minutes. Succinylcholine is used in surgical, anesthetic, and other procedures in which a brief period of muscle relaxation is called for.Neuromuscular Blocking Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission of nerve impulses at the skeletal neuromuscular junction. They can be of two types, competitive, stabilizing blockers (NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS) or noncompetitive, depolarizing agents (NEUROMUSCULAR DEPOLARIZING AGENTS). Both prevent acetylcholine from triggering the muscle contraction and they are used as anesthesia adjuvants, as relaxants during electroshock, in convulsive states, etc.Thorax: The upper part of the trunk between the NECK and the ABDOMEN. It contains the chief organs of the circulatory and respiratory systems. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Muscles: Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.Botulinum Toxins: Toxic proteins produced from the species CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM. The toxins are synthesized as a single peptide chain which is processed into a mature protein consisting of a heavy chain and light chain joined via a disulfide bond. The botulinum toxin light chain is a zinc-dependent protease which is released from the heavy chain upon ENDOCYTOSIS into PRESYNAPTIC NERVE ENDINGS. Once inside the cell the botulinum toxin light chain cleaves specific SNARE proteins which are essential for secretion of ACETYLCHOLINE by SYNAPTIC VESICLES. This inhibition of acetylcholine release results in muscular PARALYSIS.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Vocal Cord Paralysis: Congenital or acquired paralysis of one or both VOCAL CORDS. This condition is caused by defects in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, the VAGUS NERVE and branches of LARYNGEAL NERVES. Common symptoms are VOICE DISORDERS including HOARSENESS or APHONIA.Motor Neurons: Neurons which activate MUSCLE CELLS.Neuromuscular Junction: The synapse between a neuron and a muscle.Paralyses, Familial Periodic: A heterogenous group of inherited disorders characterized by recurring attacks of rapidly progressive flaccid paralysis or myotonia. These conditions have in common a mutation of the gene encoding the alpha subunit of the sodium channel in skeletal muscle. They are frequently associated with fluctuations in serum potassium levels. Periodic paralysis may also occur as a non-familial process secondary to THYROTOXICOSIS and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1481)Muscle Proteins: The protein constituents of muscle, the major ones being ACTINS and MYOSINS. More than a dozen accessory proteins exist including TROPONIN; TROPOMYOSIN; and DYSTROPHIN.Facial Paralysis: Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis.Muscle, Smooth: Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Muscle Fibers, Skeletal: Large, multinucleate single cells, either cylindrical or prismatic in shape, that form the basic unit of SKELETAL MUSCLE. They consist of MYOFIBRILS enclosed within and attached to the SARCOLEMMA. They are derived from the fusion of skeletal myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, SKELETAL) into a syncytium, followed by differentiation.Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.Sleep Paralysis: A common condition characterized by transient partial or total paralysis of skeletal muscles and areflexia that occurs upon awakening from sleep or less often while falling asleep. Stimuli such as touch or sound may terminate the episode, which usually has a duration of seconds to minutes. This condition may occur in normal subjects or be associated with NARCOLEPSY; CATAPLEXY; and hypnagogic HALLUCINATIONS. The pathophysiology of this condition is closely related to the normal hypotonia that occur during REM sleep. (From Adv Neurol 1995;67:245-271)Tick Paralysis: Paralysis caused by a neurotropic toxin secreted by the salivary glands of ticks.Muscle Development: Developmental events leading to the formation of adult muscular system, which includes differentiation of the various types of muscle cell precursors, migration of myoblasts, activation of myogenesis and development of muscle anchorage.Muscle Denervation: The resection or removal of the innervation of a muscle or muscle tissue.Paralysis, Hyperkalemic Periodic: An autosomal dominant familial disorder which presents in infancy or childhood and is characterized by episodes of weakness associated with hyperkalemia. During attacks, muscles of the lower extremities are initially affected, followed by the lower trunk and arms. Episodes last from 15-60 minutes and typically occur after a period of rest following exercise. A defect in skeletal muscle sodium channels has been identified as the cause of this condition. Normokalemic periodic paralysis is a closely related disorder marked by a lack of alterations in potassium levels during attacks of weakness. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1481)Muscle Fibers, Fast-Twitch: Skeletal muscle fibers characterized by their expression of the Type II MYOSIN HEAVY CHAIN isoforms which have high ATPase activity and effect several other functional properties - shortening velocity, power output, rate of tension redevelopment. Several fast types have been identified.Muscle Fatigue: A state arrived at through prolonged and strong contraction of a muscle. Studies in athletes during prolonged submaximal exercise have shown that muscle fatigue increases in almost direct proportion to the rate of muscle glycogen depletion. Muscle fatigue in short-term maximal exercise is associated with oxygen lack and an increased level of blood and muscle lactic acid, and an accompanying increase in hydrogen-ion concentration in the exercised muscle.Muscle Fibers, Slow-Twitch: Skeletal muscle fibers characterized by their expression of the Type I MYOSIN HEAVY CHAIN isoforms which have low ATPase activity and effect several other functional properties - shortening velocity, power output, rate of tension redevelopment.Myocytes, Smooth Muscle: Non-striated, elongated, spindle-shaped cells found lining the digestive tract, uterus, and blood vessels. They are derived from specialized myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, SMOOTH MUSCLE).Oculomotor Muscles: The muscles that move the eye. Included in this group are the medial rectus, lateral rectus, superior rectus, inferior rectus, inferior oblique, superior oblique, musculus orbitalis, and levator palpebrae superioris.Mitochondria, Muscle: Mitochondria of skeletal and smooth muscle. It does not include myocardial mitochondria for which MITOCHONDRIA, HEART is available.Muscle Weakness: A vague complaint of debility, fatigue, or exhaustion attributable to weakness of various muscles. The weakness can be characterized as subacute or chronic, often progressive, and is a manifestation of many muscle and neuromuscular diseases. (From Wyngaarden et al., Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p2251)Neck Muscles: The neck muscles consist of the platysma, splenius cervicis, sternocleidomastoid(eus), longus colli, the anterior, medius, and posterior scalenes, digastric(us), stylohyoid(eus), mylohyoid(eus), geniohyoid(eus), sternohyoid(eus), omohyoid(eus), sternothyroid(eus), and thyrohyoid(eus).Muscle Hypotonia: A diminution of the skeletal muscle tone marked by a diminished resistance to passive stretching.Muscle Spindles: Skeletal muscle structures that function as the MECHANORECEPTORS responsible for the stretch or myotactic reflex (REFLEX, STRETCH). They are composed of a bundle of encapsulated SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS, i.e., the intrafusal fibers (nuclear bag 1 fibers, nuclear bag 2 fibers, and nuclear chain fibers) innervated by SENSORY NEURONS.Respiratory Muscles: These include the muscles of the DIAPHRAGM and the INTERCOSTAL MUSCLES.Muscle, Striated: One of two types of muscle in the body, characterized by the array of bands observed under microscope. Striated muscles can be divided into two subtypes: the CARDIAC MUSCLE and the SKELETAL MUSCLE.Muscle Relaxation: That phase of a muscle twitch during which a muscle returns to a resting position.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Papillary Muscles: Conical muscular projections from the walls of the cardiac ventricles, attached to the cusps of the atrioventricular valves by the chordae tendineae.Facial Muscles: Muscles of facial expression or mimetic muscles that include the numerous muscles supplied by the facial nerve that are attached to and move the skin of the face. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Hypokalemia: Abnormally low potassium concentration in the blood. It may result from potassium loss by renal secretion or by the gastrointestinal route, as by vomiting or diarrhea. It may be manifested clinically by neuromuscular disorders ranging from weakness to paralysis, by electrocardiographic abnormalities (depression of the T wave and elevation of the U wave), by renal disease, and by gastrointestinal disorders. (Dorland, 27th ed)Intercostal Muscles: Respiratory muscles that arise from the lower border of one rib and insert into the upper border of the adjoining rib, and contract during inspiration or respiration. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Poliomyelitis: An acute infectious disease of humans, particularly children, caused by any of three serotypes of human poliovirus (POLIOVIRUS). Usually the infection is limited to the gastrointestinal tract and nasopharynx, and is often asymptomatic. The central nervous system, primarily the spinal cord, may be affected, leading to rapidly progressive paralysis, coarse FASCICULATION and hyporeflexia. Motor neurons are primarily affected. Encephalitis may also occur. The virus replicates in the nervous system, and may cause significant neuronal loss, most notably in the spinal cord. A rare related condition, nonpoliovirus poliomyelitis, may result from infections with nonpoliovirus enteroviruses. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp764-5)Abdominal Muscles: Muscles forming the ABDOMINAL WALL including RECTUS ABDOMINIS, external and internal oblique muscles, transversus abdominis, and quadratus abdominis. (from Stedman, 25th ed)Quadriceps Muscle: The quadriceps femoris. A collective name of the four-headed skeletal muscle of the thigh, comprised of the rectus femoris, vastus intermedius, vastus lateralis, and vastus medialis.Muscular Atrophy: Derangement in size and number of muscle fibers occurring with aging, reduction in blood supply, or following immobilization, prolonged weightlessness, malnutrition, and particularly in denervation.Muscle Cells: Mature contractile cells, commonly known as myocytes, that form one of three kinds of muscle. The three types of muscle cells are skeletal (MUSCLE FIBERS, SKELETAL), cardiac (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC), and smooth (MYOCYTES, SMOOTH MUSCLE). They are derived from embryonic (precursor) muscle cells called MYOBLASTS.Muscular Diseases: Acquired, familial, and congenital disorders of SKELETAL MUSCLE and SMOOTH MUSCLE.Masseter Muscle: A masticatory muscle whose action is closing the jaws.Diaphragm: The musculofibrous partition that separates the THORACIC CAVITY from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. Contraction of the diaphragm increases the volume of the thoracic cavity aiding INHALATION.Thyrotoxicosis: A hypermetabolic syndrome caused by excess THYROID HORMONES which may come from endogenous or exogenous sources. The endogenous source of hormone may be thyroid HYPERPLASIA; THYROID NEOPLASMS; or hormone-producing extrathyroidal tissue. Thyrotoxicosis is characterized by NERVOUSNESS; TACHYCARDIA; FATIGUE; WEIGHT LOSS; heat intolerance; and excessive SWEATING.NAV1.4 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel: A voltage-gated sodium channel subtype that mediates the sodium ion PERMEABILITY of SKELETAL MYOCYTES. Defects in the SCN4A gene, which codes for the alpha subunit of this sodium channel, are associated with several MYOTONIC DISORDERS.Masticatory Muscles: Muscles arising in the zygomatic arch that close the jaw. Their nerve supply is masseteric from the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Isometric Contraction: Muscular contractions characterized by increase in tension without change in length.Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle: Elongated, spindle-shaped, quiescent myoblasts lying in close contact with adult skeletal muscle. They are thought to play a role in muscle repair and regeneration.Pectoralis Muscles: The pectoralis major and pectoralis minor muscles that make up the upper and fore part of the chest in front of the AXILLA.Hindlimb: Either of two extremities of four-footed non-primate land animals. It usually consists of a FEMUR; TIBIA; and FIBULA; tarsals; METATARSALS; and TOES. (From Storer et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p73)Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Temporal Muscle: A masticatory muscle whose action is closing the jaws; its posterior portion retracts the mandible.Dicistroviridae: A family of invertebrate RNA viruses in the order Picornavirales.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Psoas Muscles: A powerful flexor of the thigh at the hip joint (psoas major) and a weak flexor of the trunk and lumbar spinal column (psoas minor). Psoas is derived from the Greek "psoa", the plural meaning "muscles of the loin". It is a common site of infection manifesting as abscess (PSOAS ABSCESS). The psoas muscles and their fibers are also used frequently in experiments in muscle physiology.Paraplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness.Myofibrils: The long cylindrical contractile organelles of STRIATED MUSCLE cells composed of ACTIN FILAMENTS; MYOSIN filaments; and other proteins organized in arrays of repeating units called SARCOMERES .Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Hyperkalemia: Abnormally high potassium concentration in the blood, most often due to defective renal excretion. It is characterized clinically by electrocardiographic abnormalities (elevated T waves and depressed P waves, and eventually by atrial asystole). In severe cases, weakness and flaccid paralysis may occur. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Muscle paralysis[20]. *Failure of kidneys to remove excess fluid may cause: *Swelling of the legs, ankles, feet, face, or hands ... Acute: Low blood pressure, blockage of the urinary tract, certain medications, muscle breakdown, and hemolytic uremic syndrome. ... Causes of acute kidney failure include low blood pressure, blockage of the urinary tract, certain medications, muscle breakdown ... Muscle cramps (caused by low levels of calcium which can be associated with hyperphosphatemia) ...
"Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis and the adult muscle sodium channel alpha-subunit gene". Science. 250 (4983): 1000-2. doi: ... Patients typically complain of muscle stiffness that can continue to focal weakness. This muscle stiffness cannot be walked off ... "A Met-to-Val mutation in the skeletal muscle Na+ channel alpha-subunit in hyperkalaemic periodic paralysis". Nature. 354 (6352 ... "Paramyotonia congenita and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis associated with a Met 1592 Val substitution in the skeletal muscle ...
Ocular paralysis (cranial nerve palsy). *Impaired muscle coordination. *Weakness (muscle). *Loss of sensation ... It has also been used to study the metabolism of other organs such as muscles.[13]:309 ...
severe muscle weakness or paralysis. *Hyperphosphatemia. Like potassium, phosphates are also predominantly intracellular. ...
... incomplete paralysis ; Class C - paralysed below segment T10 ; Class D - cauda equina with functioning thigh muscles) . Club ... incomplete paralysis; Class C - paralysed below segment T10; Class D - cauda equina with functioning thigh muscles. Swimming ... incomplete paralysis ; Class C - paralysed below segment T10 ; Class D - cauda equina with functioning thigh muscles. Precision ... incomplete paralysis; Class C - paralysed below segment T10; Class D - cauda equina with functioning thigh muscles. ...
Song, YW; Kim, SJ; Heo, TH; Kim, MH; Kim, JB (2012). "Normokalemic periodic paralysis is not a distinct disease". Muscle & ... hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, was first identified in the descendants of Impressive, a registered Quarter Horse (see AQHA ... periodic paralysis, myotonia congenita and paramyotonia congenita. Channelopathies affecting synaptic function are a type of ... website). The channelopathies of human skeletal muscle include hyper- and hypokalemic (high and low potassium blood ...
... and muscle paralysis. In poultry and wild birds, flaccid paralysis is usually seen in the legs, wings, neck and eyelids. ... Symptoms include flaccid muscle paralysis; dogs with breathing difficulties will require more intensive care monitoring. Muscle ... The muscle paralysis is progressive; it usually begins at the hindquarters and gradually moves to the front limbs, neck, and ... This causes paralysis. Advanced botulism can cause respiratory failure by paralysing the muscles of the chest; this can ...
The toxin paralyses muscles gradually. Large mammals hunted in this way die slowly from a small injection of the poison. ...
Symptoms include decreased or absent reflexes and muscle tone, weakness, or paralysis. It often occurs in the rear legs and is ... Death can occur secondary to paralysis of the respiratory muscles, but in North America, a good prognosis results once the ... Tick paralysis is an acute, ascending motor paralysis that occurs in dogs and cats. The cause is a neurotoxin in the saliva of ... Distal symmetric polyneuropathy symptoms include atrophy of the distal leg muscles and the muscles of the head, and rear limb ...
The former also provides paralysis of the eye muscles. Corneal incision - Two cuts are made at the margin of the clear cornea ...
Flaccid paralysis of skeletal muscles develops within 1 minute. In normal subjects, skeletal muscle function returns to normal ... This condition is recognized clinically when paralysis of the respiratory and other skeletal muscles fails to spontaneously ... There may be genetic variability in the kinetics of this enzyme that can lead to prolonged muscle blockade and potentially ... This depolarization initially triggers fasciculation of skeletal muscle. As a result of prolonged depolarization, endogenous ...
This causes muscle weakness and paralysis. Restoration of nerve function may occur in some fibers a second time, but eventually ... Changes in muscle strength are determined in specific muscle groups using various muscle scales which quantify strength, such ... The overuse and underuse of muscles also may contribute to muscle weakness. Another theory is that people who have recovered ... Muscle strength and endurance training are more important in managing the symptoms of PPS than the ability to perform long ...
This was the desired plane for surgery when muscle relaxants were not used. Plane IV - from complete intercostal paralysis to ... Plane III - from beginning to completion of intercostal muscle paralysis. Diaphragmatic respiration persists but there is ... from cessation of eyeball movements to beginning of paralysis of intercostal muscles. Laryngeal reflex is lost although ... Pupils are widely dilated and muscles are relaxed. In 1954, Joseph F. Artusio further divided the first stage in Guedel's ...
Damage to motor fibers results in paralysis of the muscles. Nervous plexus injuries create more signs and symptoms from sensory ... Motor fibers that allow movement of skeletal muscle. Sympathetic fibers that innervate the skin and blood vessels of the four ... In axonotmesis, EMG changes (2 to 3 weeks after injury) in the denervated muscles include: Fibrillation potentials (FP) ... or irregular connections and contractions of muscles. There are two kinds of nerve injury classifications: Endoneurial tube ...
This may cause paralysis of both supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles. This article incorporates text in the public domain ...
Affected dogs have tremors, muscle weakness, and trouble walking. Symptoms slowly increase until limb paralysis begins to occur ... It can cause seizures, muscle stiffness, and ataxia, but is more commonly found in Staffordshire Bull Terriers.[19] A ...
Erb-Charcot paralysis: a rare form of spinal syphilis; named with French neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot. Erb's point: an ... Electrical stimulation over this region causes contraction of various arm muscles. Erb-Westphal symptom: a reflex anomaly seen ... Erb-Duchenne palsy, also known as Erb's palsy or brachial plexus palsy: a muscular paralysis during childbirth; named with ... Erb-Charcot disease - spastic spinal paralysis). Handbuch der Krankheiten des Nervensystems. (Textbook on disorders of the ...
Latrotoxin causes pain, muscle contraction and if untreated potentially paralysis and death. Snake venoms act as toxins at the ... causing muscle contraction. Muscles require innervation to function-and even just to maintain muscle tone, avoiding atrophy. ... This causes paralysis in the muscles involved in the affected junctions. Unlike presynaptic neurotoxins, postsynaptic toxins ... By doing so, it induces a transient flaccid paralysis and chemical denervation localized to the striated muscle that it has ...
"Restoration of grasp following paralysis through brain-controlled stimulation of muscles". Nature. 485 (7398): 368-71. Bibcode: ... While it can strengthen muscles, a significant downside for the users of FES is that their muscles tire after a short time and ... People have recovered sensation, use of formerly paralysed muscles, and bladder and bowel function after the surgeries, eg ... Functional electrical stimulation (FES) uses coordinated electric shocks to muscles to cause them to contract in a walking ...
Accelerated excretion of potassium ions (K+). With extreme K+ loss there is muscle weakness and eventually paralysis. ...
... is a type of facial paralysis that results in an inability to control the facial muscles on the affected side.[1] ... Facial palsy is typified by inability to control movement in the muscles of facial expression. The paralysis is of the ... regrowth of nerves controlling muscles attached to the eye may sidetrack and also regrow connections reaching the muscles of ... Bell's palsy is the most common cause of one sided facial nerve paralysis (70%).[2][5] It occurs in 1 to 4 per 10,000 people ...
Loss of muscle function or paralysis of the lower legs. *Mental confusion/speech difficulties ... Hoarseness, where the child makes moves to moan but emits no sound or just faint moans[24] caused by nerve paralysis[10] ... Muscle tremor is typical of avian encephalomyelitis. A therapeutic diagnosis can be tried by supplementing thiamine only in the ... It is a kind of paralysis, or rather tremor: for it penetrates the motion and sensation of the hands and feet indeed sometimes ...
Where there is complete paralysis, the preferred option is to perform vertical muscle transposition procedures such as Jensen's ... These two muscles are synergists or "yoke muscles" as both attempt to move the eye over to the left or right. The condition is ... "Unaugmented Vertical Muscle Transposition Surgery for Chronic Sixth Nerve Paralysis". Strabismus. 14 (4): 177-181. doi:10.1080/ ... Vallée, L.; Guilbert, F.; Lemaitre, J. F.; Nuyts, J. P. (1990). "Benign paralysis of the 6th cranial nerve in children". ...
Injury to the nerve results in: Paralysis of the teres minor muscle and deltoid muscle, resulting in loss of abduction of arm ( ... Paralysis of deltoid and teres minor muscles results in flat shoulder deformity. Loss of sensation in the skin over a small ... The axillary nerve supplies two muscles in the arm: deltoid (a muscle of the shoulder), and teres minor (one of the rotator ... The anterior branch also gives off a few small cutaneous branches, which pierce the muscle and supply in the overlaying skin. ...
Akinesia (paralysis of the external eye muscles) may be less complete, however. Tenon JR, Naus J, Blanken R (March 2003). " ... It is perforated by the tendons of the ocular muscles, and is reflected backward on each as a tubular sheath. The sheath of the ... The expansions from the sheaths of the Recti lateralis and medialis are strong, especially that from the latter muscle, and are ... and sometimes may only affect the lacrimal gland or the extraocular muscles. Local anaesthetic may be instilled into the space ...
Eric Dubois et al.: Effect of pollen traps on the relapse of chronic bee paralysis virus in honeybee (Apis mellifera) colonies ... D. Qian et al.: Extra small virus-like particles (XSV) and nodavirus associated with whitish muscle disease in the giant ... Slow bee paralysis virus (SBPV), sowie Flügeldeformationsvirus - en. Deformed wing virus (DWV) ...
This results in paralysis of the vocal cord muscles.. Vocal cord paralysis can affect your ability to speak and even breathe. ... In vocal cord paralysis, the nerve impulses to your voice box (larynx) are disrupted, resulting in paralysis of the muscle. ... Bulk injection. Paralysis of the nerve to your vocal cord will probably leave the vocal cord muscle thin and weak. To add bulk ... For vocal cord paralysis, some basic questions to ask your doctor include:. *Whats the most likely cause of my vocal cord ...
For people with sleep paralysis, you come into consciousness before your brain returns control of your muscles which in turn ... Paralysis whilst entering or exiting REM sleep (dreaming). Total body paralysis, with sparing of respiration and eye movements ... Sleep Paralysis can be a symptom of another sleep disorder called Narcolepsy. This is a more severe sleeping disorder and would ... A Few Suggestions on How to Escape Sleep Paralysis *. Willing yourself to make a sound or at times just moving your finger will ...
They use nerve transfers, nerve grafts, muscle transplants and innovative reanimation techniques to achieve the desired result. ... Facial paralysis in children can be one-sided (unilateral) or involve both sides (bilateral). It can be congenital, meaning ... Our facial paralysis clinic is run by Dr. Greg Borschel and Dr. Ron Zuker who are experienced microsurgeons. ... The Facial Paralysis Program at SickKids provides state of the art micro surgical reconstruction to animate the paralyzed face ...
Looking for abbreviations of BVFP? It is Bilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis. Bilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis listed as BVFP ... Laryngotracheal reconstruction with a muscle-pedicle hyoid bone flap: a series of 23 patients ... We have also considered its use in selected cases of bilateral vocal fold paralysis.. Botulinum toxin in otolaryngology: A ... On examination, we discovered that the patient had undiagnosed bilateral vocal fold paralysis. She exhibited no signs of any ...
What is tick paralysis? Meaning of tick paralysis as a finance term. What does tick paralysis mean in finance? ... Definition of tick paralysis in the Financial Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. ... Tick paralysis can lead to muscle weakness, loss of coordination and in some cases, death from respiratory failure as chest ... Tick paralysis financial definition of tick paralysis https://financial-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/tick+paralysis ...
Tick paralysis is a condition that occurs when a cat is bitten by a type of tick that produces a paralysis-causing toxin. Of ... Causes of Tick Paralysis in Cats. The singular cause of tick paralysis for cats is the bite of a tick that releases a toxin ... Symptoms of Tick Paralysis in Cats. If your cat has been bitten by a tick that can cause paralysis you will notice some visible ... Tick paralysis is a condition that occurs when a cat is bitten by a type of tick that produces a paralysis-causing toxin. Of ...
Sleep paralysis only paralyzes your voluntary muscles. Your lungs are semi-voluntary so that is why you can use breathing as ... Embrace Sleep Paralysis. If you experience sleep paralysis, it may be something that will stick with you for the rest of your ... Escaping Paralysis. Most people that experience sleep paralysis try to break out of it by moving one part of their body. ... Inducing Sleep Paralysis. Many people that hear about sleep paralysis want to try it regardless of the bad experiences most ...
This condition is called sleep paralysis. Sleep paralysis may leave you feeling frightened, especially if you also see or hear ... Your muscles are "turned off" during REM sleep. If you become aware before the REM cycle has finished, you may notice that you ... Who Develops Sleep Paralysis?. Up to as many as four out of every 10 people may have sleep paralysis. This common condition is ... What Is Sleep Paralysis?. Sleep paralysis is a feeling of being conscious but unable to move. It occurs when a person passes ...
You may have known about paralysis but you know there is a type called respiratory paralysis. This deadly form paralysis ... Respiratory Paralysis, also called Acute Respiratory Failure occurs when the muscles involved in breathing become severely weak ... Respiratory paralysis, if not treated, can cause the death of the patient due to lack of oxygen in the body. Patients suffering ... Who Is At Risk of Getting Respiratory Paralysis?. A person is more prone to acute respiratory failure if he/she:. *Takes a lot ...
Stimulating neurons with light can restore movement to paralysed mouse muscles - a step towards using optogenetic approaches ... Muscles in action. The group inserted an algal gene that codes for a light-responsive protein into mouse embryonic stem cells. ... The leg muscles contracted in response. "We were surprised at how well this worked," says Linda Greensmith, who led the UCL ... The teams first goal is to help people with motor neuron disease who lose the ability to control their breathing muscles. " ...
Facial Muscles Paralysis: 1 assigned downloads, like Bells Palsy from unique5stardeals ... Similar tags: facial • musclesparalysis Top tags: sound effects • games shop • service repair manual • yamaha ... Bells palsy Comprehensive overview covers causes, treatment of this usually temporary facial paralysis. Definition Bells palsy ...
Home ▶ Newsroom ▶ Releases ▶ Man Walks Again After Surgery to Reverse Muscle Paralysis ... Constantine had a brain stem stroke that caused paralysis on the right side of his body. His leg muscles became so severely ... "Our team performed a delicate surgery to reduce input from the nerves that were causing the muscles to over contract to the ... An additional nerve conduction study, called an electromyogram (EMG), identified the muscles causing the dysfunction. ...
Skeletal Muscle Paralysis in Hypothermic Patients After Cardiac Arrest (RELAX). This study has been completed. ... Paralysis. Muscle Hypotonia. Heart Diseases. Cardiovascular Diseases. Body Temperature Changes. Signs and Symptoms. Neurologic ... Requirement of Skeletal Muscle Paralysis in Hypothermic Patients After Cardiac Arrest - a Pilot Study. ... Cardiac Arrest With Successful Resuscitation Hypothermia Skeletal Muscle Relaxant Overdose Drug: rocuronium Other: placebo ...
Snyder-Warwick describes the surgical process of transferring muscle and nerve to restore movement after facial paralysis. ...
An artificial connection between the brain and muscles can restore complex hand movements in monkeys following paralysis, ... Brain-activated muscle stimulation restores monkeys hand movement after paralysis. April 20, 2012. ... Ref.: Ethier C., et al., Restoration of grasp following paralysis through brain-controlled stimulation of muscles, Nature, 2012 ... An artificial connection between the brain and muscles can restore complex hand movements in monkeys following paralysis, ...
Remarks ON PARALYSIS.... *Remarks ON PARALYSIS OF THE MOVEMENTS OF THE TRUNK IN HEMIPLEGIA, AND THE MUSCLES WHICH ARE AFFECTED ... Remarks ON PARALYSIS OF THE MOVEMENTS OF THE TRUNK IN HEMIPLEGIA, AND THE MUSCLES WHICH ARE AFFECTED Br Med J 1909; 1 :881 ... Remarks ON PARALYSIS OF THE MOVEMENTS OF THE TRUNK IN HEMIPLEGIA, AND THE MUSCLES WHICH ARE AFFECTED. Br Med J 1909; 1 doi: ... Remarks ON PARALYSIS OF THE MOVEMENTS OF THE TRUNK IN HEMIPLEGIA, AND THE MUSCLES WHICH ARE AFFECTED ...
List of 100 causes for Gait disorder and Leg paralysis and Muscle spasticity, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses ... Causes: Leg paralysis *Introduction: Leg paralysis *Leg paralysis: Add a 4th symptom *Leg paralysis: Remove a symptom Muscle ... Gait disorder AND Leg paralysis AND Muscle spasticity - Causes of All Symptoms *Gait disorder OR Leg paralysis OR Muscle ... Causes: Muscle spasticity *Introduction: Muscle spasticity *Muscle spasticity: Add a 4th symptom *Muscle spasticity: Remove a ...
Malfunction of this nerve can result in paralysis or weakness of the muscles of the ears, eyelids, lips, and nostrils. ... Facial nerve paresis and paralysis is a disorder of the facial cranial nerve - a nerve that originates in the brain (as opposed ... Facial Nerve Paresis/Paralysis in Rabbits. Facial nerve paresis and paralysis is a disorder of the facial cranial nerve - a ... Weakness/Paralysis of the Facial Muscles Due to Nerve Damage in Rabbits. ...
Influence of Skeletal Muscle Paralysis on Metabolism in Hypothermic Patients After Cardiac Arrest. The safety and scientific ... Influence of Skeletal Muscle Paralysis on Metabolism in Hypothermic Patients After Cardiac Arrest. ... Paralysis. Heart Arrest. Critical Illness. Heart Diseases. Cardiovascular Diseases. Disease Attributes. Pathologic Processes. ... The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of muscle relaxing drugs on the energy rate during hypothermia after ...
List of 283 causes for Calcaneal bone numb and Heartburn and Respiratory muscle paralysis, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, ... Respiratory muscle paralysis:*Causes: Respiratory muscle paralysis *Introduction: Respiratory muscle paralysis *Respiratory ... Respiratory muscle paralysis: Remove a symptom Results: Causes of Calcaneal bone numb AND Heartburn AND Respiratory muscle ... Calcaneal bone numb and Heartburn and Respiratory muscle paralysis. *Calcaneal bone numb AND Heartburn AND Respiratory muscle ...
Skeletal Muscle β-Adrenoceptors and Familial Hypokalaemic Periodic Paralysis (FHPP). I.M. Kantola, M.S. Elfellah, L.T. ... Skeletal Muscle β-Adrenoceptors and Familial Hypokalaemic Periodic Paralysis (FHPP). I.M. Kantola, M.S. Elfellah, L.T. ... Skeletal Muscle β-Adrenoceptors and Familial Hypokalaemic Periodic Paralysis (FHPP) Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a ...
Residual Paralysis , Incidence of Postoperative Residual Neuromuscular Blockade in Portugal ... Muscle paralysis , Post-Anesthesia , Residual Neuromuscular Blockade , Observational Study , ...
Safe Anesthesia Induction in Patients with Anterior Mediastinal Mass Using Muscle Paralysis Mona Sarkiss*, Carlos Jimenez, ... Ventilation and hemodynamics were unchanged after muscle paralysis, an 11.2 mm rigid bronchoscope was inserted without ... Safe Anesthesia Induction in Patients with Anterior Mediastinal Mass Using Muscle Paralysis. J Anesth Clin Res 8:722. doi: ... The muscle relaxation was reversed and the patient was extubated. The patients dyspnea and stridor resolved immediately after ...
These measures produced recovery from the respiratory muscle paralysis. Stool examination revealed eggs and numerous larvae of ... He continued to have severe diarrhea and again developed marked hypokalemia with respiratory muscle paralysis, abdominal ... followed by acute respiratory failure due to respiratory muscle paralysis, and cardiac arrest. He was resuscitated and ... Hypokalemic Respiratory Muscle Paralysis following Strongyloides Stercoralis Hyperinfection: A Case Report * * Orlando Antônio ...
Combating Facial Paralysis With Low-Latency Muscle Reanimation using LabVIEW and the NI RIO platform Company: Tampere ... Combating Facial Paralysis With Low-Latency Muscle Reanimation. using LabVIEW and the NI RIO platform ... Unilateral Facial Paralysis and Facial Pacing. Unilateral facial paralysis is a condition in which one side of the face is ... Current limitations include difficulties in activating the targeted muscles, difficulties in producing varying levels of muscle ...
  • Because vocal cord paralysis keeps the opening to the airway from completely opening or closing, other complications may include choking on or actually inhaling (aspirating) food or liquid. (mayoclinic.org)
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