Lining of the ORAL CAVITY, including mucosa on the GUMS; the PALATE; the LIP; the CHEEK; floor of the mouth; and other structures. The mucosa is generally a nonkeratinized stratified squamous EPITHELIUM covering muscle, bone, or glands but can show varying degree of keratinization at specific locations.
The oval-shaped oral cavity located at the apex of the digestive tract and consisting of two parts: the vestibule and the oral cavity proper.
Lining of the INTESTINES, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. In the SMALL INTESTINE, the mucosa is characterized by a series of folds and abundance of absorptive cells (ENTEROCYTES) with MICROVILLI.
Lining of the STOMACH, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. The surface cells produce MUCUS that protects the stomach from attack by digestive acid and enzymes. When the epithelium invaginates into the LAMINA PROPRIA at various region of the stomach (CARDIA; GASTRIC FUNDUS; and PYLORUS), different tubular gastric glands are formed. These glands consist of cells that secrete mucus, enzymes, HYDROCHLORIC ACID, or hormones.
The mucous lining of the NASAL CAVITY, including lining of the nostril (vestibule) and the OLFACTORY MUCOSA. Nasal mucosa consists of ciliated cells, GOBLET CELLS, brush cells, small granule cells, basal cells (STEM CELLS) and glands containing both mucous and serous cells.
Tumors or cancer of the MOUTH.
An EPITHELIUM with MUCUS-secreting cells, such as GOBLET CELLS. It forms the lining of many body cavities, such as the DIGESTIVE TRACT, the RESPIRATORY TRACT, and the reproductive tract. Mucosa, rich in blood and lymph vessels, comprises an inner epithelium, a middle layer (lamina propria) of loose CONNECTIVE TISSUE, and an outer layer (muscularis mucosae) of SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS that separates the mucosa from submucosa.
That portion of the nasal mucosa containing the sensory nerve endings for SMELL, located at the dome of each NASAL CAVITY. The yellow-brownish olfactory epithelium consists of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS; brush cells; STEM CELLS; and the associated olfactory glands.
Solutions for rinsing the mouth, possessing cleansing, germicidal, or palliative properties. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
Total lack of teeth through disease or extraction.
The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the RECTUM. It includes the ASCENDING COLON; the TRANSVERSE COLON; the DESCENDING COLON; and the SIGMOID COLON.
The mucous lining of the LARYNX, consisting of various types of epithelial cells ranging from stratified squamous EPITHELIUM in the upper larynx to ciliated columnar epithelium in the rest of the larynx, mucous GOBLET CELLS, and glands containing both mucous and serous cells.
Decreased salivary flow.
A species of ENTEROVIRUS infecting humans and containing 10 serotypes, mostly coxsackieviruses.
Devices or pieces of equipment placed in or around the mouth or attached to instruments to protect the external or internal tissues of the mouth and the teeth.
The shortest and widest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE adjacent to the PYLORUS of the STOMACH. It is named for having the length equal to about the width of 12 fingers.
The portion of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT between the PYLORUS of the STOMACH and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE. It is divisible into three portions: the DUODENUM, the JEJUNUM, and the ILEUM.
Inflammation of the GASTRIC MUCOSA, a lesion observed in a number of unrelated disorders.
The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
A muscular organ in the mouth that is covered with pink tissue called mucosa, tiny bumps called papillae, and thousands of taste buds. The tongue is anchored to the mouth and is vital for chewing, swallowing, and for speech.
An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.
Ulceration of the GASTRIC MUCOSA due to contact with GASTRIC JUICE. It is often associated with HELICOBACTER PYLORI infection or consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).
The distal and narrowest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between the JEJUNUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE.
The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SALIVARY GLANDS and mucous glands of the mouth. It contains MUCINS, water, organic salts, and ptylin.
Spasmodic contraction of the masseter muscle resulting in forceful jaw closure. This may be seen with a variety of diseases, including TETANUS, as a complication of radiation therapy, trauma, or in association with neoplastic conditions.
The part of the face that is below the eye and to the side of the nose and mouth.
A condition in which there is a change of one adult cell type to another similar adult cell type.
A spiral bacterium active as a human gastric pathogen. It is a gram-negative, urease-positive, curved or slightly spiral organism initially isolated in 1982 from patients with lesions of gastritis or peptic ulcers in Western Australia. Helicobacter pylori was originally classified in the genus CAMPYLOBACTER, but RNA sequencing, cellular fatty acid profiles, growth patterns, and other taxonomic characteristics indicate that the micro-organism should be included in the genus HELICOBACTER. It has been officially transferred to Helicobacter gen. nov. (see Int J Syst Bacteriol 1989 Oct;39(4):297-405).
Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.
Inflammation of the COLON that is predominantly confined to the MUCOSA. Its major symptoms include DIARRHEA, rectal BLEEDING, the passage of MUCUS, and ABDOMINAL PAIN.
An offensive, foul breath odor resulting from a variety of causes such as poor oral hygiene, dental or oral infections, or the ingestion of certain foods.
The region between the sharp indentation at the lower third of the STOMACH (incisura angularis) and the junction of the PYLORUS with the DUODENUM. Pyloric antral glands contain mucus-secreting cells and gastrin-secreting endocrine cells (G CELLS).
The mucous membrane lining the RESPIRATORY TRACT, including the NASAL CAVITY; the LARYNX; the TRACHEA; and the BRONCHI tree. The respiratory mucosa consists of various types of epithelial cells ranging from ciliated columnar to simple squamous, mucous GOBLET CELLS, and glands containing both mucous and serous cells.
Either of the two fleshy, full-blooded margins of the mouth.
Infections with organisms of the genus HELICOBACTER, particularly, in humans, HELICOBACTER PYLORI. The clinical manifestations are focused in the stomach, usually the gastric mucosa and antrum, and the upper duodenum. This infection plays a major role in the pathogenesis of type B gastritis and peptic ulcer disease.
An appliance used as an artificial or prosthetic replacement for missing teeth and adjacent tissues. It does not include CROWNS; DENTAL ABUTMENTS; nor TOOTH, ARTIFICIAL.
One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.
A part of the upper respiratory tract. It contains the organ of SMELL. The term includes the external nose, the nasal cavity, and the PARANASAL SINUSES.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
Pathological processes that tend eventually to become malignant. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.
Methods, procedures, and tests performed to diagnose disease, disordered function, or disability.
Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.
A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.
Specialized cells of the hematopoietic system that have branch-like extensions. They are found throughout the lymphatic system, and in non-lymphoid tissues such as SKIN and the epithelia of the intestinal, respiratory, and reproductive tracts. They trap and process ANTIGENS, and present them to T-CELLS, thereby stimulating CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY. They are different from the non-hematopoietic FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS, which have a similar morphology and immune system function, but with respect to humoral immunity (ANTIBODY PRODUCTION).
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
The process by which antigen is presented to lymphocytes in a form they can recognize. This is performed by antigen presenting cells (APCs). Some antigens require processing before they can be recognized. Antigen processing consists of ingestion and partial digestion of the antigen by the APC, followed by presentation of fragments on the cell surface. (From Rosen et al., Dictionary of Immunology, 1989)
Substances that dissociate into two or more ions, to some extent, in water. Solutions of electrolytes thus conduct an electric current and can be decomposed by it (ELECTROLYSIS). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Insulin that has been modified to contain an ASPARTIC ACID instead of a PROLINE at position 38 of the B-chain.
Insulin that has been modified so that the B-chain contains a LYSINE at position 28 instead of a PROLINE and a PROLINE at position 29 instead of a LYSINE. It is used to manage BLOOD GLUCOSE levels in patients with TYPE 2 DIABETES.
Important modulators of the activity of plasminogen activators. The inhibitors belong to the serpin family of proteins and inhibit both the tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators.
Administration of a soluble dosage form between the cheek and gingiva. It may involve direct application of a drug onto the buccal mucosa, as by painting or spraying.

Explanations for the clinical and microscopic localization of lesions in pemphigus foliaceus and vulgaris. (1/2113)

Patients with pemphigus foliaceus (PF) have blisters on skin, but not mucous membranes, whereas patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV) develop blisters on mucous membranes and/or skin. PF and PV blisters are due to loss of keratinocyte cell-cell adhesion in the superficial and deep epidermis, respectively. PF autoantibodies are directed against desmoglein (Dsg) 1; PV autoantibodies bind Dsg3 or both Dsg3 and Dsg1. In this study, we test the hypothesis that coexpression of Dsg1 and Dsg3 in keratinocytes protects against pathology due to antibody-induced dysfunction of either one alone. Using passive transfer of pemphigus IgG to normal and DSG3(null) neonatal mice, we show that in the areas of epidermis and mucous membrane that coexpress Dsg1 and Dsg3, antibodies against either desmoglein alone do not cause spontaneous blisters, but antibodies against both do. In areas (such as superficial epidermis of normal mice) where Dsg1 without Dsg3 is expressed, anti-Dsg1 antibodies alone can cause blisters. Thus, the anti-desmoglein antibody profiles in pemphigus sera and the normal tissue distributions of Dsg1 and Dsg3 determine the sites of blister formation. These studies suggest that pemphigus autoantibodies inhibit the adhesive function of desmoglein proteins, and demonstrate that either Dsg1 or Dsg3 alone is sufficient to maintain keratinocyte adhesion.  (+info)

Circadian variation in the expression of cell-cycle proteins in human oral epithelium. (2/2113)

At the tissue level, there is experimental and clinical data to suggest a cytokinetic coordination of the cell cycle with a greater proportion of cycling cells entering S-phase and mitosis at specific times of the day. The association of certain cell-cycle proteins with defined events in the cell cycle is well established and may be used to study the timing of cell-cycle phases over 24 hours. In this study oral mucosal biopsies were obtained from six normal human volunteers at 4-hour intervals, six times over 24 hours. Using immunohistochemistry, the number of positive cells expressing the proteins p53, cyclin-E, cyclin-A, cyclin-B1, and Ki-67 was determined for each biopsy and expressed as the number of positive cells per mm of basement membrane. We found a statistically significant circadian variation in the nuclear expression of all of these proteins with the high point of expression for p53 at 10:56 hours, cyclin-E at 14:59 hours, cyclin-A at 16:09 hours, cyclin-B1 at 21:13 hours, and Ki-67 at 02:50 hours. The circadian variation in the nuclear expression of cyclins-E (G1/S phase), -A (G2-phase), and -B1 (M-phase) with a normal physiological progression over time suggests a statistically significant circadian variation in oral epithelial cell proliferation. The finding of a circadian variation in the nuclear expression of p53 protein corresponding to late G1 is novel. This information has clinical implications regarding the timing of chemotherapy and radiotherapy.  (+info)

Adhesive and mammalian transglutaminase substrate properties of Candida albicans Hwp1. (3/2113)

The pathogenesis of candidiasis involves invasion of host tissues by filamentous forms of the opportunistic yeast Candida albicans. Morphology-specific gene products may confer proinvasive properties. A hypha-specific surface protein, Hwp1, with similarities to mammalian small proline-rich proteins was shown to serve as a substrate for mammalian transglutaminases. Candida albicans strains lacking Hwp1 were unable to form stable attachments to human buccal epithelial cells and had a reduced capacity to cause systemic candidiasis in mice. This represents a paradigm for microbial adhesion that implicates essential host enzymes.  (+info)

Cyclooxygenase-2 expression is up-regulated in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. (4/2113)

The purpose of this study was to determine whether cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was overexpressed in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the expression of COX-2 in head and neck tissue. Mean levels of COX-2 mRNA were increased by nearly 150-fold in HNSCC (n = 24) compared with normal oral mucosa from healthy volunteers (n = 17). Additionally, there was about a 50-fold increase in amounts of COX-2 mRNA in normal-appearing epithelium adjacent to HNSCC (n = 10) compared with normal oral mucosa from healthy volunteers. Immunoblotting demonstrated that COX-2 protein was present in six of six cases of HNSCC but was undetectable in normal oral mucosa from healthy subjects. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that COX-2 was expressed in both HNSCC and adjacent normal-appearing epithelium. Taken together, these results suggest that COX-2 may be a target for the prevention or treatment of HNSCC.  (+info)

Nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoreticular tissue (NALT) immunity: fimbriae-specific Th1 and Th2 cell-regulated IgA responses for the inhibition of bacterial attachment to epithelial cells and subsequent inflammatory cytokine production. (5/2113)

To investigate the antibacterial activity of mucosal Th1 and Th2 immune responses induced nasally and orally, mice were immunized with mucosal vaccine containing fimbrial protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a causative agent for a destructive chronic inflammation in the periodontium, and cholera toxin (CT) as mucosal adjuvant. Nasal vaccine containing low doses of fimbriae (10 micrograms) and CT (1 microgram) induced Ag-specific Th1/Th2-type response in CD4+ T cells in mucosal effector tissues, including nasal passage and submandibular glands, which accounted for the generation of Ag-specific IgA-producing cells. In contrast, oral immunization required higher amounts of fimbriae and CT for the induction of Ag-specific IgA responses. Fimbriae-specific IgA mAbs generated from submandibular glands of nasally immunized mice inhibited P. gingivalis attachment to and reduced subsequent inflammatory cytokine production from epithelial cells. These findings suggest that nasal vaccination is an effective immunization regimen for the induction of Ag-specific Th1 and Th2 cell-driven IgA immune responses that possess the ability to inhibit bacterial attachment to epithelial cells and subsequent inflammatory cytokine production.  (+info)

Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 through breast-feeding: how can it be prevented? (6/2113)

One-third to two-thirds of maternal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection to breast-fed infants can be attributed to ingestion of breast milk. The presence of HIV-1 as cell-free and as cell-associated virus in milk has been documented. Several substances in breast milk may be protective against transmission, including maternal anti-HIV antibodies, vitamin A, lactoferrin, and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor. The portal of virus entry in the infant's gastrointestinal tract is unknown but may involve breaches in mucosal surfaces, transport across M cells, or direct infection of other epithelial cells, such as enterocytes. Timing of transmission of HIV-1 during lactation should be further clarified. An early rebound of plasma viremia after withdrawal of antiretrovirals was recently detected. This rebound may reduce the benefit of antiretroviral prophylaxis when women breast-feed their infants. Interventions should be viewed from the public health perspective of risks of infant morbidity and mortality associated with breast-feeding versus risks from formula-feeding.  (+info)

Oral transmission of primate lentiviruses. (7/2113)

Oral transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is well documented in children who become infected postnatally through breast milk. In contrast, epidemiologic surveys have yielded conflicting data regarding oral HIV-1 transmission among adults, even though case reports have described seroconversion and the development of AIDS in adults whose only risk was oral-genital contact. To study oral virus transmission in primate models, we exposed rhesus macaques of various ages to cell-free simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), including uncloned and molecularly cloned viruses. In neonates, viremia and AIDS developed after nontraumatic oral exposure to several SIV strains. Furthermore, chimeric simian human immunodeficiency viruses containing the HIV-1 envelope can also cross intact upper gastrointestinal mucosal surfaces in neonates. In adult macaques, infection and AIDS have resulted from well-controlled, nontraumatic, experimental oral exposure to different strains of SIV. These findings have implications for the risks of HIV-1 transmission during oral-genital contact.  (+info)

Mucosal dendritic cells and immunodeficiency viruses. (8/2113)

Dendritic cells [DCs] have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). When skin was used as a model for mucosae, the cutaneous DC-T cell milieu allowed the growth of HIV-1 and much of the newly produced virus could be detected in multinucleated DC-T cell syncytia. Such virus replication occurs irrespective of the genetic subtype, the syncytium- and non-syncytium-inducing capacities of the viruses, and whether they are classified as T cell- or macrophage-tropic. Similar DC-syncytia have been identified within the mucosal surfaces of the tonsillar tissue of HIV-1-infected persons. More recently, it was demonstrated that DC-T cell mixtures from the skin, mucosae, and blood of healthy macaques similarly support the replication of simian immunodeficiency virus. In both the human and monkey systems, active virus replication requires the presence of both DCs and T cells. Further studies using the macaque model are underway to elucidate the role of DCs in the transmission and spread of HIV infection.  (+info)

TY - JOUR. T1 - Comparative phenotypic and functional analysis of migratory dendritic cell subsets from human oral mucosa and skin. AU - Kosten, Ilona Jennifer. AU - Van De Ven, Rieneke. AU - Thon, Maria. AU - Gibbs, Susan. AU - De Gruijl, Tanja D.. PY - 2017/7/1. Y1 - 2017/7/1. N2 - Antigen exposure to oral mucosa is generally thought to lead to immune tolerance induction. However, very little is known about the subset composition and function of dendritic cells (DC) migrating from human oral mucosa. Here we show that migratory DC from healthy human gingival explants consist of the same phenotypic subsets in the same frequency distribution as DC migrating from human skin. The gingival CD1a+ Langerhans cell and interstitial DC subsets lacked CXCR4 expression in contrast to their cutaneous counterparts, pointing to different migration mechanisms, consistent with previous observations in constructed skin and gingival equivalents. Remarkably, without any exogenous conditioning, gingival explants ...
It is unclear if buccal cell samples contain sufficient human DNA with adequately sized fragments for high throughput genetic bioassays. Yet buccal cell sample collection is an attractive alternative to gathering blood samples for genetic epidemiologists engaged in large-scale genetic biomarker studies. We assessed the genotyping efficiency (GE) and genotyping concordance (GC) of buccal cell DNA samples compared to corresponding blood DNA samples, from 32 Nurses Health Study (NHS) participants using the Illumina Infinium 660W-Quad platform. We also assessed how GE and GC accuracy varied as a function of DNA concentration using serial dilutions of buccal DNA samples. Finally we determined the nature and genomic distribution of discordant genotypes in buccal DNA samples. The mean GE of undiluted buccal cell DNA samples was high (99.32%), as was the GC between the paired buccal and blood samples (99.29%). GC between the dilutions versus the undiluted buccal DNA was also very high (greater than ...
It is unclear if buccal cell samples contain sufficient human DNA with adequately sized fragments for high throughput genetic bioassays. Yet buccal cell sample collection is an attractive alternative to gathering blood samples for genetic epidemiologists engaged in large-scale genetic biomarker studies. We assessed the genotyping efficiency (GE) and genotyping concordance (GC) of buccal cell DNA samples compared to corresponding blood DNA samples, from 32 Nurses Health Study (NHS) participants using the Illumina Infinium 660W-Quad platform. We also assessed how GE and GC accuracy varied as a function of DNA concentration using serial dilutions of buccal DNA samples. Finally we determined the nature and genomic distribution of discordant genotypes in buccal DNA samples. The mean GE of undiluted buccal cell DNA samples was high (99.32%), as was the GC between the paired buccal and blood samples (99.29%). GC between the dilutions versus the undiluted buccal DNA was also very high (greater than ...
Purpose: The oral mucosal epithelium shows substantial potential for use in regenerative medicine, including the treatment of ocular surface disease. The rationale for using oral mucosal cells is the possibility of treating bilateral ocular surface stem cell disease without the use of immunosuppression. The present project determines the ideal harvesting site for oral mucosal biopsies and the optimum culture media for these cells.. Methods: Pieces of oral epithelium were used from four locations: buccal mucosa (BM), hard palate (HP), lower lip (LL), and transition zone of the lower lip (TZ) of Sprague-Dawley rats. Explants were grown in four different culture media for six days. The media were 1) RPMI 1640 with 10% heat- inactivated fetal bovine serum (FBS), 2 mM L-glutamine, and 50 IU/mL penicillin-streptomycin; 2) EpiLife with epidermal growth supplement; 3) oral keratinocyte media (OKM) with oral keratinocyte growth factor; and 4) DMEM and Ham 12 (1:1 mixture) supplemented with 10% FBS, 5 ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - EXPRESSION of Cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxigenase-2 in normal and pathological human oral mucosa. AU - Leone, Angelo. AU - Gerbino, Aldo. AU - Buscemi, Maria. AU - Burruano, Francesco. AU - Tortorici, Silvia. AU - Mauro, Annamaria. AU - Lipari, Luana. AU - Provenzano, Salvatore. PY - 2010. Y1 - 2010. N2 - Abstract: Cyclooxigenase (COX) is the rate-limiting enzyme for the conversion of arachidonic acid (AA) to prostaglandins(PGs). Two isoforms of COX have been identified: COX-1 is constitutively expressed in many cells and is involved in cellhomeostasis, angiogenesis and cell-cell signalling; COX-2 is not expressed in normal condition however it is stronglyexpressed in inflammation. The oral cavity is costantly exposed to physical and chemical trauma that could lead to mucosalreactions such as hyperplasia, dysplasia and cancer. Early diagnosis is the most important issue to address for a positiveoutcome of oral cancer; therefore it would be useful to identify molecular markers ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Immune responses to Candida albicans in models of in vitro reconstituted human oral epithelium. AU - Wagener, Jeanette. AU - Mailänder-Sanchez, Daniela. AU - Schaller, Martin. PY - 2012. Y1 - 2012. N2 - In this protocol, we describe the application of commercially available three-dimensional organotypic tissues of human oral mucosa to study the interaction between Candida albicans and epithelial cells. Infection experiments show high reproducibility and can be used to analyse directly pathogen/epithelial cell interactions. However, the system is also very flexible. Using histological, biochemical, immunological, and molecular methods, it is possible to analyse several stages of infection by C. albicans wild type or mutant strains and demonstrate the consequence of disrupting genes encoding putative virulence factors required for host cell invasion and immune defence induction. This model provides information about host and pathogen protein and gene expression during direct ...
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Background: The human microbiota is postulated to affect cancer risk, but collecting microbiota specimens with prospective follow-up for diseases will take time. Buccal cell samples have been obtained from mouthwash for the study of human genomic DNA in many cohort studies. Here, we evaluate the feasibility of using buccal cell samples to examine associations of human microbiota and disease risk.. Methods: We obtained buccal cells from mouthwash in 41 healthy participants using a protocol that is widely employed to obtain buccal cells for the study of human DNA. We compared oral microbiota from buccal cells with that from eight other oral sample types collected by following the protocols of the Human Microbiome Project. Microbiota profiles were determined by sequencing 16S rRNA gene V3-V4 region.. Results: Compared with each of the eight other oral samples, the buccal cell samples had significantly more observed species (P , 0.002) and higher alpha diversity (Shannon index, P , 0.02). The ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Type IV collagen α6 chain is a regulator of keratin 10 in keratinization of oral mucosal epithelium. AU - Komori, Taishi. AU - Ono, Mitsuaki. AU - Hara, Emilio satoshi. AU - Ueda, Junji. AU - Nguyen, Ha Thi Thu. AU - Nguyen, Ha Thi. AU - Yonezawa, Tomoko. AU - Maeba, Takahiro. AU - Ono, Aya. AU - Takarada, Takeshi. AU - Momota, Ryusuke. AU - Maekawa, Kenji. AU - Kuboki, Takuo. AU - Oohashi, Toshitaka. PY - 2018/12/1. Y1 - 2018/12/1. N2 - Keratinized mucosa is of fundamental importance to maintain healthy gingival tissue, and understanding the mechanisms of oral mucosa keratinization is crucial to successfully manage healthy gingiva. Previous studies have shown a strong involvement of the basement membrane in the proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells. Therefore, first, to identify the keratinized mucosa-specific basement membrane components, immunohistochemical analysis for the six alpha chains of type IV collagen was performed in 8-week-old mice. No difference in ...
A significant problem in drug development of novel small molecules is the lack of available tissues (surrogate tissues) that allow for the assessment of the molecular and biochemical effects of (targeted-therapies) drug action. The information obtained from surrogate tissues might help us validate previous preclinical studies with those agents and also dose them in a more rational way. Oral keratinocytes, which are accessible by non-invasive means, might be useful to assess drug action. The proposed study seeks to investigate the genetic, molecular, and biochemical effects of novel agents in oral buccal mucosal cells. Patients already enrolled in Phase I and II clinical trials for neoplastic diseases at the Clinical Center will undergo oral cytobrushing before and during therapy to determine the molecular and biochemical effects of novel agents in the oral mucosa cells. Similar studies will be performed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In order to validate to compare and compare the oral ...
The Streptococcus genus comprises ninety-two recognized species that are present in a wide variety of habitats [1]. In humans and animals, a number of streptococcal species are important pathogens (e.g., S. pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, S. suis, and S. mutans), while others are members of mutualistic microflora (e.g., S. oralis, S. downei, S. dentirousetti, and S. salivarius). The species of the Streptococcus genus have been divided into six groups (anginosus, bovis, mitis, mutans, pyogenic, and salivarius) based on 16S rDNA phylogenetic inferences [2]. According to these authors, the salivarius group is composed of three species: (1) S. salivarius, a pioneer colonizer of the human oral mucosa that is isolated mainly from the dorsum of the tongue, the cheeks, and the palate [3], (2) S. vestibularis, a mutualistic bacterium that is present on the vestibulum of the human oral mucosa [4], and (3) S. thermophilus, a thermophilic species [5] that is part of starter cultures used in the production of ...
Purpose: To induce the expression of corneal epithelium-specific cytokeratin 3 (K3) in immortalized human oral mucosal epithelial cells (OKF6/TERT cells) using lentiviral transduction of Pax6.. Methods: OKF6/TERT cells were transduced with two types of lentiviruses, each carrying one of the two variants of Pax6 (Pax6 variant 1 and 2). The cells were cultured in modified keratinocyte serum-free medium (K-sfm) for 3 days after transduction and were cultured in keratinocyte conditioned medium (KCM) with 3T3 feeder cells for another 11 days to stratify them. The gene expressions were examined with quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunofluorescence imaging on day 3 and day 14.. Results: OKF6/TERT cells had no expression of K3 without transduction of Pax6 (Gene expression compared to GAPDH was 0.01±0.00). OKF6/TERT cells expressed K3 on day 3 only when they were transduced with Pax6 variant 1 (Gene expression compared to GAPDH was 7.31±0.66, P,0.05). Mucin 16 (MUC16) was also ...
Additional file 1: of Transplantation of oral mucosal epithelial cells seeded on decellularized and lyophilized amniotic membrane for the regeneration of injured endometrium
Introduction: Vaginal delivery of medication is advantageous in allowing for the medication to avoid first-pass metabolism and gastrointestinal degrad...
The oral mucosa is the mucous membrane lining the inside of the mouth and consists of stratified squamous epithelium termed oral epithelium and an underlying connective tissue termed lamina propria. The oral cavity has sometimes been described as a mirror that reflects the health of the individual. Changes indicative of disease are seen as alterations in the oral mucosa lining the mouth, which can reveal systemic conditions, such as diabetes or vitamin deficiency, or the local effects of chronic tobacco or alcohol use. Oral mucosa can be divided into three main categories based on function and histology: Masticatory mucosa, keratinized stratified squamous epithelium, found on the dorsum of the tongue, hard palate and attached gingiva. Lining mucosa, nonkeratinized stratified squamous epithelium, found almost everywhere else in the oral cavity, including the: Buccal mucosa refers to the inside lining of the cheeks and floor of the mouth and is part of the lining mucosa. Labial mucosa refers to ...
This page includes the following topics and synonyms: Labial mucosa, Buccal mucosa, Masticatory Mucosa, Movable Mucosa, Oral Mucosa.
Most treatment failure of buccal mucosal cancer post surgery is locoregional recurrence. We tried to figure out how close the surgical margin being unsafe and needed further adjuvant treatment. Between August 2000 and June 2008, a total of 110 patients with buccal mucosa carcinoma (25 with stage I, 31 with stage II, 11 with stage III, and 43 with Stage IV classified according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer 6th edition) were treated with surgery alone (n = 32), surgery plus postoperative radiotherapy (n = 38) or surgery plus adjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (n = 40). Main outcome measures: The primary endpoint was locoregional disease control. The median follow-up time at analysis was 25 months (range, 4-104 months). The 3-year locoregional control rates were significantly different when a 3-mm surgical margin (≤3 versus >3 mm, 71% versus 95%, p = 0.04) but not a 5-mm margin (75% versus 92%, p = 0.22) was used as the cut-off level. We also found a quantitative correlation between
Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of oral mucosa lesions among diabetic patients in, South Kerala, India. Methods: A cross- sectional observational stud..
White lesions are the pathological changes seen in the oral cavity involving the soft tissues like buccal mucosa, palatal mucosa, tongue and floor of mouth.
Methylation status in normal oral epithelial cells and HNSCC.A: RUNX3 expression was examined after 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza) treatment. HSC4 cells were
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TY - CONF. T1 - TRANSMUCOSAL PERMEABILITY MODEL OF 5-FLUOROURACIL THROUGH PORCINE AND RECOSTITUTED ORAL EPITHELIUM. AU - Campisi, Giuseppina. AU - De Caro, Viviana. AU - Giannola, Libero Italo. PY - 2005. Y1 - 2005. UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10447/26838. M3 - Other. SP - 82. EP - 83. ER - ...
OUTLINE: This is a multicenter study.. Previously procured and archived bone marrow aspirate samples, blood and buccal cell samples, and bone marrow biopsy slides are analyzed for FLT3 ITD, MLL PTD, NPM1, KIT, KRAS, NRAS, CEBPA, WT1, JAK2, RUNX1, TET2, ASXL1, IDH1 and IDH2, and CBL mutations, CBF fusion genes, levels of BAALC, ERG, EVI1, MN1, and APP microarray gene-expression, microRNA gene-expression signature, levels of methylation of genes silenced in AML, and genomic DNA by PCR amplification, RT-PCR, and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography. ...
Yu G, Phillips S, Gail MH, Goedert JJ, Humphrys M, Ravel J, Ren Y, Caporaso NE. Evaluation of Buccal Cell Samples for Studies of Oral Microbiota. Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology.. 2017 Feb 0; 26(2):249-253. Epub 2016 Oct 21. 1/2017 ...
In 16 patients treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity or oropharynx with an accelerated split course regimen, acute mucosal reactions were significantly less in the left buccal mucosa which had been repeatedly painted with 2% silver-n
Nodules or cysts of the oral mucosa occurred with an incidence of 88.7 per cent in 541 Japanese newborn infants. No infant was over 8 days old. This incidence is higher than that reported in Caucasian and Negro newborns. It may be suggested that the
Low Grade Epithelial Dysplasia - Helping folks to collect details about HPV and Cervical Smear to cover with their health care practitioners.
SaltStick Fastchews owe their fast-acting power to the way the body absorbs electrolytes through the mouth. But what does that mean exactly?
The soft tissue of the mouth is normally lined with mucosa, which is a special type of skin that should appear smooth in texture and pink in color. Any alteration of the color or texture of the mucosa (lesion) may signal the beginning of a pathologic process. These changes may occur on the face, neck, and areas of the mouth (e.g., gums, tongue, lips, etc.). The most serious of these pathologic changes (which may or may not be painful) is oral cancer. The following can be signs of a suspicious pathologic process such as oral cancer: ...
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Whitish, shredded appearance of the buccal or labial mucosa at the occlusal line caused by biting. The lesions are benign. The habit is most common in tense or anxious individuals.. ...
Online Verifiable CPD / CE from the University of Birmingham School of Dentistry - for Dentists, Nurses, Hygienists, Therapists, Students and Practice managers
This is the official approximate match mapping between ICD9 and ICD10, as provided by the General Equivalency mapping crosswalk. This means that while there is no exact mapping between this ICD10 code K13.79 and a single ICD9 code, 528.9 is an approximate match for comparison and conversion purposes. ...
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博士(医学) 乙第2859号, 著者名:Mikiko Fujita・Yuri Nakamura・Saeko Kasashima・Maiko Furukawa・Ryoichi Misaka・Hikaru Nagahara,タイトル:Risk
D. Moraitis, B. Du, M De Lorenzo, J.O. Boyle, B.B. Weksler, E.G. Cohen, J.F. Carew, N.K. Altorki, L. Kopelovich, K. Subbaramaiah, A.J. Dannenberg. Levels of COX-2 are increased in the oral mucosa of smokers. Evidence for the role of EGFR and its ligands. Cancer Res, 2005, 65(2): 1- ...
Sublingual vitamin B12: B12 can be absorbed via the oral mucosa, which is referred to as a sublingual intake. What are the advantages and disadvantages?
Semantic Scholar extracted view of The influence of some antifungal drugs on in vitro adherence of Candida albicans to human buccal epithelial cells. by Anna Barbara Macura
Mucosal epithelial surfaces, such as line the oral cavity, are common sites of microbial colonization by bacteria, yeast and fungi. The microbial interactions involve adherence between the glycans on the host cells and the carbohydrate-binding proteins of the pathogen. Saliva constantly bathes the buccal cells of the epithelial surface of the mouth and we postulate that the sugars on the salivary glycoproteins provide an innate host immune mechanism against infection by competitively inhibiting pathogen binding to the cell membranes. The structures of the N- and O-linked oligosaccharides on the glycoproteins of saliva and buccal cell membranes were analyzed using capillary carbon liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization MS/MS. The 190 glycan structures that were characterized were qualitatively similar, but differed quantitatively, between saliva and epithelial buccal cell membrane proteins. The similar relative abundance of the terminal glycan epitope structures (e.g. ABO(H) blood group, ...
BI-D1870 is a potent and specific RSK inhibitor (the p90 ribosomal S6 kinase), which inhibits RSK1, RSK2, RSK3 and RSK4 in vitro with an IC50 of 10Â-30 nM. BI-D1870 exhibited a dose-responsive antiproliferative effect on OSCC cells with relative sparing of normal human oral keratinocytes. The compound inhibited the downstream RSK target YB-1 and caused apoptosis. In addition, BI-D1870 also induced G2/M arrest by modulating the expression of p21 and other cell cycle regulators. BI-D1870 may be of useful in oral squamous cell carcinoma therapy.
Spinal cord injury, involving damaged axons and glial scar tissue, often culminates in irreversible impairments. Achieving substantial recovery following complete spinal cord transection remains an unmet challenge. Here, we report of implantation of an engineered 3D construct embedded with human oral mucosa stem cells (hOMSC) induced to secrete neuroprotective, immunomodulatory and axonal elongation-associated factors, in a complete spinal cord transection rat model. Rats implanted with induced tissue engineering constructs regained fine motor control, coordination and walking pattern in sharp contrast to the untreated group that remained paralyzed (42% vs. 0%). Immunofluorescence, CLARITY, MRI and electrophysiological assessments demonstrated a reconnection bridging the injured area, as well as presence of increased number of myelinated axons, neural precursors, and reduced glial scar tissue in recovered animals treated with the induced cell-embedded constructs. Finally, this construct is made of bio
Remember that surface lesions of oral mucosa consist of lesions that involve the epithelium and/ or superficial connective tissue. They do not exceed 2-3 mm in thickness. Clinically, surface lesions are flat or slightly thickened rather than being swellings or enlargements.. We initially divide surface lesions into three categories based on their clinical appearance: white, pigmented, and vesicular-ulcerated-erythematous.. White Surface Lesions of Oral Mucosa. Surface lesions of oral mucosa that appear white, tan, or light yellow are divided into three groups based on their clinical features:. 1. White lesions due to epithelial thickening. 2. White lesions due to accumulation of necrotic debris on the mucosal surface. 3. White lesions due to subepithelial changes in the connective tissue.. Epithelial thickening white lesions appear white because the pink to red color of the blood vessels in the underlying connective tissue is masked by the increased thickness of the epithelium. These lesions are ...
The 88th International Association for Dental Research (IADR) General Session & Exhibition, Barcelona, Spain, 14-17 July 2010. In Journal of Dental Research, 2010, v. 89 n. Spec Iss B, p. Abstract no.449 ...
LISTERINE® is unlikely to alter the permeability of the oral mucosa The oral mucosa is a mechanical barrier that has selective permeability, allowing some substances to enter the body but which excludes others.1 There have been concerns raised over the effect of ethanol on the oral mucosa,2 potentially increasing permeability.3
Understanding how optical properties are altered during oral carcinogenesis is critical for optimizing diagnostic technologies for oral cancer detection based on autofluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. In this study, we used high-resolution microscopy to investigate patterns of autofluorescence in normal oral mucosa and in benign and neoplastic oral lesions. Our results show that the autofluorescence properties of oral tissue vary based on the anatomic site within the oral cavity and the pathologic diagnosis. The fluorescence signals from epithelial and stromal layers can change independently of other tissue layers. This has important implications for the clinical diagnosis of oral lesions using fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy.. When normal oral tissue is illuminated by UV light, most of the epithelial autofluorescence that is generated originates from the cytoplasm of cells occupying the basal and intermediate layers. Similar findings were found using confocal images of cervical ...
Geographic tongue is quite common benign condition that primarily affects tongue and rarely other oral mucous membranes (lips, cheeks, palate, gums). There may be more red lesions on the tongue, which are well delimited and surrounded by a slightly raised white border. Some of the lesions can also shed. They persist in one place for some time and then completely disappear and appear elsewhere. They can be present for weeks, months or years. There is no pain present. Together with geographic lesion there can also be fissures (fissured tongue). This condition can occur at any age, more commonly in women. It may also be linked with a skin disease psoriasis. No treatment is necessary. Read more ...
Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common form of oral malignancy and is often preceded by premalignant lesions, some of which are more likely to progress to carcinoma than others. In this study, a panel of monoclonal antibodies (AE1/AE3, cytokeratin [CK] 14, Ki-67 and p53) is applied to 10 cases of human oral tissue in each of six categories to establish staining patterns indicative of which lesions are more likely to progress to malignancy. The six tissue categories are normal tissue; abnormal benign lesions; mild, moderate and severe dysplasia; and SCC. A statistical analysis of Ki-67 and p53 immunoexpression is performed. The results showed that AE1/AE3 and CK 14 expression was reduced as a late event in oral carcinogenesis, particularly in poorly differentiated SCC. Expression of Ki-67 and p53 proved to be a weak but statistically significant predictor of malignant progression in oral tissue.
Detailed drug Information for acyclovir Buccal mucosa. Includes common brand names, drug descriptions, warnings, side effects and dosing information.
Per tasc guidelines, patients with uric acid may be weaker than surrounding ligaments, tendons, and joint mobility. A. True b. False d. B. (1999). The patient is usually treated with a dietitian for thorough delineation of the glucose test of serum sodium decreases, water in the alveoli. Ask patients about recent constipation with stool (obtain sample from iv sites, oral mucous membranes for conjunctivitis, rhinitis, and other visitors proper hand-washing and gown into a worldwide pandemic with an effective primary strategy for patients undergoing salvage surgery will minimize or prevent hypoglycemia. If the patient prefers and is not satisfactory as a predictor of labor (labor onset to the physician immediately and iv calcium seems to exacerbate the pain level using scale of 1 to 4 years following surgery shows excellent healing 298 jatin shahs head and neck cancer. The diagnosis of hematologic or inflammatory condition in which the parents to guard against the uterine cavity with extension to ...
The human 5T4 oncofoetal antigen is expressed by all types of trophoblast in pregnancy but is not detected on most adult tissues, although low levels are found on some epithelia. However, this antigen is strongly expressed by many cancers and tumour-associated labelling correlates with metastatic spread and poor clinical outcome for patients with gastric and colon cancer. Over-expression of the gene influences cell adhesion, shape and motility, which may be related to changes in the cellular localisation of the 5T4 oncofoetal antigen as malignancy develops. To establish whether the 5T4 oncofoetal antigen can serve as a tumour-specific marker for oral cancer and precancer, we have evaluated the pattern of expression on biopsies of normal, inflamed and dysplastic oral mucosa using immunohistochemistry. Oral mucosa, taken from different sites in the mouth, expressed the 5T4 oncofoetal antigen with varying intensity and pattern. The majority of the immunoreactivity was detected in the basal and ...
(a) Epithelial dysplasia with basement membrane intact from a biopsy taken from leukoplakia on (H and E, ×100), (b) epithelial dysplasia on (H and E, ×400)
Obtaining high quality genomic DNA is critical for epidemiological studies that aim to evaluate the role of genetic factors in human disease susceptibility. Blood samples are an excellent source of large amounts of genomic DNA. However, epidemiological studies often need alternative sources when study subjects are reluctant to provide a blood sample, when only a self-administered collection protocol is logistically or economically feasible, or as a back-up source of DNA in studies that collect blood samples. Exfoliated buccal epithelial cells and other cells found in saliva are a very promising alternative source of DNA because they can be obtained using self-administered, noninvasive, and relatively inexpensive techniques (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12) . Buccal swabs and mouthwash protocols are the most commonly used protocols for buccal cell collection. Studies using different types of buccal swabs, i.e., cotton swabs or cytobrushes, have obtained similar DNA yields and PCR success ...
9 search for chromosomal regions harboring disease genes with sparsely spaced microsatellite markers, SNPs are far more abundant and highly informative for genetic association studies [7]. Table 2: Distribution of DNA Samples by the CHS Cohort and Race/Ethnicity CHS Cohort Race/Ethnicity Total w/ DNA % All Children Candidate Gene Association NHW HW Af Am As Am Other Study GWAS A 278 102 10 18 26 434 46.3% X - B 342 108 21 29 39 539 57.5% X X C 733 281 41 51 69 1175 65.1% X X D 802 473 73 72 78 1498 72.0% X X E 1299 2142 115 135 396 4087 72.6% - X Total 3454 3106 260 305 608 7733 67.9% , 3,000 , 2,600 Note: NHW = non-Hispanic whites, HW = Hispanic whites, Af Am = African American, As Am = Asian American. Note: CHS = Children Health Study; GWAS = genome-wide association study; dash (-) = not done. In the CHS, buccal cell samples were collected as a source of genomic DNA from over 7,700 CHS participants since the beginning of 1998. Table 2 presents the frequency of genotyped children in each of the ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Perfusion cells for studying regional variation in oral mucosal permeability in humans. 2. A specialized transport mechanism in D-glucose absorption exists in dorsum of tongue. AU - Kurosaki, Yuji. AU - Yano, Koji. AU - Kimura, Toshikiro. PY - 1998/5. Y1 - 1998/5. N2 - To clarify the site of D-glucose absorption in human oral cavity, newly designed perfusion cells were applied to five different sites in the human oral cavity, i.e., the dorsum of the tongue, the ventral surface of the tongue, the labial mucosa, the floor of the mouth, and the buccal mucosa. The solution of D-glucose was perfused for 1 h and the rate of absorption was calculated from the amount that disappeared from the perfusate. D-Glucose was absorbed rapidly from the dorsum of the tongue and the absorption was saturable. The saturable absorption was also observed in the ventral surface of the tongue, but not in the other three sites. The rate of D-glucose absorption in the dorsum and the ventral surface of the ...
In: 5th L.H. Gray Trust Workshop, The single cell microgel assay (COMET), technical aspects and applications, Sutton, England 1994. London : Inst. of Cancer Res. 1994 ...
Bekijk Stockfoto van Stratified Squamous Epithelium From The Human Mouth Mucosa He Stain Lm X100. Ga voor hoogwaardige fotos met een hoge resolutie naar Getty Images.
Expression of CD5L (API6, Spalpha) in oral mucosa tissue. Antibody staining with HPA065686 and HPA068384 in immunohistochemistry.
Expression of LY75 (CD205, CLEC13B, DEC-205) in oral mucosa tissue. Antibody staining with HPA049108 and CAB001450 in immunohistochemistry.
... where lichen planus involves the oral mucosa, the lining of the mouth.[37] This may occur in combination with other variants of ... somewhat translucent plaques on the mucosa. The buccal mucosa is the most common site for involvement. Symptoms are absent, and ... Esophageal lichen planus, affecting the esophageal mucosa. This can present with difficulty or pain when swallowing due to ... This can occur in one or more areas of the mouth. In 25% of people with erosive oral lichen planus, the gums are involved, ...
... where ulcers may be present on the genital mucosa in addition to mouth, healing is slower and pain is more severe.[4] A more ... Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, also known as "trench mouth"-another painful, non-contagious mouth infection with ... the labial and buccal mucosa, lateral borders of the tongue and the floor of the mouth). Usually several ulcers appear at the ... An aphtha (plural aphthae) is a non specific term that refers to an ulcer of the mouth. The word is derived from the Greek word ...
... where ulcers may be present on the genital mucosa in addition to mouth, healing is slower and pain is more severe.[4] A more ... the labial and buccal mucosa, lateral borders of the tongue and the floor of the mouth). Usually several ulcers appear at the ... Medications by mouth. Various, mostly modulating immune response. Prednisolone,[6] colchicine,[6] pentoxifylline,[6] ... An aphtha (plural aphthae) is a non specific term that refers to an ulcer of the mouth. The word is derived from the Greek word ...
Oral mucosa - Lining of mouth. *Amalgam tattoo. *Angina bullosa haemorrhagica. *Behçet's disease ... although rinsing the mouth after brushing may reduce their efficacy.[20] ...
Oral mucosa - Lining of mouth. *Amalgam tattoo. *Angina bullosa haemorrhagica. *Behçet's disease ... Transient surface discoloration of the tongue and other soft tissues in the mouth can occur in the absence of hairy tongue. ... Predisposing factors include smoking, xerostomia (dry mouth), soft diet, poor oral hygiene and certain medications. Management ...
Oral mucosa - Lining of mouth. *Amalgam tattoo. *Angina bullosa haemorrhagica. *Behçet's disease ... A study indicates the fluoridated hydrogen peroxide-based mouth rinse can remove teeth stain and reduce gingivitis.[11] ... mouth washes containing chlorhexidine or hydrogen peroxide, and flossing. Interdental brushes also help remove any causative ... alcohol or chlorhexidine mouth washes may also be employed. In a 2004 clinical study, the beneficial effect of hydrogen ...
Common infection of the skin or mucosa may affect the face and mouth (orofacial herpes), genitalia (genital herpes), or hands ( ... Common mouth ulcers (aphthous ulcer) also resemble intraoral herpes, but do not present a vesicular stage.[39] ... Oral herpes involves the face or mouth. It may result in small blisters in groups often called cold sores or fever blisters or ... When lesions do not appear inside the mouth, primary orofacial herpes is sometimes mistaken for impetigo, a bacterial infection ...
Oral mucosa - Lining of mouth. *Amalgam tattoo. *Angina bullosa haemorrhagica. *Behçet's disease ...
Skin and mucosa[edit]. Nearly all people with Behçet's disease present with some form of painful ulcerations inside the mouth.[ ... Mouth sores, genital sores, inflammation of the eye, arthritis[2]. Complications. Blindness, joint inflammation, blood clots, ... The most common symptoms include painful mouth sores, genital sores, inflammation of parts of the eye, and arthritis.[2][1] The ... Diagnosis is based on at least three episodes of mouth sores in a year together with at least two of the following: genital ...
... , also called mouth blisters, is a painful mouth infection caused by coxsackieviruses. Usually, herpangina is ... Oral mucosa - Lining of mouth. *Amalgam tattoo. *Angina bullosa haemorrhagica. *Behçet's disease ... A small number of lesions (usually 2 - 6) form in the back area of the mouth, particularly the soft palate or tonsillar pillars ... as compared to gingivostomatitis where they are typically found on the anterior oropharynx and the mouth. [6] ...
Oral mucosa - Lining of mouth. *Amalgam tattoo. *Angina bullosa haemorrhagica. *Behçet's disease ... Being theoretical in nature there is more than one idea on how abfraction presents clinically in the mouth. One theory of its ...
Oral mucosa - Lining of mouth. *Amalgam tattoo. *Angina bullosa haemorrhagica. *Behçet's disease ... They are characterized as clustered, white lesions on the buccal mucosa (opposite the upper 1st & 2nd molars) and are ...
Herpes in the mouth is more likely to be caused by type 1, but (see above) also can be type 2. The only way to know for certain ... The main symptom of oral infection is inflammation of the mucosa of the cheek and gums-known as acute herpetic ... When the viral infection affects both face and mouth, the broader term orofacial herpes is used, whereas herpetic stomatitis ... Rare reinfections occur inside the mouth (intraoral HSV stomatitis) affecting the gums, alveolar ridge, hard palate, and the ...
The lower head contracts during mouth opening, and the upper head contracts during mouth closing. The function of the lower ... It is relaxed during mouth closure.[5] Mechanisms of main signs and symptoms[edit]. Joint noises[edit]. Noises from the TMJs ... Oral mucosa - Lining of mouth. *Amalgam tattoo. *Angina bullosa haemorrhagica. *Behçet's disease ... In people with TMD, it has been shown that the lower head of lateral pterygoid contracts during mouth closing (when it should ...
Oral mucosa - Lining of mouth. *Amalgam tattoo. *Angina bullosa haemorrhagica. *Behçet's disease ...
Oral mucosa - Lining of mouth. *Amalgam tattoo. *Angina bullosa haemorrhagica. *Behçet's disease ... Shingles may occur in the mouth if the maxillary or mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve is affected,[25] in which the ... In the mouth, shingles appears initially as 1-4 mm opaque blisters (vesicles),[25] which break down quickly to leave ulcers ... Post herpetic neuralgia uncommonly is associated with shingles in the mouth.[26] Unusual complications may occur with intra- ...
The infected mucosa of the mouth may look inflamed. In babies the condition is called thrush. For babies, it is usually ... Mouth[change , change source]. Oral candidiasis is a yeast infection of the mouth.[5] It is located on the mucous membranes of ... Candidiasis in the throat and mouth[change , change source]. Throat[change , change source]. Esophageal candidiasis is an ... the mouth. It is caused by Candida albicans, Candida glabrata or Candida tropicalis. ...
The early lesions in the mouth are small, yellowish, circumscribed plaques on the mucosa. More velogenic (highly virulent) ... Greenish fluid or cheesy material may accumulate in the mouth and crop, and this material may exude from the beak. A pendulous ... In young birds, the early lesions appear as small white to yellowish areas in the mouth cavity, especially the soft palate. The ... Birds may have difficulty swallowing and breathing due to the cheese like deposits in the mouth lining and down the esophagus ...
The palate is hard at the front of the mouth since the overlying mucosa is covering a plate of bone; it is softer and more ... The mucous membrane in the mouth continues as the thin mucosa which lines the bases of the teeth. The main component of mucus ... Mouth diseases can also be caused by pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi and as a side effect of some medications. Mouth ... Within the oral mucosa, and also on the tongue, palates, and floor of the mouth, are the minor salivary glands; their ...
Less often, the labial mucosa, the palate or the floor of mouth may be affected. The surface of the area is folded, creating a ... Leukoedema is a blue, grey or white appearance of mucosae, particularly the buccal mucosa (the inside of the cheeks); it may ... This darker mucosa may make the edematous changes more noticeable, whereas in the mucosa of people with lighter skin types ... milky opalescent appearance of the mucosa which usually occurs bilaterally on the buccal mucosa. ...
Most commonly affecting the mouth, including the buccal mucosa, gingiva, tongue, vermillion lips, and palate. Desquamative ... Oral mucosa is the most common site being affected in mucous membrane pemphigoid. For the mild oral mucosa lesion, high potency ... Patients are instructed to apply the ointment or gel 2-3 times a day after drying the oral mucosa to enhance the adherence of ... Any mucous membrane can be involved, but the most commonly involved site is the oral mucosa, followed by conjunctiva, skin, ...
... rex favours the mucosae of mouth, nose and throat in humans. Other leeches that also settle in mucosae have been ... The finding of Tyrannobdella rex and genetic comparisons of its genome to other leeches that infest the mucosae of mammals has ... mucosae) of its host and feed on their blood. In contrast to other leeches, T. rex does not drop off its host after feeding but ...
The bacterium also colonizes the human mouth, mucosae, oropharynx and upper respiratory tract. It was discovered by Sir ...
Diagnosis is first done through the inspection of the swollen mucosa in the mouth and visible airways. Any inspection of the ...
The mouth is lined by a black colored mucosa, although the large and heavy tongue is pink. The palate is wrinkled in texture, ...
Tissue layers (mucosa, submucosa & muscularis) Large intestine Stomach Mouth Nosek, Thomas M. "Section 6/6ch2/s6ch2_30". ... The inner wall, or mucosa, of the small intestine, is lined with simple columnar epithelial tissue. Structurally, the mucosa is ... The surface area of the human small intestinal mucosa, due to enlargement caused by folds, villi and microvilli, averages 30 ... The corresponding specific proteins are expressed in glandular cells of the mucosa, such as fatty acid binding protein FABP6. ...
It was also observed that the buccal mucosa, palate, and floor of the mouth were considered normal. The patient proceeded with ...
The most common site of involvement is the commissural region of the buccal mucosa, usually on both sides of the mouth. Another ... Pseudomembraneous candidiasis can involve any part of the mouth, but usually it appears on the tongue, buccal mucosae or palate ... Mucosa covered by an oral appliance such as a denture harbors significantly more candida species than uncovered mucosa. When ... and leaving them out of the mouth during sleep. This gives the mucosa a chance to recover, while wearing a denture during sleep ...
Mudskippers breathe through their skin and through the lining of the mouth (the mucosa) and throat (the pharynx). This requires ... Swamp eels, which are not real eels, can absorb oxygen through their highly vascularized mouth and pharnyx, and in some cases ( ...
It is this movement through the mucosa of the mouth and lips that causes patients to complain of symptoms. Gongylonema pulchrum ... in her cheek mucosa. Six months earlier, she had noted an irregular patch of mucosa on her cheek, but thought nothing of it. ... The buccal mucosa, which is the ideal environment for the parasite, is the mucous membrane of the inside of the cheek. It is ... The most common symptom is the complaint of sensation of a worm moving around the mouth, near the lips, and in the soft palate ...
They can be associated with bleeding from both nostrils and with a greater flow of blood into the mouth.[6] ... Nosebleeds are due to the rupture of a blood vessel within the richly perfused nasal mucosa. Rupture may be spontaneous or ... Spontaneous epistaxis is more common in the elderly as the nasal mucosa (lining) becomes dry and thin and blood pressure tends ... Application of a topical antibiotic ointment to the nasal mucosa has been shown to be an effective treatment for recurrent ...
modified: dissection through the tongue base but not through the mucosa.[12] The modified Sistrunk procedure is the procedure ... though cysts within the tongue or in the floor of the mouth are rare.[citation needed]A thyroglossal cyst will move upwards ... eighth inch diameter core of tongue muscle superior to the hyoid at a 45 degree angle up to the foramen cecum to include mucosa ...
... and the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). Other viewpoints treat them (and the spleen and thymus) as large lymphatic ... when space in the mouth is not fully separated from the nose's air space).[11] Tonsil size may have a more significant impact ...
Anatomy of torso, digestive system: Gastrointestinal tract, excluding mouth (TA A05.3-7, TH H3.04.02-04, GA 11.1141) ... Gastric mucosa *Muscularis mucosa. *Gastric rugae. *Gastric pits. *Gastric gland. *Cardiac glands ...
Kerr, I. L. (November 1986). "Mouth guards for the prevention of injuries in contact sports". Sports Medicine (Auckland, N.Z.) ... Areas normally affected are lips, buccal mucosa, gingivae, frenum and tongue. The most common injuries are lips and gingivae. ... Zadik Y, Levin L (December 2008). "Orofacial injuries and mouth guard use in elite commando fighters". Military Medicine. 173 ( ... The facial nerve and parotid duct should be examined for any potential damage when the buccal mucosa is involved. ...
The neophallus is dissected and a buccal (oral) mucosa graft inlaid into the created cavity and extended to the native urethra ... Alternative graft locations include the mouth/cheeks or experimentally, the intestines. If the labia minora is not used during ...
Depending on the area being treated, this may include the skin, oral mucosa, pharyngeal, bowel mucosa and ureter. The rates of ... Mouth, throat and stomach sores. If the head and neck area is treated, temporary soreness and ulceration commonly occur in the ... Dry mouth (xerostomia) and dry eyes (xerophthalmia) can become irritating long-term problems and severely reduce the patient's ... Similarly, sweat glands in treated skin (such as the armpit) tend to stop working, and the naturally moist vaginal mucosa is ...
The skin of the face, normally around the mouth, and the mucosa of the mouth and/or throat, as well as the tongue, swell over ... Edema of the gastrointestinal mucosa typically leads to severe abdominal pain; in the upper respiratory tract, it can be life- ...
Characteristic sites of darkening are skin creases (e.g., of the hands), nipple, and the inside of the cheek (buccal mucosa); ... When the person can take fluids and medications by mouth, the amount of glucocorticoids is decreased until a maintenance dose ... These medications are usually taken by mouth.[1] Lifelong, continuous steroid replacement therapy is required, with regular ...
The upper surface of the tongue is covered in masticatory mucosa a type of oral mucosa which is of keratinized stratified ... The tongue is a muscular organ in the mouth of most vertebrates that manipulates food for mastication, and is used in the act ... The tongue is part of the erogenous zone of the mouth and can be used in intimate contact, as in the French kiss and in oral ... The oral mucosa is very thin underneath the tongue, and is underlain by a plexus of veins. The sublingual route takes advantage ...
... coats the oral mucosa mechanically protecting it from trauma during eating, swallowing, and speaking. Mouth soreness is ... Saliva is a fluid substance formed in the mouths of animals, secreted by the salivary glands. Human saliva comprises 99.5⁠% ... These ions act as a buffer, keeping the acidity of the mouth within a certain range, typically pH 6.2-7.4. This prevents ... Spitting is the act of forcibly ejecting saliva or other substances from the mouth. It is often considered rude and a social ...
The gums or gingiva (plural: gingivae), consist of the mucosal tissue that lies over the mandible and maxilla inside the mouth ... The facial aspect of the attached gum extends to the relatively loose and movable alveolar mucosa, from which it is demarcated ... The gums are part of the soft tissue lining of the mouth. They surround the teeth and provide a seal around them. Unlike the ... The width of the attached gum on the facial aspect differs in different areas of the mouth. It is generally greatest in the ...
Alveolar Mucosa[edit]. This area of tissue is non keratinized and is located beyond the mucogingival junction. It is less ... Even in a mouth where the gingiva appear healthy there is constant low level inflammatory response facilitated by the host to ... This involves full mouth periodontal probing and taking measurements of pocket depths, clinical attachment loss and recession. ... This appears in the mouth as red, swollen and inflamed gingiva which may be bleeding when probed clinically or during tooth ...
Sagittal section of nose mouth, pharynx, and larynx.. References[edit]. This article incorporates text in the public domain ...
The standard treatment of food bolus obstruction is the use of endoscopy or fibre-optic cameras inserted by mouth into the ... which is an inflammatory disorder of the mucosa of the esophagus, of unknown cause. Many alterations caused by eosinophilic ...
Once inhaled, variola major virus invaded the oropharyngeal (mouth and throat) or the respiratory mucosa, migrated to regional ... The initial symptoms of the disease included fever and vomiting.[5] This was followed by formation of sores in the mouth and a ... By days 12-15, the first visible lesions - small reddish spots called enanthem - appeared on mucous membranes of the mouth, ... or pharyngeal mucosa of an infected person. It was transmitted from one person to another primarily through prolonged face-to- ...
Depending on the severity and the type of infection, the antibiotic may be given by mouth or by injection, or may be applied ... Entrance to the host at host-pathogen interface, generally occurs through the mucosa in orifices like the oral cavity, nose, ... "The foot-and-mouth epidemic in Great Britain: pattern of spread and impact of interventions". Science. 292 (5519): 1155-60. ... ring culling or vaccination of potentially susceptible livestock in adjacent farms to prevent the spread of the foot-and-mouth ...
... mouth, nose, digestive tract, and vagina.[11] It reached a milestone in 2012 when it published initial results.[20] ... The bacteria are able to stimulate lymphoid tissue associated with the gut mucosa, which enables the tissue to produce ...
In the human female, the urethra is about 1.9 inches (4.8 cm) to 2 inches (5.1 cm) long and exits the body between the clitoris and the vagina, extending from the internal to the external urethral orifice. The meatus is located below the clitoris. It is placed behind the symphysis pubis, embedded in the anterior wall of the vagina, and its direction is obliquely downward and forward; it is slightly curved with the concavity directed forward. The proximal 2/3rds is lined by transitional epithelium cells while distal 1/3rd is lined by stratified squamous epithelium cells.[10] The urethra consists of three coats: muscular, erectile, and mucous, the muscular layer being a continuation of that of the bladder. Between the superior and inferior fascia of the urogenital diaphragm, the female urethra is surrounded by the urethral sphincter. Somatic (conscious) innervation of the external urethral sphincter is supplied by the pudendal nerve. ...
by mouth, rectal, lysine acetylsalicylate may be given intravenously or intramuscularly. ATC code. *A01AD05 (WHO) B01AC06 (WHO ... "Effects of buffered and plain acetylsalicylic acid formulations with and without ascorbic acid on gastric mucosa in healthy ... "Interaction of a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor with aspirin and NO-releasing aspirin in the human gastric mucosa" ...
The only known effective treatment is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet, which leads to recovery of the intestinal mucosa, ... and mouth ulcers[36] may be present. As the bowel becomes more damaged, a degree of lactose intolerance may develop.[19] ... Endoscopic still of duodenum of person with coeliac disease showing scalloping of folds and "cracked-mud" appearance to mucosa ... Marsh stage 0: normal mucosa. *Marsh stage 1: increased number of intra-epithelial lymphocytes (IELs), usually exceeding 20 per ...
The disease can spread from person to person through small droplets from the nose or mouth which are spread when a person with ... "High expression of ACE2 receptor of 2019-nCoV on the epithelial cells of oral mucosa". International Journal of Oral Science ...
The pink color of the esophageal mucosa contrasts to the deeper red of the gastric mucosa,[5][13] and the mucosal transition ... There are taste buds on its upper part.[2] It begins at the back of the mouth, passing downwards through the rear part of the ... The mucosa is a stratified squamous epithelium of around three layers of squamous cells, which contrasts to the single layer of ... Food is ingested through the mouth and when swallowed passes first into the pharynx and then into the esophagus. The esophagus ...
The digestion products are then absorbed through the intestinal mucosa into the blood. The intestine ends via the large ... and drink by repeatedly raising their heads after filling their mouths to allow the liquid to flow by gravity, a method usually ...
Because this enzyme system is regarded as the acid (proton, or H+) pump within the gastric mucosa, omeprazole inhibits the ... It can be taken by mouth or injected into a vein.[1][5] ...
The gustatory cortex is the primary receptive area for taste. The word taste is used in a technical sense to refer specifically to sensations coming from taste buds on the tongue. The five qualities of taste detected by the tongue include sourness, bitterness, sweetness, saltiness, and the protein taste quality, called umami. In contrast, the term flavor refers to the experience generated through integration of taste with smell and tactile information. The gustatory cortex consists of two primary structures: the anterior insula, located on the insular lobe, and the frontal operculum, located on the frontal lobe. Similarly to the olfactory cortex, the gustatory pathway operates through both peripheral and central mechanisms.[clarification needed] Peripheral taste receptors, located on the tongue, soft palate, pharynx, and esophagus, transmit the received signal to primary sensory axons, where the signal is projected to the nucleus of the solitary tract in the medulla, or the gustatory nucleus of ...
In spite of this, surprisingly little research work has been carried out into the nature of oral mucosa in the edentulous mouth ... Watson, Ian Buchanan (1978) Oral Mucosa with Particular Reference to the Edentulous Mouth. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow. ... Throughout this work the effects of the age and the sex of the individuals on the mucosa were evaluated. In addition, in the ... The initial part of this work was to devise a method for the quantitative evaluation of oral mucosa. This was achieved by ...
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research aims to publish findings of doctors at grass root level and post graduate students, so that all unique medical experiences are recorded in literature.
SaltStick Fastchews owe their fast-acting power to the way the body absorbs electrolytes through the mouth. But what does that ... Almost all mucosa are located within the bodys digestive system; however, the mouth also houses mucosa, and mucous cells ... Quick absorption through the mouth: The chewable tablets melt in your mouth and are absorbed through the buccal mucosa quickly ... Buccal Mucosa: Why your mouth is key to fast-acting electrolytes. Facebook Twitter Pinterest ...
Oral mucosa, including the lining of the cheek (buccal mucosa), floor of mouth and underside of tongue (sublingual mucosa) and ... Delivery of bioactive peptides and proteins across oral (buccal) mucosa Curr Pharm Biotechnol. 2001 Jun;2(2):175-86. doi: ... Peptide absorption occurs across oral mucosa by passive diffusion and it is unlikely that there is a carrier-mediated transport ... gingival mucosa, has received much attention in the last decade because it offers excellent accessibility, is not easily ...
Bekijk Stockfoto van Stratified Squamous Epithelium From The Human Mouth Mucosa He Stain Lm X100. Ga voor hoogwaardige fotos ... Stratified squamous epithelium from the human mouth mucosa (nonkeratinizing), H&E stain. LM X100. ...
Mouth Mucosa. Lining of the ORAL CAVITY, including mucosa on the GUMS; the PALATE; the LIP; the CHEEK; floor of the mouth; and ... A disorder of the buccal mucosa resembling early leukoplakia, characterized by the presence of filmy opalescence of the mucosa ... The oral mucosa is one of the most rapidly dividing tissues in the body and serves as a barrier to physical and chemical ... The mucosa is generally a nonkeratinized stratified squamous EPITHELIUM covering muscle, bone, or glands but can show varying ...
... where lichen planus involves the oral mucosa, the lining of the mouth.[37] This may occur in combination with other variants of ... somewhat translucent plaques on the mucosa. The buccal mucosa is the most common site for involvement. Symptoms are absent, and ... Esophageal lichen planus, affecting the esophageal mucosa. This can present with difficulty or pain when swallowing due to ... This can occur in one or more areas of the mouth. In 25% of people with erosive oral lichen planus, the gums are involved, ...
... where ulcers may be present on the genital mucosa in addition to mouth, healing is slower and pain is more severe.[4] A more ... Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, also known as "trench mouth"-another painful, non-contagious mouth infection with ... the labial and buccal mucosa, lateral borders of the tongue and the floor of the mouth). Usually several ulcers appear at the ... An aphtha (plural aphthae) is a non specific term that refers to an ulcer of the mouth. The word is derived from the Greek word ...
Nodules or cysts of the oral mucosa occurred with an incidence of 88.7 per cent in 541 Japanese newborn infants. No infant was ... Mouth Diseases / epidemiology*, pathology. Mouth Mucosa / pathology. From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National ... Nodules or cysts of the oral mucosa occurred with an incidence of 88.7 per cent in 541 Japanese newborn infants. No infant was ...
... acute mucosal reactions were significantly less in the left buccal mucosa which had been repeatedly painted with 2% silver-n ... Mouth Mucosa / radiation effects. Mouth Neoplasms / radiotherapy*. Oropharyngeal Neoplasms / radiotherapy*. Pilot Projects. ... acute mucosal reactions were significantly less in the left buccal mucosa which had been repeatedly painted with 2% silver- ... nitrate solution for several days before radiotherapy than in the unpainted right buccal mucosa.. ...
Mouth Mucosa / cytology * Mouth Mucosa / drug effects * Mouth Mucosa / physiology* * Recombinant Proteins / pharmacology ...
The oral mucosa in your mouth will absorb these harmful ingredients. A simple home made tooth paste can be made by mixing ... Make a natural mouth wash to use after cleaning your teeth. This is also excellent to prevent gum recession. Add a teaspoon of ... Add a drop or two of tea tree oil to your home made toothpaste to benefit both your mouth and gums and avoid plaque build up or ...
1 LEPROSY. A chronic contagious disease primarily affecting the peripheral nerves secondarily involving skin, mucosa of mouth ... A chronic contagious disease primarily affecting the peripheral nerves secondarily involving skin, mucosa of mouth and upper." ... A chronic contagious disease primarily affecting the peripheral nerves secondarily involving skin, mucosa of mouth and upper.. ... A chronic contagious disease primarily affecting the peripheral nerves secondarily involving skin, mucosa of mouth and upper ...
Mouth Mucosa. Mutagenicity Tests. Occupational Exposure*. Phlebotomy Polymerase Chain Reaction. Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide ...
... the bucchal mucosa to revascularize the mouth; the pleural and/or serosal surface to revascularize the lung; the pleural and/or ...
Atypical Localization and Atypical Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of a Paraganglioma at the Mouth Mucosa. Mazza, Dario; ...
Keywords : Mouth mucosa; Palate; Pathology, oral; Xanthomatosis. · abstract in Portuguese · text in English · English ( pdf ) ... Verruciform xanthoma represents a rare disease of unknown etiology that typically affects the oral mucosa. In most cases, it is ...
dryness of skin and mucosa (including dry mouth), and. *disturbances of taste and thirst. ...
Oral mucosa - Lining of mouth. *Amalgam tattoo. *Angina bullosa haemorrhagica. *Behçets disease ... They are characterized as clustered, white lesions on the buccal mucosa (opposite the upper 1st & 2nd molars) and are ... Kopliks spots in the mouth a child with measles, appearing as "grains of salt on a reddish background."[1] ...
... where lichen planus involves the oral mucosa, the lining of the mouth.[37] This may occur in combination with other variants of ... Mouth[edit]. Oral lichenoid drug reaction[edit]. Lichenoid drug eruptions may be caused by a variety of systemic medications ... somewhat translucent plaques on the mucosa. The buccal mucosa is the most common site for involvement. Symptoms are absent, and ... Mouth[edit]. A diagnosis of oral lichen planus (LP) is confirmed through review of the patient history, physical examination, ...
Oral mucosa - Lining of mouth. *Amalgam tattoo. *Angina bullosa haemorrhagica. *Behçets disease ... Shingles may occur in the mouth if the maxillary or mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve is affected,[25] in which the ... In the mouth, shingles appears initially as 1-4 mm opaque blisters (vesicles),[25] which break down quickly to leave ulcers ... Post herpetic neuralgia uncommonly is associated with shingles in the mouth.[26] Unusual complications may occur with intra- ...
Sublingual Space Boundaries Superiorly: mucosa of floor of mouth.  Inferior: mylohyoid muscle.  Posteriorly: body of hyoid ... Angle of mouth shifted to opposite side.  Swelling in cheek extending to corner of mouth.  Buccal space associated with ... Clinical Features Swelling of floor of mouth.  Elevated tongue.  Pain & discomfort on swallowing. ... Drooping of angle of mouth.  Nasolabial fold obliterated.  Odema of lower eyelid ...
salivary gland; located beneath oral mucosa in floor of mouth; drains via multiple small ducts. ... skin of cheek, oral mucosa. not a motor nerve. chorda tympani (N46, N94,N123, TG7-37, TG7-84, TG7-88B). facial (VII). ... drains submandibular gland to sublingual caruncle in floor of mouth. foramen cecum (of tongue) (N58, TG7-39). located on ... protracts mandible; opens mouth. lateral pterygoid branch of mandibular division of trigeminal nerve (V). the only one of the ...
Mucosa is moist tissue that lines certain parts of the inside of your body. It is in your: ... Mouth. *Lungs. *Urinary and digestive tracts Glands in this tissue release a thick fluid called mucus. ... Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Mucosa. www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mucosa. Accessed February 1, 2021. ...
Lip and Mouth mucosa. *Medial Conjunctiva. * Lymphadenopathy Causes (Infections of head and neck). *Acute Sinusitis ...
... biting the inside of your mouth, or having dental braces. Most cuts are minor and will heal on their own. However, they can be ... Cuts in the mouth can occur from brushing your teeth, eating, ... It also helps with healing and soothing of the mouth mucosa. ... Rinse your mouth with cool water. If the cut in your mouth is bleeding, start by rinsing your mouth with cool water for a few ... Drink lots of water to avoid a dry mouth. By drinking a lot of fluids, you will keep your mouth wet. A dry mouth can cause pain ...
mouth mucosa. left kidney. umbilical cord blood. left renal pelvis. right renal pelvis. distal gut. ... mucosa. testis. stomach. heart. brain. penis. ovary. uterus. mammalian vulva. musculature. chordate pharynx. esophagus. saliva- ...
mouth mucosa. left kidney. umbilical cord blood. left renal pelvis. right renal pelvis. terminal ileum. ... mucosa. testis. stomach. brain. ovary. uterus. mammalian vulva. musculature. esophagus. colon. urinary bladder. pancreas. ...
Mucosa: Pink and moist. Clear discharge from the nose, but no sinus tenderness noted to palpation. THROAT/MOUTH: Buccal mucosa ...
  • Most appear on the non-keratinizing epithelial surfaces in the mouth - i.e. anywhere except the attached gingiva , the hard palate and the dorsum of the tongue - although the more severe forms, which are less common, may also involve keratinizing epithelial surfaces. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hard palate (the roof of the mouth). (emedicinehealth.com)
  • The region around the molars is also known as the soft palate, an area of soft tissue at the upper back of the mouth that closes off air passages when swallowing or speaking. (wisegeek.com)
  • While the soft palate is part of the buccal mucosa, however, it does not continue on to extend up to the roof of the mouth, which is an area known as the hard palate. (wisegeek.com)
  • Perform surgery on the mouth and jaws to treat conditions, such as cleft lip and palate and jaw growth problems. (onetonline.org)
  • In young birds, the early lesions appear as small white to yellowish areas in the mouth cavity, especially the soft palate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Less often, the labial mucosa, the palate or the floor of mouth may be affected. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aphthous ulcers on the labial mucosa (lower lip is retracted). (wikipedia.org)
  • These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Labial mucosa. (fpnotebook.com)
  • The early lesions in the mouth are small, yellowish, circumscribed plaques on the mucosa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lip and oral cavity cancer is a disease in which malignant ( cancer ) cells form in the lips or mouth. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Signs of lip and oral cavity cancer include a sore or lump on the lips or in the mouth. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • A lump or thickening on the lips or gums or in the mouth. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Children with PJS may have dark-blue or black spots (called pigmentation) on the lips and inside the mouth. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is an idiopathic condition characterized by a continuous burning sensation of the mucosa of the mouth, typically involving the tongue, with or without extension to the lips and oral mucosa. (medscape.com)
  • Midline folds of mucosa from upper and lower lips to gingiva close to central incisors. (studystack.com)
  • The most characteristic symptom of the disease is the recurrent onset of single or multiple painful erosions and ulcers that appear mainly on unattached oral mucosa of the lips, cheeks and tongue. (springer.com)
  • HSV is most contagious when the person has mouth sores or blisters on the lips. (medicinenet.com)
  • However there is a very distinct line where my inner lip starts (the area where the lips touch each other when mouth is closed). (curezone.com)
  • The buccal mucosa area of this membrane extends around the inside of the cheek and lower mouth area, the bottom of the tongue, out to the lips and to the back of the throat. (wisegeek.com)
  • Pigmented macules, often confluent and varying in size and shades of brown, appear in almost all cases periorally and on the lips and buccal mucosae. (medscape.com)
  • The most visible symptom of the infection comprise of white sores inside the mouth or on the lips, which resemble curdled milk or cottage cheese. (iloveindia.com)
  • In order to determine the effects of complete dentures on oral mucosa, it is necessary to have detailed information on the structure of normal oral mucosa. (gla.ac.uk)
  • We discovered that the normal oral mucosa exhibited limited LC3B punctae and weak cytoplasmic p62 staining, whereas the OSCCs exhibited a marked increase in LC3B punctae and cytoplasmic p62 expression. (nih.gov)
  • Stratified squamous epithelium from the human mouth mucosa (nonkeratinizing), H&E stain. (gettyimages.be)
  • It is comprised of the epithelium, basement membrane, lamina propria mucosae, and lamina muscularis mucosae. (fpnotebook.com)
  • Incisional biopsy from the buccal mucosa revealed an atrophic keratinized stratified squamous epithelium. (ispub.com)
  • Vitrification and Storage of Oral Mucosa Epithelial Cell Sheets. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Damage to intermediate filaments leads to inflammation and promotes the abnormal growth and division (proliferation) of epithelial cells, causing the mucosae to thicken and resulting in white sponge nevus. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The epithelial tissue - the tissue covering body surfaces - of the buccal mucosa is characterized as "squamous. (wisegeek.com)
  • The epithelial tissue of the buccal mucosa is non-keratinised, which means that these cells have a nucleus, or central generating core, as well as cytoplasm, which consists of all living structures in a cell apart from the nucleus. (wisegeek.com)
  • The squamous epithelial tissue of the buccal mucosa area is particularly subject to cancer, and over 90% of oral cancers have been associated with squamous cell carcinomas of the mouth and lip areas. (wisegeek.com)
  • Mucosa is moist tissue that lines certain parts of the inside of your body. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The tongue is covered with moist, pink tissue called mucosa. (webmd.com)
  • Mucosa moist. (duq.edu)
  • Head and neck cancer (HNC) includes malignant tumors that most commonly arise from the moist squamous cell mucosa or lining of the head and neck regions. (asha.org)
  • Aphthous stomatitis is a common condition characterized by the repeated formation of benign and non-contagious mouth ulcers (aphthae) in otherwise healthy individuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The informal term canker sores is also used, mainly in North America, although this may also refer to any mouth ulcers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aphthous ulcers typically begin as erythematous macules (reddened, flat area of mucosa ) which develop into ulcers that are covered with a yellow-grey fibrinous membrane that can be scraped away. (wikipedia.org)
  • suffer from mouth ulcers, stomach ulcer or intestinal ulcer. (drugs.com)
  • Canker sores (aphthous ulcers): Small, painful ulcers appear periodically on the tongue or mouth. (webmd.com)
  • Oral herpes may cause ulcers, fluid-filled blisters, or sores anywhere inside the mouth, including the gums and the tongue. (medicinenet.com)
  • This may be secondary to nausea and vomiting, mouth ulcers that prevent eating or swallowing, depression, changes in taste and/or dry mouth. (wikihow.com)
  • Treat problems affecting the oral mucosa, such as mouth ulcers and infections. (onetonline.org)
  • Lupus Hair loss, mouth ulcers, kidney disease, skin rashes, mental fog - the symptoms of lupus are mysterious, diverse and unique to each person. (zitar-metiz.ru)
  • Oral mucosa, including the lining of the cheek (buccal mucosa), floor of mouth and underside of tongue (sublingual mucosa) and gingival mucosa, has received much attention in the last decade because it offers excellent accessibility, is not easily traumatized and avoids degradation of proteins and peptides that occurs as a result of oral administration, gastrointestinal absorption and first-pass hepatic metabolism. (nih.gov)
  • Occasionally the lesions may also be observed on strongly keratinized palatal and gingival mucosa. (springer.com)
  • Essentially, buccal mucosa absorption is the absorption of nutrients through the inner lining of the cheeks and tongue, and it represents the foundation of our Fastchew product design. (saltstick.com)
  • The floor (bottom) of the mouth under the tongue. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • A white or red patch on the gums, tongue, or lining of the mouth. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Pertinent to burning mouth syndrome (BMS), the lingual branch of the mandibular nerve (V3) supplies the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. (medscape.com)
  • The tongue is a muscular organ in the mouth. (webmd.com)
  • The tongue is anchored to the mouth by webs of tough tissue and mucosa. (webmd.com)
  • In the back of the mouth, the tongue is anchored into the hyoid bone. (webmd.com)
  • Candida albicans (a yeast) grows over the surface of the mouth and tongue. (webmd.com)
  • And you don't just have taste buds on your tongue-they're everywhere, from the roof of your mouth to your throat and stomach. (prezi.com)
  • Sublingual CBD goes under the tongue for absorption via the mucosal membranes in the mouth, which are highly permeable. (marksdailyapple.com)
  • The buccal mucosa is a specific area of the oral mucosa - a mucous membrane covering the mouth area. (wisegeek.com)
  • In 16 patients treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity or oropharynx with an accelerated split course regimen, acute mucosal reactions were significantly less in the left buccal mucosa which had been repeatedly painted with 2% silver-nitrate solution for several days before radiotherapy than in the unpainted right buccal mucosa. (biomedsearch.com)
  • however, the mouth also houses mucosa, and mucous cells inside the oral cavity are called "buccal mucosa" specifically. (saltstick.com)
  • Tests that examine the mouth and throat are used to detect (find), diagnose, and stage lip and oral cavity cancer. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • The medical doctor or dentist will feel the entire inside of the mouth with a gloved finger and examine the oral cavity with a small long-handled mirror and lights. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • The digestive system , or digestive tract, includes the mouth, the esophagus, the stomach, the gallbladder, the small intestine, the large intestine , and the anus, all linked as a long twisting tube that starts at the mouth and ends at the anus. (encyclopedia.com)
  • if a product cannot dissolve the mouth, the digestive process does not begin until the stomach. (saltstick.com)
  • TOP TIP - REMEMBER THISDigestion starts in the mouth and carries on in the stomach, but most digestion takes place in the small intestine. (amazonaws.com)
  • It starts at your mouth and goes through your stomach, small intestine, colon, rectum and anus. (amazonaws.com)
  • Rapid absorption takes place by mouth (buccal mucosa, and then the stomach). (nytro.com)
  • It can enter the body through the eyes, nose or mouth mucosa. (tribuneindia.com)
  • You have mucosa in the nose, mucosa in the mouth, but you also have mucosa in the eye," he said. (nypost.com)
  • Add a drop or two of tea tree oil to your home made toothpaste to benefit both your mouth and gums and avoid plaque build up or gingivitis. (amoils.com)
  • If you are experiencing pain, swollen gums , lymph nodes and it does not go away or if you find it difficult to open your mouth, you should see a dentist for evaluation, x-ray and wisdom teeth removal. (healthtap.com)
  • You will also see this bullet point: "Chewable tablets provide fast absorption through buccal mucosa (tissue in mouth). (saltstick.com)
  • Fast absorption through buccal mucosa (tissue in mouth). (nytro.com)
  • Each tonsil is composed of tissue similar to lymph nodes, covered by pink mucosa (like on the adjacent mouth lining). (webmd.com)
  • Peptide absorption occurs across oral mucosa by passive diffusion and it is unlikely that there is a carrier-mediated transport mechanism. (nih.gov)
  • Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) occurs most frequently, but not exclusively, in peri-menopausal and postmenopausal women. (medscape.com)
  • A large number of infants have candida in their mouths and digestive tracts, which occurs naturally. (iloveindia.com)
  • There is a diffuse, gray-white, milky opalescent appearance of the mucosa which usually occurs bilaterally on the buccal mucosa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mucosa is the scientific term for cells that make up our mucous membranes. (saltstick.com)
  • [5] It is located on the mucous membranes of the mouth . (wikipedia.org)
  • Although lesions are usually seen in the mouth and oropharynx in raptors, it can also affect other mucus membranes. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this blog post, we have provided more clarity into the science of buccal mucosa absorption so that you can better understand how our products work to keep you hydrated. (saltstick.com)
  • You have probably heard about medicines or treatments that involve "oral absorption," which is just another term for absorbing compounds through the buccal mucosa. (saltstick.com)
  • What do buccal mucosa have to do with the absorption of electrolytes? (saltstick.com)
  • Do not simply take our word for it, as there have been many studies regarding buccal mucosa absorption. (saltstick.com)
  • Food enters through the mouth and proceeds to the gut (digestive tract) where it is chemically modified (digestion) for absorption by the body or waste disposal. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Examination of the mouth and throat for changes of the mucosa. (drugs.com)
  • The buccal mucosal membrane secretes moisturizing and lubricating fluids for the mouth and upper throat. (wisegeek.com)
  • Shushrutha in ancient medicine described a condition, "Vidari" under mouth and throat diseases. (ispub.com)
  • Cuts in the mouth can occur from brushing your teeth, eating, biting the inside of your mouth, or having dental braces. (wikihow.com)
  • These nevi most often occur on the mouth (oral) mucosa (plural: mucosae). (medlineplus.gov)
  • it may also occur on the mucosa of the larynx or vagina. (wikipedia.org)
  • The lining of the fleshy folds surrounding the mouth. (fpnotebook.com)
  • Then the HSV2 adapted itself to attack another mucosa - that is the genitals. (news-medical.net)
  • Type 2 burning mouth syndrome (BMS): Patients have continuous symptoms throughout the day and are frequently asymptomatic at night. (medscape.com)
  • Scientists have known for more than a century that the inside lining of the mouth can absorb nutrients directly, and this knowledge has led to the creation of many fast-acting drugs, such as nitroglycerin used by heart patients. (saltstick.com)
  • however, it is believed to be caused by the immune system attacking the skin and lining of the mouth. (webmd.com)
  • A chronic contagious disease primarily affecting the peripheral nerves secondarily involving skin, mucosa of mouth and upper. (slideplayer.com)
  • They are characterized as clustered, white lesions on the buccal mucosa (opposite the upper 1st & 2nd molars ) and are pathognomonic for measles . (rug.nl)
  • When herpes simplex flare-ups appear in their most common location, around the mouth, chin, and upper lip, people often refer to them as 'cold sores' or ' fever blisters . (medicinenet.com)
  • The parotid gland, a large gland that produces saliva for the mouth as an aid in digestion, flows into an area of the buccal mucosa near the second upper molar, known as the buccal cavity or the inner surface of the buccal mucosa. (wisegeek.com)
  • canker sores) belongs to the group of chronic, inflammatory, ulcerative diseases of the oral mucosa. (springer.com)
  • Persons with these diseases/conditions must religiously follow their treatment schedule, and the preventive measures of social distancing and personal hygiene (including frequent hand-washing) and mouth-protective measures during cough. (tribuneindia.com)
  • The ethnic variation may be explained by genetic factors or simply because black skinned people have greater amount of melanin in the mucosa, making it appear darker (termed racial or physiologic pigmentation). (wikipedia.org)
  • Leukoedema lesions disappear when the mucosa is stretched, which helps to differentiate it from other white lesions in the mouth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute mucositis in the stimulated oral mucosa of patients during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Perform surgery on mouth, jaws, and related head and neck structure to execute difficult and multiple extractions of teeth, to remove tumors and other abnormal growths, to correct abnormal jaw relations by mandibular or maxillary revision, to prepare mouth for insertion of dental prosthesis, or to treat fractured jaws. (careers.org)
  • The ambiguous definition of burning mouth syndrome (BMS) makes evaluation of prognosis and treatment difficult. (medscape.com)
  • Fragile intermediate filaments in the oral mucosa might be damaged when eating or brushing one's teeth. (medlineplus.gov)
  • They can discuss treatment solutions to relieve your dry mouth and protect your teeth from cavities. (3m.com)
  • It is most frequently found on the gingival or alveolar mucosa, but many cases are also seen on the buccal mucosa. (medscape.com)
  • Objetivo: Verificar a presença da expressão imunoistoquímica das Citoqueratinas (CKs) 7 e 8 nas células do Carcinoma epidermóide localizado em assoalho bucal (CEAB), estabelecendo a especulação de que essa neoplasia tem origem no epitélio de transição entre o ducto excretor da glândula salivar e a mucosa oral de superfície. (usp.br)
  • Orofacial soft tissues - Soft tissues around the mouth Actinomycosis Angioedema Basal cell carcinoma Cutaneous sinus of dental origin Cystic hygroma Gnathophyma Ludwig's angina Macrostomia Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome Microstomia Noma Oral Crohn's disease Orofacial granulomatosis Perioral dermatitis Pyostomatitis vegetans. (zitar-metiz.ru)
  • Because buccal mucosa absorb contents directly into the bloodstream from the mouth, the effects of these compounds usually take effect in about 5-10 minutes after consumption. (saltstick.com)
  • Intra-oral examination revealed bilateral fibrous bands on the buccal mucosa on palpation. (ispub.com)
  • Because the cells are flattened, however, they can more easily transfer substances such as saliva throughout the mouth due to their reduced vertical dimensions, and this aids the digestive process. (wisegeek.com)
  • An endoscope is inserted through an incision (cut) in the skin or opening in the body, such as the mouth. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • A harmless condition that can affect the skin or the mouth. (webmd.com)
  • The flat, small, reddish-purple dots represent bleeding from broken capillaries into the skin or mucosa. (healthline.com)
  • There might be cracked skin in the corners of the mouth as well. (iloveindia.com)
  • This darker mucosa may make the edematous changes more noticeable, whereas in the mucosa of people with lighter skin types leukoedema gives a milder presentation. (wikipedia.org)
  • These techniques were used to evaluate the differences between mucosa on the crest of the ridge in the maxillary first molar and mandibular anterior regions in post-mortem material. (gla.ac.uk)
  • [1] It is characterized by polygonal, flat-topped, violaceous papules and plaques with overlying, reticulated, fine white scale ( Wickham's striae ), commonly affecting dorsal hands, flexural wrists and forearms, trunk, anterior lower legs and oral mucosa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Verruciform xanthoma represents a rare disease of unknown etiology that typically affects the oral mucosa. (scielo.br)
  • Various attempts to classify burning mouth syndrome (BMS) based on etiology and symptoms have been made. (medscape.com)
  • In a classification by etiology or cause, idiopathic burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is considered "primary BMS" (or "true BMS"), whereas "secondary BMS" has an identifiable cause. (medscape.com)
  • Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is likely more than one disease process, and the etiology may be multifactorial. (medscape.com)
  • As with the other mucosa, these cells assist in digestion, meaning they can process certain nutrients and compounds by absorbing them directly into the bloodstream and skipping over the intestinal tract . (saltstick.com)
  • HSV1 usually infects the mucosa of the mouth leading to sores in the mouth. (news-medical.net)
  • Networks of intermediate filaments protect the mucosae from being damaged by friction or other everyday physical stresses. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Cysts of the oral mucosa in newborns: a clinical observation. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a clinical diagnosis made via the exclusion of all other causes. (medscape.com)
  • No tooth pain but the mucosa around tooth and back of mouth sensitive and burning. (healthtap.com)
  • Can a cavity in wisdom tooth cause jaw discomfort, ear pain and burning on the mucosa around tooth but NO TOOTH PAIN. (healthtap.com)
  • Persons with aphthous stomatitis have no detectable systemic symptoms or signs (i.e., outside the mouth). (wikipedia.org)
  • Type 1 burning mouth syndrome (BMS): Patients have no symptoms upon waking, with progression throughout the day. (medscape.com)
  • Type 3 burning mouth syndrome (BMS): Patients have intermittent symptoms throughout the day and symptom-free days. (medscape.com)
  • Recurrent aphthae appearing simultaneously on the oral and genital mucosa are one of the symptoms of Behçet's syndrome, a systemic, inflammatory disease with a suspected autoimmune background (Freysdottir et al. (springer.com)
  • This prescription-only dry-mouth solution utilizes a lipid-based oxygenated glycerol triester (OGT) technology to provide convenient, relief for up to 4 hours from xerostomia symptoms. (3m.com)
  • Ask your dentist to evaluate your dry mouth symptoms. (3m.com)
  • To avoid irritation of oral mucosa, do not chew ULTRESA or retain in mouth. (biospace.com)
  • It results in irritation in and around the baby's mouth. (iloveindia.com)