A mild, highly infectious viral disease of children, characterized by vesicular lesions in the mouth and on the hands and feet. It is caused by coxsackieviruses A.
A species of ENTEROVIRUS infecting humans and containing 10 serotypes, mostly coxsackieviruses.
Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and severe viral disease in cloven-hoofed animals, characterized by fever, formation of vesicles and erosions in the mouth, on the tongue, lips, teats, and feet, causing significant economic losses in agriculture and livestock farming.
A genus of the family PICORNAVIRIDAE whose members preferentially inhabit the intestinal tract of a variety of hosts. The genus contains many species. Newly described members of human enteroviruses are assigned continuous numbers with the species designated "human enterovirus".
Enterovirus Infections are acute viral illnesses caused by various Enterovirus serotypes, primarily transmitted through the fecal-oral route, manifesting as a wide range of clinical symptoms, from asymptomatic or mild self-limiting fever to severe and potentially life-threatening conditions, such as meningitis, encephalitis, myocarditis, and neonatal sepsis-like illness, depending on the age, immune status, and serotype of the infected individual.
Herpangina is a mild, self-limiting viral infection predominantly affecting children during summer and fall, characterized by the sudden onset of fever, sore throat, and small vesicles or ulcers on the posterior palate and tonsillar pillars.
The oval-shaped oral cavity located at the apex of the digestive tract and consisting of two parts: the vestibule and the oral cavity proper.
A genus of the family PICORNAVIRIDAE infecting mainly cloven-hoofed animals. They cause vesicular lesions and upper respiratory tract infections. FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE VIRUS is the type species.
The type species of APHTHOVIRUS, causing FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE in cloven-hoofed animals. Several different serotypes exist.
A heterogeneous group of infections produced by coxsackieviruses, including HERPANGINA, aseptic meningitis (MENINGITIS, ASEPTIC), a common-cold-like syndrome, a non-paralytic poliomyelitis-like syndrome, epidemic pleurodynia (PLEURODYNIA, EPIDEMIC) and a serious MYOCARDITIS.
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
A plant genus of the family POACEAE. Finger millet or raggee (E. coracana) is an important food grain in southern Asia and parts of Africa.
Diseases of the nail plate and tissues surrounding it. The concept is limited to primates.
A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.
Proteins that form the CAPSID of VIRUSES.
Domesticated farm animals raised for home use or profit but excluding POULTRY. Typically livestock includes CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; SWINE; GOATS; and others.
A neurological condition that is characterized by uncontrolled rapid irregular movements of the eye (OPSOCLONUS) and the muscle (MYOCLONUS) causing unsteady, trembling gait. It is also known as dancing eyes-dancing feet syndrome and is often associated with neoplasms, viral infections, or autoimmune disorders involving the nervous system.
Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
A syndrome characterized by headache, neck stiffness, low grade fever, and CSF lymphocytic pleocytosis in the absence of an acute bacterial pathogen. Viral meningitis is the most frequent cause although MYCOPLASMA INFECTIONS; RICKETTSIA INFECTIONS; diagnostic or therapeutic procedures; NEOPLASTIC PROCESSES; septic perimeningeal foci; and other conditions may result in this syndrome. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p745)
Suspensions of attenuated or killed viruses administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious viral disease.
'Mouth diseases' is a broad term referring to various conditions that cause inflammation, infection, or structural changes in any part of the mouth, including the lips, gums, tongue, palate, cheeks, and teeth, which can lead to symptoms such as pain, discomfort, difficulty in chewing or speaking, and altered aesthetics.
Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.
A parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch in southeast Asia, consisting of 11 states (West Malaysia) on the Malay Peninsula and two states (East Malaysia) on the island of BORNEO. It is also called the Federation of Malaysia. Its capital is Kuala Lumpur. Before 1963 it was the Union of Malaya. It reorganized in 1948 as the Federation of Malaya, becoming independent from British Malaya in 1957 and becoming Malaysia in 1963 as a federation of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak, and Singapore (which seceded in 1965). The form Malay- probably derives from the Tamil malay, mountain, with reference to its geography. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p715 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p329)
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Singapore" is not a medical term or concept, it's a country in Southeast Asia. If you have any questions about medical topics, I'd be happy to try and help!
Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
Antibodies that reduce or abolish some biological activity of a soluble antigen or infectious agent, usually a virus.
The "mouth floor" refers to the inferior aspect of the oral cavity, which is formed by the muscular floor of the mouth, consisting primarily of the mylohyoid muscle, and contains the opening of the sublingual and submandibular glands.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
An ulceration caused by prolonged pressure on the SKIN and TISSUES when one stays in one position for a long period of time, such as lying in bed. The bony areas of the body are the most frequently affected sites which become ischemic (ISCHEMIA) under sustained and constant pressure.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Minnesota" is a state located in the Midwestern United States and not a term with a medical definition. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, I'd be happy to help!

Oral examination: a screening tool for HIV infection? (1/673)

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the predictive values for HIV infection of diagnosis of oral manifestations of the infection. METHOD: Prevalence of oral manifestations was compared in cross sectional blinded clinical examinations of homosexual men attending a genitourinary medicine clinic. Data were extrapolated to populations in England and Wales based on estimates of the prevalence of HIV infection. RESULTS: Data were analysed for 572 HIV infected and non-infected men (312 and 260 respectively). Positive predictive values for erythematous candidiasis, hairy leucoplakia and pseudomembranous candidiasis were greater than 0.96 at the genitourinary medicine clinic and are estimated to be greater than 0.72 among homosexual men in London. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical diagnoses of mucosal lesions alone are poor predictors of HIV infection but are useful when used in conjunction with a social history to establish if there are risk factors for infection.  (+info)

Intraepithelial lymphocytes traffic to the intestine and enhance resistance to Toxoplasma gondii oral infection. (2/673)

Toxoplasma gondii Ag-primed intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) from the mouse intestine have been shown to be protective against an lethal parasite challenge when adoptively transferred into recipient mice. In the present study, we observed that Ag-primed IEL traffic to the intestine of naive mice following i.v. administration. Primed and CD8beta+ IEL were the most efficient cells at homing to the host organ. In congenic mice, IEL migrated from intestine within several hours posttransfer. On Ag reexposure, the primed IEL return to the intestine where they enhance resistance as determined by reduction in the number of brain cysts. Treatment of recipient mice with anti-alpha4 and anti-alphaE Abs partially inhibited IEL intestinal homing. The Ab treatment dramatically impaired resistance to a subsequent oral infection. These finding indicate that lymphocyte homing is an important parameter in establishing long term immunity to recurrent infection with this parasite.  (+info)

Oral carriage of staphylococci in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (3/673)

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of oral staphylococcal carriage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared with healthy controls. METHODS: Fifty healthy adults, 25 healthy elderly volunteers and 25 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were studied. An oral rinse, tongue swab and nasal swab were collected for culture on blood agar and a range of selective agars. Isolates of staphylococci were identified and antibiotic sensitivity profiles determined by standard methods. RESULTS: Staphylococci were isolated from the mouths of 94% of the healthy adults, 24% of whom carried Staphylococcus aureus. All the healthy elderly carried oral staphylococci and 36% were colonized with S. aureus. Staphylococci were isolated from 96% of the rheumatoid arthritis patients and this group had the highest carriage rate of S. aureus (56%), significantly higher than the healthy adults (P < 0.05). In all three groups, Staphylococcus epidermidis was isolated from the mouths of > 80%. No methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus were isolated. CONCLUSION: Oral carriage of S. aureus appears to be common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and studies of the mouth as a source of infection in septic arthritis would be merited.  (+info)

Human Gongylonema infection in a resident of New York City. (4/673)

A case of infection with Gongylonema is described in a 41-year-old woman living in New York City. The patient sought medical attention with the complaint of a sensation of 1-year duration of something moving in her mouth. On two occasions she removed worms from her mouth, once from her lip, once from the gum. One of the specimens submitted for examination was an adult female Gongylonema. It is not possible to say whether the infection was acquired in New York City, or elsewhere, since the patient traveled frequently to Mississippi to visit relatives. As cases of delusional parasitosis continue to increase, clinicians and laboratorians alike need to be alert to the possibility that foreign objects removed from the mouth, or elsewhere, may indeed represent unusual parasitic infections, and that these objects should be examined before being discarded.  (+info)

Interleukin-15 production at the early stage after oral infection with Listeria monocytogenes in mice. (5/673)

We previously reported that exogenous interleukin-15 (IL-15) induces proliferation and activation of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (i-IEL) in naive mice. To investigate the ability of endogenous IL-15 to stimulate i-IEL in vivo, we monitored i-IEL and intestinal epithelial cells (i-EC) in mice after an oral infection with Listeria monocytogenes. Although the populations of alphabeta and gammadelta i-IEL were not significantly changed after the oral infection, the expression level of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was increased both at transcriptional and protein levels, and a conversely marked decrease in interleukin-4 (IL-4) was detected in the i-IEL on day 1 after infection as compared with before infection. The T helper 1 (Th1)-biased response of i-IEL coincided with a peak response of IL-15 production in the i-EC after oral infection. These results suggested that IL-15 produced from i-EC may be at least partly involved in the stimulation of i-IEL to produce IFN-gamma after oral infection with L. monocytogenes.  (+info)

Medullary dorsal horn neuronal activity in rats with persistent temporomandibular joint and perioral inflammation. (6/673)

Studies at spinal levels indicate that peripheral tissue or nerve injury induces a state of hyperexcitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons that participates in the development of persistent pain and hyperalgesia. It has not been demonstrated that persistent injury in the orofacial region leads to a similar state of central hyperexcitability in the trigeminal system. The purpose of the present study was to conduct a parametric analysis of the response properties of nociceptive and nonnociceptive neurons in trigeminal nucleus caudalis (medullary dorsal horn, MDH) in a rat model of persistent orofacial inflammation. Neurons were recorded extracellularly and classified as low-threshold mechanoreceptive (LTM, n = 49), wide dynamic range (WDR, n = 82), and nociceptive-specific (NS, n = 11) neurons according to their response properties to mechanical stimuli applied to their cutaneous receptive fields (RFs). The inflammation was induced 24 h before the recordings by injecting complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) capsule or the perioral (PO) skin. The mean areas of the high-threshold RFs of WDR neurons in TMJ (8.66 +/- 0.61 cm(2), n = 25) and PO (5.61 +/- 2.07 cm(2), n = 25) inflamed rats were significantly larger than those in naive rats (1.10 +/- 0. 16 cm(2), n = 32). The mean RF size in TMJ-inflamed rats also was significantly larger than that in PO-inflamed rats (P < 0.01). Furthermore the mean area of the RFs of NS neurons (3.74 +/- 1.44 cm(2), n = 5) was significantly larger in TMJ inflamed rats as compared with naive rats (0.4 +/- 0.09 cm(2), n = 3) (P < 0.05). The background activity in the TMJ- and PO-inflamed rats was generally greater in WDR and NS neurons, but less in LTM neurons, when compared with naive rats. The responses of WDR neurons to noxious mechanical stimuli were increased significantly in TMJ-inflamed rats (P < 0.05) as compared with naive rats. WDR neuronal responses to mechanical stimulation also were increased in PO-inflamed rats but to a lesser extent than in TMJ-inflamed rats. The injection of CFA into the TMJ or PO skin resulted in reduced responses of LTM neurons to mechanical stimuli. The responses of MDH nociceptive neurons to 48-55 degrees C heating were greater in inflamed rats as compared with naive rats. A subpopulation of WDR neurons recorded from TMJ (n = 4 of 10)- or PO (n = 3 of 13)-injected rats responded to cooling in addition to heating of the RFs but did not grade their responses with changes in stimulus intensity. These results indicate that persistent orofacial inflammation produced hyperexcitability of MDH nociceptive neurons. TMJ inflammation resulted in more robust changes in MDH nociceptive neurons as compared with PO inflammation, consistent with previous studies of increased inflammation, increased MDH Fos-protein expression, and increased MDH preprodynorphin mRNA expression in this deep tissue orofacial model of pain and hyperalgesia. The inflammation-induced MDH hyperexcitability may contribute to mechanisms of persistent pain associated with orofacial deep tissue painful conditions.  (+info)

Heterogeneity of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains in various human infections and relationships between serotype, genotype, and antimicrobial susceptibility. (7/673)

Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an oral pathogen, only occasionally causes nonoral infections. In this study 52 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains from 51 subjects with nonoral infections were serotyped and genotyped by arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) to determine whether a certain clone(s) is specifically associated with nonoral infections or particular in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. The promoter structure of leukotoxin genes was additionally investigated to find the deletion characteristic of highly leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. The nonoral A. actinomycetemcomitans strains included all five known serotypes and nonserotypeable strains, the most common serotypes being b (40%) and c (31%). AP-PCR distinguished 10 different genotypes. A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype b strains were more frequently found in blood samples of patients with bacteremia or endocarditis than in patients with focal infections. One AP-PCR genotype was significantly more frequently found among strains originating in focal infections than in blood samples. Resistance to benzylpenicillin was significantly more frequent among A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype b strains than among strains of other serotypes. No differences in the leukotoxin gene promoter region or benzylpenicillin resistance between nonoral and oral A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were observed. Nonoral A. actinomycetemcomitans strains showed great similarity to the oral strains, confirming that the oral cavity is the likely source of nonoral A. actinomycetemcomitans infections. The predominance of serotype b strains in endocarditis and bacteremia supports the hypothesis of a relationship between certain A. actinomycetemcomitans clones and some nonoral infections. The mechanisms behind the exceptionally high rate of occurrence of benzylpenicillin resistance among A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype b strains are to be elucidated in further studies.  (+info)

A glutamine insertion in the 1A alpha helical domain of the keratin 4 gene in a familial case of white sponge nevus. (8/673)

White Sponge Nevus (WSN) is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder that predominantly affects noncornified stratified squamous epithelia. Clinically, it is characterized by the presence of soft, white, and "spongy" plaques in the oral mucosa. The characteristic histopathologic features are epithelial thickening, parakeratosis, and vacuolization of the suprabasal layer of oral epithelial keratinocytes. Mutations in keratin 4 (K4) and keratin 13 (K13) genes have already been demonstrated to be responsible for WSN; the identification of new keratin mutations in a stratified squamous epithelia closely related to epidermis is of relevance for the understanding of the biochemistry of intermediate filaments, and for genotype phenotype correlations. In this study we investigated a 27-y-old, female Italian patient, affected by white asymptomatic oral plaques. Sequence analysis revealed a 3 bp (ACA) heterozygous insertion localized in the helix initiation motif of the 1A alpha helical domain of K4. We report this new K4 gene mutation and describe an amino acid insertion, in the 1A domain, responsible for a keratin disease.  (+info)

Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a mild, contagious viral infection common in infants and children but can sometimes occur in adults. The disease is often caused by coxsackievirus A16 or enterovirus 71.

The name "hand, foot and mouth" comes from the fact that blister-like sores usually appear in the mouth (and occasionally on the buttocks and legs) along with a rash on the hands and feet. The disease is not related to foot-and-mouth disease (also called hoof-and-mouth disease), which affects cattle, sheep, and swine.

HFMD is spread through close personal contact, such as hugging and kissing, or through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. It can also be spread by touching objects and surfaces that have the virus on them and then touching the face. People with HFMD are most contagious during the first week of their illness but can still be contagious for weeks after symptoms go away.

There is no specific treatment for HFMD, and it usually resolves on its own within 7-10 days. However, over-the-counter pain relievers and fever reducers may help alleviate symptoms. It's important to encourage good hygiene practices, such as handwashing and covering the mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing, to prevent the spread of HFMD.

Enterovirus A, Human is a type of enterovirus that infects humans. Enteroviruses are small, single-stranded RNA viruses that belong to the Picornaviridae family. There are over 100 different types of enteroviruses, and they are divided into several species, including Enterovirus A, B, C, D, and Rhinovirus.

Enterovirus A includes several important human pathogens, such as polioviruses (which have been largely eradicated thanks to vaccination efforts), coxsackieviruses, echoviruses, and enterovirus 71. These viruses are typically transmitted through the fecal-oral route or respiratory droplets and can cause a range of illnesses, from mild symptoms like fever, rash, and sore throat to more severe diseases such as meningitis, encephalitis, myocarditis, and paralysis.

Poliovirus, which is the most well-known member of Enterovirus A, was responsible for causing poliomyelitis, a highly infectious disease that can lead to irreversible paralysis. However, due to widespread vaccination programs, wild poliovirus transmission has been eliminated in many parts of the world, and only a few countries still report cases of polio caused by vaccine-derived viruses.

Coxsackieviruses and echoviruses can cause various symptoms, including fever, rash, mouth sores, muscle aches, and respiratory illnesses. In some cases, they can also lead to more severe diseases such as meningitis or myocarditis. Enterovirus 71 is a significant pathogen that can cause hand, foot, and mouth disease, which is a common childhood illness characterized by fever, sore throat, and rash on the hands, feet, and mouth. In rare cases, enterovirus 71 can also lead to severe neurological complications such as encephalitis and polio-like paralysis.

Prevention measures for enterovirus A infections include good hygiene practices, such as washing hands frequently, avoiding close contact with sick individuals, and practicing safe food handling. Vaccination is available for poliovirus and can help prevent the spread of vaccine-derived viruses. No vaccines are currently available for other enterovirus A infections, but research is ongoing to develop effective vaccines against these viruses.

Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease that affects cloven-hoofed animals, including cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, and buffalo. The virus can also infect wild animals like deer and antelope. FMD is not a direct threat to human health but may have significant economic impacts due to restrictions on trade and movement of infected animals.

The disease is characterized by fever, blister-like sores (vesicles) in the mouth, on the tongue, lips, gums, teats, and between the hooves. The vesicles can rupture, causing painful erosions that make it difficult for affected animals to eat, drink, or walk. In severe cases, FMD can lead to death, particularly among young animals.

The causative agent of foot-and-mouth disease is the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), which belongs to the Picornaviridae family and Aphthovirus genus. There are seven serotypes of FMDV: O, A, C, Asia 1, and South African Territories (SAT) 1, SAT 2, and SAT 3. Infection with one serotype does not provide cross-protection against other serotypes.

Prevention and control measures for foot-and-mouth disease include vaccination, quarantine, movement restrictions, disinfection, and culling of infected animals in severe outbreaks. Rapid detection and response are crucial to prevent the spread of FMD within and between countries.

An enterovirus is a type of virus that primarily infects the gastrointestinal tract. There are over 100 different types of enteroviruses, including polioviruses, coxsackieviruses, echoviruses, and newer enteroviruses such as EV-D68 and EV-A71. These viruses are typically spread through close contact with an infected person, or by consuming food or water contaminated with the virus.

While many people infected with enteroviruses may not experience any symptoms, some may develop mild to severe illnesses such as hand, foot and mouth disease, herpangina, meningitis, encephalitis, myocarditis, and paralysis (in case of poliovirus). Infection can occur in people of all ages, but young children are more susceptible to infection and severe illness.

Prevention measures include practicing good hygiene, such as washing hands frequently with soap and water, avoiding close contact with sick individuals, and not sharing food or drinks with someone who is ill. There are also vaccines available to prevent poliovirus infection.

Enterovirus infections are viral illnesses caused by enteroviruses, which are a type of picornavirus. These viruses commonly infect the gastrointestinal tract and can cause a variety of symptoms depending on the specific type of enterovirus and the age and overall health of the infected individual.

There are over 100 different types of enteroviruses, including polioviruses, coxsackieviruses, echoviruses, and newer enteroviruses such as EV-D68 and EV-A71. Some enterovirus infections may be asymptomatic or cause only mild symptoms, while others can lead to more severe illnesses.

Common symptoms of enterovirus infections include fever, sore throat, runny nose, cough, muscle aches, and skin rashes. In some cases, enteroviruses can cause more serious complications such as meningitis (inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord), encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle), and paralysis.

Enterovirus infections are typically spread through close contact with an infected person, such as through respiratory droplets or fecal-oral transmission. They can also be spread through contaminated surfaces or objects. Preventive measures include good hygiene practices, such as washing hands frequently and avoiding close contact with sick individuals.

There are no specific antiviral treatments for enterovirus infections, and most cases resolve on their own within a few days to a week. However, severe cases may require hospitalization and supportive care, such as fluids and medication to manage symptoms. Prevention efforts include vaccination against poliovirus and surveillance for emerging enteroviruses.

Herpangina is a mild, self-limiting viral infection that primarily affects children under the age of 10. It is characterized by the sudden onset of fever, sore throat, and small vesicles or ulcers (

In medical terms, the mouth is officially referred to as the oral cavity. It is the first part of the digestive tract and includes several structures: the lips, vestibule (the space enclosed by the lips and teeth), teeth, gingiva (gums), hard and soft palate, tongue, floor of the mouth, and salivary glands. The mouth is responsible for several functions including speaking, swallowing, breathing, and eating, as it is the initial point of ingestion where food is broken down through mechanical and chemical processes, beginning the digestive process.

Aphthovirus is a genus of viruses in the family Picornaviridae, order Picornavirales. This genus includes several species of viruses that are primarily associated with causing oral and foot lesions in cloven-hoofed animals, such as cattle, sheep, and pigs. The most well-known member of this genus is foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), which causes a highly contagious and economically significant disease in livestock. Other species in the Aphthovirus genus include equine rhinitis A virus, bovine rhinitis virus, and porcine teschovirus. These viruses are typically transmitted through direct contact with infected animals or their secretions and excretions, and they can cause a range of clinical signs including fever, loss of appetite, lameness, and lesions in the mouth and feet. There are currently no vaccines available for all serotypes of FMDV, and control measures typically involve quarantine, slaughter of infected animals, and strict biosecurity practices to prevent spread of the virus.

Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus belonging to the family Picornaviridae and the genus Aphthovirus. It is the causative agent of Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD), a highly contagious and severe viral disease that affects cloven-hoofed animals, including cattle, swine, sheep, goats, and buffalo. The virus can be transmitted through direct contact with infected animals or their bodily fluids, as well as through aerosolized particles in the air. FMDV has seven distinct serotypes (O, A, C, Asia 1, and South African Territories [SAT] 1, 2, and 3), and infection with one serotype does not provide cross-protection against other serotypes. The virus primarily targets the animal's epithelial tissues, causing lesions and blisters in and around the mouth, feet, and mammary glands. FMD is not a direct threat to human health but poses significant economic consequences for the global livestock industry due to its high infectivity and morbidity rates.

Coxsackievirus infections are a type of viral illness caused by Coxsackie A and B viruses, which belong to the family Picornaviridae. These viruses can cause a wide range of symptoms, depending on the specific strain and the age and overall health of the infected individual.

The most common types of Coxsackievirus infections are hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) and herpangina. HFMD is characterized by fever, sore throat, and a rash that typically appears on the hands, feet, and mouth. Herpangina is similar but is usually marked by painful sores in the back of the mouth or throat.

Other possible symptoms of Coxsackievirus infections include:

* Fever
* Headache
* Muscle aches
* Fatigue
* Nausea and vomiting
* Abdominal pain

In some cases, Coxsackievirus infections can lead to more serious complications, such as meningitis (inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord), myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle), or pleurodynia (also known as "devil's grip," a painful inflammation of the chest and abdominal muscles).

Coxsackievirus infections are typically spread through close contact with an infected person, such as through respiratory droplets or by touching contaminated surfaces. The viruses can also be spread through fecal-oral transmission.

There is no specific treatment for Coxsackievirus infections, and most people recover on their own within a week or two. However, severe cases may require hospitalization and supportive care, such as fluids and pain relief. Prevention measures include good hygiene practices, such as washing hands frequently and avoiding close contact with sick individuals.

A disease outbreak is defined as the occurrence of cases of a disease in excess of what would normally be expected in a given time and place. It may affect a small and localized group or a large number of people spread over a wide area, even internationally. An outbreak may be caused by a new agent, a change in the agent's virulence or host susceptibility, or an increase in the size or density of the host population.

Outbreaks can have significant public health and economic impacts, and require prompt investigation and control measures to prevent further spread of the disease. The investigation typically involves identifying the source of the outbreak, determining the mode of transmission, and implementing measures to interrupt the chain of infection. This may include vaccination, isolation or quarantine, and education of the public about the risks and prevention strategies.

Examples of disease outbreaks include foodborne illnesses linked to contaminated food or water, respiratory infections spread through coughing and sneezing, and mosquito-borne diseases such as Zika virus and West Nile virus. Outbreaks can also occur in healthcare settings, such as hospitals and nursing homes, where vulnerable populations may be at increased risk of infection.

"Eleusine" is the genus name for a group of plants that includes several species of grasses, some of which are known as "goosegrass." It does not have a specific medical definition, but certain species of Eleusine may have medicinal or therapeutic uses. For example, in traditional medicine, the leaves and seeds of some Eleusine species have been used to treat various conditions such as diarrhea, dysentery, and skin diseases. However, it is important to note that these uses have not been extensively studied or proven in clinical trials, so they should not be considered medical facts. Always consult with a healthcare provider for medical advice.

Nail diseases, also known as onychopathies, refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the nail unit, which includes the nail plate, nail bed, lunula, and surrounding skin (nail fold). These diseases can be caused by various factors such as fungal infections, bacterial infections, viral infections, systemic diseases, trauma, and neoplasms.

Some common examples of nail diseases include:

1. Onychomycosis - a fungal infection that affects the nail plate and bed, causing discoloration, thickening, and crumbling of the nail.
2. Paronychia - an infection or inflammation of the nail fold, caused by bacteria or fungi, resulting in redness, swelling, and pain.
3. Ingrown toenails - a condition where the nail plate grows into the surrounding skin, causing pain, redness, and infection.
4. Onycholysis - a separation of the nail plate from the nail bed, often caused by trauma or underlying medical conditions.
5. Psoriasis - a systemic disease that can affect the nails, causing pitting, ridging, discoloration, and onycholysis.
6. Lichen planus - an inflammatory condition that can affect the skin and nails, causing nail thinning, ridging, and loss.
7. Melanonychia - a darkening of the nail plate due to pigmentation, which can be benign or malignant.
8. Brittle nails - a condition characterized by weak, thin, and fragile nails that easily break or split.
9. Subungual hematoma - a collection of blood under the nail plate, often caused by trauma, resulting in discoloration and pain.
10. Tumors - abnormal growths that can develop in or around the nail unit, ranging from benign to malignant.

Accurate diagnosis and treatment of nail diseases require a thorough examination and sometimes laboratory tests, such as fungal cultures or skin biopsies. Treatment options vary depending on the underlying cause and may include topical or oral medications, surgical intervention, or lifestyle modifications.

I am not aware of a specific medical definition for the term "China." Generally, it is used to refer to:

1. The People's Republic of China (PRC), which is a country in East Asia. It is the most populous country in the world and the fourth largest by geographical area. Its capital city is Beijing.
2. In a historical context, "China" was used to refer to various dynasties and empires that existed in East Asia over thousands of years. The term "Middle Kingdom" or "Zhongguo" (中国) has been used by the Chinese people to refer to their country for centuries.
3. In a more general sense, "China" can also be used to describe products or goods that originate from or are associated with the People's Republic of China.

If you have a specific context in which you encountered the term "China" related to medicine, please provide it so I can give a more accurate response.

Capsid proteins are the structural proteins that make up the capsid, which is the protective shell of a virus. The capsid encloses the viral genome and helps to protect it from degradation and detection by the host's immune system. Capsid proteins are typically arranged in a symmetrical pattern and can self-assemble into the capsid structure when exposed to the viral genome.

The specific arrangement and composition of capsid proteins vary between different types of viruses, and they play important roles in the virus's life cycle, including recognition and binding to host cells, entry into the cell, and release of the viral genome into the host cytoplasm. Capsid proteins can also serve as targets for antiviral therapies and vaccines.

I apologize for any confusion, but "livestock" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is an agricultural term that refers to animals that are kept or raised on a farm or ranch for commercial purposes, such as the production of food, fiber, or labor. Examples of livestock include cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, poultry, and horses. I hope this clarifies any confusion. If you have any questions related to medical terminology, I would be happy to help.

Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome (OMS) is a rare neurological disorder characterized by rapid, involuntary, and chaotic eye movements (opsoclonus) and brief, shock-like jerks of the muscles (myoclonus). These symptoms can affect various parts of the body, including the limbs, trunk, and face. OMS is often associated with a variety of underlying causes, such as viral infections, tumors, or autoimmune disorders. In some cases, no specific cause can be identified, and this is referred to as idiopathic OMS.

The symptoms of OMS can significantly impact an individual's daily functioning and quality of life. Treatment typically involves a combination of medications to manage the symptoms and address any underlying causes. The prognosis for individuals with OMS varies depending on the severity of the condition and the effectiveness of treatment. Some people may experience significant improvement in their symptoms, while others may have persistent neurological impairments.

Cattle diseases are a range of health conditions that affect cattle, which include but are not limited to:

1. Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD): Also known as "shipping fever," BRD is a common respiratory illness in feedlot cattle that can be caused by several viruses and bacteria.
2. Bovine Viral Diarrhea (BVD): A viral disease that can cause a variety of symptoms, including diarrhea, fever, and reproductive issues.
3. Johne's Disease: A chronic wasting disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis. It primarily affects the intestines and can cause severe diarrhea and weight loss.
4. Digital Dermatitis: Also known as "hairy heel warts," this is a highly contagious skin disease that affects the feet of cattle, causing lameness and decreased productivity.
5. Infectious Bovine Keratoconjunctivitis (IBK): Also known as "pinkeye," IBK is a common and contagious eye infection in cattle that can cause blindness if left untreated.
6. Salmonella: A group of bacteria that can cause severe gastrointestinal illness in cattle, including diarrhea, dehydration, and septicemia.
7. Leptospirosis: A bacterial disease that can cause a wide range of symptoms in cattle, including abortion, stillbirths, and kidney damage.
8. Blackleg: A highly fatal bacterial disease that causes rapid death in young cattle. It is caused by Clostridium chauvoei and vaccination is recommended for prevention.
9. Anthrax: A serious infectious disease caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis. Cattle can become infected by ingesting spores found in contaminated soil, feed or water.
10. Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD): A highly contagious viral disease that affects cloven-hooved animals, including cattle. It is characterized by fever and blisters on the feet, mouth, and teats. FMD is not a threat to human health but can have serious economic consequences for the livestock industry.

It's important to note that many of these diseases can be prevented or controlled through good management practices, such as vaccination, biosecurity measures, and proper nutrition. Regular veterinary care and monitoring are also crucial for early detection and treatment of any potential health issues in your herd.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

Aseptic meningitis is a type of meningitis (inflammation of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord) that is not caused by bacterial infection. Instead, it can be due to viral infections, fungal infections, or non-infectious causes such as certain medications, chemical irritants, or underlying medical conditions. In aseptic meningitis, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis may show increased white blood cells, typically lymphocytes, but no bacterial growth on culture. Common viral causes include enteroviruses, herpes simplex virus, and varicella-zoster virus. Treatment depends on the underlying cause and may include supportive care, antiviral medications, or immunosuppressive therapy in some cases.

A viral vaccine is a biological preparation that introduces your body to a specific virus in a way that helps your immune system build up protection against the virus without causing the illness. Viral vaccines can be made from weakened or inactivated forms of the virus, or parts of the virus such as proteins or sugars. Once introduced to the body, the immune system recognizes the virus as foreign and produces an immune response, including the production of antibodies. These antibodies remain in the body and provide immunity against future infection with that specific virus.

Viral vaccines are important tools for preventing infectious diseases caused by viruses, such as influenza, measles, mumps, rubella, polio, hepatitis A and B, rabies, rotavirus, chickenpox, shingles, and some types of cancer. Vaccination programs have led to the control or elimination of many infectious diseases that were once common.

It's important to note that viral vaccines are not effective against bacterial infections, and separate vaccines must be developed for each type of virus. Additionally, because viruses can mutate over time, it is necessary to update some viral vaccines periodically to ensure continued protection.

Mouth diseases refer to a variety of conditions that affect the oral cavity, including the lips, gums, teeth, tongue, palate, and lining of the mouth. These diseases can be caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, or other organisms. They can also result from injuries, chronic illnesses, or genetic factors.

Some common examples of mouth diseases include dental caries (cavities), periodontal disease (gum disease), oral herpes, candidiasis (thrush), lichen planus, and oral cancer. Symptoms may include pain, swelling, redness, bleeding, bad breath, difficulty swallowing or speaking, and changes in the appearance of the mouth or teeth. Treatment depends on the specific diagnosis and may involve medications, dental procedures, or lifestyle changes.

Antibodies, viral are proteins produced by the immune system in response to an infection with a virus. These antibodies are capable of recognizing and binding to specific antigens on the surface of the virus, which helps to neutralize or destroy the virus and prevent its replication. Once produced, these antibodies can provide immunity against future infections with the same virus.

Viral antibodies are typically composed of four polypeptide chains - two heavy chains and two light chains - that are held together by disulfide bonds. The binding site for the antigen is located at the tip of the Y-shaped structure, formed by the variable regions of the heavy and light chains.

There are five classes of antibodies in humans: IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Each class has a different function and is distributed differently throughout the body. For example, IgG is the most common type of antibody found in the bloodstream and provides long-term immunity against viruses, while IgA is found primarily in mucous membranes and helps to protect against respiratory and gastrointestinal infections.

In addition to their role in the immune response, viral antibodies can also be used as diagnostic tools to detect the presence of a specific virus in a patient's blood or other bodily fluids.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Malaysia" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in Southeast Asia, consisting of thirteen states and three federal territories. If you have any questions about Malaysia's geography, culture, or people, I would be happy to try to help answer those! However, if you have a question related to medicine or healthcare, please provide more details so I can give you an accurate and helpful response.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Singapore" is not a medical term or concept. It is a sovereign city-state and island country in Southeast Asia. If you have any questions related to medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

A viral RNA (ribonucleic acid) is the genetic material found in certain types of viruses, as opposed to viruses that contain DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid). These viruses are known as RNA viruses. The RNA can be single-stranded or double-stranded and can exist as several different forms, such as positive-sense, negative-sense, or ambisense RNA. Upon infecting a host cell, the viral RNA uses the host's cellular machinery to translate the genetic information into proteins, leading to the production of new virus particles and the continuation of the viral life cycle. Examples of human diseases caused by RNA viruses include influenza, COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2), hepatitis C, and polio.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

Neutralizing antibodies are a type of antibody that defends against pathogens such as viruses or bacteria by neutralizing their ability to infect cells. They do this by binding to specific regions on the surface proteins of the pathogen, preventing it from attaching to and entering host cells. This renders the pathogen ineffective and helps to prevent or reduce the severity of infection. Neutralizing antibodies can be produced naturally in response to an infection or vaccination, or they can be generated artificially for therapeutic purposes.

The term "mouth floor" is not a standard medical terminology. However, it might refer to the floor of the mouth, which is the part of the oral cavity located beneath the tongue and above the hyoid bone, which is a U-shaped bone in the front of the neck that helps support the tongue. The mouth floor contains several salivary glands, muscles, and nerves that are important for functions such as swallowing and speaking.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure injury or bedsore, is defined by the National Pressure Injury Advisory Panel (NPIAP) as "localized damage to the skin and/or underlying soft tissue usually over a bony prominence or related to a medical or other device." The damage can be caused by intense and/or prolonged pressure or shear forces, or a combination of both. Pressure ulcers are staged based on their severity, ranging from an initial reddening of the skin (Stage 1) to full-thickness tissue loss that extends down to muscle and bone (Stage 4). Unstageable pressure ulcers are those in which the base of the wound is covered by yellow, tan, green or brown tissue and the extent of tissue damage is not visible. Suspected deep tissue injury (Suspected DTI) describes intact skin or non-blanchable redness of a localized area usually over a bony prominence due to pressure and/or shear. The area may be preceded by tissue that is painful, firm, mushy, boggy, warmer or cooler as compared to adjacent tissue.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Minnesota" is not a medical term or concept. It is a state located in the Midwestern United States, known for its cold winters, beautiful lakes, and friendly people. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help!

... vocals Foot in Mouth Disease at AllMusic Miccio, Anthony. "Gob Foot in Mouth Disease". Blender. Archived from the original on ... Foot In Mouth Disease is the fourth studio album by Canadian punk rock band Gob, released on April 1, 2003 in Canada by ...
... (FMD) or hoof-and-mouth disease (HMD) is an infectious and sometimes fatal viral disease that affects ... Foot-and-mouth outbreaks, Animal viral diseases, Bovine diseases, Sheep and goat diseases, Infectious diseases with eradication ... Viruses portal Animal virology Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) Swine vesicular disease (SVD) Blain, an archaic disease of ... Another viral disease with similar symptoms, hand, foot and mouth disease, occurs more frequently in humans, especially in ...
HFMD should not be confused with foot-and-mouth disease (also known as hoof-and-mouth disease), which mostly affects livestock ... "Mysterious deadly illness in Cambodian children tied to hand, foot and mouth disease". Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease. World ... Media related to Hand, foot and mouth disease at Wikimedia Commons Highly contagious Hand, foot and mouth disease killing ... "Treat Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease". CDC. February 2, 2021. Retrieved October 9, 2021. "Hand Foot and Mouth Disease". CDC. ...
... (FMDV) is the pathogen that causes foot-and-mouth disease. It is a picornavirus, the prototypical ... Foot-and-mouth disease virus occurs in seven major serotypes: O, A, C, SAT-1, SAT-2, SAT-3, and Asia-1. These serotypes show ... The disease, which causes vesicles (blisters) in the mouth and feet of cattle, pigs, sheep, goats, and other cloven-hoofed ... May 2005). "Comparative Genomics of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus". J. Virol. 79 (10): 6487-504. doi:10.1128/JVI.79.10.6487- ...
Kosti Rezovo Gramatikovo Granichar Kirovo 2011 Bulgaria foot-and-mouth disease outbreak is an outbreak of foot-and-mouth ... A necropsy revealed foot-and mouth disease. Following this, 37 infected animals were discovered in the village of Kosti, and ... "Press release - Foot and Mouth Disease: Commission adopts urgent protection measures after case in wild boar in Bulgaria". ... Jamal, SM; Belsham, GJ (5 December 2013). "Foot-and-mouth disease: past, present and future". Veterinary Research. 44: 116. doi ...
"Hoof and Mouth Disease". "Foot & Mouth Disease general information summary" (PDF). "Foot-and-Mouth Disease Fact Sheet" (PDF). ... High-impact animal diseases such as foot-and-mouth disease or African swine fevers may not directly affect human health, but ... Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a severe highly contagious viral disease affecting cloven-hooved animals, such as cattle, sheep ... "Cattle Disease Guide Foot-and-Mouth". John F. Timoney, MVB, PhD, Desc, MRCVS, Keeneland Chair of Infectious Diseases, Gluck ...
Silk, H (2014). "Diseases of the mouth". Primary Care. 41 (1): 75-90. doi:10.1016/j.pop.2013.10.011. PMID 24439882. S2CID ... Degenerative disorders were more prominent than disease. Physical stress is easier to see on the bones, compared to disease on ... Caries is associated with poor cleaning of the mouth and receding gums that expose the roots of teeth. A study done on the ... Dental caries is the scientific term for cavities or tooth decay as a result of bacteria fermenting carbohydrates in the mouth ...
Philipp J (16 July 2015). "Medications, diseases among factors for dry mouth". azcentral.com. Tom WC (3 July 2007). "Magic ... Mouthwash, mouth rinse, oral rinse, or mouth bath is a liquid which is held in the mouth passively or swirled around the mouth ... sensation of a dry mouth, etc. Alcohol-containing mouthwashes may make dry mouth and halitosis worse, as they dry out the mouth ... The term mouth bath implies that the liquid is passively held in the mouth, rather than vigorously swilled around (which could ...
Partial crystal structures for VPgs of foot and mouth disease virus and coxsackie virus B3 suggest that there may be two sites ... The first animal virus discovered (1897) was the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). It is the prototypic member of the genus ... Martinez-Salas E, Saiz M, Sobrino F (2008). "Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus". In Mettenleiter TC, Sobrino F (eds.). Animal ... an animal pathogen causing foot-and-mouth disease.[citation needed] In this group, primer-dependent RNA synthesis uses a small ...
Perry, B.D. and Rich, K (2007). The poverty impacts of foot and mouth disease and the poverty reduction implications of its ... Perry, B.D. and Sones, K.R. (Editors) (2007). Global Roadmap for Improving the Tools to Control Foot-and-Mouth Disease in ... Perry, B.D., Gleeson, L.J., Khounsey, S., Bounema, P., Blacksell, S. (2002). The dynamics and impact of foot and mouth disease ... "Foot and Mouth Disease Project". "AgResults.org - $30 Million Brucellosis Vaccine Prize". Archived from the original on 16 ...
Foot-and Mouth Disease outbreaks. DEFRA Foot and Mouth Disease. SAFE AIR II (Italy) - The simulation of air pollution from ...
The anti-livestock pathogens included: rinderpest virus; foot-and-mouth disease virus; Bacillus anthracis (the causative agent ... one focusing on plant diseases and the other on diseases associated with agricultural animals. Despite having signed the 1972 ... and rust diseases of wheat and other small grain crops. There is no reliable information at all with regard to which delivery ...
The 1967 United Kingdom foot-and-mouth outbreak was a major outbreak of foot and mouth disease in the United Kingdom. The only ... It provided recommendations to keep the disease out of the country and plans for fighting the foot-and-mouth disease. Origins ... "Foot and Mouth disease - FMD". EDEN. Archived from the original on 1 October 2009. Retrieved 24 August 2009. Bowden, Hilary (21 ... The Report of the Committee of Inquiry on Foot-and-Mouth Disease part 1 and part 2 were published on 7 March 1969 and 3 ...
Foot and mouth disease: The 1967 outbreak and its aftermath. ISBN 9780854840960. "The Diseases of Animals (Extension of ... Diseases of Animals Act 1894 Diseases of Animals Act 1896 Diseases of Animals Act 1903 Diseases of Animals Act 1909 Diseases of ... Diseases of Animals Act 1922 Diseases of Animals Act 1924 Diseases of Animals Act 1925 Diseases of Animals Act 1927 Diseases of ... "Diseases of Animals Act 1950: consolidation of Diseases of Animals Acts 1894-1937". The National Archives. Zuckerman, Baron ...
He declared a state of emergency in Miyazaki during a major outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in May 2010. He decided not to ... "Foot-and-mouth disease hits Japan". AP. Retrieved 20 December 2013. Ishihara easily wins reelection / Tokyo governor takes 4th ...
Rodriguez LL, Grubman MJ (November 2009). "Foot and mouth disease virus vaccines". Vaccine. 27 (Suppl 4): D90-4. doi:10.1016/j. ... "Disease resistant crops". GMO Compass. Archived from the original on 3 June 2010. Demont M, Tollens E (2004). "First impact of ... In 2015 a virus was used to insert a healthy gene into the skin cells of a boy suffering from a rare skin disease, ... By knocking out genes responsible for certain conditions it is possible to create animal model organisms of human diseases. As ...
Cassels, Alan (4 March 2008). "Spreading disease by word of mouth". Toronto Star. Retrieved 13 September 2013. Barber, Charles ... Although a spoof, some news outlets have reported the disease as if this were a real disorder. The disease was invented and ... Motivational deficiency disorder is the name of a fake disease imagined for a health campaign to raise awareness of disease ... The disease was first described in an effort coordinated by Ray Moynihan when BMJ published a description of it for April ...
... and Foot-and-mouth Disease (1952). In 1949 Gowers was appointed chairman of the Royal Commission on Capital Punishment (1949-53 ... He became chairman of the board of the hospital where his father had worked, the National Hospital for Nervous Diseases (now ...
... es infect split-hooved animals, and include the causative agent of foot-and-mouth disease, Foot-and-mouth disease ... Foot-and-Mouth Disease summary from the US Department of Agriculture. Aphthovirus Animal viruses Viralzone: Aphtovirus ICTV ( ... 2008). "Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus". Animal Viruses: Molecular Biology. Caister Academic Press. ISBN 978-1-904455-22-6. " ... Aphthoviruses include the causative agents of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), which primarily affects livestock such as cattle, ...
Komarov, A.; Goldsmit, L. (1958). "Avianized modified foot-and-mouth disease". Bulletin of the Research Council of Israel. 7E: ... Haifa and produced one of the most successful Foot-and-mouth disease vaccines; Prof. Meir Yoeli (1912-1975) - a biologist who ... He was active in programs to promote the local olive oil industry and treat livestock diseases. In 1930, he organized the first ... The unit collected data regarding the prevalence of the disease, types and breeding places of the mosquitoes and in parallel ...
... and mouth disease. Both group A and group B coxsackieviruses can cause nonspecific febrile illnesses, rashes, upper respiratory ... and mouth disease outbreaks". Pediatr Infect Dis J. 30 (8): 675-9. doi:10.1097/INF.0b013e3182116e95. PMID 21326133. S2CID ... Interferon has since become prominent in the treatment of a variety of cancers and infectious diseases. In 2007, an outbreak of ... Bornholm disease), and were subdivided into groups A and B based on their pathology in newborn mice. (Coxsackie A virus causes ...
... and mouth disease in children. It was first isolated and characterized from cases of neurological disease in California in 1969 ... Of the placebo group, there were 30 cases of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) reported, and 41 cases of any EV71-associated ... Vietnam recorded 63,780 cases of hand, foot and mouth disease in the first seven months of 2012. According to Tran Minh Dien, ... From 1999 to 2004, there were no epidemics of hand, foot, and mouth disease in Shenzhen, People's Republic of China, but each ...
Animal parasites of the mouth and their relation to dental disease. J Am Dent Assoc 1929;1436-455. (CS1 errors: generic name, ... Rather than a single disease entity, periodontal disease is a combination of multiple disease processes that share a common ... Periodontal pathology, also termed gum diseases or periodontal diseases, are diseases involving the periodontium (the tooth ... The disease consists of a chronic inflammation associated with loss of alveolar bone. Advanced disease features include pus and ...
A Treatise on Diseases of Ear, Nose, Throat and Mouth. The care of infants and the diseases of children. A Manual of Toxicology ... Though titled in English - all books were originally written in Sanskrit) Diseases - Their Origin and Diagnosis. ... "Diseases - Their Origin and Diagnosis" brought him wide reputation and critical acclaim. He published a monthly journal in ...
Congress: 105-138 Foot and mouth disease. "Prof A. E. Mettam". The Veterinary Record. 30 (1534): 219. 1 December 1917. Bradley ...
Capel-Edwards, Maureen (1967). "Foot-and-mouth disease in Myocastor coypus". Journal of Comparative Pathology. 77 (2): 217-221 ... They can carry several zoonotic diseases (diseases transmitted from animals to humans). They are reservoirs for salmonellosis, ... Other zoonotic disease of concern they are host reservoirs for are mycobacterium tuberculosis, septicemia, toxoplasmosis, and ... Nutria are considered a global alien species and have potential to spread disease to livestock and humans. Nutria are found on ...
Website Foot and mouth disease 2007: a review and lessons learned News updates on the 2007 UK Foot-and-mouth disease outbreak ... The Institute of Animal Health at Pirbright carried out research into foot-and-mouth disease as well as other diseases ... 1967 United Kingdom foot-and-mouth outbreak 2001 United Kingdom foot-and-mouth crisis 2010 Japan foot-and-mouth outbreak " ... and-mouth outbreak occurred when the discharge of infectious effluent from a laboratory in Surrey led to foot-and-mouth disease ...
Orf (disease), colloquially known as "scabby mouth". A UK variant of Old maid (card game) called "scabby queen". This ...
Councillor Reg Hansell... "Press release: Foot and Mouth Disease" (PDF). Dover District Council. 27 March 2001. Retrieved 27 ...
Boren, Cindy (August 1, 2018). "Hand, foot and mouth disease strikes again. This time, the Yankees' J. A. Happ is ailing". The ... One week later, Syndergaard was briefly sidelined again after contracting hand, foot, and mouth disease from volunteering at a ... Axson, Scooby (July 22, 2018). "Mets Place Noah Syndergaard On DL With Hand, Foot & Mouth Disease". Sports Illustrated. ... Kernan, Kevin (August 13, 2015). "How Noah Syndergaard is helping as his brave mom battles disease". New York Post. Archived ...
Candidiasis that develops in the mouth or throat. ... About Fungal Diseases. *Types of Fungal Diseasesplus icon * ... Rinse your mouth or brush your teeth after using inhaled corticosteroids. Sources. Candida normally lives in the mouth, throat ... How can I prevent candidiasis in the mouth or throat?. Ways to help prevent candidiasis in the mouth and throat include:. * ... Who gets candidiasis in the mouth or throat?. Candidiasis in the mouth, throat, or esophagus is uncommon in healthy adults. ...
... vocals Foot in Mouth Disease at AllMusic Miccio, Anthony. "Gob Foot in Mouth Disease". Blender. Archived from the original on ... Foot In Mouth Disease is the fourth studio album by Canadian punk rock band Gob, released on April 1, 2003 in Canada by ...
Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral infection that most often begins in the throat. ... Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral infection that most often begins in the throat. ... Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral infection that most often begins in the throat. ... Hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD) is most commonly caused by a virus called coxsackievirus A16. ...
A new livestock and animal health project helps vaccinate cattle against Foot and Mouth Disease and other diseases that can ... A new livestock and animal health project helps vaccinate cattle against Foot and Mouth Disease and other diseases that can ... herds are especially at risk for contracting Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD). ... Other areas include Nakonde and Mbala which do not border a national park, but are vaccinated due to the threat of disease ...
Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a contagious disease that mainly affects young children in the Asia-Pacific region. ... Hand, foot and mouth disease afflicting children hyped up as tomato flu Leading clinicians and medical researchers in India ... Europe has faced its fair share of animal health crises, like the outbreaks of Foot and Mouth Disease, Avian influenza in the ... Researchers identify a potential drug candidate for hand, foot and mouth disease A study appearing next week in the journal ...
A final study will estimate the economic burden of the hand, foot and mouth disease and how this disease depending on its ... HomeThe Institut PasteurThe Institut Pasteur throughout the worldInternational research programsHand-Foot-Mouth disease ... The infection called "hand-foot-mouth" (HFMD) is a viral disease that mainly affects children under 5 years. It is transmitted ... The infection called "hand-foot-mouth" (HFMD) is a viral disease that mainly affects children under 5 years. It is transmitted ...
... is a common viral infection that causes painful red blisters in the mouth and throat, and on the hands, feet, and diaper area. ... What Is Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFM)?. Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFM) is a common viral infection that causes ... What Are the Signs & Symptoms of Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease?. The blisters caused by HFM are red with a small bubble of ... Can Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFM) Be Prevented?. To prevent the spread of HFM, keep kids home from school and childcare ...
... is a common viral infection that causes painful red blisters in the mouth and throat, and on the hands, feet, and diaper area. ... What Is Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFM)?. Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFM) is a common viral infection that causes ... What Are the Signs & Symptoms of Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease?. The blisters caused by HFM are red with a small bubble of ... Can Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFM) Be Prevented?. To prevent the spread of HFM, keep kids home from school and childcare ...
Foot and mouth disease in sub-Saharan Africa moves over short distances, wild buffalo are a problem Peer-Reviewed Publication ... Foot and mouth disease in sub-Saharan Africa moves over short distances, wild buffalo are a problem. American Society for ... Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is devastating to livestock all over the world, but its a particular problem in Africa, where ... New research shows that in sub-Saharan Africa the virus responsible for foot and mouth disease (FMD) moves over relatively ...
Hand, foot and mouth disease. Available from: www.who.int/westernpacific/emergencies/surveillance/archives/hand-foot-and-mouth- ... Hand, Foot & Mouth Disease. CDC Yellow Book 2024. Travel-Associated Infections & Diseases ... Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is caused by nonpolio enteroviruses, a genus of the Picornaviridae family of nonenveloped ... Chang Y-K, Chen K-H, Chen K-T. Hand, foot, and mouth disease and herpangina caused by EVA71 infections: a review of EVA71 ...
Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease. download pdf What is hand, foot, and mouth disease?. Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a ... HFMD is one of many infections that cause mouth sores. Healthcare providers determine whether the mouth sores are caused by ... How long is a person able to spread the disease?. Infected persons are most contagious during the first week of illness. The ... One or two days after fever starts, painful sores usually develop in the mouth and a skin rash might appear. The rash is ...
It is marked by sores in the mouth and a rash on the hands and feet. ... Hand-foot-and-mouth disease isnt related to foot-and-mouth disease (sometimes called hoof-and-mouth disease), which is an ... Hand-foot-and-mouth disease on the hand. Hand-foot-and-mouth disease often causes a rash of painful, blister-like lesions on ... Hand-foot-and-mouth disease on the foot. Hand-foot-and-mouth disease often causes a rash of painful, blister-like lesions on ...
... is an acute viral illness that presents as a vesicular eruption in the mouth. HFMD can also involve the hands, feet, buttocks, ... encoded search term (Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease (HFMD)) and Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease (HFMD) What to Read Next on Medscape ... Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) is an acute viral illness that presents as a vesicular eruption in the mouth, but it can ... Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) is an acute viral illness first evident as a vesicular eruption in the mouth. HFMD can also ...
... , Hand-Foot-Mouth Disease, Coxsackie Virus A. ... Hand Foot and Mouth Disease. Hand Foot and Mouth Disease Aka: Hand Foot and Mouth Disease, Hand-Foot-Mouth Disease, Coxsackie ... These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Hand Foot and Mouth Disease." Click on the image (or right ... Not seen with Herpangina or Hand Foot and Mouth Disease in past ... Search other sites for Hand Foot and Mouth Disease NLM Pubmed ...
But Crohns disease can affect more than just your GI tract. ... The common symptoms of Crohns disease include cramping, ... But this disease can affect more than just your GI tract. In fact, a few of the possible side effects of Crohns disease can ... Treatment of Crohns-related mouth ulcers usually consists of staying on course with your Crohns medication and disease ... Crohns disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that can cause inflammation in any area of the gastrointestinal ( ...
Learn about how dermatologists identify the signs and symptoms of hand-foot-and-mouth disease. ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "Hand-foot-and-mouth disease." Last updated December 22, 2017. Last accessed ... Sores can also appear elsewhere in the mouth, including the roof of the mouth. Mouth sores tend to begin as bright pink spots ... A child with hand-foot-and-mouth disease can often develop reddish spots on the soles of feet and palms of hands, which quickly ...
... foot and mouth disease is a common viral illness that primarily affects young children. Learn to recognize the symptoms, how to ... Scientific research has proven that childhood vaccines are safe and effective at preventing diseases. Learn how vaccinations ...
Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) is a viral illness with a distinct clinical presentation of oral and characteristic distal ... Dermatologic Manifestations of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease) and Dermatologic Manifestations of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease What ... Dermatologic Manifestations of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease * Sections Dermatologic Manifestations of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth ... Elevated levels of circulating histones indicate disease activity in patients with hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). Scand ...
... and mouth. Learn more from Boston Childrens Hospital. ... Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral illness that affects ... Hand-Foot-Mouth Disease , Symptoms & Causes. What causes hand-foot-mouth disease?. Hand-foot-mouth disease is most often caused ... Hand-Foot-Mouth Disease , Diagnosis & Treatments. How does a doctor diagnose hand-foot-mouth disease?. The rash of hand-foot- ... What is hand-foot-mouth disease?. Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral illness that affects infants and children, often ...
Welcome, the Journal of Chinese Medicine is the foremost English language journal on all aspects of Chinese medicine including acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, dietary medicine and Chinese medical history and philosophy.
Venezuela suspends meat imports from Colombia due to foot-and-mouth disease Source: Xinhua, 2017-07-27 04:44:16,Editor: Mu ... due to an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease.. In a public speech, Agriculture Minister Wilmar Castro announced the decision to ... adding that Venezuelan territory was 95 percent free of foot-and-mouth disease. ... The disease is rarely harmful to humans since it dies during the pasteurization of milk and the processing of meat. ...
Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) is a viral illness with a distinct clinical presentation of oral and characteristic distal ... Dermatologic Manifestations of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease) and Dermatologic Manifestations of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease What ... Drugs & Diseases , Dermatology Dermatologic Manifestations of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease Clinical Presentation. Updated: Mar ... Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) is more severe in infants and children than adults, but generally, the disease has a mild ...
This is normal precautionary practice for disease control purposes in outbreaks of Foot and Mouth Disease.. Foot and mouth ... UK: Foot and Mouth Disease outbreak in Essex. Attached is the full copy of a statement by Baroness Hayman, Minister of State at ... Foot and Mouth Disease is highly virulent in pigs, cattle, sheep and other ungulates, spreading rapidly by contact between ... I am advised by the Department of Health that although human infection of Foot and Mouth Disease has been reported, cases are ...
Hand, foot and mouth disease. * Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a viral infection that causes a rash or blisters on the ... Better Health Channel: Hand, foot and mouth disease. Common questions our doctors are asked. Is HFMD dangerous for pregnant ... Small, oval, white blisters on the palms, soles of the feet, as well as in the mouth. Your child may have a sore mouth and ... HFMD is not related to the foot and mouth disease that is found in animals. ...
Smiths Detection has announced of launching portable detection system to carry out on-site diagnosis of animal diseases such as ... Facts About Foot and Mouth Disease. Foot and mouth, which was confirmed on a British farm Friday, is a highly contagious viral ... Portable Diagnostic System for Bird Flu, Foot and Mouth Disease to Be Launched Personalised Printable Document (PDF). Please ... Portable Diagnostic System for Bird Flu, Foot and Mouth Disease to Be Launched. ...
Footpaths and bridleways in the area surrounding a farm where cattle infected with foot and mouth disease were located will be ... Footpaths and bridleways in the area surrounding a farm where cattle infected with foot and mouth disease were located will be ... PrevPreviousFoot and Mouth Disease Confirmed on Second U.K. Site, International Movement of Racehorses Affected ... Subscribe to our Horse Health enewsletter and receive the latest on horse health care, disease, and the latest research.. ...
... foot and mouth disease, keep them at home if they are unwell or have blisters. Make sure your child doesnt go to childcare or ... What puts my child at risk of getting hand, foot and mouth disease?. Anyone can get hand, foot and mouth disease, but it is ... What should I do if Im pregnant and Im exposed to hand, foot and mouth disease?. Hand, foot and mouth disease is rare in ... Key points to remember about hand, foot and mouth disease. *hand, foot and mouth disease is a common viral illness in children ...
Increase in spread of hand, foot and mouth disease among children: Pediatrician Sri Lanka Daily Mirror08:47 23-Nov-23 ... Doctors Grim Shopping Trolley Warning After Mum Catches Hand, Foot And Mouth Disease HuffPost (UK)10:24 29-Nov-23 ... Provinces and cities urged to strengthen measures against hand-foot-mouth disease Viet Nam News00:46 6-Dec-23 ... Mumps, measles and hand, foot and mouth disease The Hippocratic Post21:53 28-Nov-23 ...
a href=http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=1442,Foot & Mouth here,/a, ... Hand, Foot, & Mouth Disease (HFMD) *Do not take medical advice from the internet. If you have any medical questions please ... Redirect: 唑屲市夦释儿竪愢柑扎趵句痀 Tangshan City, a large number of children infected with hand, foot and mouth disease by Treyfish ... Emerging Diseases, & Other Health Threats - Alphabetical A thru H * ...
  • It is transmitted by direct contact between infected children and is characterized by fever, mouth sores and blisters on the hands, feet and buttocks. (pasteur.fr)
  • Hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD) is most commonly caused by a virus called coxsackievirus A16. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a contagious disease that mainly affects young children in the Asia-Pacific region. (news-medical.net)
  • A new study published in January 2020 in the journal Scientific Reports reports the presence of a new lineage of enterovirus responsible for the hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD). (news-medical.net)
  • The infection called "hand-foot-mouth" (HFMD) is a viral disease that mainly affects children under 5 years. (pasteur.fr)
  • Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is caused by nonpolio enteroviruses, a genus of the Picornaviridae family of nonenveloped RNA viruses (e.g., coxsackievirus A6, coxsackievirus A16, enterovirus A71). (cdc.gov)
  • HFMD treatment mainly involves supportive care to treat symptoms of fever or pain caused by mouth sores, and to prevent dehydration, especially in young children. (cdc.gov)
  • Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a rash illness caused by viruses that belong to the Enterovirus genus (group). (virginia.gov)
  • HFMD is spread from person to person by direct contact with the viruses that cause this disease. (virginia.gov)
  • HFMD is one of many infections that cause mouth sores. (virginia.gov)
  • Healthcare providers determine whether the mouth sores are caused by HFMD by considering the age of the patient, what other symptoms are reported, and what the mouth sores look like. (virginia.gov)
  • Visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website at the CDC page on HFMD . (virginia.gov)
  • Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) is an acute viral illness that presents as a vesicular eruption in the mouth, but it can also involve the hands, feet, buttocks, and/or genitalia. (medscape.com)
  • Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) is an acute viral illness first evident as a vesicular eruption in the mouth. (medscape.com)
  • When a child gets hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD), most signs and symptoms clear within 7 to 10 days. (aad.org)
  • Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) is a viral illness with a distinct clinical presentation of oral and characteristic distal extremity lesions. (medscape.com)
  • Epidemic hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) viral infections are usually caused by members of the Enterovirus genus, most commonly, coxsackievirus A16, A6, or enterovirus 71. (medscape.com)
  • Hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) epidemics tend to occur every 3 years in the United States. (medscape.com)
  • HFMD is more severe in infants and children than adults, but generally, the disease has a mild course. (medscape.com)
  • Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a viral infection that causes a rash or blisters on the hands and feet, as well as in or around the mouth. (rch.org.au)
  • HFMD is not related to the foot and mouth disease that is found in animals. (rch.org.au)
  • The seasonal flu is losing momentum while cases of hand-foot-and-mouth disease(HFMD) are on the rise. (kbs.co.kr)
  • It is important to note that HFMD is NOT related to foot and mouth disease of animals. (dermnetnz.org)
  • On 24 September 2022, the Regional Public Health Unit in Ilocos received a report of a cluster of suspected hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in one school in Balungao, Pangasinan Province, the Philippines. (who.int)
  • Contact your healthcare provider if you have symptoms that you think are related to candidiasis in the mouth, throat, or esophagus. (cdc.gov)
  • What Are the Signs & Symptoms of Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease? (kidshealth.org)
  • Symptoms include sores in the mouth and a rash on the hands and feet. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Hand-foot-and-mouth disease may cause all of the following symptoms or only some of them. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Some people, especially adults, can pass the virus without showing any symptoms of the disease. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Read on to learn about six surprising ways that Crohn's disease can affect your body and what you can do to help ease the symptoms. (healthline.com)
  • And while its symptoms tend to be relatively mild, hand, foot, and mouth disease can make babies and toddlers (and their caregivers) pretty miserable. (choc.org)
  • While an official diagnosis can be made via a mouth swab or stool sample, pediatricians often simply make a determination based on the symptoms of hand, foot, and mouth disease, says Adam Spanier, MD, an associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore-which is why it's important to call your pediatrician if you suspect your child may have the illness. (choc.org)
  • Patients suffering from gum disease, bleeding gums and loose teeth could be displaying key symptoms of diabetes," warned Bupa Dental Care's clinical director, Steve Preddy. (express.co.uk)
  • Speak to a dentist if you're worried about the signs or symptoms of gum disease. (express.co.uk)
  • Initially, those infected with hand, foot and mouth disease present with fevers and other symptoms, including sore throat, a general unwell feeling or fatigue, irritability in infants and toddlers, and loss of appetite. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Although your child is most contagious with hand, foot and mouth disease during the first week of the illness, the virus can remain in the body for weeks after signs and symptoms are gone. (mayoclinic.org)
  • The symptoms of hand, foot and mouth disease usually develop between three and five days after being exposed to the infection . (kendallhealth.org)
  • Symptoms include fever, painful mouth sores, and a rash. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Treatment of hand-foot-and-mouth disease is aimed at relieving symptoms. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Various attempts to classify burning mouth syndrome (BMS) based on etiology and symptoms have been made. (medscape.com)
  • Type 1 burning mouth syndrome (BMS): Patients have no symptoms upon waking, with progression throughout the day. (medscape.com)
  • Type 2 burning mouth syndrome (BMS): Patients have continuous symptoms throughout the day and are frequently asymptomatic at night. (medscape.com)
  • Type 3 burning mouth syndrome (BMS): Patients have intermittent symptoms throughout the day and symptom-free days. (medscape.com)
  • Europe has faced its fair share of animal health crises, like the outbreaks of Foot and Mouth Disease, Avian influenza in the Netherlands (2003), and African swine fever. (news-medical.net)
  • Outbreaks of the disease are more common in summer and early autumn in the United States. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Coxsackievirus A6 may have become the commonest enterovirus in seasonal outbreaks of hand-foot-and-mouth disease in children in France and Finland. (medscape.com)
  • Coxsackievirus A6 may have become the commonest enterovirus in seasonal outbreaks of hand-foot-and-mouth disease in children in parts of Europe. (medscape.com)
  • This is normal precautionary practice for disease control purposes in outbreaks of Foot and Mouth Disease. (just-food.com)
  • The device can be decontaminated at the location, a critical feature in the control of disease outbreaks. (medindia.net)
  • The vaccine could prevent future outbreaks of the disease, and potentially lead to new treatments for polio and other human diseases. (vetscite.org)
  • European Union farm ministers Monday approved new regulations intended to curb economic damage from future outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease by using vaccination earlier and creating a system of combating the disease on a regional basis. (efeedlink.com)
  • The new directive keeps the existing ban on vaccinating farm animals when no sign the disease is present, but it allows precautionary vaccinations to occur when outbreaks are detected and it gives E.U. countries more authority to restrict livestock movements regionally when the disease is suspected but not yet confirmed. (efeedlink.com)
  • E.U. nations will also be able to act against the disease on a regional basis if it is determined that outbreaks are isolated to specific areas. (efeedlink.com)
  • To prevent an outbreak of FMD and other animal diseases in the country, the Department of Veterinary Services in the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock (MAL) has set up vaccination centers throughout the province. (worldbank.org)
  • An outbreak of hand-foot-and-mouth disease in China during 2003 was caused by echovirus 19. (medscape.com)
  • CARACAS, July 26 (Xinhua) -- The Venezuelan government suspended on Wednesday meat imports from Colombia, for six months, due to an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease. (xinhuanet.com)
  • This ban on agricultural products from Colombia will be maintained for six months until Colombian authorities can control the outbreak of the disease," said Castro, adding that Venezuelan territory was 95 percent free of foot-and-mouth disease. (xinhuanet.com)
  • Attached is the full copy of a statement by Baroness Hayman, Minister of State at MAFF, to the House of Lords today on the outbreak in Essex of foot and mouth disease. (just-food.com)
  • As those who remember 1967 will know, a widespread outbreak of Foot and Mouth Disease can be extremely serious for the whole of the farming community. (just-food.com)
  • Very rarely (in an outbreak or with certain types of the virus) the hand, foot and mouth virus causes a more severe rash involving more of the body, or a more serious illness including inflammation of the brain or heart. (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • The United States has not had an outbreak of FMD since 1929 but there is no way to guarantee that this very contagious disease is gone forever - as the United Kingdom learned in 2001, when an outbreak of FMD ended a 34-year disease-free streak. (thepigsite.com)
  • The disease spreads rapidly and wreaks havoc on trade and transportation, so being prepared for an outbreak is a priority for the US government. (thepigsite.com)
  • In the event of an outbreak, this technology could facilitate rapid containment of the disease. (thepigsite.com)
  • An outbreak of lumpy skin disease would cost Australia $7.4 billion in its first year. (abc.net.au)
  • It's really the forgotten disease that has been overshadowed by the foot-and-mouth disease outbreak,' she said. (abc.net.au)
  • The Scotsman reports that the Duchess of Hamilton, who the paper describes as "a high-profile animal welfare campaigner", has erected a 10-foot stone memorial to the animals killed during the 2001 outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in the United Kingdom. (carnell.com)
  • A day care setting, school or other setting where there are a lot people in close contact are great breeding grounds for an outbreak of hand, foot and mouth disease. (mayoclinic.org)
  • In 2001, an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in the United Kingdom led to the destruction of nearly 10 million animals. (vetscite.org)
  • The project led in collaboration with Institut Pasteur du Cambodge and Ho Chi Minh City , aims to provide a set of epidemiologic data in the hope of defining strategies for prevention, diagnosis and treatment of severe forms of the disease hand-foot-mouth. (pasteur.fr)
  • The rash of hand-foot-mouth disease is unique, which usually allows for a diagnosis simply on a physical exam. (childrenshospital.org)
  • British engineering company Smiths Detection has announced that it is launching a portable detection system which will enable veterinarians to carry out on-site diagnosis of animal diseases such as foot-and-mouth and avian flu. (medindia.net)
  • The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. (medindia.net)
  • A diagnosis of scabby mouth can be confirmed by laboratory examination of the scabs by electron microscopy but this is rarely necessary. (vic.gov.au)
  • The diagnosis is based on an examination of the mouth sores and rash. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a clinical diagnosis made via the exclusion of all other causes. (medscape.com)
  • 1 Sometimes, Candida can multiply and cause an infection if the environment inside the mouth, throat, or esophagus changes in a way that encourages fungal growth. (cdc.gov)
  • Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral infection that most often begins in the throat. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFM) is a common viral infection that causes painful red blisters in the mouth and throat, and on the hands, feet, and diaper area. (kidshealth.org)
  • New research shows that in sub-Saharan Africa the virus responsible for foot and mouth disease (FMD) moves over relatively short distances and the African buffalo are important natural reservoirs for the infection. (eurekalert.org)
  • Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is a mild, contagious viral infection common in young children. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Frequent hand-washing and avoiding close contact with people who have hand-foot-and-mouth disease may help lower your child's risk of infection. (mayoclinic.org)
  • The most common cause of hand-foot-and-mouth disease is infection from coxsackievirus 16. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Most people get the coxsackievirus infection - and hand-foot-and-mouth disease - through the mouth. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Atypical hand-foot-and-mouth disease associated with coxsackievirus A6 infection. (aad.org)
  • However, a study from China in 2011 showed that the neutralizing antibody response was not correlated with disease severity, suggesting that cellular immune response, besides neutralizing antibodies, could play a critical role in controlling the outcome of enterovirus 71 infection in humans. (medscape.com)
  • I am advised by the Department of Health that although human infection of Foot and Mouth Disease has been reported, cases are rare and of no health significance - the last report of human infection appears to have been in the 1960s. (just-food.com)
  • Staying away from others who have the disease, cleaning/not sharing toys during the infection also helps prevent spread of the disease. (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • Hand, foot, and mouth disease is a type of viral infection, explains Sarah Kohl, MD, a clinical assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and founder and president of TravelReadyMD. (choc.org)
  • 4. (1) A veterinary surgeon, who examines any animal or carcase and is of opinion that the animal or carcase is affected with foot-and-mouth disease or was so affected when it died or was slaughtered, shall immediately give notice of the infection or suspicion of infection to a member of the Gárda Síochána at the nearest Gárda Síochána station. (irishstatutebook.ie)
  • Cool, non-woolled areas such as the mouth, legs, feet, teats and poll are the usual sites of infection. (vic.gov.au)
  • Sheep grazing stubble or on harsh feed are most susceptible to scabby mouth infection due to a higher incidence of minor injuries of the mouth and feet. (vic.gov.au)
  • Hand, foot and mouth disease is a highly contagious viral infection that commonly affects kids ages 5 and under. (mayoclinic.org)
  • We were recently contacted by researchers at the Pasteur Institute of Beijing (Ruichen Wei, Qiben Leng) who were grappling with an out break of Hand-Foot-Mouth Disease, a serious infection caused by enterovirus 71 (EV71) among other viruses. (epivax.com)
  • HHV-2, also known as HSV-2, causes genital herpes and occasionally causes oral disease that is clinically similar to that of HHV-1 infection. (medscape.com)
  • HHV-3, also known as varicella-zoster virus (VZV), causes the primary infection chickenpox and the secondary reactivation disease herpes zoster. (medscape.com)
  • HHV-4, also known as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), causes the primary infection infectious mononucleosis , and it is implicated in various diseases, such as African Burkitt lymphoma , other immunoproliferative disorders, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. (medscape.com)
  • The host response to this infection is an important factor in determining the extent and severity of the disease. (medscape.com)
  • Immunosuppressive drug therapy and any disease (eg, HIV infection) resulting in suppression of the normal inflammatory and immune mechanisms can cause or enhance severe periodontal diseases. (medscape.com)
  • People with HIV, individuals who are immunocompromised, children, adolescents, and people who are pregnant or breastfeeding may be at risk for increased disease severity and adverse health outcomes associated with monkeypox infection. (cdc.gov)
  • It is currently unknown whether HIV infection affects a person's risk of acquiring Monkeypox virus infection and developing disease after exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • Chemist Marvin Grubman and visiting scientist Fayna Diaz-San Segundo examine a plate used in a test to determine the correct amount of a new foot-and-mouth disease vaccine to administer to cattle. (thepigsite.com)
  • A scabby mouth vaccine is readily available and provides good protection from the disease. (vic.gov.au)
  • Humans may also become infected from accidental inoculation of the scabby mouth vaccine. (vic.gov.au)
  • There is no vaccine to prevent hand, foot and mouth disease. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Virologists have devised a way to create an entirely synthetic vaccine for foot-and-mouth disease. (vetscite.org)
  • But if the method used to create the vaccine proves successful when scaled to commercial production, it could also be used to create vaccines for human diseases that are caused by viruses of the same family, such as hand, foot and mouth disease, which is ubiquitous in Southeast Asia, and polio, which still blights the lives of millions of people in the developing world. (vetscite.org)
  • Earlier attempts to produce a synthetic vaccine for foot and mouth disease were often thwarted by peculiarities of viral geometry. (vetscite.org)
  • There is currently no vaccine in the United States to protect against the viruses that cause hand, foot, and mouth disease. (kendallhealth.org)
  • The largest population-based study of the epidemiology of hand, foot, and mouth disease was conducted in China to better inform vaccine and other interventions. (medscape.com)
  • But access and use of these tools and technology and the creation of enabling environment that will eliminate obstacles such as vaccine hesitancy, risk of current and future pandemic, inefficient health service delivery and improvement of social determinants that would disable disease transmission would start with the sense of urgency and accountability at the local and national leadership. (who.int)
  • 6 The treatment for mild to moderate infections in the mouth or throat is usually an antifungal medicine applied to the inside of the mouth for 7 to 14 days. (cdc.gov)
  • For severe infections, the most common treatment is fluconazole (an antifungal medication) taken by mouth or through a vein. (cdc.gov)
  • The teams will also test the efficacy and safety of two molecules (suramin and itraconazole) already used in other human diseases, to treat enteroviruses infections. (pasteur.fr)
  • See Cutaneous Manifestations of HIV Disease and Cutaneous Manifestations of Hepatitis C for information on these viral infections. (medscape.com)
  • Herpesviruses establish latent permanent infections in their hosts, although clinical signs of disease may not be detected. (medscape.com)
  • As of July 29, 2022, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state and local public health partners are reporting 5,189 cases of Monkeypox virus infections in the United States across 47 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico. (cdc.gov)
  • Candida normally lives on the skin and inside the body, in places such as the mouth, throat, gut, and vagina, without causing any problems. (cdc.gov)
  • Candidiasis in the mouth and throat is also called thrush or oropharyngeal candidiasis. (cdc.gov)
  • Who gets candidiasis in the mouth or throat? (cdc.gov)
  • Candidiasis in the mouth, throat, or esophagus is uncommon in healthy adults. (cdc.gov)
  • People who get candidiasis in the esophagus often also have candidiasis in the mouth and throat. (cdc.gov)
  • How can I prevent candidiasis in the mouth or throat? (cdc.gov)
  • Candida normally lives in the mouth, throat, and the rest of the digestive tract without causing any problems. (cdc.gov)
  • Healthcare providers can usually diagnose candidiasis in the mouth or throat simply by looking inside. (cdc.gov)
  • 8 Sometimes a healthcare provider will take a small sample from the mouth or throat. (cdc.gov)
  • Candidiasis in the mouth, throat, or esophagus is usually treated with antifungal medicine. (cdc.gov)
  • The exact number of cases of candidiasis in the mouth, throat, and esophagus in the United States is difficult to determine. (cdc.gov)
  • It can be hard for parents to tell if a child (especially a very young one) has HFM if sores are only inside the mouth or throat. (kidshealth.org)
  • One or two days after the fever begins, painful sores may develop in the front of the mouth or throat. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Sores that develop in the back of the mouth and throat may suggest a related viral illness called herpangina. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Call your health care provider if your child is younger than six months, has a weakened immune system, or has mouth sores or a sore throat that makes it painful to drink fluids. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Your child may have a sore mouth and throat, leading to poor appetite or risk of dehydration (drinking and eating can be painful because of the mouth blisters). (rch.org.au)
  • You also may not spot a rash at all, since it can take the form of ulcers hidden inside your child's mouth or throat. (choc.org)
  • Small blisters ( vesicles ) and ulcers may develop in and/or around the lips and mouth and the back of the throat. (dermnetnz.org)
  • The virus that usually causes hand, foot and mouth disease often is spread person to person through contact with an infected person's nasal secretions, throat discharge, saliva, stool or respiratory droplets sprayed into the air after a cough or sneeze. (mayoclinic.org)
  • The disease can cause sores in the mouth and throat, making swallowing painful and difficult. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Children have a sore throat or mouth pain and may refuse to eat. (msdmanuals.com)
  • A variety of disease-producing bacteria and viruses are carried in the mouth, nose, throat and respiratory tract. (who.int)
  • These include the development of blisters in the mouth, causing considerable salivation, and on the feet, resulting in lameness. (just-food.com)
  • According to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), FMD is a highly contagious viral disease affecting cloven-hoofed animals and that can cause severe economic losses. (worldbank.org)
  • Severe forms of the disease characterized by severe complication due to the dissemination of the disease at neurological, cardiovascular or respiratory levels can cause the death of children. (pasteur.fr)
  • In severe cases they cover the lips and spread into the mouth and nostrils. (vic.gov.au)
  • Hand-foot-and-mouth disease, as well as severe disease complications, are more common among infants and children younger than 5 years. (medscape.com)
  • Study on Risk Factors for Severe Hand-foot-and-mouth Disease. (medscape.com)
  • Persons with advanced and uncontrolled HIV might be at higher risk for severe or prolonged monkeypox disease. (cdc.gov)
  • With cattle sharing watering holes with buffalo, particularly during the dry season, herds are especially at risk for contracting Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD). (worldbank.org)
  • Hand-foot-mouth disease is often confused with foot-and-mouth disease , which affects cattle, sheep, and pigs. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Colombia has taken steps to address concerns, stating that they feared the disease had been brought into the country illegally through cattle smuggled the border. (xinhuanet.com)
  • STATEMENT BY BARONESS HAYMAN The Government's Chief Veterinary Officer last night confirmed the presence of Foot and Mouth Disease in pigs in an abattoir and in cattle on a neighbouring farm near Brentwood in Essex. (just-food.com)
  • Foot and Mouth Disease is highly virulent in pigs, cattle, sheep and other ungulates, spreading rapidly by contact between animals, transmission via people or transport, or through the air. (just-food.com)
  • Footpaths and bridleways in the area surrounding a farm where cattle infected with foot and mouth disease were located will be closed, the British Horse Society (BHS) announced earlier today. (thehorse.com)
  • Scientists at the USDA Agricultural Research Service are using infra-red technology to identify cattle infected with foot and mouth disease (FMD) virus. (thepigsite.com)
  • That is why scientists at the ARS Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC) at Orient Point, New York, are using the technology to identify cattle that may have been infected with foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). (thepigsite.com)
  • Australian cattle producers have been on high alert for the mosquito-spread disease since it was detected on the Indonesian island of Sumatra in March. (abc.net.au)
  • Lumpy skin disease is spread to cattle and buffalo via insects such as flies, mosquitoes and possibly ticks, and can spread at up to 28 kilometres a day. (abc.net.au)
  • Right now, Australia's livestock and support sectors are working hard to prevent the possible incursion of Foot and Mouth Disease and/or Lumpy Skin Disease, with both diseases detected in Indonesian cattle," Vice President David Jochinke said. (nff.org.au)
  • A few years ago whole countries were in a state of panic because their cattle had a terrible disease called foot and mouth disease. (tidings.org)
  • Many cattle were slaughtered to try to prevent this disease from spreading. (tidings.org)
  • Hand-foot-and-mouth disease often causes a rash of painful, blister-like lesions on the palms of the hands. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Hand-foot-and-mouth disease often causes a rash of painful, blister-like lesions on the soles of the feet. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Ulcers or white lesions also appear in the mouth,' says Dr Philippa. (madeformums.com)
  • Vaccination at this site may produce lesions on the udder, resulting in mastitis and an increased risk of transmitting scabby mouth to the lamb. (vic.gov.au)
  • This clearly recognizable syndrome is characterized by vesicular lesions on the mouth and an exanthem on the hands and feet (and buttocks) in association with fever. (medscape.com)
  • Expert analysis has warned that lumpy skin disease (LSD) is almost three times more likely to arrive in Australia compared to foot-and-mouth disease but getting barely any national attention compared to the latter. (abc.net.au)
  • There are other experts that believe that lumpy skin disease, given the patterns of spread around the world will enter Australia, so 100 per cent probability, but the timeline for that is unknown, it could be potentially as early as this wet season, but could be 10 years away,' Dr Fitzpatrick said. (abc.net.au)
  • Will Evans wants northern Australia to be well prepared in case lumpy skin disease is detected in Australia. (abc.net.au)
  • Federal Agriculture Minister Murray Watt says it's important to remember that Australia remains free from lumpy skin disease. (abc.net.au)
  • to study the diversity of viruses responsible for disease foot-hand-mouth and their evolution. (pasteur.fr)
  • These viruses spread quite easily," says Jeffrey Kahn, MD, director of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Children's Medical Center in Dallas. (choc.org)
  • But if we could use this to move away from inactivated polio viruses in the vaccines, it would have very powerful impacts because we are so close to ending this disease. (vetscite.org)
  • Both the polio and foot-and-mouth viruses are shaped as an icosahedron - a polyhedron with 20 triangular faces. (vetscite.org)
  • Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is caused by a group of RNA viruses called enteroviruses. (medscape.com)
  • Communicable, or infectious diseases, are caused by microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, parasites and fungi that can be spread, directly or indirectly, from one person to another. (who.int)
  • Foot In Mouth Disease is the fourth studio album by Canadian punk rock band Gob, released on April 1, 2003 in Canada by Nettwerk, internationally by Arista Records, and in Japan by BMG. (wikipedia.org)
  • Soda Marching Song Marching Song (Pointed Sticks) Custers Last 1 Nite Stand (live) Heavy Metal Shuffle Self Appointed Leader Videos from The World According to Gob I Hear You Calling For The Moment No Regrets Theo Goutzinakis - Backing vocals (lead vocals on "Bully"), guitar Tom Thacker - Lead vocals (backing vocals on "Bully"), guitar Craig Wood - Bass, vocals Gabe Mantle - Drums, vocals Foot in Mouth Disease at AllMusic Miccio, Anthony. (wikipedia.org)
  • A new study in the preprint server bioRxiv published in November 2020 describes the discovery of acrylamide fragments that can effectively disable key enzymes in both the hand, foot and mouth virus and SARS-CoV-2 virus. (news-medical.net)
  • Finally, there is to date no specific treatment for the hand-foot-mouth disease. (pasteur.fr)
  • A final study will estimate the economic burden of the hand, foot and mouth disease and how this disease depending on its severity affects the quality of life of patients over time (measuring quality of life health-related). (pasteur.fr)
  • Can Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFM) Be Prevented? (kidshealth.org)
  • Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is devastating to livestock all over the world, but it's a particular problem in Africa, where wildlife that harbor the virus are thought to pass it on to their domesticated cousins. (eurekalert.org)
  • There's no specific treatment for hand-foot-and-mouth disease. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is usually a minor illness. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Other types of enteroviruses also may cause hand-foot-and-mouth disease. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is most common in children in child care. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Your child is most contagious during the first week of having hand-foot-and-mouth disease. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is a common and potentially but infrequently fatal in children under 5 years of age. (medscape.com)
  • These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Hand Foot and Mouth Disease. (fpnotebook.com)
  • A child with hand-foot-and-mouth disease can often develop reddish spots on the soles of feet and palms of hands, which quickly turn into bumps or blisters. (aad.org)
  • No racial predilection is recognized for hand-foot-and-mouth disease. (medscape.com)
  • The male-to-female ratio for hand-foot-and-mouth disease is 1:1. (medscape.com)
  • Most cases of hand-foot-and-mouth disease affect children younger than 10 years, although cases in adults are reported. (medscape.com)
  • Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral illness that affects infants and children, often appearing as a rash of small, blister-like bumps in the hands, feet, and mouth. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Hand-foot-mouth disease is caused by the coxsackie virus. (childrenshospital.org)
  • The Children's Hospital Informatics Program created HealthMap , an online resource and smart phone application that helps track the spread of contagious diseases, including hand-foot-mouth disease, in real time. (childrenshospital.org)
  • How does a doctor diagnose hand-foot-mouth disease? (childrenshospital.org)
  • How do we treat hand-foot-mouth disease? (childrenshospital.org)
  • Since a virus causes hand-foot-mouth disease, antibiotics are not effective and the disease simply needs to run its course. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Foot and mouth disease is not a public health issue. (just-food.com)
  • Foot and mouth, which was confirmed on a British farm Friday, is a highly contagious viral disease that affects all cloven-footed animals. (medindia.net)
  • Smiths Detection is currently working with the Institute for Animal Health (IAH), the global reference centre for foot-and-mouth disease, to develop and validate the system. (medindia.net)
  • Smiths Detection is actively collaborating with the Institute for Animal Health's global reference laboratory for foot-and-mouth disease to develop an assay to allow the rapid detection of FMD-infected animals in the field," Dr. Donald King, Group Leader of Molecular Characterisation and Diagnostics at the UK Institute for Animal Health (IAH), said. (medindia.net)
  • If your child has hand, foot and mouth disease, keep them at home if they are unwell or have blisters. (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • Human hand, foot and mouth disease is not related to foot and mouth disease in animals. (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • What puts my child at risk of getting hand, foot and mouth disease? (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • Anyone can get hand, foot and mouth disease, but it is most common in children under 10, and particularly in pre-school children. (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • Hand, foot and mouth disease is more common in warm weather - usually in the summer or early autumn. (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • Hand, foot and mouth disease spreads easily between people - it is very easy to catch. (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • Children with hand, foot and mouth disease are most likely to spread the disease in the first week - before all the blisters have dried. (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • Mild fever is usually the first sign of hand, foot and mouth disease. (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • Hand, foot and mouth disease is usually mild and lasts about 3 to 7 days. (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • Can hand, foot and mouth disease happen more than once? (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • Yes, hand, foot and mouth disease can occasionally happen more than once as there are different types of the virus that cause it. (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • How is hand, foot and mouth disease diagnosed? (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • Your family doctor can usually diagnose hand, foot and mouth disease by examining your child. (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • When should I seek help for my child's hand, foot and mouth disease? (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • How do I prevent hand, foot and mouth disease spreading? (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • How can I care for my child with hand, foot and mouth disease at home? (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • If your child is miserable with hand, foot and mouth disease, you can give them paracetamol. (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • Is there any treatment for hand, foot and mouth disease? (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • What should I do if I'm pregnant and I'm exposed to hand, foot and mouth disease? (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • The mere mention of "hand, foot and mouth disease" is enough to make any parent shudder. (choc.org)
  • Hand, foot, and mouth disease is typically caused by the Coxsackie virus-usually, but not always, the Coxsackie 1 virus. (choc.org)
  • But older children and adults can also contract hand, foot, and mouth disease-even if they've had it before. (choc.org)
  • It's generally contracted through contact with feces, saliva or mucus, and while it can surface year-round, hand, foot, and mouth disease tends to cluster in the summer and fall, according to Jonathan Auth, MD , a pediatrician at CHOC Hospital in Orange County , California. (choc.org)
  • So when is hand, foot, and mouth disease contagious? (choc.org)
  • Infrared image of a cow not infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus (above). (thepigsite.com)
  • Hand, foot and mouth disease - so poorly! (mumsnet.com)
  • My 1-year-old has hand, foot and mouth (at least, that's what the doctor and I think it is) but he is soooooo poorly. (mumsnet.com)
  • Seems like hand, foot and mouth. (mumsnet.com)
  • I guess he was so poorly because he had 3 things at once… the cough/cold, the hand foot and mouth, and then the bacterial thing. (mumsnet.com)
  • That compares to an 11.6 per cent risk for foot-and-mouth. (abc.net.au)
  • Foot-And-Mouth Disease Order, 1956. (irishstatutebook.ie)
  • S.I. No. 324/1956 - Foot-And-Mouth Disease Order, 1956. (irishstatutebook.ie)
  • 1. This Order may be cited as the Foot-and-Mouth Disease Order, 1956. (irishstatutebook.ie)
  • 3) A veterinary surgeon, before leaving any land or premises on which foot-and-mouth disease exists or is suspected to exist, shall thoroughly disinfect his hands, boots, clothes and overalls and take all other reasonable precautions to prevent the spread of disease. (irishstatutebook.ie)
  • 5. (1) A local authority at the request of the Minister shall cause such inquiry to be made by a veterinary inspector of the local authority as the Minister may direct into the existence or suspected existence of foot-and-mouth disease in the area. (irishstatutebook.ie)
  • And how can you get rid of hand, foot and mouth? (madeformums.com)
  • Hand, foot and mouth is generally caused by a Coxsackie virus. (madeformums.com)
  • What does hand, foot and mouth look like? (madeformums.com)
  • How can you stop hand, foot and mouth spreading? (madeformums.com)
  • It's also worth making sure the person with hand, foot and mouth uses their own utensils, cups, towels etc. (madeformums.com)
  • How do you treat hand, foot and mouth disease? (madeformums.com)
  • If your child has a mild case of hand, foot and mouth, there isn't much you can do except make sure they're eating and drinking enough. (madeformums.com)
  • Can adults catch hand, foot and mouth? (madeformums.com)
  • Is hand, foot and mouth dangerous if you're pregnant? (madeformums.com)
  • How long will hand, foot and mouth last? (madeformums.com)
  • However, patients with suspected hand-foot-and-mouth disease have risen by three-point-eight percent, to reach 19-point-five per one-thousand outpatients. (kbs.co.kr)
  • What are the clinical features of hand, foot, and mouth disease? (dermnetnz.org)
  • The second provision, on the intentional release of pathogens, is a concern that animal rights activists from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals helped create when both Bruce Friedrich and Ingrid Newkirk made public statements in 2001 hoping that Great Britain's foot-and-mouth epidemic would afflict farm animals in the United States as well. (carnell.com)
  • I openly hope that it [foot and mouth disease] comes here. (carnell.com)
  • The government relied largely on a strategy of slaughtering all animals within a 1.5 km radius of any confirmed presence of foot-and-mouth disease. (carnell.com)
  • This memorial is dedicated to all the animal needlessly slaughtered in the foot-and-mouth crisis. (carnell.com)
  • Recently, I have heard that cases of hand, foot and mouth disease are on the rise. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Keep children with hand, foot and mouth disease out of child care or school until their fever is gone and mouth sores have healed. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Rarely do those sickened with hand, foot and mouth disease require hospitalization. (mayoclinic.org)
  • VIET NAM - MSD Animal Health (known as Merck Animal Health in the USA and Canada) is proud to announce the presentation of awards to four young scientists at the Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Alliance (GFRA) 2015 Scientific Meeting held in Hanoi Vietnam, in honour of their research in disease-endemic areas. (thebeefsite.com)
  • Every year, foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) causes enormous economic losses to the livestock industry resulting from morbidity in adult animals, reduced animal productivity, mortality in young stock and restriction to international trade in animals and animal products due to sanitary control measures, and affects more than 100 countries around the world," added winner Dr Syed Jamal, University of Malakand, Pakistan. (thebeefsite.com)
  • We are proud to honour young scientists and encourage further research to help manage the complexities of foot-and-mouth disease where it is most needed," said Alasdair King, director, Intergovernmental Veterinary Health, MSD Animal Health. (thebeefsite.com)
  • It too is a deadly disease and can be called foot in mouth disease. (tidings.org)
  • Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is an illness that causes sores in or on the mouth and on the hands, feet, and sometimes the buttocks and legs. (kendallhealth.org)
  • Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is common in children but can also occur in adults. (kendallhealth.org)
  • Generally, a person with hand, foot, and mouth disease is most contagious during the first week of illness. (kendallhealth.org)
  • Avoid close contact such as kissing, hugging, or sharing eating utensils or cups with people with hand, foot, and mouth disease. (kendallhealth.org)
  • An epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease several years ago in the U.K. caused billions of dollars in damage to the country's farming and tourism industries. (efeedlink.com)
  • Does Polio Vaccination Protect Against Hand-Foot-Mouth Disease? (epivax.com)
  • Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is caused by various enteroviruses and is usually spread by coming into contact with contaminated material or air droplets. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is more common in the spring, summer, and fall but can occur in winter. (msdmanuals.com)
  • A common symptom of hand-foot-and-mouth disease is fever. (msdmanuals.com)
  • A strain of coxsackievirus that causes atypical forms of hand-foot-and-mouth disease can cause the sores to appear on different parts of the body. (msdmanuals.com)
  • To diagnose hand-foot-and-mouth disease, doctors examine the sores. (msdmanuals.com)
  • A simple and effective way to help prevent hand-foot-and-mouth disease is handwashing. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Hand-foot-and-mouth (HFM) disease is a viral syndrome with a distinct exanthem-enanthem. (medscape.com)
  • Between 2008 and 2012, the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention recorded 7,200,092 probable cases of hand, foot, and mouth disease (annual incidence, 1·2 per 1000 person-years from 2010-12). (medscape.com)
  • however, Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is not usually associated with meningitis. (medscape.com)
  • Evolutionary and Ecological Drivers Shape the Emergence and Extinction of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Lineages. (bvsalud.org)
  • Livestock farming across the world is constantly threatened by the evolutionary turnover of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) strains in endemic systems, the underlying dynamics of which remain to be elucidated. (bvsalud.org)
  • Up to 50 percent of people with Crohn's will develop mouth ulcers at some point as a result of their condition. (healthline.com)
  • Treatment of Crohn's-related mouth ulcers usually consists of staying on course with your Crohn's medication and disease management. (healthline.com)
  • People with Crohn's disease sometimes develop anemia from blood loss caused by intestinal ulcers. (healthline.com)
  • Topical Lidocaine to Improve Oral Intake in Children With Painful Infectious Mouth Ulcers: A Blinded, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial. (medscape.com)
  • A suspected case was defined as any student or staff member with mouth ulcers and papulovesicular or maculopapular rash on the palms, fingers, soles of the feet or buttocks occurring from 1 September to 5 October 2022. (who.int)
  • Further research on epidemiology of the disease, diagnostics, characterisation of FMD virus and vaccinology is required to improve control of the disease in endemic areas and to reduce the threat to the disease-free areas. (thebeefsite.com)
  • If you are a healthcare provider, click here to see the Infectious Diseases Society of America's Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of CandidiasisExternal external icon . (cdc.gov)
  • Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. (medlineplus.gov)
  • ECOMORE 2: understanding environmental impact on the emergence of infectious diseases in Southeast Asia. (pasteur.fr)
  • It employs a novel form of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), a well established technique for the detection and analysis of infectious diseases. (medindia.net)
  • This disease can be caused by many different enteroviruses, such as coxsackievirus, and is most common among young children. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In wild buffalo, the disease is very rarely symptomatic and animals can be persistently infected for a period of several years. (eurekalert.org)
  • The disease is rarely harmful to humans since it dies during the pasteurization of milk and the processing of meat. (xinhuanet.com)
  • Rarely, disease recurs. (medscape.com)
  • He explained that FMD vaccination is carried out on an annual basis to keep the disease incidence to zero. (worldbank.org)
  • FMD is a notifiable disease and vaccination of all animals at risk in defined buffer zones is the most effective method of control. (worldbank.org)
  • Although most animals recover over the course of months, some die of complications from the disease. (eurekalert.org)
  • Left untreated, diabetes can increase the risk of a range of complications, including heart disease and strokes. (express.co.uk)
  • Bird flu (avian influenza/avian flu) is a disease caused by an influenza virus (H5N1) that primarily affects birds but can infect humans also. (medindia.net)
  • This disease affects the skin and mucous membranes, causing painful sores to appear inside the mouth. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Smoking, which has an adverse effect on periodontal health, also affects this overall disease condition. (medscape.com)
  • An atlas of stomatology : oral diseases and manifestations of systemic diseases / Crispian Scully and Stephen Flint. (who.int)
  • Increasing evidence indicates that oral microbiota participate in various systemic diseases. (medscape.com)
  • Several systemic diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, may increase the prevalence, incidence, or severity of gingivitis and periodontitis. (medscape.com)
  • Scabby mouth (contagious ecthyma, orf) is a highly contagious, viral disease of sheep, goats and occasionally humans. (vic.gov.au)
  • It will enable vets to diagnose diseases in livestock and birds in the field in less than 90 minutes, and eliminate the requirement of sending the samples for laboratory analysis. (medindia.net)
  • The information collated here is for instructional and/or discussion purposes only and is NOT intended to diagnose or treat any disease, illness, or other medical condition. (flutrackers.com)
  • No universally accepted diagnostic criteria, laboratory tests, imaging studies or other modalities definitively diagnose or exclude burning mouth syndrome (BMS). (medscape.com)
  • Though why people would turn to vegetarianism over a disease that, except in very rare instance, effects only non-humans and even then simply causes a mild illness is a mystery (the problem the disease causes is almost exclusively economic for farmers, and is endemic in much of the world without any adverse health risks to human beings other than slightly higher costs for meat). (carnell.com)
  • it is a culture that can be threatened by the spread of animal diseases, affecting the lives of poor people who depend on them. (worldbank.org)
  • Alex Mwanakasale, the task team leader for the LDAHP, said $25 million has been allocated to strengthening veterinary services including surveillance, laboratory diagnostic capacity, control of animal diseases and institutional support to the livestock and agriculture ministry. (worldbank.org)
  • It is important to bring animal diseases under control as a prerequisite for productivity improvements," he said. (worldbank.org)
  • If your child's mouth is sore, don't give them sour, salty or spicy foods. (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Picornavirus Laboratory within the Division of Viral Diseases routinely performs qualitative pan-enterovirus molecular testing, after which the laboratory performs sequencing for enterovirus typing in consultation with state or local health departments in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • Exanthematous viral diseases. (aad.org)
  • Bryan Charleston, head of the Livestock Viral Diseases Programme at the Pirbright Institute in Woking, UK, and his colleagues used computer simulations to create a model of the protein shell of the virus that causes the disease, then reconstructed it from synthetic protein components. (vetscite.org)
  • The livestock sector contributes approximately 39% percent to rural incomes in Zambia, making the control of FMD and other diseases and their vectors a critical priority. (worldbank.org)
  • Zambia's long term livestock sector strategy is to establish a Disease-Free Zone as defined by the OIE, with the objective of accessing international markets for livestock and meat products. (worldbank.org)
  • Livestock trade was banned for months, and restrictions were imposed on the movements of both animals and humans that could act as carriers of the disease. (efeedlink.com)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • According to the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency(KDCA), suspected influenza patients fell to 21-point-five for every one-thousand outpatients last week, down by four-point-two from the previous week. (kbs.co.kr)
  • by WHO Expert Committee on Prevention Methods and Programmes for Oral Diseases. (who.int)
  • Prevention methods and programmes for oral diseases : report of a WHO expert committee [meeting held in Geneva from 12 to 16 September 1983]. (who.int)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. (cdc.gov)
  • It brings interactive tutorials with information about diseases, prevention, procedure and condition. (bvsalud.org)
  • And/or]Intentionally or knowingly release or introduce any pathogen or disease in or near an animal facility that has the potential to cause disease in any animal at the animal facility or that otherwise threatens human health or biosecurity at the animal facility. (carnell.com)
  • Most children have a few painful mouth sores, which usually develop on the tongue. (aad.org)
  • Let us recognize the dangers that come from saying harmful words with our tongue, and let us with David resolve to restrain our mouth with a muzzle. (tidings.org)
  • Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is an idiopathic condition characterized by a continuous burning sensation of the mucosa of the mouth, typically involving the tongue, with or without extension to the lips and oral mucosa. (medscape.com)
  • This disease is very common in children under the age of 10. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Gum disease is very common, and if you develop the condition - which is also known as periodontitis - it doesn't necessarily mean that you have diabetes. (express.co.uk)
  • Excessive consumption of diet soda could raise the risk of metabolic dysfunction-associated Steatotic liver disease (MASLD), the most common form of chronic liver disease. (medicaldaily.com)
  • Red spots may appear on the palms of the hands, soles of the feet and around the mouth, as well as on the knees, elbows, torso, buttocks and genital areas. (choc.org)
  • While the rash is usually on the hands, feet and mouth, "it can occur on the rest of the body, often on the buttocks,' says Dr Philippa. (madeformums.com)
  • Cobblestoning, which presents as swollen, raised bumps along the inside lining of the cheeks and behind the lips, is another type of mouth lesion that can occur with Crohn's. (healthline.com)
  • A study appearing next week in the journal Nature Communications offers some good news in the search for antiviral drugs for hard-to-treat diseases. (news-medical.net)
  • To prevent the spread of HFM, keep kids home from school and childcare while they have a fever or open blisters on the skin and in the mouth. (kidshealth.org)
  • FMD strikes cloven-hoofed animals, presenting as a high fever, blistering in the mouth and feet, decline in milk production in females, and weight loss. (eurekalert.org)
  • One or two days after fever starts, painful sores usually develop in the mouth and a skin rash might appear. (virginia.gov)
  • Distribution of this disease is worldwide, with a peak incidence in the summer and fall in temperate climates and with no seasonal pattern in the tropics. (medscape.com)
  • The project will also allow the training of health workers in rural sites to improve the care of children with the disease and training in hospitals of health professionals on research on this disease. (pasteur.fr)
  • Proper hand washing is essential in helping to prevent the disease from being spread to other children. (childrenshospital.org)
  • In one study, 80% of the children presented with anorexia and mouth soreness. (medscape.com)
  • Children can also easily catch the disease by touching things like toys and then putting their hands or toys in their mouth. (kidshealth.org.nz)
  • The UK's fight against zoonotic diseases, including avian flu and bovine tuberculosis received a major boost today (16 February) with the allocation of £200 million for a programme of investment into world leading research facilities. (news-medical.net)
  • Eight types of HHV have been linked with oral disease. (medscape.com)
  • It is believed to chronically persist in salivary gland tissue in some hosts, and oral shedding is the probable route of disease transmission. (medscape.com)
  • Several diseases involve these 2 systems and manifest in the oral cavity. (medscape.com)
  • The microenvironment of the oral cavity changes with the age of the patient, the eruption or loss of teeth, and the appearance of disease states (eg, caries, periodontal disease). (medscape.com)
  • Oral microorganisms may also enter the deeper tissue after trauma or surgery, which contributes to the disease process, particularly when they cause BE. (medscape.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge of driver truck about oral cancer, its risk factors, injuries and treatment of disease. (bvsalud.org)
  • Often, Crohn's disease occurs at the lower end of the small intestine where it joins with the large intestine (colon). (healthline.com)
  • Transmission occurs via direct contact with blister fluid or droplets spread from the mouth. (dermnetnz.org)
  • Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) occurs most frequently, but not exclusively, in peri-menopausal and postmenopausal women. (medscape.com)
  • In a classification by etiology or cause, idiopathic burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is considered "primary BMS" (or "true BMS"), whereas "secondary BMS" has an identifiable cause. (medscape.com)
  • Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is likely more than one disease process, and the etiology may be multifactorial. (medscape.com)
  • They also tend to put their hands in their mouths. (mayoclinic.org)
  • The funny-sounding name is derived from the telltale rash that generally appears on the hands, feet and mouth (as well as blisters surfacing in the mouth) of those infected. (choc.org)
  • Wash your hands with soapy water for at least 20 seconds after changing your baby's nappy, and avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands. (madeformums.com)
  • As the disease progresses, many people develop painful sores on their hands and feet, and in their mouths. (mayoclinic.org)
  • You touch your nose, eyes, or mouth after you have touched something contaminated by the virus, such as a toy or doorknob. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Painful mouth sores may cause your child to stop drinking, which can lead to dehydration. (aad.org)
  • The virus is most easily spread the first week a person has the disease. (medlineplus.gov)
  • How long is a person able to spread the disease? (virginia.gov)
  • Good hand washing helps prevent the spread of the disease. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Good hand washing is necessary to help prevent the spread of the disease. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Owners must examine their animals regularly and look out for any signs of problems - time is of the essence if we are to limit the spread of this disease. (just-food.com)
  • Millions of animals were killed and their carcasses burned in an effort to stop the spread of the disease. (carnell.com)
  • The most prevalent type of mouth ulcer is a minor aphthous ulcer, commonly referred to as a canker sore , which can last up to 2 weeks. (healthline.com)
  • The mouth and feet are most commonly affected. (vic.gov.au)
  • It is essential that farmers and all those handling animals in markets or abattoirs should be vigilant for signs of disease. (just-food.com)
  • When disease is suspected, the animals and other contacts are slaughtered, and full compensation is paid. (just-food.com)
  • Rather, it enables scientists to concentrate their resources by quickly isolating animals that require further testing with a disease-specific method. (thepigsite.com)
  • This disease is a can impact live sheep exports due to the close confinement of animals. (vic.gov.au)
  • Animals that recover from scabby mouth develop a life long immunity to the disease. (vic.gov.au)
  • Our landscape is already under pressure from out-of-control populations of introduced animals like deer, pigs and foxes, which can also act as vectors for many dangerous diseases. (nff.org.au)
  • E.U. Health and Consumer Protection Commissioner David Byrne said the new regulations take into account the fact that it is now possible to distinguish vaccinated animals from animals that are infected with the highly contagious disease. (efeedlink.com)
  • Cold drinks or ice lollies may ease a sore mouth,' says Dr Philippa. (madeformums.com)