Supination: Applies to movements of the forearm in turning the palm forward or upward. When referring to the foot, a combination of adduction and inversion movements of the foot.Pronation: Applies to movements of the forearm in turning the palm backward or downward. When referring to the foot, a combination of eversion and abduction movements in the tarsal and metatarsal joints (turning the foot up and in toward the midline of the body).Motion: Physical motion, i.e., a change in position of a body or subject as a result of an external force. It is distinguished from MOVEMENT, a process resulting from biological activity.Motion Perception: The real or apparent movement of objects through the visual field.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Elbow Joint: A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.Elbow: Region of the body immediately surrounding and including the ELBOW JOINT.Ulna: The inner and longer bone of the FOREARM.Radius FracturesRadius: The outer shorter of the two bones of the FOREARM, lying parallel to the ULNA and partially revolving around it.Wrist Joint: The joint that is formed by the distal end of the RADIUS, the articular disc of the distal radioulnar joint, and the proximal row of CARPAL BONES; (SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; triquetral bone).Brachial Plexus Neuropathies: Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Fractures, Malunited: Union of the fragments of a fractured bone in a faulty or abnormal position. If two bones parallel to one another unite by osseous tissue, the result is a crossunion. (From Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 4th ed)Forearm: Part of the arm in humans and primates extending from the ELBOW to the WRIST.Forearm Injuries: Injuries to the part of the upper limb of the body between the wrist and elbow.Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Motion Sickness: Disorder caused by motion, as sea sickness, train sickness, car sickness, air sickness, or SPACE MOTION SICKNESS. It may include nausea, vomiting and dizziness.Ulna Fractures: Fractures of the larger bone of the forearm.Motion Therapy, Continuous Passive: Movement of a body part initiated and maintained by a mechanical or electrical device to restore normal range of motion to joints, muscles, or tendons after surgery, prosthesis implantation, contracture flexion, or long immobilization.Clubfoot: A deformed foot in which the foot is plantarflexed, inverted and adducted.Contracture: Prolonged shortening of the muscle or other soft tissue around a joint, preventing movement of the joint.Tenodesis: Fixation of the end of a tendon to a bone, often by suturing.Torque: The rotational force about an axis that is equal to the product of a force times the distance from the axis where the force is applied.Osteotomy: The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Volar Plate: A thick, fibrocartilaginous ligament at the metacarpophalageal joint.Joint Deformities, Acquired: Deformities acquired after birth as the result of injury or disease. The joint deformity is often associated with rheumatoid arthritis and leprosy.Subtalar Joint: Formed by the articulation of the talus with the calcaneus.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Tendon Transfer: Surgical procedure by which a tendon is incised at its insertion and placed at an anatomical site distant from the original insertion. The tendon remains attached at the point of origin and takes over the function of a muscle inactivated by trauma or disease.Fractures, Comminuted: A fracture in which the bone is splintered or crushed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Wrist Injuries: Injuries to the wrist or the wrist joint.Casts, Surgical: Dressings made of fiberglass, plastic, or bandage impregnated with plaster of paris used for immobilization of various parts of the body in cases of fractures, dislocations, and infected wounds. In comparison with plaster casts, casts made of fiberglass or plastic are lightweight, radiolucent, able to withstand moisture, and less rigid.Shoulder Joint: The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.Arm: The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.Hand Strength: Force exerted when gripping or grasping.Fracture Fixation, Internal: The use of internal devices (metal plates, nails, rods, etc.) to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Fracture Fixation: The use of metallic devices inserted into or through bone to hold a fracture in a set position and alignment while it heals.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Ankle Injuries: Harm or hurt to the ankle or ankle joint usually inflicted by an external source.Psychophysics: The science dealing with the correlation of the physical characteristics of a stimulus, e.g., frequency or intensity, with the response to the stimulus, in order to assess the psychologic factors involved in the relationship.Joint Instability: Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.DislocationsOptical Illusions: An illusion of vision usually affecting spatial relations.Humeral FracturesFingers: Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.Motor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Figural Aftereffect: A perceptual phenomenon used by Gestalt psychologists to demonstrate that events in one part of the perceptual field may affect perception in another part.Sensory Thresholds: The minimum amount of stimulus energy necessary to elicit a sensory response.Artifacts: Any visible result of a procedure which is caused by the procedure itself and not by the entity being analyzed. Common examples include histological structures introduced by tissue processing, radiographic images of structures that are not naturally present in living tissue, and products of chemical reactions that occur during analysis.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Depth Perception: Perception of three-dimensionality.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Pattern Recognition, Visual: Mental process to visually perceive a critical number of facts (the pattern), such as characters, shapes, displays, or designs.Eye Movements: Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.
  • One of the newest categories of running shoes available on the market, minimalist footwear is designed for people who prefer a midfoot or forefoot running style, less cushioning and no stability or motion control features. (sierratradingpost.com)
  • The anterior tibialis attaches to the inferomedial base, functioning in elevation of the 1st metatarsal and supination of the forefoot. (amazonaws.com)
  • The purpose of this study is to assess which orthosis-a traditional thermoplastic ulnar based muenster, a delta cast style muenster and the Hely and Weber MTC Fracture Brace-allows for the least amount of supination and pronation in a healthy population in the dominant extremity. (bioportfolio.com)
  • If we say "supinated," as in the adjective, what we really mean is a fixed or static amount of supination, but only in the magenta pie slice, past the zero-degree centerline. (guitarworld.com)
  • Here, we report a case of a 32-year-old male who sustained a Weber B fracture of the lateral malleolus following a supination ankle injury, which was treated conservatively, following which the patient presented with ankle instability and was found to have concurrent anterior talofibular ligament tear. (hindawi.com)
  • This is a localized injury to subchondral bone that results from repetitive lateral compression of the elbow during overhead motions. (medscape.com)
  • Study _____________________________________________________________________________________________ important for clinical identificaObjectives: To determine intra- and intertester reliability of the hand-held pencil (HHP) and the tion City _______________________________State/Province __________________Zip/Postal of impairments, functional Code _____________________ plumbline goniometer (PLG) methods for measuring active forearm pronation and supination limitations, and monitoring effimotions in individuals with and without injuries. (scribd.com)
  • The HHP and PLG, however, are 2 more functional I No I Yes The distal forearm method is methods for measuring forearm motions, though limited information on the psychometric the most common measurement properties of these tests is currently available. (scribd.com)
  • Conclusions: The HHP and PLG are highly reliable methods for measuring functional forearm requires measuring pronation and pronation and supination. (scribd.com)
  • Forearm supination weakness is the usual functional complaint prompting visit to the physician. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Supination is the act of turning the forearm from a "palm down" position to a "palm up" position, such as when tightening a screw with a screwdriver. (hss.edu)
  • Exercise technique is important to avoid potential injury, control the movement of your dumbbells by slowing down the movement speed at the end ranges of motion in each direction. (acefitness.org)
  • Ranges of motion are limited by the bony architecture of a joint, related ligaments and the muscles crossing that joint. (infobarrel.com)
  • Total ROM for pronation-supination was significantly decreased compared to the uninjured contralateral limb for both IM and FM, although not different from control limbs. (asme.org)
  • Motion in the lower limb should be thought of as an upside-down pendulum of the body passing over the planted foot. (positivehealth.com)
  • These foot pivoting motions allow us to place a foot in front of the body and transfer our centre of mass forward and over the stance limb. (positivehealth.com)
  • Repeat motions ___ times, holding each stretch ___ seconds. (healthwise.net)
  • Mechanical stretching devices differ from continuous passive motion devices in that they are nonmotorized and include the following types: low-load prolonged-duration stretch (LLPS) devices, patient-actuated serial stretch (PASS) devices and static progressive stretch (SPS) devices. (wellmark.com)
  • SP stretch devices hold the joint in a set position, while allowing manual modification of the joint angle, and may allow active motion without resistance. (wellmark.com)
  • The JAS Pronation-Supination system utilizes proven principles of Static Progressive Stretch (SPS) to achieve permanent restoration of joint ROM in three 30-minute sessions per day. (jointactivesystems.com)