A family of cellular proteins that mediate the correct assembly or disassembly of polypeptides and their associated ligands. Although they take part in the assembly process, molecular chaperones are not components of the final structures.
A class of MOLECULAR CHAPERONES found in both prokaryotes and in several compartments of eukaryotic cells. These proteins can interact with polypeptides during a variety of assembly processes in such a way as to prevent the formation of nonfunctional structures.
A class of MOLECULAR CHAPERONES whose members act in the mechanism of SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION by STEROID RECEPTORS.
A family of heat-shock proteins that contain a 70 amino-acid consensus sequence known as the J domain. The J domain of HSP40 heat shock proteins interacts with HSP70 HEAT-SHOCK PROTEINS. HSP40 heat-shock proteins play a role in regulating the ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATASES activity of HSP70 heat-shock proteins.
Proteins which are synthesized in eukaryotic organisms and bacteria in response to hyperthermia and other environmental stresses. They increase thermal tolerance and perform functions essential to cell survival under these conditions.
Processes involved in the formation of TERTIARY PROTEIN STRUCTURE.
A family of multisubunit protein complexes that form into large cylindrical structures which bind to and encapsulate non-native proteins. Chaperonins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to enhance the efficiency of PROTEIN FOLDING reactions and thereby help proteins reach their functional conformation. The family of chaperonins is split into GROUP I CHAPERONINS, and GROUP II CHAPERONINS, with each group having its own repertoire of protein subunits and subcellular preferences.
A constitutively expressed subfamily of the HSP70 heat-shock proteins. They preferentially bind and release hydrophobic peptides by an ATP-dependent process and are involved in post-translational PROTEIN TRANSLOCATION.
A lectin found in ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM membranes that binds to specific N-linked OLIGOSACCHARIDES found on newly synthesized proteins. It may play role in PROTEIN FOLDING or retention and degradation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum.
A group I chaperonin protein that forms the barrel-like structure of the chaperonin complex. It is an oligomeric protein with a distinctive structure of fourteen subunits, arranged in two rings of seven subunits each. The protein was originally studied in BACTERIA where it is commonly referred to as GroEL protein.
LACTAMS forming compounds with a ring size of approximately 1-3 dozen atoms.
Benzene rings which contain two ketone moieties in any position. They can be substituted in any position except at the ketone groups.
Basic glycoprotein members of the SERPIN SUPERFAMILY that function as COLLAGEN-specific MOLECULAR CHAPERONES in the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM.
A multifunctional protein that is found primarily within membrane-bound organelles. In the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM it binds to specific N-linked oligosaccharides found on newly-synthesized proteins and functions as a MOLECULAR CHAPERONE that may play a role in PROTEIN FOLDING or retention and degradation of misfolded proteins. In addition calreticulin is a major storage form for CALCIUM and functions as a calcium-signaling molecule that can regulate intracellular calcium HOMEOSTASIS.
A group I chaperonin protein that forms a lid-like structure which encloses the non-polar cavity of the chaperonin complex. The protein was originally studied in BACTERIA where it is commonly referred to as GroES protein.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
A system of cisternae in the CYTOPLASM of many cells. In places the endoplasmic reticulum is continuous with the plasma membrane (CELL MEMBRANE) or outer membrane of the nuclear envelope. If the outer surfaces of the endoplasmic reticulum membranes are coated with ribosomes, the endoplasmic reticulum is said to be rough-surfaced (ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM, ROUGH); otherwise it is said to be smooth-surfaced (ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM, SMOOTH). (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
A group of eukaryotic high-molecular mass heat-shock proteins that represent a subfamily of HSP70 HEAT-SHOCK PROTEINS. Hsp110 proteins prevent protein aggregation and can maintain denatured proteins in folding-competent states.
Proteins obtained from ESCHERICHIA COLI.
A subclass of crystallins that provides the majority of refractive power and translucency to the lens (LENS, CRYSTALLINE) in VERTEBRATES. Alpha-crystallins also act as molecular chaperones that bind to denatured proteins, keep them in solution and thereby maintain the translucency of the lens. The proteins exist as large oligomers that are formed from ALPHA-CRYSTALLIN A CHAIN and ALPHA-CRYSTALLIN B CHAIN subunits.
A group of enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP. The hydrolysis reaction is usually coupled with another function such as transporting Ca(2+) across a membrane. These enzymes may be dependent on Ca(2+), Mg(2+), anions, H+, or DNA.
Proteins involved in the assembly and disassembly of HISTONES into NUCLEOSOMES.
A constellation of responses that occur when an organism is exposed to excessive heat. Responses include synthesis of new proteins and regulation of others.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Disruption of the non-covalent bonds and/or disulfide bonds responsible for maintaining the three-dimensional shape and activity of the native protein.
A family of low molecular weight heat-shock proteins that can serve as MOLECULAR CHAPERONES.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
One of the alpha crystallin subunits. In addition to being expressed in the lens (LENS, CRYSTALLINE), alpha-crystallin B chain has been found in a variety of tissues such as HEART; BRAIN; MUSCLE; and KIDNEY. Accumulation of the protein in the brain is associated with NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES such as CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB SYNDROME and ALEXANDER DISEASE.
The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.
A group II chaperonin found in eukaryotic CYTOSOL. It is comprised of eight subunits with each subunit encoded by a separate gene. This chaperonin is named after one of its subunits which is a T-COMPLEX REGION-encoded polypeptide.
Proteins obtained from the species SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.
Enzyme that catalyzes the first step of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (CITRIC ACID CYCLE). It catalyzes the reaction of oxaloacetate and acetyl CoA to form citrate and coenzyme A. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 4.1.3.7.
A heterogeneous family of water-soluble structural proteins found in cells of the vertebrate lens. The presence of these proteins accounts for the transparency of the lens. The family is composed of four major groups, alpha, beta, gamma, and delta, and several minor groups, which are classed on the basis of size, charge, immunological properties, and vertebrate source. Alpha, beta, and delta crystallins occur in avian and reptilian lenses, while alpha, beta, and gamma crystallins occur in all other lenses.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.
A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.
An enzyme that catalyzes the isomerization of proline residues within proteins. EC 5.2.1.8.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).
The reconstitution of a protein's activity following denaturation.
An enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of the planetary sulfur atom of thiosulfate ion to cyanide ion to form thiocyanate ion. EC 2.8.1.1.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
An ATP-dependent protease found in prokaryotes, CHLOROPLASTS, and MITOCHONDRIA. It is a soluble multisubunit complex that plays a role in the degradation of many abnormal proteins.
Sulfur-sulfur bond isomerases that catalyze the rearrangement of disulfide bonds within proteins during folding. Specific protein disulfide-isomerase isoenzymes also occur as subunits of PROCOLLAGEN-PROLINE DIOXYGENASE.
The process of moving proteins from one cellular compartment (including extracellular) to another by various sorting and transport mechanisms such as gated transport, protein translocation, and vesicular transport.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
One of the subunits of alpha-crystallins. Unlike ALPHA-CRYSTALLIN B CHAIN the expression of ALPHA-CRYSTALLIN A CHAIN is limited primarily to the lens (LENS, CRYSTALLINE).
A large multisubunit complex that plays an important role in the degradation of most of the cytosolic and nuclear proteins in eukaryotic cells. It contains a 700-kDa catalytic sub-complex and two 700-kDa regulatory sub-complexes. The complex digests ubiquitinated proteins and protein activated via ornithine decarboxylase antizyme.
Hydrocarbon rings which contain two ketone moieties in any position. They can be substituted in any position except at the ketone groups.
Proteins to which calcium ions are bound. They can act as transport proteins, regulator proteins, or activator proteins. They typically contain EF HAND MOTIFS.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
Indolizines are organic compounds that consist of a condensed pyridine and pyrrole ring structure, which can be found in certain natural and synthetic substances, and have been studied for their potential biological activities.
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape and arrangement of multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
A subfamily of small heat-shock proteins that function as molecular chaperones that aid in refolding of non-native proteins. They play a protective role that increases cellular survival during times of stress.
The process by which two molecules of the same chemical composition form a condensation product or polymer.
Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
Any of various enzymatically catalyzed post-translational modifications of PEPTIDES or PROTEINS in the cell of origin. These modifications include carboxylation; HYDROXYLATION; ACETYLATION; PHOSPHORYLATION; METHYLATION; GLYCOSYLATION; ubiquitination; oxidation; proteolysis; and crosslinking and result in changes in molecular weight and electrophoretic motility.
A family of peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases that bind to CYCLOSPORINS and regulate the IMMUNE SYSTEM. EC 5.2.1.-
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
Macromolecular complexes formed from the association of defined protein subunits.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
Disorders caused by imbalances in the protein homeostasis network - synthesis, folding, and transport of proteins; post-translational modifications; and degradation or clearance of misfolded proteins.
The unfavorable effect of environmental factors (stressors) on the physiological functions of an organism. Prolonged unresolved physiological stress can affect HOMEOSTASIS of the organism, and may lead to damaging or pathological conditions.
The assembly of the QUATERNARY PROTEIN STRUCTURE of multimeric proteins (MULTIPROTEIN COMPLEXES) from their composite PROTEIN SUBUNITS.
Proteins found in any species of fungus.
A major protein fraction of milk obtained from the WHEY.
Proteins found in the PERIPLASM of organisms with cell walls.
Intracellular fluid from the cytoplasm after removal of ORGANELLES and other insoluble cytoplasmic components.
The ability of a protein to retain its structural conformation or its activity when subjected to physical or chemical manipulations.
Conformational transitions of a protein from unfolded states to a more folded state.
The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.
A cellular response to environmental insults that cause disruptions in PROTEIN FOLDING and/or accumulation of defectively folded protein in the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. It consists of a group of regulatory cascades that are triggered as a response to altered levels of calcium and/or the redox state of the endoplasmic reticulum. Persistent activation of the unfolded protein response leads to the induction of APOPTOSIS.
Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.
Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.
The process of cleaving a chemical compound by the addition of a molecule of water.
A change from planar to elliptic polarization when an initially plane-polarized light wave traverses an optically active medium. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
A class of organic compounds which contain an anilino (phenylamino) group linked to a salt or ester of naphthalenesulfonic acid. They are frequently used as fluorescent dyes and sulfhydryl reagents.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
The space between the inner and outer membranes of a cell that is shared with the cell wall.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
Stress-inducible members of the heat-shock proteins 70 family. HSP72 heat shock proteins function with other MOLECULAR CHAPERONES to mediate PROTEIN FOLDING and to stabilize pre-existent proteins against aggregation.
One of the BASIC-LEUCINE ZIPPER TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS that is synthesized as a membrane-bound protein in the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. In response to endoplasmic reticulum stress it translocates to the GOLGI APPARATUS. It is activated by PROTEASES and then moves to the CELL NUCLEUS to regulate GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of GENES involved in the unfolded protein response.
Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
A broad-spectrum antibiotic that is being used as prophylaxis against disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection in HIV-positive patients.
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
A generic term for any circumscribed mass of foreign (e.g., lead or viruses) or metabolically inactive materials (e.g., ceroid or MALLORY BODIES), within the cytoplasm or nucleus of a cell. Inclusion bodies are in cells infected with certain filtrable viruses, observed especially in nerve, epithelial, or endothelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)
The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.
The ability of a substance to be dissolved, i.e. to form a solution with another substance. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A highly conserved 76-amino acid peptide universally found in eukaryotic cells that functions as a marker for intracellular PROTEIN TRANSPORT and degradation. Ubiquitin becomes activated through a series of complicated steps and forms an isopeptide bond to lysine residues of specific proteins within the cell. These "ubiquitinated" proteins can be recognized and degraded by proteosomes or be transported to specific compartments within the cell.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
Enzymes that oxidize certain LUMINESCENT AGENTS to emit light (PHYSICAL LUMINESCENCE). The luciferases from different organisms have evolved differently so have different structures and substrates.
Serologic tests in which a positive reaction manifested by visible CHEMICAL PRECIPITATION occurs when a soluble ANTIGEN reacts with its precipitins, i.e., ANTIBODIES that can form a precipitate.
A family of ubiquitously-expressed peroxidases that play a role in the reduction of a broad spectrum of PEROXIDES like HYDROGEN PEROXIDE; LIPID PEROXIDES and peroxinitrite. They are found in a wide range of organisms, such as BACTERIA; PLANTS; and MAMMALS. The enzyme requires the presence of a thiol-containing intermediate such as THIOREDOXIN as a reducing cofactor.
Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.
Conformational transitions of the shape of a protein to various unfolded states.
A transparent, biconvex structure of the EYE, enclosed in a capsule and situated behind the IRIS and in front of the vitreous humor (VITREOUS BODY). It is slightly overlapped at its margin by the ciliary processes. Adaptation by the CILIARY BODY is crucial for OCULAR ACCOMMODATION.
Protein modules with conserved ligand-binding surfaces which mediate specific interaction functions in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS and the specific BINDING SITES of their cognate protein LIGANDS.
The chemical or biochemical addition of carbohydrate or glycosyl groups to other chemicals, especially peptides or proteins. Glycosyl transferases are used in this biochemical reaction.
Electrophoresis in which a second perpendicular electrophoretic transport is performed on the separate components resulting from the first electrophoresis. This technique is usually performed on polyacrylamide gels.
CELL LINES derived from the CV-1 cell line by transformation with a replication origin defective mutant of SV40 VIRUS, which codes for wild type large T antigen (ANTIGENS, POLYOMAVIRUS TRANSFORMING). They are used for transfection and cloning. (The CV-1 cell line was derived from the kidney of an adult male African green monkey (CERCOPITHECUS AETHIOPS).)
An N-acetylglycosamine containing antiviral antibiotic obtained from Streptomyces lysosuperificus. It is also active against some bacteria and fungi, because it inhibits the glucosylation of proteins. Tunicamycin is used as tool in the study of microbial biosynthetic mechanisms.
The aggregation of soluble ANTIGENS with ANTIBODIES, alone or with antibody binding factors such as ANTI-ANTIBODIES or STAPHYLOCOCCAL PROTEIN A, into complexes large enough to fall out of solution.
Semiautonomous, self-reproducing organelles that occur in the cytoplasm of all cells of most, but not all, eukaryotes. Each mitochondrion is surrounded by a double limiting membrane. The inner membrane is highly invaginated, and its projections are called cristae. Mitochondria are the sites of the reactions of oxidative phosphorylation, which result in the formation of ATP. They contain distinctive RIBOSOMES, transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER); AMINO ACYL T RNA SYNTHETASES; and elongation and termination factors. Mitochondria depend upon genes within the nucleus of the cells in which they reside for many essential messenger RNAs (RNA, MESSENGER). Mitochondria are believed to have arisen from aerobic bacteria that established a symbiotic relationship with primitive protoeukaryotes. (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.
Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.
A family of immunophilin proteins that bind to the immunosuppressive drugs TACROLIMUS (also known as FK506) and SIROLIMUS. EC 5.2.1.-
Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.
Chromatography on non-ionic gels without regard to the mechanism of solute discrimination.
Immunologic method used for detecting or quantifying immunoreactive substances. The substance is identified by first immobilizing it by blotting onto a membrane and then tagging it with labeled antibodies.
Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.
Complexes of RNA-binding proteins with ribonucleic acids (RNA).
Hereditary and sporadic conditions which are characterized by progressive nervous system dysfunction. These disorders are often associated with atrophy of the affected central or peripheral nervous system structures.
A diverse class of enzymes that interact with UBIQUITIN-CONJUGATING ENZYMES and ubiquitination-specific protein substrates. Each member of this enzyme group has its own distinct specificity for a substrate and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme. Ubiquitin-protein ligases exist as both monomeric proteins multiprotein complexes.
The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
Small proteinaceous infectious particles which resist inactivation by procedures that modify NUCLEIC ACIDS and contain an abnormal isoform of a cellular protein which is a major and necessary component. The abnormal (scrapie) isoform is PrPSc (PRPSC PROTEINS) and the cellular isoform PrPC (PRPC PROTEINS). The primary amino acid sequence of the two isoforms is identical. Human diseases caused by prions include CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB SYNDROME; GERSTMANN-STRAUSSLER SYNDROME; and INSOMNIA, FATAL FAMILIAL.
Adenosine 5'-(trihydrogen diphosphate). An adenine nucleotide containing two phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety at the 5'-position.
The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.
An infraorder of PRIMATES comprised of the families CERCOPITHECIDAE (old world monkeys); HYLOBATIDAE (siamangs and GIBBONS); and HOMINIDAE (great apes and HUMANS). With the exception of humans, they all live exclusively in Africa and Asia.
A type of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where polyribosomes are present on the cytoplasmic surfaces of the ER membranes. This form of ER is prominent in cells specialized for protein secretion and its principal function is to segregate proteins destined for export or intracellular utilization.
Measurement of the intensity and quality of fluorescence.
The measurement of the quantity of heat involved in various processes, such as chemical reactions, changes of state, and formations of solutions, or in the determination of the heat capacities of substances. The fundamental unit of measurement is the joule or the calorie (4.184 joules). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.
The thermodynamic interaction between a substance and WATER.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
Methods for determining interaction between PROTEINS.
A variable annual leguminous vine (Pisum sativum) that is cultivated for its rounded smooth or wrinkled edible protein-rich seeds, the seed of the pea, and the immature pods with their included seeds. (From Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1973)
The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.
Enzymes that catalyze either the racemization or epimerization of chiral centers within amino acids or derivatives. EC 5.1.1.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.
Proteins that control the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.
A class of enzymes that catalyze geometric or structural changes within a molecule to form a single product. The reactions do not involve a net change in the concentrations of compounds other than the substrate and the product.(from Dorland, 28th ed) EC 5.
Commonly observed structural components of proteins formed by simple combinations of adjacent secondary structures. A commonly observed structure may be composed of a CONSERVED SEQUENCE which can be represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE.
A genus of CRUSTACEA of the order ANOSTRACA, found in briny pools and lakes and often cultured for fish food. It has 168 chromosomes and differs from most crustaceans in that its blood contains hemoglobin.
Proteases that contain proteolytic core domains and ATPase-containing regulatory domains. They are usually comprised of large multi-subunit assemblies. The domains can occur within a single peptide chain or on distinct subunits.
Systems of enzymes which function sequentially by catalyzing consecutive reactions linked by common metabolic intermediates. They may involve simply a transfer of water molecules or hydrogen atoms and may be associated with large supramolecular structures such as MITOCHONDRIA or RIBOSOMES.
ENDOPEPTIDASES which have a cysteine involved in the catalytic process. This group of enzymes is inactivated by CYSTEINE PROTEINASE INHIBITORS such as CYSTATINS and SULFHYDRYL REAGENTS.
Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.
Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in fungi.
Proteins produced from GENES that have acquired MUTATIONS.
A family of soluble metal binding proteins that are involved in the intracellular transport of specific metal ions and their transfer to the appropriate metalloprotein precursor.
The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)
Any member of the group of ENDOPEPTIDASES containing at the active site a serine residue involved in catalysis.
A highly conserved heterodimeric glycoprotein that is differentially expressed during many severe physiological disturbance states such as CANCER; APOPTOSIS; and various NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS. Clusterin is ubiquitously expressed and appears to function as a secreted MOLECULAR CHAPERONE.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
A family of histone molecular chaperones that play roles in sperm CHROMATIN decondensation and CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY in fertilized eggs. They were originally discovered in XENOPUS egg extracts as histone-binding factors that mediate nucleosome formation in vitro.
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
Members of a family of highly conserved proteins which are all cis-trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerases (PEPTIDYLPROLYL ISOMERASE). They bind the immunosuppressant drugs CYCLOSPORINE; TACROLIMUS and SIROLIMUS. They possess rotamase activity, which is inhibited by the immunosuppressant drugs that bind to them.
Cleavage of proteins into smaller peptides or amino acids either by PROTEASES or non-enzymatically (e.g., Hydrolysis). It does not include Protein Processing, Post-Translational.
An analytical method used in determining the identity of a chemical based on its mass using mass analyzers/mass spectrometers.
Enzymes that catalyze the exohydrolysis of 1,4-alpha-glucosidic linkages with release of alpha-glucose. Deficiency of alpha-1,4-glucosidase may cause GLYCOGEN STORAGE DISEASE TYPE II.
Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
The naturally occurring or experimentally induced replacement of one or more AMINO ACIDS in a protein with another. If a functionally equivalent amino acid is substituted, the protein may retain wild-type activity. Substitution may also diminish, enhance, or eliminate protein function. Experimentally induced substitution is often used to study enzyme activities and binding site properties.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
A strong organic base existing primarily as guanidium ions at physiological pH. It is found in the urine as a normal product of protein metabolism. It is also used in laboratory research as a protein denaturant. (From Martindale, the Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed and Merck Index, 12th ed) It is also used in the treatment of myasthenia and as a fluorescent probe in HPLC.
Various physiological or molecular disturbances that impair ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM function. It triggers many responses, including UNFOLDED PROTEIN RESPONSE, which may lead to APOPTOSIS; and AUTOPHAGY.
Protein precursors, also known as proproteins or prohormones, are inactive forms of proteins that undergo post-translational modification, such as cleavage, to produce the active functional protein or peptide hormone.
The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
Screening techniques first developed in yeast to identify genes encoding interacting proteins. Variations are used to evaluate interplay between proteins and other molecules. Two-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for protein-protein interactions, one-hybrid for DNA-protein interactions, three-hybrid interactions for RNA-protein interactions or ligand-based interactions. Reverse n-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for mutations or other small molecules that dissociate known interactions.
Single chains of amino acids that are the units of multimeric PROTEINS. Multimeric proteins can be composed of identical or non-identical subunits. One or more monomeric subunits may compose a protomer which itself is a subunit structure of a larger assembly.
A subfamily of small heat-shock proteins found in a wide variety of organisms.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of (S)-malate and NAD+ to oxaloacetate and NADH. EC 1.1.1.37.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
Components of a cell produced by various separation techniques which, though they disrupt the delicate anatomy of a cell, preserve the structure and physiology of its functioning constituents for biochemical and ultrastructural analysis. (From Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2d ed, p163)
Different forms of a protein that may be produced from different GENES, or from the same gene by ALTERNATIVE SPLICING.
Reagents with two reactive groups, usually at opposite ends of the molecule, that are capable of reacting with and thereby forming bridges between side chains of amino acids in proteins; the locations of naturally reactive areas within proteins can thereby be identified; may also be used for other macromolecules, like glycoproteins, nucleic acids, or other.
A group of acylated oligopeptides produced by Actinomycetes that function as protease inhibitors. They have been known to inhibit to varying degrees trypsin, plasmin, KALLIKREINS, papain and the cathepsins.
A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.
A cell line generated from human embryonic kidney cells that were transformed with human adenovirus type 5.
Compounds that inhibit the function or proteolytic action of the PROTEASOME.
A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).
A class of cell surface receptors recognized by its pharmacological profile. Sigma receptors were originally considered to be opioid receptors because they bind certain synthetic opioids. However they also interact with a variety of other psychoactive drugs, and their endogenous ligand is not known (although they can react to certain endogenous steroids). Sigma receptors are found in the immune, endocrine, and nervous systems, and in some peripheral tissues.
A synuclein that is a major component of LEWY BODIES that plays a role in neurodegeneration and neuroprotection.
The systematic study of the complete complement of proteins (PROTEOME) of organisms.
The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.
An antibiotic compound derived from Streptomyces niveus. It has a chemical structure similar to coumarin. Novobiocin binds to DNA gyrase, and blocks adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity. (From Reynolds, Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p189)
Enzymes of the isomerase class that catalyze the oxidation of one part of a molecule with a corresponding reduction of another part of the same molecule. They include enzymes converting aldoses to ketoses (ALDOSE-KETOSE ISOMERASES), enzymes shifting a carbon-carbon double bond (CARBON-CARBON DOUBLE BOND ISOMERASES), and enzymes transposing S-S bonds (SULFUR-SULFUR BOND ISOMERASES). (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 5.3.
Thyroglobulin is a glycoprotein synthesized and secreted by thyroid follicular cells, serving as a precursor for the production of thyroid hormones T3 and T4, and its measurement in blood serves as a tumor marker for thyroid cancer surveillance.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
A family of proteins that play a role as cofactors in the process of CLATHRIN recycling in cells.
A species of CERCOPITHECUS containing three subspecies: C. tantalus, C. pygerythrus, and C. sabeus. They are found in the forests and savannah of Africa. The African green monkey (C. pygerythrus) is the natural host of SIMIAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS and is used in AIDS research.
A fibrous protein complex that consists of proteins folded into a specific cross beta-pleated sheet structure. This fibrillar structure has been found as an alternative folding pattern for a variety of functional proteins. Deposits of amyloid in the form of AMYLOID PLAQUES are associated with a variety of degenerative diseases. The amyloid structure has also been found in a number of functional proteins that are unrelated to disease.
One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.
Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of molecules across a biological membrane. Included in this broad category are proteins involved in active transport (BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT, ACTIVE), facilitated transport and ION CHANNELS.
A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Mrj encodes a DnaJ-related co-chaperone that is essential for murine placental development. (1/6127)

We have identified a novel gene in a gene trap screen that encodes a protein related to the DnaJ co-chaperone in E. coli. The gene, named Mrj (mammalian relative of DnaJ) was expressed throughout development in both the embryo and placenta. Within the placenta, expression was particularly high in trophoblast giant cells but moderate levels were also observed in trophoblast cells of the chorion at embryonic day 8.5, and later in the labyrinth which arises from the attachment of the chorion to the allantois (a process called chorioallantoic fusion). Insertion of the ROSAbetageo gene trap vector into the Mrj gene created a null allele. Homozygous Mrj mutants died at mid-gestation due to a failure of chorioallantoic fusion at embryonic day 8.5, which precluded formation of the mature placenta. At embryonic day 8.5, the chorion in mutants was morphologically normal and expressed the cell adhesion molecule beta4 integrin that is known to be required for chorioallantoic fusion. However, expression of the chorionic trophoblast-specific transcription factor genes Err2 and Gcm1 was significantly reduced. The mutants showed no abnormal phenotypes in other trophoblast cell types or in the embryo proper. This study indicates a previously unsuspected role for chaperone proteins in placental development and represents the first genetic analysis of DnaJ-related protein function in higher eukaryotes. Based on a survey of EST databases representing different mouse tissues and embryonic stages, there are 40 or more DnaJ-related genes in mammals. In addition to Mrj, at least two of these genes are also expressed in the developing mouse placenta. The specificity of the developmental defect in Mrj mutants suggests that each of these genes may have unique tissue and cellular activities.  (+info)

p50(cdc37) acting in concert with Hsp90 is required for Raf-1 function. (2/6127)

Genetic screens in Drosophila have identified p50(cdc37) to be an essential component of the sevenless receptor/mitogen-activated kinase protein (MAPK) signaling pathway, but neither the function nor the target of p50(cdc37) in this pathway has been defined. In this study, we examined the role of p50(cdc37) and its Hsp90 chaperone partner in Raf/Mek/MAPK signaling biochemically. We found that coexpression of wild-type p50(cdc37) with Raf-1 resulted in robust and dose-dependent activation of Raf-1 in Sf9 cells. In addition, p50(cdc37) greatly potentiated v-Src-mediated Raf-1 activation. Moreover, we found that p50(cdc37) is the primary determinant of Hsp90 recruitment to Raf-1. Overexpression of a p50(cdc37) mutant which is unable to recruit Hsp90 into the Raf-1 complex inhibited Raf-1 and MAPK activation by growth factors. Similarly, pretreatment with geldanamycin (GA), an Hsp90-specific inhibitor, prevented both the association of Raf-1 with the p50(cdc37)-Hsp90 heterodimer and Raf-1 kinase activation by serum. Activation of Raf-1 via baculovirus coexpression with oncogenic Src or Ras in Sf9 cells was also strongly inhibited by dominant negative p50(cdc37) or by GA. Thus, formation of a ternary Raf-1-p50(cdc37)-Hsp90 complex is crucial for Raf-1 activity and MAPK pathway signaling. These results provide the first biochemical evidence for the requirement of the p50(cdc37)-Hsp90 complex in protein kinase regulation and for Raf-1 function in particular.  (+info)

Chaperone activity with a redox switch. (3/6127)

Hsp33, a member of a newly discovered heat shock protein family, was found to be a very potent molecular chaperone. Hsp33 is distinguished from all other known molecular chaperones by its mode of functional regulation. Its activity is redox regulated. Hsp33 is a cytoplasmically localized protein with highly reactive cysteines that respond quickly to changes in the redox environment. Oxidizing conditions like H2O2 cause disulfide bonds to form in Hsp33, a process that leads to the activation of its chaperone function. In vitro and in vivo experiments suggest that Hsp33 protects cells from oxidants, leading us to conclude that we have found a protein family that plays an important role in the bacterial defense system toward oxidative stress.  (+info)

Recovery following relief of unilateral ureteral obstruction in the neonatal rat. (4/6127)

BACKGROUND: Obstructive nephropathy is a primary cause of renal insufficiency in infants and children. This study was designed to distinguish the reversible and irreversible cellular consequences of temporary unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) on the developing kidney. METHODS: Rats were subjected to UUO or sham operation in the first 48 hours of life, and the obstruction was removed five days later (or was left in place). Kidneys were removed for study 14 or 28 days later. In additional groups, kidneys were removed at the end of five days of obstruction. Immunoreactive distribution of renin was determined in arterioles, and the distribution of epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-beta1, clusterin, vimentin, and alpha-smooth muscle actin was determined in tubules and/or interstitium. The number of glomeruli, glomerular maturation, tubular atrophy, and interstitial collagen deposition was determined by morphometry. Renal cellular proliferation and apoptosis were measured by proliferating cell nuclear antigen and the TdT uridine-nick-end-label technique, respectively. The glomerular filtration rate was measured by inulin clearance. RESULTS: Renal microvascular renin maintained a fetal distribution with persistent UUO; this was partially reversed by the relief of obstruction. Although glomerular maturation was also delayed and glomerular volume was reduced by UUO, the relief of obstruction prevented the reduction in glomerular volume. Although relief of obstruction did not reverse a 40% reduction in the number of nephrons, the glomerular filtration rate of the postobstructed kidney was normal. The relief of obstruction did not improve tubular cell proliferation and only partially reduced apoptosis induced by UUO. This was associated with a persistent reduction in the tubular epidermal growth factor. In addition, the relief of obstruction reduced but did not normalize tubular expression of transforming growth factor-beta1, clusterin, and vimentin, all of which are evidence of persistent tubular injury. The relief of obstruction significantly reduced interstitial fibrosis and expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin by interstitial fibroblasts, but not to normal levels. CONCLUSIONS: The relief of obstruction in the neonatal rat attenuates, but does not reverse, renal vascular, glomerular, tubular, and interstitial injury resulting from five days of UUO. Hyperfiltration by remaining nephrons and residual tubulointerstitial injury in the postobstructed kidney are likely to lead to deterioration of renal function later in life.  (+info)

Ca2+ regulation of interactions between endoplasmic reticulum chaperones. (5/6127)

Casade Blue (CB), a fluorescent dye, was used to investigate the dynamics of interactions between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumenal chaperones including calreticulin, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), and ERp57. PDI and ERp57 were labeled with CB, and subsequently, we show that the fluorescence intensity of the CB-conjugated proteins changes upon exposure to microenvironments of a different polarity. CD analysis of the purified proteins revealed that changes in the fluorescence intensity of CB-ERp57 and CB-PDI correspond to conformational changes in the proteins. Using this technique we demonstrate that PDI interacts with calreticulin at low Ca2+ concentration (below 100 microM), whereas the protein complex dissociates at >400 microM Ca2+. These are the Ca2+ concentrations reminiscent of Ca2+ levels found in empty or full ER Ca2+ stores. The N-domain of calreticulin interacts with PDI, but Ca2+ binding to the C-domain of the protein is responsible for Ca2+ sensitivity of the interaction. ERp57 also interacts with calreticulin through the N-domain of the protein. Initial interaction between these proteins is Ca2+-independent, but it is modulated by Ca2+ binding to the C-domain of calreticulin. We conclude that changes in ER lumenal Ca2+ concentration may be responsible for the regulation of protein-protein interactions. Calreticulin may play a role of Ca2+ "sensor" for ER chaperones via regulation of Ca2+-dependent formation and maintenance of structural and functional complexes between different proteins involved in a variety of steps during protein synthesis, folding, and post-translational modification.  (+info)

The mammalian endoplasmic reticulum stress response element consists of an evolutionarily conserved tripartite structure and interacts with a novel stress-inducible complex. (6/6127)

When mammalian cells are subjected to calcium depletion stress or protein glycosylation block, the transcription of a family of glucose-regulated protein (GRP) genes encoding endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones is induced to high levels. The consensus mammalian ER stress response element (ERSE) conserved among grp promoters consists of a tripartite structure CCAAT(N9)CCACG, with N being a strikingly GC-rich region of 9 bp. The ERSE, in duplicate copies, can confer full stress inducibility to a heterologous promoter in a sequence-specific but orientation-independent manner. In addition to CBF/NF-Y and YY1 binding to the CCAAT and CCACG motifs, respectively, we further discovered that an ER stress-inducible complex (ERSF) from HeLa nuclear extract binds specifically to the ERSE. Strikingly, the interaction of the ERSF with the ERSE requires a conserved GGC motif within the 9 bp region. Since mutation of the GGC triplet sequence also results in loss of stress inducibility, specific sequence within the 9 bp region is an integral part of the tripartite structure. Finally, correlation of factor binding with stress inducibility reveals that ERSF binding to the ERSE alone is not sufficient; full stress inducibility requires integrity of the CCAAT, GGC and CCACG sequence motifs, as well as precise spacing among these sites.  (+info)

Calreticulin, a peptide-binding chaperone of the endoplasmic reticulum, elicits tumor- and peptide-specific immunity. (7/6127)

Calreticulin (CRT), a peptide-binding heat shock protein (HSP) of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), has been shown previously to associate with peptides transported into the ER by transporter associated with antigen processing (Spee, P., and J. Neefjes. 1997. Eur. J. Immunol. 27: 2441-2449). Our studies show that CRT preparations purified from tumors elicit specific immunity to the tumor used as the source of CRT but not to an antigenically distinct tumor. The immunogenicity is attributed to the peptides associated with the CRT molecule and not to the CRT molecule per se. It is further shown that CRT molecules can be complexed in vitro to unglycosylated peptides and used to elicit peptide-specific CD8(+) T cell response in spite of exogenous administration. These characteristics of CRT closely resemble those of HSPs gp96, hsp90, and hsp70, although CRT has no apparent structural homologies to them.  (+info)

DYT1 mutation in French families with idiopathic torsion dystonia. (8/6127)

A GAG deletion at position 946 in DYT1, one of the genes responsible for autosomal dominant idiopathic torsion dystonia (ITD), has recently been identified. We tested 24 families and six isolated cases with ITD and found 14 individuals from six French families who carried this mutation, indicating that 20% of the affected families carried the DYT1 mutation. Age at onset was always before 20 years (mean, 9+/-4 years). Interestingly, the site of onset was the upper limb in all but one patient. Dystonia was generalized in seven patients and remained focal or segmental in three patients. The absence of common haplotypes among DYT1 families suggests that at least six independent founder mutations have occurred. In addition, one Ashkenazi Jewish family carried the common haplotype described previously in Ashkenazi Jewish patients, but it was absent in the other family. Moreover, the dystonia remained focal in the latter family when compared with the usual generalized phenotype in patients with the common Ashkenazi Jewish haplotype. This indicates that there are at least two founder mutations in this population.  (+info)

Molecular chaperones are a group of proteins that assist in the proper folding and assembly of other protein molecules, helping them achieve their native conformation. They play a crucial role in preventing protein misfolding and aggregation, which can lead to the formation of toxic species associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. Molecular chaperones are also involved in protein transport across membranes, degradation of misfolded proteins, and protection of cells under stress conditions. Their function is generally non-catalytic and ATP-dependent, and they often interact with their client proteins in a transient manner.

HSP70 heat-shock proteins are a family of highly conserved molecular chaperones that play a crucial role in protein folding and protection against stress-induced damage. They are named after the fact that they were first discovered in response to heat shock, but they are now known to be produced in response to various stressors, such as oxidative stress, inflammation, and exposure to toxins.

HSP70 proteins bind to exposed hydrophobic regions of unfolded or misfolded proteins, preventing their aggregation and assisting in their proper folding. They also help target irreversibly damaged proteins for degradation by the proteasome. In addition to their role in protein homeostasis, HSP70 proteins have been shown to have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects, making them a subject of interest in various therapeutic contexts.

HSP90 (Heat Shock Protein 90) refers to a family of highly conserved molecular chaperones that are expressed in all eukaryotic cells. They play a crucial role in protein folding, assembly, and transport, thereby assisting in the maintenance of proper protein function and cellular homeostasis. HSP90 proteins are named for their increased expression during heat shock and other stress conditions, which helps protect cells by facilitating the refolding or degradation of misfolded proteins that can accumulate under these circumstances.

HSP90 chaperones are ATP-dependent and consist of multiple domains: a N-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD), a middle domain, and a C-terminal dimerization domain. They exist as homodimers and interact with a wide range of client proteins, including transcription factors, kinases, and steroid hormone receptors. By regulating the activity and stability of these client proteins, HSP90 chaperones contribute to various cellular processes such as signal transduction, cell cycle progression, and stress response. Dysregulation of HSP90 function has been implicated in numerous diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and infectious diseases, making it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention.

HSP40, also known as heat shock protein 40 or DNAJ proteins, are a family of chaperone proteins that play a crucial role in the folding and assembly of other proteins. They are named after their ability to be upregulated in response to heat shock and other stress conditions that can cause protein misfolding and aggregation.

HSP40 proteins function as co-chaperones, working together with HSP70 chaperone proteins to facilitate the folding of nascent polypeptides or the refolding of denatured proteins. They contain a highly conserved J-domain that interacts with the ATPase domain of HSP70, stimulating its ATP hydrolysis activity and promoting the binding of HSP70 to client proteins.

HSP40 proteins can also play a role in protein degradation by targeting misfolded or aggregated proteins for destruction by the proteasome or autophagy pathways. Additionally, they have been implicated in various cellular processes such as transcription regulation, DNA repair, and apoptosis.

There are several subfamilies of HSP40 proteins, classified based on their structural features and functions. These include the DNAJA, DNAJB, and DNAJC subfamilies, each with distinct domains and cellular localization patterns. Dysregulation of HSP40 proteins has been linked to various diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, and infectious diseases.

Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) are a group of conserved proteins that are produced by cells in response to stressful conditions, such as increased temperature, exposure to toxins, or infection. They play an essential role in protecting cells and promoting their survival under stressful conditions by assisting in the proper folding and assembly of other proteins, preventing protein aggregation, and helping to refold or degrade damaged proteins. HSPs are named according to their molecular weight, for example, HSP70 and HSP90. They are found in all living organisms, from bacteria to humans, indicating their fundamental importance in cellular function and survival.

Protein folding is the process by which a protein molecule naturally folds into its three-dimensional structure, following the synthesis of its amino acid chain. This complex process is determined by the sequence and properties of the amino acids, as well as various environmental factors such as temperature, pH, and the presence of molecular chaperones. The final folded conformation of a protein is crucial for its proper function, as it enables the formation of specific interactions between different parts of the molecule, which in turn define its biological activity. Protein misfolding can lead to various diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

Chaperonins are a type of molecular chaperone found in cells that assist in the proper folding of other proteins. They are large, complex protein assemblies that form a protective cage-like structure around unfolded polypeptides, providing a protected environment for them to fold into their correct three-dimensional shape.

Chaperonins are classified into two groups: Group I chaperonins, which are found in bacteria and archaea, and Group II chaperonins, which are found in eukaryotes (including humans). Both types of chaperonins share a similar overall structure, consisting of two rings stacked on top of each other, with each ring containing multiple subunits.

Group I chaperonins, such as GroEL in bacteria, function by binding to unfolded proteins and encapsulating them within their central cavity. The chaperonin then undergoes a series of conformational changes that help to facilitate the folding of the encapsulated protein. Once folding is complete, the chaperonin releases the now-folded protein.

Group II chaperonins, such as TCP-1 ring complex (TRiC) in humans, function similarly but have a more complex mechanism of action. They not only assist in protein folding but also help to prevent protein aggregation and misfolding. Group II chaperonins are involved in various cellular processes, including protein quality control, protein trafficking, and the regulation of cell signaling pathways.

Defects in chaperonin function have been linked to several human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, and cardiovascular disease.

HSC70 (Heat Shock Cognate 70) proteins are a type of heat shock protein (HSP) that are expressed constitutively under normal physiological conditions, but their expression can be further induced by various stress stimuli such as heat, oxidative stress, and inflammation. HSC70 proteins belong to the HSP70 family, which are characterized by a molecular weight of approximately 70 kDa.

HSC70 proteins play important roles in protein folding, assembly, disassembly, and transport. They act as chaperones that assist in the proper folding of newly synthesized polypeptides and prevent aggregation of misfolded proteins. HSC70 proteins can also facilitate the degradation of damaged or unnecessary proteins by targeting them to the proteasome for degradation.

In addition, HSC70 proteins have been implicated in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, membrane trafficking, and autophagy. Dysregulation of HSC70 protein function has been linked to several diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, and viral infections.

Calnexin is a type I transmembrane protein found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells. It is a chaperone protein involved in the folding and quality control of newly synthesized glycoproteins. Calnexin binds to monoglucosylated oligosaccharides on unfolded or misfolded proteins, facilitating their correct folding and preventing their aggregation. Once the protein is correctly folded, calnexin dissociates from it and it can proceed through the ER for further processing and transport to its final destination in the cell. Calnexin also plays a role in the degradation of misfolded proteins by targeting them for ER-associated degradation (ERAD).

Chaperonin 60, also known as CPN60 or HSP60 (heat shock protein 60), is a type of molecular chaperone found in the mitochondria of eukaryotic cells. Molecular chaperones are proteins that assist in the proper folding and assembly of other proteins. Chaperonin 60 is a member of the HSP (heat shock protein) family, which are proteins that are upregulated in response to stressful conditions such as heat shock or oxidative stress.

Chaperonin 60 forms a large complex with a barrel-shaped structure that provides a protected environment for unfolded or misfolded proteins to fold properly. The protein substrate is bound inside the central cavity of the chaperonin complex, and then undergoes a series of conformational changes that facilitate its folding. Chaperonin 60 has been shown to play important roles in mitochondrial protein import, folding, and assembly, as well as in the regulation of apoptosis (programmed cell death).

Defects in chaperonin 60 have been linked to a variety of human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular disease, and cancer.

Macrocyclic lactams are chemical compounds that contain a lactam group (a cyclic amide) and a large ring size of typically 12 or more atoms. They are characterized by their macrocyclic structure, which means they have a large, circular ring of atoms in their molecular structure.

Macrocyclic lactams are important in medicinal chemistry because they can bind to biological targets with high affinity and specificity, making them useful as drugs or drug candidates. They can be found in various natural products, such as certain antibiotics, and can also be synthesized in the laboratory for use in drug discovery and development.

Some examples of macrocyclic lactams include erythromycin, a macrolide antibiotic used to treat bacterial infections, and cyclosporine, an immunosuppressant drug used to prevent organ rejection after transplant surgery.

Benzoquinones are a type of chemical compound that contain a benzene ring (a cyclic arrangement of six carbon atoms) with two ketone functional groups (-C=O) in the 1,4-positions. They exist in two stable forms, namely ortho-benzoquinone and para-benzoquinone, depending on the orientation of the ketone groups relative to each other.

Benzoquinones are important intermediates in various biological processes and are also used in industrial applications such as dyes, pigments, and pharmaceuticals. They can be produced synthetically or obtained naturally from certain plants and microorganisms.

In the medical field, benzoquinones have been studied for their potential therapeutic effects, particularly in the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases. However, they are also known to exhibit toxicity and may cause adverse reactions in some individuals. Therefore, further research is needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and potential risks before they can be safely used as drugs or therapies.

HSP47 (Heat Shock Protein 47) is a type of molecular chaperone that assists in the proper folding and assembly of collagen molecules within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells. It is also known as SERPINH1, which stands for serine protease inhibitor, clade H (heat shock protein 47).

HSP47 binds to procollagen molecules in a highly specific manner and helps facilitate their correct folding and assembly into higher-order structures. Once the collagen molecules are properly assembled, HSP47 dissociates from them and allows for their transport out of the ER and further processing in the Golgi apparatus.

HSP47 is upregulated under conditions of cellular stress, such as heat shock or oxidative stress, which can lead to an accumulation of misfolded proteins within the ER. This upregulation helps to enhance the protein folding capacity of the ER and prevent the aggregation of misfolded proteins, thereby maintaining cellular homeostasis.

Defects in HSP47 function have been implicated in various connective tissue disorders, such as osteogenesis imperfecta and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, which are characterized by abnormal collagen structure and function.

Calreticulin is a multifunctional protein found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells. Its primary function is as a calcium-binding chaperone, helping to ensure proper folding and quality control of newly synthesized glycoproteins in the ER. Calreticulin also plays roles in ER-to-Golgi transport, regulation of ER calcium homeostasis, and acts as a sensor for ER stress. Additionally, it has been implicated in various cellular processes such as adhesion, migration, phagocytosis, and immune response. Defects in calreticulin have been linked to several diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders and cancer.

Chaperonin 10, also known as CPN10 or HSP10 (heat shock protein 10), is a small heat shock protein that functions as a component of the chaperone complex in the mitochondria. It assists in the folding and assembly of proteins, particularly during stressful conditions when protein misfolding is more likely to occur. Chaperonin 10 forms a complex with Chaperonin 60 (CPN60 or HSP60) to facilitate the proper folding of imported mitochondrial proteins. The chaperonin complex provides a protected environment for protein folding, allowing hydrophobic regions to be exposed without aggregating with other unfolded proteins in the cell.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a network of interconnected tubules and sacs that are present in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. It is a continuous membranous organelle that plays a crucial role in the synthesis, folding, modification, and transport of proteins and lipids.

The ER has two main types: rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER). RER is covered with ribosomes, which give it a rough appearance, and is responsible for protein synthesis. On the other hand, SER lacks ribosomes and is involved in lipid synthesis, drug detoxification, calcium homeostasis, and steroid hormone production.

In summary, the endoplasmic reticulum is a vital organelle that functions in various cellular processes, including protein and lipid metabolism, calcium regulation, and detoxification.

HSP110 (heat shock protein 110) is a type of heat shock protein (HSP) that functions as a molecular chaperone, helping to facilitate the proper folding and assembly of other proteins. HSPs are produced by cells in response to stressful conditions, such as high temperature, which can cause proteins to unfold or misfold. By assisting in the refolding of denatured proteins, HSPs help protect cells from damage and promote their survival under stressful conditions.

HSP110 is a member of the HSP70 family of heat shock proteins, which are characterized by their ability to bind and hydrolyze ATP. HSP110 is unique within this family in that it has an extended C-terminal domain that allows it to interact with a wider range of protein substrates. This property, along with its high expression levels in response to stress, makes HSP110 an important player in the cellular stress response.

In addition to their role in protein folding, HSPs have been implicated in various other cellular processes, including protein degradation, signal transduction, and immune function. Dysregulation of HSP expression has been linked to a variety of diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and infectious diseases.

'Escherichia coli (E. coli) proteins' refer to the various types of proteins that are produced and expressed by the bacterium Escherichia coli. These proteins play a critical role in the growth, development, and survival of the organism. They are involved in various cellular processes such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, translation, repair, and regulation.

E. coli is a gram-negative, facultative anaerobe that is commonly found in the intestines of warm-blooded organisms. It is widely used as a model organism in scientific research due to its well-studied genetics, rapid growth, and ability to be easily manipulated in the laboratory. As a result, many E. coli proteins have been identified, characterized, and studied in great detail.

Some examples of E. coli proteins include enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism such as lactase, sucrase, and maltose; proteins involved in DNA replication such as the polymerases, single-stranded binding proteins, and helicases; proteins involved in transcription such as RNA polymerase and sigma factors; proteins involved in translation such as ribosomal proteins, tRNAs, and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases; and regulatory proteins such as global regulators, two-component systems, and transcription factors.

Understanding the structure, function, and regulation of E. coli proteins is essential for understanding the basic biology of this important organism, as well as for developing new strategies for combating bacterial infections and improving industrial processes involving bacteria.

Alpha-crystallins are small heat shock proteins found in the lens of the eye. They are composed of two subunits, alpha-A and alpha-B, which can form homo- or hetero-oligomers. Alpha-crystallins have chaperone-like activity, helping to prevent protein aggregation and maintain transparency of the lens. Additionally, they play a role in maintaining the structural integrity of the lens and protecting it from oxidative stress. Mutations in alpha-crystallin genes have been associated with certain forms of cataracts and other eye diseases.

Adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases) are a group of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate. This reaction releases energy, which is used to drive various cellular processes such as muscle contraction, transport of ions across membranes, and synthesis of proteins and nucleic acids.

ATPases are classified into several types based on their structure, function, and mechanism of action. Some examples include:

1. P-type ATPases: These ATPases form a phosphorylated intermediate during the reaction cycle and are involved in the transport of ions across membranes, such as the sodium-potassium pump and calcium pumps.
2. F-type ATPases: These ATPases are found in mitochondria, chloroplasts, and bacteria, and are responsible for generating a proton gradient across the membrane, which is used to synthesize ATP.
3. V-type ATPases: These ATPases are found in vacuolar membranes and endomembranes, and are involved in acidification of intracellular compartments.
4. A-type ATPases: These ATPases are found in the plasma membrane and are involved in various functions such as cell signaling and ion transport.

Overall, ATPases play a crucial role in maintaining the energy balance of cells and regulating various physiological processes.

Histone chaperones are a group of proteins that play a crucial role in the process of nucleosome assembly and disassembly. They facilitate the transfer of histones, the protein components of nucleosomes, to and from DNA during various cellular processes such as DNA replication, repair, transcription, and chromatin remodeling.

Histone chaperones bind to histones and prevent their nonspecific aggregation or association with DNA. They help in the ordered deposition of histone proteins onto DNA, forming nucleosomes, which are the fundamental units of chromatin structure. Additionally, they assist in the removal of histones from DNA during transcription, DNA repair, and replication. Histone chaperones contribute to the dynamic regulation of chromatin structure and function, thereby playing an essential role in epigenetic regulation and gene expression.

The Heat-Shock Response is a complex and highly conserved stress response mechanism present in virtually all living organisms. It is activated when the cell encounters elevated temperatures or other forms of proteotoxic stress, such as exposure to toxins, radiation, or infectious agents. This response is primarily mediated by a group of proteins known as heat-shock proteins (HSPs) or chaperones, which play crucial roles in protein folding, assembly, transport, and degradation.

The primary function of the Heat-Shock Response is to protect the cell from damage caused by misfolded or aggregated proteins that can accumulate under stress conditions. The activation of this response leads to the rapid transcription and translation of HSP genes, resulting in a significant increase in the intracellular levels of these chaperone proteins. These chaperones then assist in the refolding of denatured proteins or target damaged proteins for degradation via the proteasome or autophagy pathways.

The Heat-Shock Response is critical for maintaining cellular homeostasis and ensuring proper protein function under stress conditions. Dysregulation of this response has been implicated in various diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Protein denaturation is a process in which the native structure of a protein is altered, leading to loss of its biological activity. This can be caused by various factors such as changes in temperature, pH, or exposure to chemicals or radiation. The three-dimensional shape of a protein is crucial for its function, and denaturation causes the protein to lose this shape, resulting in impaired or complete loss of function. Denaturation is often irreversible and can lead to the aggregation of proteins, which can have negative effects on cellular function and can contribute to diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

Small Heat Shock Proteins (sHSPs) are a group of conserved molecular chaperones that play a crucial role in protecting cells from various stress conditions. They are named "heat shock proteins" because their expression is induced by heat shock and other stressful conditions, such as exposure to toxins, radiation, or infection.

Small Heat Shock Proteins are characterized by their low molecular weight, typically ranging between 12-43 kDa, and their ability to form large oligomeric complexes. These proteins function to prevent protein aggregation under stress conditions by binding to exposed hydrophobic regions of partially folded or denatured proteins, thereby preventing irreversible aggregation and promoting protein refolding.

sHSPs have been implicated in various cellular processes, including protein folding, protein degradation, signal transduction, and apoptosis. They are expressed in a wide range of tissues and organisms, from bacteria to humans, highlighting their essential role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Mutations in sHSP genes have been associated with various human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cataracts, and heart disease.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Alpha-Crystallin B chain is a protein that is a component of the eye lens. It is one of the two subunits of the alpha-crystallin protein, which is a major structural protein in the lens and helps to maintain the transparency and refractive properties of the lens. Alpha-Crystallin B chain is produced by the CRYAB gene and has chaperone-like properties, helping to prevent the aggregation of other proteins and contributing to the maintenance of lens clarity. Mutations in the CRYAB gene can lead to various eye disorders, including cataracts and certain types of glaucoma.

Tertiary protein structure refers to the three-dimensional arrangement of all the elements (polypeptide chains) of a single protein molecule. It is the highest level of structural organization and results from interactions between various side chains (R groups) of the amino acids that make up the protein. These interactions, which include hydrogen bonds, ionic bonds, van der Waals forces, and disulfide bridges, give the protein its unique shape and stability, which in turn determines its function. The tertiary structure of a protein can be stabilized by various factors such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain ions. Any changes in these factors can lead to denaturation, where the protein loses its tertiary structure and thus its function.

Chaperonin Containing TCP-1 (CCT) is a protein complex that assists in the folding of other proteins in the cytosol of eukaryotic cells. It is composed of two rings, each containing eight different subunits (designated as CCTα, CCTβ, CCTγ, CCTδ, CCTε, CCTζ, CCTη, and CCTθ or TCP-1, TCP-2, TCP-3, TCP-4, TCP-5, TCP-6, TCP-7, and TCP-8). CCT plays a crucial role in the proper folding of newly synthesized polypeptides and helps maintain protein homeostasis within the cell.

Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins are the proteins that are produced by the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This organism is a single-celled eukaryote that has been widely used as a model organism in scientific research for many years due to its relatively simple genetic makeup and its similarity to higher eukaryotic cells.

The genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been fully sequenced, and it is estimated to contain approximately 6,000 genes that encode proteins. These proteins play a wide variety of roles in the cell, including catalyzing metabolic reactions, regulating gene expression, maintaining the structure of the cell, and responding to environmental stimuli.

Many Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins have human homologs and are involved in similar biological processes, making this organism a valuable tool for studying human disease. For example, many of the proteins involved in DNA replication, repair, and recombination in yeast have human counterparts that are associated with cancer and other diseases. By studying these proteins in yeast, researchers can gain insights into their function and regulation in humans, which may lead to new treatments for disease.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

In a medical context, "hot temperature" is not a standard medical term with a specific definition. However, it is often used in relation to fever, which is a common symptom of illness. A fever is typically defined as a body temperature that is higher than normal, usually above 38°C (100.4°F) for adults and above 37.5-38°C (99.5-101.3°F) for children, depending on the source.

Therefore, when a medical professional talks about "hot temperature," they may be referring to a body temperature that is higher than normal due to fever or other causes. It's important to note that a high environmental temperature can also contribute to an elevated body temperature, so it's essential to consider both the body temperature and the environmental temperature when assessing a patient's condition.

Crystallins are the major proteins found in the lens of the eye in vertebrates. They make up about 90% of the protein content in the lens and are responsible for maintaining the transparency and refractive properties of the lens, which are essential for clear vision. There are two main types of crystallins, alpha (α) and beta/gamma (β/γ), which are further divided into several subtypes. These proteins are highly stable and have a long half-life, which allows them to remain in the lens for an extended period of time. Mutations in crystallin genes have been associated with various eye disorders, including cataracts and certain types of glaucoma.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

Carrier proteins, also known as transport proteins, are a type of protein that facilitates the movement of molecules across cell membranes. They are responsible for the selective and active transport of ions, sugars, amino acids, and other molecules from one side of the membrane to the other, against their concentration gradient. This process requires energy, usually in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate).

Carrier proteins have a specific binding site for the molecule they transport, and undergo conformational changes upon binding, which allows them to move the molecule across the membrane. Once the molecule has been transported, the carrier protein returns to its original conformation, ready to bind and transport another molecule.

Carrier proteins play a crucial role in maintaining the balance of ions and other molecules inside and outside of cells, and are essential for many physiological processes, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and nutrient uptake.

Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) is a high-energy molecule that stores and transports energy within cells. It is the main source of energy for most cellular processes, including muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and protein synthesis. ATP is composed of a base (adenine), a sugar (ribose), and three phosphate groups. The bonds between these phosphate groups contain a significant amount of energy, which can be released when the bond between the second and third phosphate group is broken, resulting in the formation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate. This process is known as hydrolysis and can be catalyzed by various enzymes to drive a wide range of cellular functions. ATP can also be regenerated from ADP through various metabolic pathways, such as oxidative phosphorylation or substrate-level phosphorylation, allowing for the continuous supply of energy to cells.

"Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a scientific name used in the field of microbiology. It refers to a species of yeast that is commonly used in various industrial processes, such as baking and brewing. It's also widely used in scientific research due to its genetic tractability and eukaryotic cellular organization.

However, it does have some relevance to medical fields like medicine and nutrition. For example, certain strains of S. cerevisiae are used as probiotics, which can provide health benefits when consumed. They may help support gut health, enhance the immune system, and even assist in the digestion of certain nutrients.

In summary, "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is a species of yeast with various industrial and potential medical applications.

Peptidylprolyl Isomerase (PPIase) is an enzyme that catalyzes the cis-trans isomerization of peptidyl-prolyl bonds in proteins. This isomerization process, which involves the rotation around a proline bond, is a rate-limiting step in protein folding and can be a significant factor in the development of various diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders and cancer.

PPIases are classified into three families: cyclophilins, FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs), and parvulins. These enzymes play important roles in protein folding, trafficking, and degradation, as well as in signal transduction pathways and the regulation of gene expression.

Inhibitors of PPIases have been developed as potential therapeutic agents for various diseases, including transplant rejection, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. For example, cyclosporine A and FK506 are immunosuppressive drugs that inhibit cyclophilins and FKBPs, respectively, and are used to prevent transplant rejection.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Protein conformation refers to the specific three-dimensional shape that a protein molecule assumes due to the spatial arrangement of its constituent amino acid residues and their associated chemical groups. This complex structure is determined by several factors, including covalent bonds (disulfide bridges), hydrogen bonds, van der Waals forces, and ionic bonds, which help stabilize the protein's unique conformation.

Protein conformations can be broadly classified into two categories: primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures. The primary structure represents the linear sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide chain. The secondary structure arises from local interactions between adjacent amino acid residues, leading to the formation of recurring motifs such as α-helices and β-sheets. Tertiary structure refers to the overall three-dimensional folding pattern of a single polypeptide chain, while quaternary structure describes the spatial arrangement of multiple folded polypeptide chains (subunits) that interact to form a functional protein complex.

Understanding protein conformation is crucial for elucidating protein function, as the specific three-dimensional shape of a protein directly influences its ability to interact with other molecules, such as ligands, nucleic acids, or other proteins. Any alterations in protein conformation due to genetic mutations, environmental factors, or chemical modifications can lead to loss of function, misfolding, aggregation, and disease states like neurodegenerative disorders and cancer.

Protein renaturation is the process of restoring the native, functional structure of a protein that has been denatured due to exposure to external stressors such as changes in temperature, pH, or the addition of chemical agents. Denaturation causes proteins to lose their unique three-dimensional structure, which is essential for their proper function. Renaturation involves slowly removing these stressors and allowing the protein to refold into its original configuration, restoring its biological activity. This process can be facilitated by various techniques, including dialysis, dilution, or the addition of specific chemical chaperones.

Thiosulfate Sulfurtransferase (TST) is an enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a sulfur group from thiosulfate to a range of acceptor molecules. It plays a crucial role in the detoxification of harmful substances and the maintenance of cellular redox balance. TST is also known as Rhodanese, which comes from the Greek word "rhodanos," meaning rose-red, due to the pinkish-red color of the enzyme when it was first isolated.

The systematic medical definition of Thiosulfate Sulfurtransferase is:

A mitochondrial matrix enzyme (EC 2.8.1.1) that catalyzes the transfer of a sulfur atom from thiosulfate to cyanide, forming thiocyanate and sulfite. This reaction serves as a detoxification pathway for cyanide in the body. TST also plays a role in maintaining cellular redox balance by participating in the reduction of oxidized proteins and other molecules.

Molecular models are three-dimensional representations of molecular structures that are used in the field of molecular biology and chemistry to visualize and understand the spatial arrangement of atoms and bonds within a molecule. These models can be physical or computer-generated and allow researchers to study the shape, size, and behavior of molecules, which is crucial for understanding their function and interactions with other molecules.

Physical molecular models are often made up of balls (representing atoms) connected by rods or sticks (representing bonds). These models can be constructed manually using materials such as plastic or wooden balls and rods, or they can be created using 3D printing technology.

Computer-generated molecular models, on the other hand, are created using specialized software that allows researchers to visualize and manipulate molecular structures in three dimensions. These models can be used to simulate molecular interactions, predict molecular behavior, and design new drugs or chemicals with specific properties. Overall, molecular models play a critical role in advancing our understanding of molecular structures and their functions.

Endopeptidase Clp is a type of enzyme found in bacteria that functions to degrade misfolded or unnecessary proteins within the cell. It is part of the ATP-dependent Clp protease family, which are complexes composed of multiple subunits, including the endopeptidase ClpP. These enzymes work together to unfold and break down proteins into smaller peptides or individual amino acids for recycling or removal. Endopeptidase Clp specifically recognizes and cleaves internal peptide bonds within proteins, contributing to protein quality control and maintaining cellular homeostasis in bacteria.

Protein Disulfide-Isomerases (PDIs) are a family of enzymes found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells. They play a crucial role in the folding and maturation of proteins by catalyzing the formation, breakage, and rearrangement of disulfide bonds between cysteine residues in proteins. This process helps to stabilize the three-dimensional structure of proteins and is essential for their proper function. PDIs also have chaperone activity, helping to prevent protein aggregation and assisting in the correct folding of nascent polypeptides. Dysregulation of PDI function has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and diabetes.

Protein transport, in the context of cellular biology, refers to the process by which proteins are actively moved from one location to another within or between cells. This is a crucial mechanism for maintaining proper cell function and regulation.

Intracellular protein transport involves the movement of proteins within a single cell. Proteins can be transported across membranes (such as the nuclear envelope, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, or plasma membrane) via specialized transport systems like vesicles and transport channels.

Intercellular protein transport refers to the movement of proteins from one cell to another, often facilitated by exocytosis (release of proteins in vesicles) and endocytosis (uptake of extracellular substances via membrane-bound vesicles). This is essential for communication between cells, immune response, and other physiological processes.

It's important to note that any disruption in protein transport can lead to various diseases, including neurological disorders, cancer, and metabolic conditions.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

Alpha-Crystallin A Chain is a protein that is part of the alpha-crystallin family, which are small heat shock proteins. These proteins play a role in protecting cells from stress and aggregation of other proteins. Alpha-Crystallin A Chain is found in various tissues, including the eye lens, where it helps maintain lens transparency and prevent cataracts. Mutations in the gene that encodes alpha-Crystallin A Chain have been associated with certain inherited forms of cataracts.

The proteasome endopeptidase complex is a large protein complex found in the cells of eukaryotic organisms, as well as in archaea and some bacteria. It plays a crucial role in the degradation of damaged or unneeded proteins through a process called proteolysis. The proteasome complex contains multiple subunits, including both regulatory and catalytic particles.

The catalytic core of the proteasome is composed of four stacked rings, each containing seven subunits, forming a structure known as the 20S core particle. Three of these rings are made up of beta-subunits that contain the proteolytic active sites, while the fourth ring consists of alpha-subunits that control access to the interior of the complex.

The regulatory particles, called 19S or 11S regulators, cap the ends of the 20S core particle and are responsible for recognizing, unfolding, and translocating targeted proteins into the catalytic chamber. The proteasome endopeptidase complex can cleave peptide bonds in various ways, including hydrolysis of ubiquitinated proteins, which is an essential mechanism for maintaining protein quality control and regulating numerous cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, signal transduction, and stress response.

In summary, the proteasome endopeptidase complex is a crucial intracellular machinery responsible for targeted protein degradation through proteolysis, contributing to various essential regulatory functions in cells.

Quinones are a class of organic compounds that contain a fully conjugated diketone structure. This structure consists of two carbonyl groups (C=O) separated by a double bond (C=C). Quinones can be found in various biological systems and synthetic compounds. They play important roles in many biochemical processes, such as electron transport chains and redox reactions. Some quinones are also known for their antimicrobial and anticancer properties. However, some quinones can be toxic or mutagenic at high concentrations.

Calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) are a diverse group of proteins that have the ability to bind calcium ions (Ca^2+^) with high affinity and specificity. They play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including signal transduction, muscle contraction, neurotransmitter release, and protection against oxidative stress.

The binding of calcium ions to these proteins induces conformational changes that can either activate or inhibit their functions. Some well-known CaBPs include calmodulin, troponin C, S100 proteins, and parvalbumins. These proteins are essential for maintaining calcium homeostasis within cells and for mediating the effects of calcium as a second messenger in various cellular signaling pathways.

In the context of medical and biological sciences, a "binding site" refers to a specific location on a protein, molecule, or cell where another molecule can attach or bind. This binding interaction can lead to various functional changes in the original protein or molecule. The other molecule that binds to the binding site is often referred to as a ligand, which can be a small molecule, ion, or even another protein.

The binding between a ligand and its target binding site can be specific and selective, meaning that only certain ligands can bind to particular binding sites with high affinity. This specificity plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, enzyme catalysis, or drug action.

In the case of drug development, understanding the location and properties of binding sites on target proteins is essential for designing drugs that can selectively bind to these sites and modulate protein function. This knowledge can help create more effective and safer therapeutic options for various diseases.

Temperature, in a medical context, is a measure of the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment. It is usually measured using a thermometer and reported in degrees Celsius (°C), degrees Fahrenheit (°F), or kelvin (K). In the human body, normal core temperature ranges from about 36.5-37.5°C (97.7-99.5°F) when measured rectally, and can vary slightly depending on factors such as time of day, physical activity, and menstrual cycle. Elevated body temperature is a common sign of infection or inflammation, while abnormally low body temperature can indicate hypothermia or other medical conditions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Indolizines" is not a medical term. It is a chemical term that refers to a class of heterocyclic organic compounds which contain a seven-membered ring with two nitrogen atoms and a carbon-carbon double bond. They are used in the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals and natural products, but they are not a medical condition or diagnosis.

Quaternary protein structure refers to the arrangement and interaction of multiple folded protein molecules in a multi-subunit complex. These subunits can be identical or different forms of the same protein or distinctly different proteins that associate to form a functional complex. The quaternary structure is held together by non-covalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonds, ionic bonds, and van der Waals forces. Understanding quaternary structure is crucial for comprehending the function, regulation, and assembly of many protein complexes involved in various cellular processes.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

HSP27, also known as HSPB1 (Heat Shock Protein B1), is a member of the small heat shock protein family. These proteins are characterized by their ability to be upregulated in response to various stressful conditions, including elevated temperatures, oxidative stress, and exposure to toxins. HSP27 functions as a molecular chaperone, helping to prevent protein misfolding and aggregation, thereby maintaining protein homeostasis within the cell. It has been implicated in several cellular processes such as apoptosis, autophagy, and cytoskeletal organization. Additionally, HSP27 has been found to play a role in various pathologies including neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and cardiovascular disorders.

Dimerization is a process in which two molecules, usually proteins or similar structures, bind together to form a larger complex. This can occur through various mechanisms, such as the formation of disulfide bonds, hydrogen bonding, or other non-covalent interactions. Dimerization can play important roles in cell signaling, enzyme function, and the regulation of gene expression.

In the context of medical research and therapy, dimerization is often studied in relation to specific proteins that are involved in diseases such as cancer. For example, some drugs have been developed to target and inhibit the dimerization of certain proteins, with the goal of disrupting their function and slowing or stopping the progression of the disease.

Peptides are short chains of amino acid residues linked by covalent bonds, known as peptide bonds. They are formed when two or more amino acids are joined together through a condensation reaction, which results in the elimination of a water molecule and the formation of an amide bond between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another.

Peptides can vary in length from two to about fifty amino acids, and they are often classified based on their size. For example, dipeptides contain two amino acids, tripeptides contain three, and so on. Oligopeptides typically contain up to ten amino acids, while polypeptides can contain dozens or even hundreds of amino acids.

Peptides play many important roles in the body, including serving as hormones, neurotransmitters, enzymes, and antibiotics. They are also used in medical research and therapeutic applications, such as drug delivery and tissue engineering.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

Post-translational protein processing refers to the modifications and changes that proteins undergo after their synthesis on ribosomes, which are complex molecular machines responsible for protein synthesis. These modifications occur through various biochemical processes and play a crucial role in determining the final structure, function, and stability of the protein.

The process begins with the translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) into a linear polypeptide chain, which is then subjected to several post-translational modifications. These modifications can include:

1. Proteolytic cleavage: The removal of specific segments or domains from the polypeptide chain by proteases, resulting in the formation of mature, functional protein subunits.
2. Chemical modifications: Addition or modification of chemical groups to the side chains of amino acids, such as phosphorylation (addition of a phosphate group), glycosylation (addition of sugar moieties), methylation (addition of a methyl group), acetylation (addition of an acetyl group), and ubiquitination (addition of a ubiquitin protein).
3. Disulfide bond formation: The oxidation of specific cysteine residues within the polypeptide chain, leading to the formation of disulfide bonds between them. This process helps stabilize the three-dimensional structure of proteins, particularly in extracellular environments.
4. Folding and assembly: The acquisition of a specific three-dimensional conformation by the polypeptide chain, which is essential for its function. Chaperone proteins assist in this process to ensure proper folding and prevent aggregation.
5. Protein targeting: The directed transport of proteins to their appropriate cellular locations, such as the nucleus, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, or plasma membrane. This is often facilitated by specific signal sequences within the protein that are recognized and bound by transport machinery.

Collectively, these post-translational modifications contribute to the functional diversity of proteins in living organisms, allowing them to perform a wide range of cellular processes, including signaling, catalysis, regulation, and structural support.

Cyclophilins are a family of proteins that have peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity, which means they help with the folding and functioning of other proteins in cells. They were first identified as binding proteins for the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporine A, hence their name.

Cyclophilins are found in various organisms, including humans, and play important roles in many cellular processes such as signal transduction, protein trafficking, and gene expression. In addition to their role in normal cell function, cyclophilins have also been implicated in several diseases, including viral infections, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders.

In medicine, the most well-known use of cyclophilins is as a target for immunosuppressive drugs used in organ transplantation. Cyclosporine A and its derivatives work by binding to cyclophilins, which inhibits their activity and subsequently suppresses the immune response.

Membrane proteins are a type of protein that are embedded in the lipid bilayer of biological membranes, such as the plasma membrane of cells or the inner membrane of mitochondria. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including:

1. Cell-cell recognition and signaling
2. Transport of molecules across the membrane (selective permeability)
3. Enzymatic reactions at the membrane surface
4. Energy transduction and conversion
5. Mechanosensation and signal transduction

Membrane proteins can be classified into two main categories: integral membrane proteins, which are permanently associated with the lipid bilayer, and peripheral membrane proteins, which are temporarily or loosely attached to the membrane surface. Integral membrane proteins can further be divided into three subcategories based on their topology:

1. Transmembrane proteins, which span the entire width of the lipid bilayer with one or more alpha-helices or beta-barrels.
2. Lipid-anchored proteins, which are covalently attached to lipids in the membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor or other lipid modifications.
3. Monotopic proteins, which are partially embedded in the membrane and have one or more domains exposed to either side of the bilayer.

Membrane proteins are essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and are targets for various therapeutic interventions, including drug development and gene therapy. However, their structural complexity and hydrophobicity make them challenging to study using traditional biochemical methods, requiring specialized techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

Recombinant fusion proteins are artificially created biomolecules that combine the functional domains or properties of two or more different proteins into a single protein entity. They are generated through recombinant DNA technology, where the genes encoding the desired protein domains are linked together and expressed as a single, chimeric gene in a host organism, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells.

The resulting fusion protein retains the functional properties of its individual constituent proteins, allowing for novel applications in research, diagnostics, and therapeutics. For instance, recombinant fusion proteins can be designed to enhance protein stability, solubility, or immunogenicity, making them valuable tools for studying protein-protein interactions, developing targeted therapies, or generating vaccines against infectious diseases or cancer.

Examples of recombinant fusion proteins include:

1. Etaglunatide (ABT-523): A soluble Fc fusion protein that combines the heavy chain fragment crystallizable region (Fc) of an immunoglobulin with the extracellular domain of the human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). This fusion protein functions as a decoy receptor, neutralizing IL-6 and its downstream signaling pathways in rheumatoid arthritis.
2. Etanercept (Enbrel): A soluble TNF receptor p75 Fc fusion protein that binds to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and inhibits its proinflammatory activity, making it a valuable therapeutic option for treating autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriasis.
3. Abatacept (Orencia): A fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) linked to the Fc region of an immunoglobulin, which downregulates T-cell activation and proliferation in autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.
4. Belimumab (Benlysta): A monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) protein, preventing its interaction with the B-cell surface receptor and inhibiting B-cell activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
5. Romiplostim (Nplate): A fusion protein consisting of a thrombopoietin receptor agonist peptide linked to an immunoglobulin Fc region, which stimulates platelet production in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).
6. Darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp): A hyperglycosylated erythropoiesis-stimulating protein that functions as a longer-acting form of recombinant human erythropoietin, used to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease or cancer.
7. Palivizumab (Synagis): A monoclonal antibody directed against the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which prevents RSV infection and is administered prophylactically to high-risk infants during the RSV season.
8. Ranibizumab (Lucentis): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody fragment that binds and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), used in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and other ocular disorders.
9. Cetuximab (Erbitux): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), used in the treatment of colorectal cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
10. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully humanized monoclonal antibody that targets tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease.
11. Bevacizumab (Avastin): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF-A, used in the treatment of various cancers, including colorectal, lung, breast, and kidney cancer.
12. Trastuzumab (Herceptin): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets HER2/neu receptor, used in the treatment of breast cancer.
13. Rituximab (Rituxan): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to CD20 antigen on B cells, used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis.
14. Palivizumab (Synagis): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus, used in the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in high-risk infants.
15. Infliximab (Remicade): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
16. Natalizumab (Tysabri): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to α4β1 integrin, used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease.
17. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis.
18. Golimumab (Simponi): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and ulcerative colitis.
19. Certolizumab pegol (Cimzia): A PEGylated Fab' fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and Crohn's disease.
20. Ustekinumab (Stelara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-12 and IL-23, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease.
21. Secukinumab (Cosentyx): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
22. Ixekizumab (Taltz): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.
23. Brodalumab (Siliq): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17 receptor A, used in the treatment of psoriasis.
24. Sarilumab (Kevzara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
25. Tocilizumab (Actemra): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, giant cell arteritis, and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell-induced cytokine release syndrome.
26. Siltuximab (Sylvant): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment of multicentric Castleman disease.
27. Satralizumab (Enspryng): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6 receptor alpha, used in the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.
28. Sirukumab (Plivensia): A human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Medical Definition of "Multiprotein Complexes" :

Multiprotein complexes are large molecular assemblies composed of two or more proteins that interact with each other to carry out specific cellular functions. These complexes can range from relatively simple dimers or trimers to massive structures containing hundreds of individual protein subunits. They are formed through a process known as protein-protein interaction, which is mediated by specialized regions on the protein surface called domains or motifs.

Multiprotein complexes play critical roles in many cellular processes, including signal transduction, gene regulation, DNA replication and repair, protein folding and degradation, and intracellular transport. The formation of these complexes is often dynamic and regulated in response to various stimuli, allowing for precise control of their function.

Disruption of multiprotein complexes can lead to a variety of diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and infectious diseases. Therefore, understanding the structure, composition, and regulation of these complexes is an important area of research in molecular biology and medicine.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Proteostasis is the process by which cells regulate the proper functioning and folding of proteins within the body to maintain cellular homeostasis. A deficiency in proteostasis refers to an impairment in this regulatory process, leading to the accumulation of misfolded or aggregated proteins. This can result in various diseases, such as neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, and metabolic conditions.

Proteostasis deficiencies can occur due to genetic mutations, environmental factors, or aging, which can affect the function of protein quality control systems, including chaperones, the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and autophagy. These systems are responsible for recognizing and disposing of misfolded proteins, preventing their accumulation and subsequent toxicity.

In summary, proteostasis deficiencies refer to impairments in the regulation of protein homeostasis within cells, leading to the accumulation of misfolded or aggregated proteins and contributing to various diseases.

Physiological stress is a response of the body to a demand or threat that disrupts homeostasis and activates the autonomic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. This results in the release of stress hormones such as adrenaline, cortisol, and noradrenaline, which prepare the body for a "fight or flight" response. Increased heart rate, rapid breathing, heightened sensory perception, and increased alertness are some of the physiological changes that occur during this response. Chronic stress can have negative effects on various bodily functions, including the immune, cardiovascular, and nervous systems.

Protein multimerization refers to the process where multiple protein subunits assemble together to form a complex, repetitive structure called a multimer or oligomer. This can involve the association of identical or similar protein subunits through non-covalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, ionic bonding, and van der Waals forces. The resulting multimeric structures can have various shapes, sizes, and functions, including enzymatic activity, transport, or structural support. Protein multimerization plays a crucial role in many biological processes and is often necessary for the proper functioning of proteins within cells.

Fungal proteins are a type of protein that is specifically produced and present in fungi, which are a group of eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds. These proteins play various roles in the growth, development, and survival of fungi. They can be involved in the structure and function of fungal cells, metabolism, pathogenesis, and other cellular processes. Some fungal proteins can also have important implications for human health, both in terms of their potential use as therapeutic targets and as allergens or toxins that can cause disease.

Fungal proteins can be classified into different categories based on their functions, such as enzymes, structural proteins, signaling proteins, and toxins. Enzymes are proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in fungal cells, while structural proteins provide support and protection for the cell. Signaling proteins are involved in communication between cells and regulation of various cellular processes, and toxins are proteins that can cause harm to other organisms, including humans.

Understanding the structure and function of fungal proteins is important for developing new treatments for fungal infections, as well as for understanding the basic biology of fungi. Research on fungal proteins has led to the development of several antifungal drugs that target specific fungal enzymes or other proteins, providing effective treatment options for a range of fungal diseases. Additionally, further study of fungal proteins may reveal new targets for drug development and help improve our ability to diagnose and treat fungal infections.

Lactalbumin is a protein found in milk, specifically in the whey fraction. It is a globular protein with a molecular weight of around 14,000 daltons and consists of 123 amino acids. Lactalbumin is denatured and coagulates under heat, which makes it useful in cooking and baking as a stabilizer and emulsifier.

In addition to its use as a food ingredient, lactalbumin has also been studied for its potential health benefits. It contains all essential amino acids and is easily digestible, making it a high-quality source of protein. Some research suggests that lactalbumin may have immune-enhancing properties and could potentially be used in the treatment of certain medical conditions. However, more research is needed to confirm these potential benefits.

Periplasmic proteins are a type of protein that are found in the periplasm, which is the compartment between the inner and outer membranes of gram-negative bacteria. This region contains a variety of enzymes and other proteins that play important roles in various cellular processes, including nutrient transport, metabolism, and protection against antibiotics.

Periplasmic proteins are synthesized on the cytoplasmic side of the inner membrane and are then translocated across the membrane into the periplasm through specialized protein channels. Once in the periplasm, these proteins can perform a variety of functions, such as binding to and transporting nutrients, breaking down toxic compounds, or participating in quality control processes that help ensure the proper folding and assembly of other proteins.

Periplasmic proteins are often involved in important bacterial processes, such as the production of antibiotics, the degradation of complex carbohydrates, and the resistance to environmental stresses. As a result, they have attracted interest as potential targets for new antibiotics and other therapeutic agents.

Cytosol refers to the liquid portion of the cytoplasm found within a eukaryotic cell, excluding the organelles and structures suspended in it. It is the site of various metabolic activities and contains a variety of ions, small molecules, and enzymes. The cytosol is where many biochemical reactions take place, including glycolysis, protein synthesis, and the regulation of cellular pH. It is also where some organelles, such as ribosomes and vesicles, are located. In contrast to the cytosol, the term "cytoplasm" refers to the entire contents of a cell, including both the cytosol and the organelles suspended within it.

Protein stability refers to the ability of a protein to maintain its native structure and function under various physiological conditions. It is determined by the balance between forces that promote a stable conformation, such as intramolecular interactions (hydrogen bonds, van der Waals forces, and hydrophobic effects), and those that destabilize it, such as thermal motion, chemical denaturation, and environmental factors like pH and salt concentration. A protein with high stability is more resistant to changes in its structure and function, even under harsh conditions, while a protein with low stability is more prone to unfolding or aggregation, which can lead to loss of function or disease states, such as protein misfolding diseases.

Protein refolding is the process by which a denatured or misfolded protein reverts to its native, functional three-dimensional structure. Proteins are complex molecules that perform a wide range of functions within living organisms. Their function is heavily dependent on their unique three-dimensional shape, which is determined by the specific sequence of amino acids that make up the protein.

When proteins are exposed to certain environmental conditions, such as changes in temperature, pH, or the presence of denaturing agents, they can lose their native conformation and become denatured or misfolded. This can result in the loss of protein function and, in some cases, the formation of aggregates that can be toxic to cells.

Protein refolding is a crucial process for maintaining proper protein function within cells. It involves several steps:

1. Unfolding: The denatured or misfolded protein must first be unfolded into its linear amino acid sequence. This can be accomplished through various methods, such as exposure to chemical denaturants or changes in pH.
2. Renaturation: Once the protein is unfolded, it can begin to refold into its native conformation. This process is often facilitated by chaperone proteins, which help to stabilize the protein and prevent aggregation during the refolding process.
3. Folding: The protein must then fold into its correct three-dimensional structure. This is a complex process that involves the formation of specific bonds between amino acids, as well as the interaction with other molecules in the cell.
4. Quality control: Once the protein has folded, it must be checked for correct folding and function. Misfolded proteins may be targeted for degradation by the cell's quality control mechanisms.

Protein refolding is a critical process that occurs naturally within cells, but it can also be studied in vitro (outside of the cell) using various techniques. Understanding the mechanisms of protein refolding is important for developing therapies for diseases caused by protein misfolding and aggregation, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

Secondary protein structure refers to the local spatial arrangement of amino acid chains in a protein, typically described as regular repeating patterns held together by hydrogen bonds. The two most common types of secondary structures are the alpha-helix (α-helix) and the beta-pleated sheet (β-sheet). In an α-helix, the polypeptide chain twists around itself in a helical shape, with each backbone atom forming a hydrogen bond with the fourth amino acid residue along the chain. This forms a rigid rod-like structure that is resistant to bending or twisting forces. In β-sheets, adjacent segments of the polypeptide chain run parallel or antiparallel to each other and are connected by hydrogen bonds, forming a pleated sheet-like arrangement. These secondary structures provide the foundation for the formation of tertiary and quaternary protein structures, which determine the overall three-dimensional shape and function of the protein.

The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) is a cellular stress response pathway that is activated when the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle responsible for protein folding and processing, becomes overwhelmed with misfolded or unfolded proteins. The UPR is initiated by three ER transmembrane sensors: IRE1, PERK, and ATF6. These sensors detect the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER lumen and transmit signals to the nucleus to induce a variety of adaptive responses aimed at restoring ER homeostasis.

These responses include:

* Transcriptional upregulation of genes encoding chaperones, folding enzymes, and components of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) machinery to enhance protein folding capacity and promote the clearance of misfolded proteins.
* Attenuation of global protein synthesis to reduce the influx of new proteins into the ER.
* Activation of autophagy, a process that helps eliminate damaged organelles and aggregated proteins.

If these adaptive responses are insufficient to restore ER homeostasis, the UPR can also trigger apoptosis, or programmed cell death, as a last resort to eliminate damaged cells and prevent the spread of protein misfolding diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders.

DNA-binding proteins are a type of protein that have the ability to bind to DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), the genetic material of organisms. These proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as regulation of gene expression, DNA replication, repair and recombination.

The binding of DNA-binding proteins to specific DNA sequences is mediated by non-covalent interactions, including electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals forces. The specificity of binding is determined by the recognition of particular nucleotide sequences or structural features of the DNA molecule.

DNA-binding proteins can be classified into several categories based on their structure and function, such as transcription factors, histones, and restriction enzymes. Transcription factors are a major class of DNA-binding proteins that regulate gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences in the promoter region of genes and recruiting other proteins to modulate transcription. Histones are DNA-binding proteins that package DNA into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin structure. Restriction enzymes are DNA-binding proteins that recognize and cleave specific DNA sequences, and are widely used in molecular biology research and biotechnology applications.

Electrophoresis, polyacrylamide gel (EPG) is a laboratory technique used to separate and analyze complex mixtures of proteins or nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) based on their size and electrical charge. This technique utilizes a matrix made of cross-linked polyacrylamide, a type of gel, which provides a stable and uniform environment for the separation of molecules.

In this process:

1. The polyacrylamide gel is prepared by mixing acrylamide monomers with a cross-linking agent (bis-acrylamide) and a catalyst (ammonium persulfate) in the presence of a buffer solution.
2. The gel is then poured into a mold and allowed to polymerize, forming a solid matrix with uniform pore sizes that depend on the concentration of acrylamide used. Higher concentrations result in smaller pores, providing better resolution for separating smaller molecules.
3. Once the gel has set, it is placed in an electrophoresis apparatus containing a buffer solution. Samples containing the mixture of proteins or nucleic acids are loaded into wells on the top of the gel.
4. An electric field is applied across the gel, causing the negatively charged molecules to migrate towards the positive electrode (anode) while positively charged molecules move toward the negative electrode (cathode). The rate of migration depends on the size, charge, and shape of the molecules.
5. Smaller molecules move faster through the gel matrix and will migrate farther from the origin compared to larger molecules, resulting in separation based on size. Proteins and nucleic acids can be selectively stained after electrophoresis to visualize the separated bands.

EPG is widely used in various research fields, including molecular biology, genetics, proteomics, and forensic science, for applications such as protein characterization, DNA fragment analysis, cloning, mutation detection, and quality control of nucleic acid or protein samples.

Hydrolysis is a chemical process, not a medical one. However, it is relevant to medicine and biology.

Hydrolysis is the breakdown of a chemical compound due to its reaction with water, often resulting in the formation of two or more simpler compounds. In the context of physiology and medicine, hydrolysis is a crucial process in various biological reactions, such as the digestion of food molecules like proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Enzymes called hydrolases catalyze these hydrolysis reactions to speed up the breakdown process in the body.

Circular dichroism (CD) is a technique used in physics and chemistry to study the structure of molecules, particularly large biological molecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. It measures the difference in absorption of left-handed and right-handed circularly polarized light by a sample. This difference in absorption can provide information about the three-dimensional structure of the molecule, including its chirality or "handedness."

In more technical terms, CD is a form of spectroscopy that measures the differential absorption of left and right circularly polarized light as a function of wavelength. The CD signal is measured in units of millidegrees (mdeg) and can be positive or negative, depending on the type of chromophore and its orientation within the molecule.

CD spectra can provide valuable information about the secondary and tertiary structure of proteins, as well as the conformation of nucleic acids. For example, alpha-helical proteins typically exhibit a strong positive band near 190 nm and two negative bands at around 208 nm and 222 nm, while beta-sheet proteins show a strong positive band near 195 nm and two negative bands at around 217 nm and 175 nm.

CD spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the structural changes that occur in biological molecules under different conditions, such as temperature, pH, or the presence of ligands or other molecules. It can also be used to monitor the folding and unfolding of proteins, as well as the binding of drugs or other small molecules to their targets.

Anilino Naphthalenesulfonates are a group of compounds that contain both aniline and naphthalene sulfonate components. Aniline is a organic compound with the formula C6H5NH2, and naphthalene sulfonate is the sodium salt of naphthalene-1,5-disulfonic acid.

Anilino Naphthalenesulfonates are commonly used as fluorescent dyes in various applications such as histology, microscopy, and flow cytometry. These compounds exhibit strong fluorescence under ultraviolet light and can be used to label and visualize specific structures or molecules of interest. Examples of Anilino Naphthalenesulfonates include Propidium Iodide, Acridine Orange, and Hoechst 33258.

It is important to note that while these compounds are widely used in research and diagnostic settings, they may also have potential hazards and should be handled with appropriate safety precautions.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

The periplasm is a term used in the field of microbiology, specifically in reference to gram-negative bacteria. It refers to the compartment or region located between the bacterial cell's inner membrane (cytoplasmic membrane) and its outer membrane. This space contains a unique mixture of proteins, ions, and other molecules that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, such as nutrient uptake, waste excretion, and the maintenance of cell shape.

The periplasm is characterized by its peptidoglycan layer, which provides structural support to the bacterial cell and protects it from external pressures. This layer is thinner in gram-negative bacteria compared to gram-positive bacteria, which do not have an outer membrane and thus lack a periplasmic space.

Understanding the periplasmic region of gram-negative bacteria is essential for developing antibiotics and other therapeutic agents that can target specific cellular processes or disrupt bacterial growth and survival.

Transcription factors are proteins that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression by controlling the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA (mRNA). They function by binding to specific DNA sequences, known as response elements, located in the promoter region or enhancer regions of target genes. This binding can either activate or repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the properties and interactions of the particular transcription factor. Transcription factors often act as part of a complex network of regulatory proteins that determine the precise spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development, differentiation, and homeostasis in an organism.

In genetics, sequence alignment is the process of arranging two or more DNA, RNA, or protein sequences to identify regions of similarity or homology between them. This is often done using computational methods to compare the nucleotide or amino acid sequences and identify matching patterns, which can provide insight into evolutionary relationships, functional domains, or potential genetic disorders. The alignment process typically involves adjusting gaps and mismatches in the sequences to maximize the similarity between them, resulting in an aligned sequence that can be visually represented and analyzed.

HSP72, or Heat Shock Protein 72, is a member of the heat shock protein (HSP) family, which are highly conserved proteins found in all living organisms. They function as molecular chaperones, helping to facilitate the proper folding and assembly of other proteins and preventing their aggregation under stressful conditions, such as elevated temperatures, oxidative stress, or inflammation. HSP72 is specifically induced by heat shock and plays a crucial role in protecting cells from various forms of stress-induced damage and promoting cell survival. It also participates in the immune response and has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular disease.

Activating Transcription Factor 6 (ATF6) is a protein that plays a crucial role in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, also known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR is a cellular signaling pathway that is activated when misfolded proteins accumulate in the ER, which can be caused by various stressors such as nutrient deprivation, hypoxia, or infection.

ATF6 is a transcription factor that is normally located in the ER membrane. When ER stress occurs, ATF6 is cleaved and activated, allowing it to translocate to the nucleus where it binds to specific DNA sequences and activates the transcription of genes involved in the UPR. These genes encode proteins that help to restore ER homeostasis by increasing protein folding capacity, reducing protein synthesis, and promoting protein degradation.

ATF6 is also involved in other cellular processes such as inflammation, apoptosis, and autophagy. Dysregulation of the UPR and ATF6 activation has been implicated in various diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, and metabolic diseases.

Proteins are complex, large molecules that play critical roles in the body's functions. They are made up of amino acids, which are organic compounds that are the building blocks of proteins. Proteins are required for the structure, function, and regulation of the body's tissues and organs. They are essential for the growth, repair, and maintenance of body tissues, and they play a crucial role in many biological processes, including metabolism, immune response, and cellular signaling. Proteins can be classified into different types based on their structure and function, such as enzymes, hormones, antibodies, and structural proteins. They are found in various foods, especially animal-derived products like meat, dairy, and eggs, as well as plant-based sources like beans, nuts, and grains.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Rifabutin is an antibiotic drug that belongs to the class of rifamycins. According to the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) database of the National Library of Medicine, Rifabutin is defined as: "A semi-synthetic antibiotic produced from Streptomyces mediterranei and related to rifamycin B. It has iron-binding properties and is used, usually in combination with other antibiotics, to treat tuberculosis. Its antibacterial action is due to inhibition of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity."

Rifabutin is primarily used to prevent and treat Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infections in people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). It may also be used off-label for other bacterial infections, such as tuberculosis, atypical mycobacteria, and Legionella pneumophila.

Rifabutin has a unique chemical structure compared to other rifamycin antibiotics like rifampin and rifapentine. This structural difference results in a longer half-life and better tissue distribution, allowing for once-daily dosing and improved penetration into the central nervous system (CNS).

As with any medication, Rifabutin can have side effects, including gastrointestinal disturbances, rashes, and elevated liver enzymes. Additionally, it is known to interact with several other medications, such as oral contraceptives, anticoagulants, and some anti-seizure drugs, which may require dose adjustments or monitoring for potential interactions.

Substrate specificity in the context of medical biochemistry and enzymology refers to the ability of an enzyme to selectively bind and catalyze a chemical reaction with a particular substrate (or a group of similar substrates) while discriminating against other molecules that are not substrates. This specificity arises from the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, which has evolved to match the shape, charge distribution, and functional groups of its physiological substrate(s).

Substrate specificity is a fundamental property of enzymes that enables them to carry out highly selective chemical transformations in the complex cellular environment. The active site of an enzyme, where the catalysis takes place, has a unique conformation that complements the shape and charge distribution of its substrate(s). This ensures efficient recognition, binding, and conversion of the substrate into the desired product while minimizing unwanted side reactions with other molecules.

Substrate specificity can be categorized as:

1. Absolute specificity: An enzyme that can only act on a single substrate or a very narrow group of structurally related substrates, showing no activity towards any other molecule.
2. Group specificity: An enzyme that prefers to act on a particular functional group or class of compounds but can still accommodate minor structural variations within the substrate.
3. Broad or promiscuous specificity: An enzyme that can act on a wide range of structurally diverse substrates, albeit with varying catalytic efficiencies.

Understanding substrate specificity is crucial for elucidating enzymatic mechanisms, designing drugs that target specific enzymes or pathways, and developing biotechnological applications that rely on the controlled manipulation of enzyme activities.

Inclusion bodies are abnormal, intracellular accumulations or aggregations of various misfolded proteins, protein complexes, or other materials within the cells of an organism. They can be found in various tissues and cell types and are often associated with several pathological conditions, including infectious diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, and genetic diseases.

Inclusion bodies can vary in size, shape, and location depending on the specific disease or condition. Some inclusion bodies have a characteristic appearance under the microscope, such as eosinophilic (pink) staining with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histological stain, while others may require specialized stains or immunohistochemical techniques to identify the specific misfolded proteins involved.

Examples of diseases associated with inclusion bodies include:

1. Infectious diseases: Some viral infections, such as HIV, hepatitis B and C, and herpes simplex virus, can lead to the formation of inclusion bodies within infected cells.
2. Neurodegenerative disorders: Several neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the presence of inclusion bodies, including Alzheimer's disease (amyloid-beta plaques and tau tangles), Parkinson's disease (Lewy bodies), Huntington's disease (Huntingtin aggregates), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (TDP-43 and SOD1 inclusions).
3. Genetic diseases: Certain genetic disorders, such as Danon disease, neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease, and some lysosomal storage disorders, can also present with inclusion bodies due to the accumulation of abnormal proteins or metabolic products within cells.

The exact role of inclusion bodies in disease pathogenesis remains unclear; however, they are often associated with cellular dysfunction, oxidative stress, and increased inflammation, which can contribute to disease progression and neurodegeneration.

HeLa cells are a type of immortalized cell line used in scientific research. They are derived from a cancer that developed in the cervical tissue of Henrietta Lacks, an African-American woman, in 1951. After her death, cells taken from her tumor were found to be capable of continuous division and growth in a laboratory setting, making them an invaluable resource for medical research.

HeLa cells have been used in a wide range of scientific studies, including research on cancer, viruses, genetics, and drug development. They were the first human cell line to be successfully cloned and are able to grow rapidly in culture, doubling their population every 20-24 hours. This has made them an essential tool for many areas of biomedical research.

It is important to note that while HeLa cells have been instrumental in numerous scientific breakthroughs, the story of their origin raises ethical questions about informed consent and the use of human tissue in research.

Solubility is a fundamental concept in pharmaceutical sciences and medicine, which refers to the maximum amount of a substance (solute) that can be dissolved in a given quantity of solvent (usually water) at a specific temperature and pressure. Solubility is typically expressed as mass of solute per volume or mass of solvent (e.g., grams per liter, milligrams per milliliter). The process of dissolving a solute in a solvent results in a homogeneous solution where the solute particles are dispersed uniformly throughout the solvent.

Understanding the solubility of drugs is crucial for their formulation, administration, and therapeutic effectiveness. Drugs with low solubility may not dissolve sufficiently to produce the desired pharmacological effect, while those with high solubility might lead to rapid absorption and short duration of action. Therefore, optimizing drug solubility through various techniques like particle size reduction, salt formation, or solubilization is an essential aspect of drug development and delivery.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that is present in all eukaryotic cells and plays a crucial role in the regulation of various cellular processes, such as protein degradation, DNA repair, and stress response. It is involved in marking proteins for destruction by attaching to them, a process known as ubiquitination. This modification can target proteins for degradation by the proteasome, a large protein complex that breaks down unneeded or damaged proteins in the cell. Ubiquitin also has other functions, such as regulating the localization and activity of certain proteins. The ability of ubiquitin to modify many different proteins and play a role in multiple cellular processes makes it an essential player in maintaining cellular homeostasis.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

Luciferases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of their substrates, leading to the emission of light. This bioluminescent process is often associated with certain species of bacteria, insects, and fish. The term "luciferase" comes from the Latin word "lucifer," which means "light bearer."

The most well-known example of luciferase is probably that found in fireflies, where the enzyme reacts with a compound called luciferin to produce light. This reaction requires the presence of oxygen and ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which provides the energy needed for the reaction to occur.

Luciferases have important applications in scientific research, particularly in the development of sensitive assays for detecting gene expression and protein-protein interactions. By labeling a protein or gene of interest with luciferase, researchers can measure its activity by detecting the light emitted during the enzymatic reaction. This allows for highly sensitive and specific measurements, making luciferases valuable tools in molecular biology and biochemistry.

A precipitin test is a type of immunodiagnostic test used to detect and measure the presence of specific antibodies or antigens in a patient's serum. The test is based on the principle of antigen-antibody interaction, where the addition of an antigen to a solution containing its corresponding antibody results in the formation of an insoluble immune complex known as a precipitin.

In this test, a small amount of the patient's serum is added to a solution containing a known antigen or antibody. If the patient has antibodies or antigens that correspond to the added reagent, they will bind and form a visible precipitate. The size and density of the precipitate can be used to quantify the amount of antibody or antigen present in the sample.

Precipitin tests are commonly used in the diagnosis of various infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders, and allergies. They can also be used in forensic science to identify biological samples. However, they have largely been replaced by more modern immunological techniques such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and radioimmunoassays (RIAs).

Peroxiredoxins (Prx) are a family of peroxidases that play a crucial role in cellular defense against oxidative stress. They catalyze the reduction of hydrogen peroxide, organic hydroperoxides, and peroxynitrite, thereby protecting cells from potentially harmful effects of these reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

Peroxiredoxins are ubiquitously expressed in various cellular compartments, including the cytosol, mitochondria, and nucleus. They contain a conserved catalytic cysteine residue that gets oxidized during the reduction of peroxides, which is then reduced back to its active form by thioredoxins or other reducing agents.

Dysregulation of peroxiredoxin function has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, understanding the role of peroxiredoxins in cellular redox homeostasis is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat oxidative stress-related diseases.

Site-directed mutagenesis is a molecular biology technique used to introduce specific and targeted changes to a specific DNA sequence. This process involves creating a new variant of a gene or a specific region of interest within a DNA molecule by introducing a planned, deliberate change, or mutation, at a predetermined site within the DNA sequence.

The methodology typically involves the use of molecular tools such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, and/or ligases to introduce the desired mutation(s) into a plasmid or other vector containing the target DNA sequence. The resulting modified DNA molecule can then be used to transform host cells, allowing for the production of large quantities of the mutated gene or protein for further study.

Site-directed mutagenesis is a valuable tool in basic research, drug discovery, and biotechnology applications where specific changes to a DNA sequence are required to understand gene function, investigate protein structure/function relationships, or engineer novel biological properties into existing genes or proteins.

Protein unfolding, also known as protein denaturation, refers to the loss of a protein's native structure, leading to a random or disordered conformation. Proteins are complex molecules that fold into specific three-dimensional shapes, allowing them to perform their biological functions. Various factors, such as heat, changes in pH, chemical denaturants, or mechanical forces, can disrupt the delicate balance of interactions that maintain this folded structure, causing the protein to unfold. Unfolded proteins may lose their functionality and can aggregate, forming insoluble aggregates, which can be harmful to cells and contribute to various diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders.

The crystalline lens is a biconvex transparent structure in the eye that helps to refract (bend) light rays and focus them onto the retina. It is located behind the iris and pupil and is suspended by small fibers called zonules that connect it to the ciliary body. The lens can change its shape to accommodate and focus on objects at different distances, a process known as accommodation. With age, the lens may become cloudy or opaque, leading to cataracts.

Protein interaction domains and motifs refer to specific regions or sequences within proteins that are involved in mediating interactions between two or more proteins. These elements can be classified into two main categories: domains and motifs.

Domains are structurally conserved regions of a protein that can fold independently and perform specific functions, such as binding to other molecules like DNA, RNA, or other proteins. They typically range from 25 to 500 amino acids in length and can be found in multiple copies within a single protein or shared among different proteins.

Motifs, on the other hand, are shorter sequences of 3-10 amino acids that mediate more localized interactions with other molecules. Unlike domains, motifs may not have well-defined structures and can be found in various contexts within a protein.

Together, these protein interaction domains and motifs play crucial roles in many biological processes, including signal transduction, gene regulation, enzyme function, and protein complex formation. Understanding the specificity and dynamics of these interactions is essential for elucidating cellular functions and developing therapeutic strategies.

Glycosylation is the enzymatic process of adding a sugar group, or glycan, to a protein, lipid, or other organic molecule. This post-translational modification plays a crucial role in modulating various biological functions, such as protein stability, trafficking, and ligand binding. The structure and composition of the attached glycans can significantly influence the functional properties of the modified molecule, contributing to cell-cell recognition, signal transduction, and immune response regulation. Abnormal glycosylation patterns have been implicated in several disease states, including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis is a type of electrophoretic technique used in the separation and analysis of complex protein mixtures. This method combines two types of electrophoresis – isoelectric focusing (IEF) and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) – to separate proteins based on their unique physical and chemical properties in two dimensions.

In the first dimension, IEF separates proteins according to their isoelectric points (pI), which is the pH at which a protein carries no net electrical charge. The proteins are focused into narrow zones along a pH gradient established within a gel strip. In the second dimension, SDS-PAGE separates the proteins based on their molecular weights by applying an electric field perpendicular to the first dimension.

The separated proteins form distinct spots on the 2D gel, which can be visualized using various staining techniques. The resulting protein pattern provides valuable information about the composition and modifications of the protein mixture, enabling researchers to identify and compare different proteins in various samples. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis is widely used in proteomics research, biomarker discovery, and quality control in protein production.

COS cells are a type of cell line that are commonly used in molecular biology and genetic research. The name "COS" is an acronym for "CV-1 in Origin," as these cells were originally derived from the African green monkey kidney cell line CV-1. COS cells have been modified through genetic engineering to express high levels of a protein called SV40 large T antigen, which allows them to efficiently take up and replicate exogenous DNA.

There are several different types of COS cells that are commonly used in research, including COS-1, COS-3, and COS-7 cells. These cells are widely used for the production of recombinant proteins, as well as for studies of gene expression, protein localization, and signal transduction.

It is important to note that while COS cells have been a valuable tool in scientific research, they are not without their limitations. For example, because they are derived from monkey kidney cells, there may be differences in the way that human genes are expressed or regulated in these cells compared to human cells. Additionally, because COS cells express SV40 large T antigen, they may have altered cell cycle regulation and other phenotypic changes that could affect experimental results. Therefore, it is important to carefully consider the choice of cell line when designing experiments and interpreting results.

Tunicamycin is not a medical condition or disease, but rather a bacterial antibiotic and a research tool used in biochemistry and cell biology. It is produced by certain species of bacteria, including Streptomyces lysosuperificus and Streptomyces chartreusis.

Tunicamycin works by inhibiting the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in the biosynthesis of N-linked glycoproteins, which are complex carbohydrates that are attached to proteins during their synthesis. This leads to the accumulation of misfolded proteins and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which can ultimately result in cell death.

In medical research, tunicamycin is often used to study the role of N-linked glycoproteins in various biological processes, including protein folding, quality control, and trafficking. It has also been explored as a potential therapeutic agent for cancer and other diseases, although its use as a drug is limited by its toxicity to normal cells.

Immunoprecipitation (IP) is a research technique used in molecular biology and immunology to isolate specific antigens or antibodies from a mixture. It involves the use of an antibody that recognizes and binds to a specific antigen, which is then precipitated out of solution using various methods, such as centrifugation or chemical cross-linking.

In this technique, an antibody is first incubated with a sample containing the antigen of interest. The antibody specifically binds to the antigen, forming an immune complex. This complex can then be captured by adding protein A or G agarose beads, which bind to the constant region of the antibody. The beads are then washed to remove any unbound proteins, leaving behind the precipitated antigen-antibody complex.

Immunoprecipitation is a powerful tool for studying protein-protein interactions, post-translational modifications, and signal transduction pathways. It can also be used to detect and quantify specific proteins in biological samples, such as cells or tissues, and to identify potential biomarkers of disease.

Mitochondria are specialized structures located inside cells that convert the energy from food into ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is the primary form of energy used by cells. They are often referred to as the "powerhouses" of the cell because they generate most of the cell's supply of chemical energy. Mitochondria are also involved in various other cellular processes, such as signaling, differentiation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death).

Mitochondria have their own DNA, known as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is inherited maternally. This means that mtDNA is passed down from the mother to her offspring through the egg cells. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to a variety of diseases and conditions, including neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, and aging.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Gene deletion is a type of mutation where a segment of DNA, containing one or more genes, is permanently lost or removed from a chromosome. This can occur due to various genetic mechanisms such as homologous recombination, non-homologous end joining, or other types of genomic rearrangements.

The deletion of a gene can have varying effects on the organism, depending on the function of the deleted gene and its importance for normal physiological processes. If the deleted gene is essential for survival, the deletion may result in embryonic lethality or developmental abnormalities. However, if the gene is non-essential or has redundant functions, the deletion may not have any noticeable effects on the organism's phenotype.

Gene deletions can also be used as a tool in genetic research to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes. For example, researchers may use gene deletion techniques to create genetically modified animal models to investigate the impact of gene deletion on disease progression or development.

"Plant proteins" refer to the proteins that are derived from plant sources. These can include proteins from legumes such as beans, lentils, and peas, as well as proteins from grains like wheat, rice, and corn. Other sources of plant proteins include nuts, seeds, and vegetables.

Plant proteins are made up of individual amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. While animal-based proteins typically contain all of the essential amino acids that the body needs to function properly, many plant-based proteins may be lacking in one or more of these essential amino acids. However, by consuming a variety of plant-based foods throughout the day, it is possible to get all of the essential amino acids that the body needs from plant sources alone.

Plant proteins are often lower in calories and saturated fat than animal proteins, making them a popular choice for those following a vegetarian or vegan diet, as well as those looking to maintain a healthy weight or reduce their risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. Additionally, plant proteins have been shown to have a number of health benefits, including improving gut health, reducing inflammation, and supporting muscle growth and repair.

Tacrolimus binding proteins, also known as FK506 binding proteins (FKBPs), are a group of intracellular proteins that bind to the immunosuppressive drug tacrolimus (also known as FK506) and play a crucial role in its mechanism of action. Tacrolimus is primarily used in organ transplantation to prevent rejection of the transplanted organ.

FKBPs are a family of peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases (PPIases) that catalyze the conversion of proline residues from their cis to trans conformations in proteins, thereby regulating protein folding and function. FKBP12, a member of this family, has a high affinity for tacrolimus and forms a complex with it upon entry into the cell.

The formation of the tacrolimus-FKBP12 complex inhibits calcineurin, a serine/threonine phosphatase that plays a critical role in T-cell activation. Calcineurin inhibition prevents the dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells), thereby blocking the expression of genes involved in T-cell activation, proliferation, and cytokine production.

In summary, tacrolimus binding proteins are intracellular proteins that bind to tacrolimus and inhibit calcineurin, leading to the suppression of T-cell activation and immune response, which is essential in organ transplantation and other immunological disorders.

Macromolecular substances, also known as macromolecules, are large, complex molecules made up of repeating subunits called monomers. These substances are formed through polymerization, a process in which many small molecules combine to form a larger one. Macromolecular substances can be naturally occurring, such as proteins, DNA, and carbohydrates, or synthetic, such as plastics and synthetic fibers.

In the context of medicine, macromolecular substances are often used in the development of drugs and medical devices. For example, some drugs are designed to bind to specific macromolecules in the body, such as proteins or DNA, in order to alter their function and produce a therapeutic effect. Additionally, macromolecular substances may be used in the creation of medical implants, such as artificial joints and heart valves, due to their strength and durability.

It is important for healthcare professionals to have an understanding of macromolecular substances and how they function in the body, as this knowledge can inform the development and use of medical treatments.

Gel chromatography is a type of liquid chromatography that separates molecules based on their size or molecular weight. It uses a stationary phase that consists of a gel matrix made up of cross-linked polymers, such as dextran, agarose, or polyacrylamide. The gel matrix contains pores of various sizes, which allow smaller molecules to penetrate deeper into the matrix while larger molecules are excluded.

In gel chromatography, a mixture of molecules is loaded onto the top of the gel column and eluted with a solvent that moves down the column by gravity or pressure. As the sample components move down the column, they interact with the gel matrix and get separated based on their size. Smaller molecules can enter the pores of the gel and take longer to elute, while larger molecules are excluded from the pores and elute more quickly.

Gel chromatography is commonly used to separate and purify proteins, nucleic acids, and other biomolecules based on their size and molecular weight. It is also used in the analysis of polymers, colloids, and other materials with a wide range of applications in chemistry, biology, and medicine.

Immunoblotting, also known as western blotting, is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology and immunogenetics to detect and quantify specific proteins in a complex mixture. This technique combines the electrophoretic separation of proteins by gel electrophoresis with their detection using antibodies that recognize specific epitopes (protein fragments) on the target protein.

The process involves several steps: first, the protein sample is separated based on size through sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Next, the separated proteins are transferred onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric field. The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies.

After blocking, the membrane is incubated with a primary antibody that specifically recognizes the target protein. Following this, the membrane is washed to remove unbound primary antibodies and then incubated with a secondary antibody conjugated to an enzyme such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or alkaline phosphatase (AP). The enzyme catalyzes a colorimetric or chemiluminescent reaction that allows for the detection of the target protein.

Immunoblotting is widely used in research and clinical settings to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and disease biomarkers. It provides high specificity and sensitivity, making it a valuable tool for identifying and quantifying proteins in various biological samples.

A plasmid is a small, circular, double-stranded DNA molecule that is separate from the chromosomal DNA of a bacterium or other organism. Plasmids are typically not essential for the survival of the organism, but they can confer beneficial traits such as antibiotic resistance or the ability to degrade certain types of pollutants.

Plasmids are capable of replicating independently of the chromosomal DNA and can be transferred between bacteria through a process called conjugation. They often contain genes that provide resistance to antibiotics, heavy metals, and other environmental stressors. Plasmids have also been engineered for use in molecular biology as cloning vectors, allowing scientists to replicate and manipulate specific DNA sequences.

Plasmids are important tools in genetic engineering and biotechnology because they can be easily manipulated and transferred between organisms. They have been used to produce vaccines, diagnostic tests, and genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for various applications, including agriculture, medicine, and industry.

Ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) are complexes composed of ribonucleic acid (RNA) and proteins. They play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including gene expression, RNA processing, transport, stability, and degradation. Different types of RNPs exist, such as ribosomes, spliceosomes, and signal recognition particles, each having specific functions in the cell.

Ribosomes are large RNP complexes responsible for protein synthesis, where messenger RNA (mRNA) is translated into proteins. They consist of two subunits: a smaller subunit containing ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and proteins that recognize the start codon on mRNA, and a larger subunit with rRNA and proteins that facilitate peptide bond formation during translation.

Spliceosomes are dynamic RNP complexes involved in pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing, where introns (non-coding sequences) are removed, and exons (coding sequences) are joined together to form mature mRNA. Spliceosomes consist of five small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs), each containing a specific small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and several proteins, as well as numerous additional proteins.

Other RNP complexes include signal recognition particles (SRPs), which are responsible for targeting secretory and membrane proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum during translation, and telomerase, an enzyme that maintains the length of telomeres (the protective ends of chromosomes) by adding repetitive DNA sequences using its built-in RNA component.

In summary, ribonucleoproteins are essential complexes in the cell that participate in various aspects of RNA metabolism and protein synthesis.

Neurodegenerative diseases are a group of disorders characterized by progressive and persistent loss of neuronal structure and function, often leading to cognitive decline, functional impairment, and ultimately death. These conditions are associated with the accumulation of abnormal protein aggregates, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and genetic mutations in the brain. Examples of neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), and Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). The underlying causes and mechanisms of these diseases are not fully understood, and there is currently no cure for most neurodegenerative disorders. Treatment typically focuses on managing symptoms and slowing disease progression.

Ubiquitin-protein ligases, also known as E3 ubiquitin ligases, are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the ubiquitination process. Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification where ubiquitin molecules are attached to specific target proteins, marking them for degradation by the proteasome or for other regulatory functions.

Ubiquitin-protein ligases catalyze the final step in this process by binding to both the ubiquitin protein and the target protein, facilitating the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme to the target protein. There are several different types of ubiquitin-protein ligases, each with their own specificity for particular target proteins and regulatory functions.

Ubiquitin-protein ligases have been implicated in various cellular processes such as protein degradation, DNA repair, signal transduction, and regulation of the cell cycle. Dysregulation of ubiquitination has been associated with several diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and inflammatory responses. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of ubiquitin-protein ligases is an important area of research in biology and medicine.

X-ray crystallography is a technique used in structural biology to determine the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms in a crystal lattice. In this method, a beam of X-rays is directed at a crystal and diffracts, or spreads out, into a pattern of spots called reflections. The intensity and angle of each reflection are measured and used to create an electron density map, which reveals the position and type of atoms in the crystal. This information can be used to determine the molecular structure of a compound, including its shape, size, and chemical bonds. X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for understanding the structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

Prions are misfolded proteins that can induce other normal proteins to also adopt the misfolded shape, leading to the formation of aggregates. These abnormal prion protein aggregates are associated with a group of progressive neurodegenerative diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Examples of TSEs include bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or "mad cow disease") in cattle, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans, and scrapie in sheep. The misfolded prion proteins are resistant to degradation by proteases, which contributes to their accumulation and subsequent neuronal damage, ultimately resulting in spongiform degeneration of the brain and other neurological symptoms associated with TSEs.

Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is a chemical compound that plays a crucial role in energy transfer within cells. It is a nucleotide, which consists of a adenosine molecule (a sugar molecule called ribose attached to a nitrogenous base called adenine) and two phosphate groups.

In the cell, ADP functions as an intermediate in the conversion of energy from one form to another. When a high-energy phosphate bond in ADP is broken, energy is released and ADP is converted to adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which serves as the main energy currency of the cell. Conversely, when ATP donates a phosphate group to another molecule, it is converted back to ADP, releasing energy for the cell to use.

ADP also plays a role in blood clotting and other physiological processes. In the coagulation cascade, ADP released from damaged red blood cells can help activate platelets and initiate the formation of a blood clot.

Protein biosynthesis is the process by which cells generate new proteins. It involves two major steps: transcription and translation. Transcription is the process of creating a complementary RNA copy of a sequence of DNA. This RNA copy, or messenger RNA (mRNA), carries the genetic information to the site of protein synthesis, the ribosome. During translation, the mRNA is read by transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules, which bring specific amino acids to the ribosome based on the sequence of nucleotides in the mRNA. The ribosome then links these amino acids together in the correct order to form a polypeptide chain, which may then fold into a functional protein. Protein biosynthesis is essential for the growth and maintenance of all living organisms.

Catarrhini is a taxonomic group within the order Primates, which includes Old World monkeys, apes, and humans. This group is defined by several distinct anatomical features, most notably the presence of a specific type of nose and throat structure that results in a downward-facing nostril and a narrow nasopharynx.

The term "catarrhine" comes from the Greek words "kata," meaning "downwards," and "rhis," meaning "nose." This refers to the distinctive shape of the nose and throat, which is different from that of New World monkeys (Platyrrhini), which have a wider nasopharynx and outward-facing nostrils.

Other features that distinguish Catarrhini from other primates include a more complex brain, a greater reliance on color vision, and a more varied diet that includes both plants and animals. Within the Catarrhini group, there are two main subgroups: Cercopithecoidea (Old World monkeys) and Hominoidea (apes and humans).

Overall, the medical definition of "Catarrhini" refers to a specific taxonomic group within the order Primates that includes Old World monkeys, apes, and humans, and is characterized by distinct anatomical features such as downward-facing nostrils and a narrow nasopharynx.

The rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) is a type of organelle found in eukaryotic cells, which are characterized by the presence of ribosomes on their cytoplasmic surface. These ribosomes give the RER a "rough" appearance and are responsible for the synthesis of proteins that are destined to be exported from the cell or targeted to various organelles within the cell.

The RER is involved in several important cellular processes, including:

1. Protein folding and modification: Once proteins are synthesized by ribosomes on the RER, they are transported into the lumen of the RER where they undergo folding and modifications such as glycosylation.
2. Quality control: The RER plays a crucial role in ensuring that only properly folded and modified proteins are transported to their final destinations within the cell or exported from the cell. Misfolded or improperly modified proteins are retained within the RER and targeted for degradation.
3. Transport: Proteins that are synthesized on the RER are packaged into vesicles and transported to the Golgi apparatus, where they undergo further modifications and sorting before being transported to their final destinations.

Overall, the rough endoplasmic reticulum is a critical organelle for protein synthesis, folding, modification, and transport in eukaryotic cells.

Fluorescence spectrometry is a type of analytical technique used to investigate the fluorescent properties of a sample. It involves the measurement of the intensity of light emitted by a substance when it absorbs light at a specific wavelength and then re-emits it at a longer wavelength. This process, known as fluorescence, occurs because the absorbed energy excites electrons in the molecules of the substance to higher energy states, and when these electrons return to their ground state, they release the excess energy as light.

Fluorescence spectrometry typically measures the emission spectrum of a sample, which is a plot of the intensity of emitted light versus the wavelength of emission. This technique can be used to identify and quantify the presence of specific fluorescent molecules in a sample, as well as to study their photophysical properties.

Fluorescence spectrometry has many applications in fields such as biochemistry, environmental science, and materials science. For example, it can be used to detect and measure the concentration of pollutants in water samples, to analyze the composition of complex biological mixtures, or to study the properties of fluorescent nanomaterials.

Calorimetry is the measurement and study of heat transfer, typically using a device called a calorimeter. In the context of medicine and physiology, calorimetry can be used to measure heat production or dissipation in the body, which can provide insight into various bodily functions and metabolic processes.

There are different types of calorimeters used for medical research and clinical applications, including direct and indirect calorimeters. Direct calorimetry measures the heat produced directly by the body, while indirect calorimetry estimates heat production based on oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production rates. Indirect calorimetry is more commonly used in clinical settings to assess energy expenditure and metabolic rate in patients with various medical conditions or during specific treatments, such as critical illness, surgery, or weight management programs.

In summary, calorimetry in a medical context refers to the measurement of heat exchange within the body or between the body and its environment, which can offer valuable information for understanding metabolic processes and developing personalized treatment plans.

Mutagenesis is the process by which the genetic material (DNA or RNA) of an organism is changed in a way that can alter its phenotype, or observable traits. These changes, known as mutations, can be caused by various factors such as chemicals, radiation, or viruses. Some mutations may have no effect on the organism, while others can cause harm, including diseases and cancer. Mutagenesis is a crucial area of study in genetics and molecular biology, with implications for understanding evolution, genetic disorders, and the development of new medical treatments.

Hydrophobic interactions: These are the interactions that occur between non-polar molecules or groups of atoms in an aqueous environment, leading to their association or aggregation. The term "hydrophobic" means "water-fearing" and describes the tendency of non-polar substances to repel water. When non-polar molecules or groups are placed in water, they tend to clump together to minimize contact with the polar water molecules. These interactions are primarily driven by the entropy increase of the system as a whole, rather than energy minimization. Hydrophobic interactions play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as protein folding, membrane formation, and molecular self-assembly.

Hydrophilic interactions: These are the interactions that occur between polar molecules or groups of atoms and water molecules. The term "hydrophilic" means "water-loving" and describes the attraction of polar substances to water. When polar molecules or groups are placed in water, they can form hydrogen bonds with the surrounding water molecules, which helps solvate them. Hydrophilic interactions contribute to the stability and functionality of various biological systems, such as protein structure, ion transport across membranes, and enzyme catalysis.

Genetic transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is used to create a complementary RNA molecule. This process is the first step in gene expression, where the genetic code in DNA is converted into a form that can be used to produce proteins or functional RNAs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase binds to the DNA template strand and reads the sequence of nucleotide bases. As it moves along the template, it adds complementary RNA nucleotides to the growing RNA chain, creating a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to the DNA template strand. Once transcription is complete, the RNA molecule may undergo further processing before it can be translated into protein or perform its functional role in the cell.

Transcription can be either "constitutive" or "regulated." Constitutive transcription occurs at a relatively constant rate and produces essential proteins that are required for basic cellular functions. Regulated transcription, on the other hand, is subject to control by various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing cells to respond to changing environmental conditions or developmental cues.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

Protein interaction mapping is a research approach used to identify and characterize the physical interactions between different proteins within a cell or organism. This process often involves the use of high-throughput experimental techniques, such as yeast two-hybrid screening, mass spectrometry-based approaches, or protein fragment complementation assays, to detect and quantify the binding affinities of protein pairs. The resulting data is then used to construct a protein interaction network, which can provide insights into functional relationships between proteins, help elucidate cellular pathways, and inform our understanding of biological processes in health and disease.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "peas" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Peas are a type of legume that is commonly consumed as a vegetable. They are rich in nutrients such as protein, fiber, vitamin C, and vitamin K. If you have any questions about the health benefits or potential risks of consuming peas, I would be happy to try to help with that.

A Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) in the context of medicinal chemistry and pharmacology refers to the relationship between the chemical structure of a drug or molecule and its biological activity or effect on a target protein, cell, or organism. SAR studies aim to identify patterns and correlations between structural features of a compound and its ability to interact with a specific biological target, leading to a desired therapeutic response or undesired side effects.

By analyzing the SAR, researchers can optimize the chemical structure of lead compounds to enhance their potency, selectivity, safety, and pharmacokinetic properties, ultimately guiding the design and development of novel drugs with improved efficacy and reduced toxicity.

Amino acid isomerases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of one amino acid stereoisomer to another. These enzymes play a crucial role in the metabolism and biosynthesis of amino acids, which are the building blocks of proteins.

Amino acids can exist in two forms, called L- and D-stereoisomers, based on the spatial arrangement of their constituent atoms around a central carbon atom. While most naturally occurring amino acids are of the L-configuration, some D-amino acids are also found in certain proteins and peptides, particularly in bacteria and lower organisms.

Amino acid isomerases can convert one stereoisomer to another by breaking and reforming chemical bonds in a process that requires energy. This conversion can be important for the proper functioning of various biological processes, such as protein synthesis, neurotransmitter metabolism, and immune response.

Examples of amino acid isomerases include proline racemase, which catalyzes the interconversion of L-proline and D-proline, and serine hydroxymethyltransferase, which converts L-serine to D-serine. These enzymes are essential for maintaining the balance of amino acids in living organisms and have potential therapeutic applications in various diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders and cancer.

Transfection is a term used in molecular biology that refers to the process of deliberately introducing foreign genetic material (DNA, RNA or artificial gene constructs) into cells. This is typically done using chemical or physical methods, such as lipofection or electroporation. Transfection is widely used in research and medical settings for various purposes, including studying gene function, producing proteins, developing gene therapies, and creating genetically modified organisms. It's important to note that transfection is different from transduction, which is the process of introducing genetic material into cells using viruses as vectors.

A peptide fragment is a short chain of amino acids that is derived from a larger peptide or protein through various biological or chemical processes. These fragments can result from the natural breakdown of proteins in the body during regular physiological processes, such as digestion, or they can be produced experimentally in a laboratory setting for research or therapeutic purposes.

Peptide fragments are often used in research to map the structure and function of larger peptides and proteins, as well as to study their interactions with other molecules. In some cases, peptide fragments may also have biological activity of their own and can be developed into drugs or diagnostic tools. For example, certain peptide fragments derived from hormones or neurotransmitters may bind to receptors in the body and mimic or block the effects of the full-length molecule.

Cell cycle proteins are a group of regulatory proteins that control the progression of the cell cycle, which is the series of events that take place in a eukaryotic cell leading to its division and duplication. These proteins can be classified into several categories based on their functions during different stages of the cell cycle.

The major groups of cell cycle proteins include:

1. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs): CDKs are serine/threonine protein kinases that regulate key transitions in the cell cycle. They require binding to a regulatory subunit called cyclin to become active. Different CDK-cyclin complexes are activated at different stages of the cell cycle.
2. Cyclins: Cyclins are a family of regulatory proteins that bind and activate CDKs. Their levels fluctuate throughout the cell cycle, with specific cyclins expressed during particular phases. For example, cyclin D is important for the G1 to S phase transition, while cyclin B is required for the G2 to M phase transition.
3. CDK inhibitors (CKIs): CKIs are regulatory proteins that bind to and inhibit CDKs, thereby preventing their activation. CKIs can be divided into two main families: the INK4 family and the Cip/Kip family. INK4 family members specifically inhibit CDK4 and CDK6, while Cip/Kip family members inhibit a broader range of CDKs.
4. Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C): APC/C is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets specific proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. During the cell cycle, APC/C regulates the metaphase to anaphase transition and the exit from mitosis by targeting securin and cyclin B for degradation.
5. Other regulatory proteins: Several other proteins play crucial roles in regulating the cell cycle, such as p53, a transcription factor that responds to DNA damage and arrests the cell cycle, and the polo-like kinases (PLKs), which are involved in various aspects of mitosis.

Overall, cell cycle proteins work together to ensure the proper progression of the cell cycle, maintain genomic stability, and prevent uncontrolled cell growth, which can lead to cancer.

Isomerases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the interconversion of isomers of a single molecule. They do this by rearranging atoms within a molecule to form a new structural arrangement or isomer. Isomerases can act on various types of chemical bonds, including carbon-carbon and carbon-oxygen bonds.

There are several subclasses of isomerases, including:

1. Racemases and epimerases: These enzymes interconvert stereoisomers, which are molecules that have the same molecular formula but different spatial arrangements of their atoms in three-dimensional space.
2. Cis-trans isomerases: These enzymes interconvert cis and trans isomers, which differ in the arrangement of groups on opposite sides of a double bond.
3. Intramolecular oxidoreductases: These enzymes catalyze the transfer of electrons within a single molecule, resulting in the formation of different isomers.
4. Mutases: These enzymes catalyze the transfer of functional groups within a molecule, resulting in the formation of different isomers.
5. Tautomeres: These enzymes catalyze the interconversion of tautomers, which are isomeric forms of a molecule that differ in the location of a movable hydrogen atom and a double bond.

Isomerases play important roles in various biological processes, including metabolism, signaling, and regulation.

Amino acid motifs are recurring patterns or sequences of amino acids in a protein molecule. These motifs can be identified through various sequence analysis techniques and often have functional or structural significance. They can be as short as two amino acids in length, but typically contain at least three to five residues.

Some common examples of amino acid motifs include:

1. Active site motifs: These are specific sequences of amino acids that form the active site of an enzyme and participate in catalyzing chemical reactions. For example, the catalytic triad in serine proteases consists of three residues (serine, histidine, and aspartate) that work together to hydrolyze peptide bonds.
2. Signal peptide motifs: These are sequences of amino acids that target proteins for secretion or localization to specific organelles within the cell. For example, a typical signal peptide consists of a positively charged n-region, a hydrophobic h-region, and a polar c-region that directs the protein to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane for translocation.
3. Zinc finger motifs: These are structural domains that contain conserved sequences of amino acids that bind zinc ions and play important roles in DNA recognition and regulation of gene expression.
4. Transmembrane motifs: These are sequences of hydrophobic amino acids that span the lipid bilayer of cell membranes and anchor transmembrane proteins in place.
5. Phosphorylation sites: These are specific serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues that can be phosphorylated by protein kinases to regulate protein function.

Understanding amino acid motifs is important for predicting protein structure and function, as well as for identifying potential drug targets in disease-associated proteins.

'Artemia' is a genus of aquatic branchiopod crustaceans, also known as brine shrimp. They are commonly found in saltwater environments such as salt lakes and highly saline ponds. Artemia are known for their ability to produce cysts (also called "resting eggs") that can survive extreme environmental conditions, making them an important organism in research related to survival in harsh environments and space exploration.

In a medical context, Artemia is not typically used as a term but may be referenced in scientific studies related to biology, genetics, or astrobiology. The compounds derived from Artemia, such as astaxanthin and other carotenoids, have been studied for their potential health benefits, including antioxidant properties and support for eye and heart health. However, these applications are still under research and not yet considered part of mainstream medical practice.

ATP-dependent proteases are a type of protein complex that play a crucial role in maintaining cellular homeostasis by breaking down damaged or misfolded proteins. They use the energy from ATP (adenosine triphosphate) hydrolysis to unfold and degrade these proteins into smaller peptides or individual amino acids, which can then be recycled or disposed of by the cell.

These proteases are essential for a variety of cellular processes, including protein quality control, regulation of cell signaling pathways, and clearance of damaged organelles. They are also involved in various cellular responses to stress, such as the unfolded protein response (UPR) and autophagy.

There are several different types of ATP-dependent proteases, including the 26S proteasome, which is responsible for degrading most intracellular proteins, and the Clp/Hsp100 family of proteases, which are involved in protein folding and disaggregation. Dysregulation of ATP-dependent proteases has been implicated in various diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, and infectious diseases.

Multienzyme complexes are specialized protein structures that consist of multiple enzymes closely associated or bound together, often with other cofactors and regulatory subunits. These complexes facilitate the sequential transfer of substrates along a series of enzymatic reactions, also known as a metabolic pathway. By keeping the enzymes in close proximity, multienzyme complexes enhance reaction efficiency, improve substrate specificity, and maintain proper stoichiometry between different enzymes involved in the pathway. Examples of multienzyme complexes include the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, the citrate synthase complex, and the fatty acid synthetase complex.

Cysteine endopeptidases are a type of enzymes that cleave peptide bonds within proteins. They are also known as cysteine proteases or cysteine proteinases. These enzymes contain a catalytic triad consisting of three amino acids: cysteine, histidine, and aspartate. The thiol group (-SH) of the cysteine residue acts as a nucleophile and attacks the carbonyl carbon of the peptide bond, leading to its cleavage.

Cysteine endopeptidases play important roles in various biological processes, including protein degradation, cell signaling, and inflammation. They are involved in many physiological and pathological conditions, such as apoptosis, immune response, and cancer. Some examples of cysteine endopeptidases include cathepsins, caspases, and calpains.

It is important to note that these enzymes require a reducing environment to maintain the reduced state of their active site cysteine residue. Therefore, they are sensitive to oxidizing agents and inhibitors that target the thiol group. Understanding the structure and function of cysteine endopeptidases is crucial for developing therapeutic strategies that target these enzymes in various diseases.

Nuclear proteins are a category of proteins that are primarily found in the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell. They play crucial roles in various nuclear functions, such as DNA replication, transcription, repair, and RNA processing. This group includes structural proteins like lamins, which form the nuclear lamina, and regulatory proteins, such as histones and transcription factors, that are involved in gene expression. Nuclear localization signals (NLS) often help target these proteins to the nucleus by interacting with importin proteins during active transport across the nuclear membrane.

Gene expression regulation in bacteria refers to the complex cellular processes that control the production of proteins from specific genes. This regulation allows bacteria to adapt to changing environmental conditions and ensure the appropriate amount of protein is produced at the right time.

Bacteria have a variety of mechanisms for regulating gene expression, including:

1. Operon structure: Many bacterial genes are organized into operons, which are clusters of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule. The expression of these genes can be coordinately regulated by controlling the transcription of the entire operon.
2. Promoter regulation: Transcription is initiated at promoter regions upstream of the gene or operon. Bacteria have regulatory proteins called sigma factors that bind to the promoter and recruit RNA polymerase, the enzyme responsible for transcribing DNA into RNA. The binding of sigma factors can be influenced by environmental signals, allowing for regulation of transcription.
3. Attenuation: Some operons have regulatory regions called attenuators that control transcription termination. These regions contain hairpin structures that can form in the mRNA and cause transcription to stop prematurely. The formation of these hairpins is influenced by the concentration of specific metabolites, allowing for regulation of gene expression based on the availability of those metabolites.
4. Riboswitches: Some bacterial mRNAs contain regulatory elements called riboswitches that bind small molecules directly. When a small molecule binds to the riboswitch, it changes conformation and affects transcription or translation of the associated gene.
5. CRISPR-Cas systems: Bacteria use CRISPR-Cas systems for adaptive immunity against viruses and plasmids. These systems incorporate short sequences from foreign DNA into their own genome, which can then be used to recognize and cleave similar sequences in invading genetic elements.

Overall, gene expression regulation in bacteria is a complex process that allows them to respond quickly and efficiently to changing environmental conditions. Understanding these regulatory mechanisms can provide insights into bacterial physiology and help inform strategies for controlling bacterial growth and behavior.

Gene expression regulation in fungi refers to the complex cellular processes that control the production of proteins and other functional gene products in response to various internal and external stimuli. This regulation is crucial for normal growth, development, and adaptation of fungal cells to changing environmental conditions.

In fungi, gene expression is regulated at multiple levels, including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, and post-translational modifications. Key regulatory mechanisms include:

1. Transcription factors (TFs): These proteins bind to specific DNA sequences in the promoter regions of target genes and either activate or repress their transcription. Fungi have a diverse array of TFs that respond to various signals, such as nutrient availability, stress, developmental cues, and quorum sensing.
2. Chromatin remodeling: The organization and compaction of DNA into chromatin can influence gene expression. Fungi utilize ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes and histone modifying enzymes to alter chromatin structure, thereby facilitating or inhibiting the access of transcriptional machinery to genes.
3. Non-coding RNAs: Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) play a role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in fungi. These sncRNAs can guide RNA-induced transcriptional silencing (RITS) complexes to specific target loci, leading to the repression of gene expression through histone modifications and DNA methylation.
4. Alternative splicing: Fungi employ alternative splicing mechanisms to generate multiple mRNA isoforms from a single gene, thereby increasing proteome diversity. This process can be regulated by RNA-binding proteins that recognize specific sequence motifs in pre-mRNAs and promote or inhibit splicing events.
5. Protein stability and activity: Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins, such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, can influence their stability, localization, and activity. These PTMs play a crucial role in regulating various cellular processes, including signal transduction, stress response, and cell cycle progression.

Understanding the complex interplay between these regulatory mechanisms is essential for elucidating the molecular basis of fungal development, pathogenesis, and drug resistance. This knowledge can be harnessed to develop novel strategies for combating fungal infections and improving agricultural productivity.

A mutant protein is a protein that has undergone a genetic mutation, resulting in an altered amino acid sequence and potentially changed structure and function. These changes can occur due to various reasons such as errors during DNA replication, exposure to mutagenic substances, or inherited genetic disorders. The alterations in the protein's structure and function may have no significant effects, lead to benign phenotypic variations, or cause diseases, depending on the type and location of the mutation. Some well-known examples of diseases caused by mutant proteins include cystic fibrosis, sickle cell anemia, and certain types of cancer.

Metallochaperones are a type of protein that play a role in the transportation, delivery, and distribution of metal ions within cells. They function to maintain proper metal ion homeostasis by ensuring that metal ions are delivered to their appropriate targets, such as metalloproteins, where they can perform essential physiological functions. Metallochaperones can bind to metal ions with high affinity and specificity, facilitating their transfer to target proteins and preventing them from engaging in non-specific interactions that could be harmful to the cell. They have been implicated in various biological processes, including metal ion detoxification, antioxidant defense, and neurotransmitter biosynthesis.

Cytoplasm is the material within a eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) that lies between the nuclear membrane and the cell membrane. It is composed of an aqueous solution called cytosol, in which various organelles such as mitochondria, ribosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, lysosomes, and vacuoles are suspended. Cytoplasm also contains a variety of dissolved nutrients, metabolites, ions, and enzymes that are involved in various cellular processes such as metabolism, signaling, and transport. It is where most of the cell's metabolic activities take place, and it plays a crucial role in maintaining the structure and function of the cell.

Serine endopeptidases are a type of enzymes that cleave peptide bonds within proteins (endopeptidases) and utilize serine as the nucleophilic amino acid in their active site for catalysis. These enzymes play crucial roles in various biological processes, including digestion, blood coagulation, and programmed cell death (apoptosis). Examples of serine endopeptidases include trypsin, chymotrypsin, thrombin, and elastase.

Clusterin is a protein that is widely expressed in many tissues and body fluids, including the tears, blood plasma, seminal fluid, milk, and cerebrospinal fluid. It is also known as apolipoprotein J or sulfated glycoprotein 2. Clusterin has diverse functions, including cell-cell communication, lipid transport, and protection against oxidative stress.

In the context of medicine and disease, clusterin has been studied for its potential role in several pathological processes, such as neurodegeneration, inflammation, cancer, and aging. In particular, clusterin has been implicated in the development and progression of various types of cancer, including prostate, breast, ovarian, and lung cancer. It is thought to contribute to tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis by promoting cell survival, angiogenesis, and resistance to chemotherapy.

Therefore, clusterin has been considered as a potential therapeutic target for cancer treatment, and several strategies have been developed to inhibit its expression or activity. However, more research is needed to fully understand the molecular mechanisms of clusterin in health and disease, and to translate these findings into effective clinical interventions.

A phenotype is the physical or biochemical expression of an organism's genes, or the observable traits and characteristics resulting from the interaction of its genetic constitution (genotype) with environmental factors. These characteristics can include appearance, development, behavior, and resistance to disease, among others. Phenotypes can vary widely, even among individuals with identical genotypes, due to differences in environmental influences, gene expression, and genetic interactions.

Nucleoplasmin is a major protein component of the nucleoplasm, the liquid matrix inside the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell. It plays a crucial role in the organization and dynamics of chromatin, which is the complex of DNA, RNA, and proteins that make up the chromosomes. Specifically, nucleoplasmin has high affinity for histone proteins, which are the core components of nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin structure. By binding to histones, nucleoplasmin helps to regulate the assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes during processes such as DNA replication, repair, and transcription. Additionally, nucleoplasmin has been implicated in the intracellular transport of proteins and RNA, contributing to the overall maintenance and function of the nuclear environment.

A cell line that is derived from tumor cells and has been adapted to grow in culture. These cell lines are often used in research to study the characteristics of cancer cells, including their growth patterns, genetic changes, and responses to various treatments. They can be established from many different types of tumors, such as carcinomas, sarcomas, and leukemias. Once established, these cell lines can be grown and maintained indefinitely in the laboratory, allowing researchers to conduct experiments and studies that would not be feasible using primary tumor cells. It is important to note that tumor cell lines may not always accurately represent the behavior of the original tumor, as they can undergo genetic changes during their time in culture.

Immunophilins are a group of intracellular proteins that have peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) activity, which enables them to catalyze the cis-trans isomerization of proline imidic peptide bonds in oligopeptides. They play crucial roles in protein folding, trafficking, and assembly, as well as in immunoregulation and signal transduction processes.

Two major classes of immunophilins are FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) and cyclophilins. These proteins can bind to immunosuppressive drugs like FK506 (tacrolimus) and cyclosporin A, respectively, forming complexes that inhibit the activity of calcineurin, a phosphatase involved in T-cell activation. This interaction leads to an inhibition of immune responses and is exploited in transplantation medicine to prevent graft rejection.

Immunophilins also participate in various cellular processes, such as protein trafficking, neuroprotection, and regulation of gene expression, by interacting with other proteins or acting as chaperones during protein folding. Dysregulation of immunophilin function has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, neurological disorders, and viral infections.

Proteolysis is the biological process of breaking down proteins into smaller polypeptides or individual amino acids by the action of enzymes called proteases. This process is essential for various physiological functions, including digestion, protein catabolism, cell signaling, and regulation of numerous biological activities. Dysregulation of proteolysis can contribute to several pathological conditions, such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and inflammatory disorders.

Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique used to identify and quantify the chemical components of a mixture or compound. It works by ionizing the sample, generating charged molecules or fragments, and then measuring their mass-to-charge ratio in a vacuum. The resulting mass spectrum provides information about the molecular weight and structure of the analytes, allowing for identification and characterization.

In simpler terms, mass spectrometry is a method used to determine what chemicals are present in a sample and in what quantities, by converting the chemicals into ions, measuring their masses, and generating a spectrum that shows the relative abundances of each ion type.

Alpha-glucosidases are a group of enzymes that break down complex carbohydrates into simpler sugars, such as glucose, by hydrolyzing the alpha-1,4 and alpha-1,6 glycosidic bonds in oligosaccharides, disaccharides, and polysaccharides. These enzymes are located on the brush border of the small intestine and play a crucial role in carbohydrate digestion and absorption.

Inhibitors of alpha-glucosidases, such as acarbose and miglitol, are used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes to slow down the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates, which helps to reduce postprandial glucose levels and improve glycemic control.

The cell nucleus is a membrane-bound organelle found in the eukaryotic cells (cells with a true nucleus). It contains most of the cell's genetic material, organized as DNA molecules in complex with proteins, RNA molecules, and histones to form chromosomes.

The primary function of the cell nucleus is to regulate and control the activities of the cell, including growth, metabolism, protein synthesis, and reproduction. It also plays a crucial role in the process of mitosis (cell division) by separating and protecting the genetic material during this process. The nuclear membrane, or nuclear envelope, surrounding the nucleus is composed of two lipid bilayers with numerous pores that allow for the selective transport of molecules between the nucleoplasm (nucleus interior) and the cytoplasm (cell exterior).

The cell nucleus is a vital structure in eukaryotic cells, and its dysfunction can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

An amino acid substitution is a type of mutation in which one amino acid in a protein is replaced by another. This occurs when there is a change in the DNA sequence that codes for a particular amino acid in a protein. The genetic code is redundant, meaning that most amino acids are encoded by more than one codon (a sequence of three nucleotides). As a result, a single base pair change in the DNA sequence may not necessarily lead to an amino acid substitution. However, if a change does occur, it can have a variety of effects on the protein's structure and function, depending on the nature of the substituted amino acids. Some substitutions may be harmless, while others may alter the protein's activity or stability, leading to disease.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Guanidine is not typically defined in the context of medical terminology, but rather, it is a chemical compound with the formula NH2(C=NH)NH2. However, guanidine and its derivatives do have medical relevance:

1. Guanidine is used as a medication in some neurological disorders, such as stiff-person syndrome, to reduce muscle spasms and rigidity. It acts on the central nervous system to decrease abnormal nerve impulses that cause muscle spasticity.

2. Guanidine derivatives are found in various medications used for treating diabetes, like metformin. These compounds help lower glucose production in the liver and improve insulin sensitivity in muscle cells.

3. In some cases, guanidine is used as a skin penetration enhancer in transdermal drug delivery systems to increase the absorption of certain medications through the skin.

It is essential to note that guanidine itself has limited medical use due to its potential toxicity and narrow therapeutic window. Its derivatives, like metformin, are more commonly used in medical practice.

Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress refers to a cellular condition characterized by the accumulation of misfolded or unfolded proteins within the ER lumen, leading to disruption of its normal functions. The ER is a membrane-bound organelle responsible for protein folding, modification, and transport, as well as lipid synthesis and calcium homeostasis. Various physiological and pathological conditions can cause an imbalance between the rate of protein entry into the ER and its folding capacity, resulting in ER stress.

To cope with this stress, cells have evolved a set of signaling pathways called the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR aims to restore ER homeostasis by reducing global protein synthesis, enhancing ER-associated degradation (ERAD) of misfolded proteins, and upregulating the expression of genes involved in protein folding, modification, and quality control.

The UPR is mediated by three major signaling branches:

1. Inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α): IRE1α is an ER transmembrane protein with endoribonuclease activity that catalyzes the splicing of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA, leading to the expression of a potent transcription factor, spliced XBP1 (sXBP1). sXBP1 upregulates genes involved in ERAD and protein folding.
2. Activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6): ATF6 is an ER transmembrane protein that, upon ER stress, undergoes proteolytic cleavage to release its cytoplasmic domain, which acts as a potent transcription factor. ATF6 upregulates genes involved in protein folding and degradation.
3. Protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK): PERK is an ER transmembrane protein that phosphorylates the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) upon ER stress, leading to a global reduction in protein synthesis and preferential translation of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). ATF4 upregulates genes involved in amino acid metabolism, redox homeostasis, and apoptosis.

These three branches of the UPR work together to restore ER homeostasis by increasing protein folding capacity, reducing global protein synthesis, and promoting degradation of misfolded proteins. However, if the stress persists or becomes too severe, the UPR can trigger cell death through apoptosis.

In summary, the unfolded protein response (UPR) is a complex signaling network that helps maintain ER homeostasis by detecting and responding to the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER lumen. The UPR involves three main branches: IRE1α, ATF6, and PERK, which work together to restore ER homeostasis through increased protein folding capacity, reduced global protein synthesis, and enhanced degradation of misfolded proteins. Persistent or severe ER stress can lead to the activation of cell death pathways by the UPR.

Protein precursors, also known as proproteins or prohormones, are inactive forms of proteins that undergo post-translational modification to become active. These modifications typically include cleavage of the precursor protein by specific enzymes, resulting in the release of the active protein. This process allows for the regulation and control of protein activity within the body. Protein precursors can be found in various biological processes, including the endocrine system where they serve as inactive hormones that can be converted into their active forms when needed.

A cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin semi-permeable phospholipid bilayer that surrounds all cells in animals, plants, and microorganisms. It functions as a barrier to control the movement of substances in and out of the cell, allowing necessary molecules such as nutrients, oxygen, and signaling molecules to enter while keeping out harmful substances and waste products. The cell membrane is composed mainly of phospholipids, which have hydrophilic (water-loving) heads and hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails. This unique structure allows the membrane to be flexible and fluid, yet selectively permeable. Additionally, various proteins are embedded in the membrane that serve as channels, pumps, receptors, and enzymes, contributing to the cell's overall functionality and communication with its environment.

DNA primers are short single-stranded DNA molecules that serve as a starting point for DNA synthesis. They are typically used in laboratory techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The primer binds to a complementary sequence on the DNA template through base pairing, providing a free 3'-hydroxyl group for the DNA polymerase enzyme to add nucleotides and synthesize a new strand of DNA. This allows for specific and targeted amplification or analysis of a particular region of interest within a larger DNA molecule.

A two-hybrid system technique is a type of genetic screening method used in molecular biology to identify protein-protein interactions within an organism, most commonly baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) or Escherichia coli. The name "two-hybrid" refers to the fact that two separate proteins are being examined for their ability to interact with each other.

The technique is based on the modular nature of transcription factors, which typically consist of two distinct domains: a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and an activation domain (AD). In a two-hybrid system, one protein of interest is fused to the DBD, while the second protein of interest is fused to the AD. If the two proteins interact, the DBD and AD are brought in close proximity, allowing for transcriptional activation of a reporter gene that is linked to a specific promoter sequence recognized by the DBD.

The main components of a two-hybrid system include:

1. Bait protein (fused to the DNA-binding domain)
2. Prey protein (fused to the activation domain)
3. Reporter gene (transcribed upon interaction between bait and prey proteins)
4. Promoter sequence (recognized by the DBD when brought in proximity due to interaction)

The two-hybrid system technique has several advantages, including:

1. Ability to screen large libraries of potential interacting partners
2. High sensitivity for detecting weak or transient interactions
3. Applicability to various organisms and protein types
4. Potential for high-throughput analysis

However, there are also limitations to the technique, such as false positives (interactions that do not occur in vivo) and false negatives (lack of detection of true interactions). Additionally, the fusion proteins may not always fold or localize correctly, leading to potential artifacts. Despite these limitations, two-hybrid system techniques remain a valuable tool for studying protein-protein interactions and have contributed significantly to our understanding of various cellular processes.

A protein subunit refers to a distinct and independently folding polypeptide chain that makes up a larger protein complex. Proteins are often composed of multiple subunits, which can be identical or different, that come together to form the functional unit of the protein. These subunits can interact with each other through non-covalent interactions such as hydrogen bonds, ionic bonds, and van der Waals forces, as well as covalent bonds like disulfide bridges. The arrangement and interaction of these subunits contribute to the overall structure and function of the protein.

HSP30, also known as HSP12 in yeast, refers to a specific family of heat-shock proteins with a molecular weight of 30 kDa. These proteins are induced by various stress conditions, including heat shock, oxidative stress, and heavy metals. They play a crucial role in protecting cells from stress-induced damage by preventing protein aggregation and assisting in protein folding and degradation. HSP30 proteins are highly conserved across species and have been found to be involved in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, membrane fusion, and autophagy. In particular, HSP30 has been shown to protect against oxidative stress by stabilizing membranes and preventing the formation of reactive oxygen species.

Malate Dehydrogenase (MDH) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the Krebs cycle, also known as the citric acid cycle or tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. It catalyzes the reversible oxidation of malate to oxaloacetate, while simultaneously reducing NAD+ to NADH. This reaction is essential for energy production in the form of ATP and NADH within the cell.

There are two main types of Malate Dehydrogenase:

1. NAD-dependent Malate Dehydrogenase (MDH1): Found primarily in the cytoplasm, this isoform plays a role in the malate-aspartate shuttle, which helps transfer reducing equivalents between the cytoplasm and mitochondria.
2. FAD-dependent Malate Dehydrogenase (MDH2): Located within the mitochondrial matrix, this isoform is involved in the Krebs cycle for energy production.

Abnormal levels of Malate Dehydrogenase enzyme can be indicative of certain medical conditions or diseases, such as myocardial infarction (heart attack), muscle damage, or various types of cancer. Therefore, MDH enzyme activity is often assessed in diagnostic tests to help identify and monitor these health issues.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Subcellular fractions refer to the separation and collection of specific parts or components of a cell, including organelles, membranes, and other structures, through various laboratory techniques such as centrifugation and ultracentrifugation. These fractions can be used in further biochemical and molecular analyses to study the structure, function, and interactions of individual cellular components. Examples of subcellular fractions include nuclear extracts, mitochondrial fractions, microsomal fractions (membrane vesicles), and cytosolic fractions (cytoplasmic extracts).

Protein isoforms are different forms or variants of a protein that are produced from a single gene through the process of alternative splicing, where different exons (or parts of exons) are included in the mature mRNA molecule. This results in the production of multiple, slightly different proteins that share a common core structure but have distinct sequences and functions. Protein isoforms can also arise from genetic variations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms or mutations that alter the protein-coding sequence of a gene. These differences in protein sequence can affect the stability, localization, activity, or interaction partners of the protein isoform, leading to functional diversity and specialization within cells and organisms.

Cross-linking reagents are chemical agents that are used to create covalent bonds between two or more molecules, creating a network of interconnected molecules known as a cross-linked structure. In the context of medical and biological research, cross-linking reagents are often used to stabilize protein structures, study protein-protein interactions, and develop therapeutic agents.

Cross-linking reagents work by reacting with functional groups on adjacent molecules, such as amino groups (-NH2) or sulfhydryl groups (-SH), to form a covalent bond between them. This can help to stabilize protein structures and prevent them from unfolding or aggregating.

There are many different types of cross-linking reagents, each with its own specificity and reactivity. Some common examples include glutaraldehyde, formaldehyde, disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS), and bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS3). The choice of cross-linking reagent depends on the specific application and the properties of the molecules being cross-linked.

It is important to note that cross-linking reagents can also have unintended effects, such as modifying or disrupting the function of the proteins they are intended to stabilize. Therefore, it is essential to use them carefully and with appropriate controls to ensure accurate and reliable results.

Leupeptins are a type of protease inhibitors, which are substances that can inhibit the activity of enzymes called proteases. Proteases play a crucial role in breaking down proteins into smaller peptides or individual amino acids. Leupeptins are naturally occurring compounds found in some types of bacteria and are often used in laboratory research to study various cellular processes that involve protease activity.

Leupeptins can inhibit several different types of proteases, including serine proteases, cysteine proteases, and some metalloproteinases. They work by binding to the active site of these enzymes and preventing them from cleaving their protein substrates. Leupeptins have been used in various research applications, such as studying protein degradation, signal transduction pathways, and cell death mechanisms.

It is important to note that leupeptins are not typically used as therapeutic agents in clinical medicine due to their potential toxicity and lack of specificity for individual proteases. Instead, they are primarily used as research tools in basic science investigations.

A genetic complementation test is a laboratory procedure used in molecular genetics to determine whether two mutated genes can complement each other's function, indicating that they are located at different loci and represent separate alleles. This test involves introducing a normal or wild-type copy of one gene into a cell containing a mutant version of the same gene, and then observing whether the presence of the normal gene restores the normal function of the mutated gene. If the introduction of the normal gene results in the restoration of the normal phenotype, it suggests that the two genes are located at different loci and can complement each other's function. However, if the introduction of the normal gene does not restore the normal phenotype, it suggests that the two genes are located at the same locus and represent different alleles of the same gene. This test is commonly used to map genes and identify genetic interactions in a variety of organisms, including bacteria, yeast, and animals.

HEK293 cells, also known as human embryonic kidney 293 cells, are a line of cells used in scientific research. They were originally derived from human embryonic kidney cells and have been adapted to grow in a lab setting. HEK293 cells are widely used in molecular biology and biochemistry because they can be easily transfected (a process by which DNA is introduced into cells) and highly express foreign genes. As a result, they are often used to produce proteins for structural and functional studies. It's important to note that while HEK293 cells are derived from human tissue, they have been grown in the lab for many generations and do not retain the characteristics of the original embryonic kidney cells.

Proteasome inhibitors are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of proteasomes, which are protein complexes that play a critical role in the breakdown and recycling of damaged or unwanted proteins within cells. By inhibiting the activity of these proteasomes, proteasome inhibitors can cause an accumulation of abnormal proteins within cells, leading to cell death.

This effect is particularly useful in the treatment of certain types of cancer, such as multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma, where malignant cells often have an overproduction of abnormal proteins that can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors. The three main proteasome inhibitors currently approved for use in cancer therapy are bortezomib (Velcade), carfilzomib (Kyprolis), and ixazomib (Ninlaro). These medications have been shown to improve outcomes and extend survival in patients with these types of cancers.

It's important to note that proteasome inhibitors can also have off-target effects on other cells in the body, leading to side effects such as neurotoxicity, gastrointestinal symptoms, and hematologic toxicities. Therefore, careful monitoring and management of these side effects is necessary during treatment with proteasome inhibitors.

Oxidation-Reduction (redox) reactions are a type of chemical reaction involving a transfer of electrons between two species. The substance that loses electrons in the reaction is oxidized, and the substance that gains electrons is reduced. Oxidation and reduction always occur together in a redox reaction, hence the term "oxidation-reduction."

In biological systems, redox reactions play a crucial role in many cellular processes, including energy production, metabolism, and signaling. The transfer of electrons in these reactions is often facilitated by specialized molecules called electron carriers, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+/NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD/FADH2).

The oxidation state of an element in a compound is a measure of the number of electrons that have been gained or lost relative to its neutral state. In redox reactions, the oxidation state of one or more elements changes as they gain or lose electrons. The substance that is oxidized has a higher oxidation state, while the substance that is reduced has a lower oxidation state.

Overall, oxidation-reduction reactions are fundamental to the functioning of living organisms and are involved in many important biological processes.

Sigma receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that were initially thought to be opioid receptors but later found to have a distinct pharmacology. They are a heterogeneous group of proteins that are widely distributed in the brain and other tissues, where they play a role in various physiological functions such as neurotransmission, signal transduction, and modulation of ion channels.

Sigma receptors can be divided into two subtypes: sigma-1 and sigma-2. Sigma-1 receptors are ligand-regulated chaperone proteins that are localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria-associated ER membranes, where they modulate calcium signaling, protein folding, and stress responses. Sigma-2 receptors, on the other hand, are still poorly characterized and their endogenous ligands and physiological functions remain elusive.

Sigma receptors can be activated by a variety of drugs, including certain antidepressants, neuroleptics, psychostimulants, and hallucinogens, as well as some natural compounds such as steroids and phenolamines. The activation of sigma receptors has been implicated in various neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, addiction, pain, and neurodegeneration, although their exact role and therapeutic potential are still under investigation.

Alpha-synuclein is a protein that is primarily found in neurons (nerve cells) in the brain. It is encoded by the SNCA gene and is abundantly expressed in presynaptic terminals, where it is believed to play a role in the regulation of neurotransmitter release.

In certain neurological disorders, including Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy, alpha-synuclein can form aggregates known as Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. These aggregates are a pathological hallmark of these diseases and are believed to contribute to the death of nerve cells, leading to the symptoms associated with these disorders.

The precise function of alpha-synuclein is not fully understood, but it is thought to be involved in various cellular processes such as maintaining the structure of the presynaptic terminal, regulating synaptic vesicle trafficking and neurotransmitter release, and protecting neurons from stress.

Proteomics is the large-scale study and analysis of proteins, including their structures, functions, interactions, modifications, and abundance, in a given cell, tissue, or organism. It involves the identification and quantification of all expressed proteins in a biological sample, as well as the characterization of post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and functional pathways. Proteomics can provide valuable insights into various biological processes, diseases, and drug responses, and has applications in basic research, biomedicine, and clinical diagnostics. The field combines various techniques from molecular biology, chemistry, physics, and bioinformatics to study proteins at a systems level.

Phosphorylation is the process of adding a phosphate group (a molecule consisting of one phosphorus atom and four oxygen atoms) to a protein or other organic molecule, which is usually done by enzymes called kinases. This post-translational modification can change the function, localization, or activity of the target molecule, playing a crucial role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Phosphorylation is reversible, and the removal of the phosphate group is facilitated by enzymes called phosphatases.

Novobiocin is an antibiotic derived from the actinomycete species Streptomyces niveus. It belongs to the class of drugs known as aminocoumarins, which function by inhibiting bacterial DNA gyrase, thereby preventing DNA replication and transcription. Novobiocin has activity against a narrow range of gram-positive bacteria, including some strains of Staphylococcus aureus (particularly those resistant to penicillin and methicillin), Streptococcus pneumoniae, and certain mycobacteria. It is used primarily in the treatment of serious staphylococcal infections and is administered orally or intravenously.

It's important to note that Novobiocin has been largely replaced by other antibiotics due to its narrow spectrum of activity, potential for drug interactions, and adverse effects. It is not widely used in clinical practice today.

Intramolecular oxidoreductases are a specific class of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of electrons within a single molecule, hence the term "intramolecular." These enzymes are involved in oxidoreduction reactions, where one part of the molecule is oxidized (loses electrons) and another part is reduced (gains electrons). This process allows for the rearrangement or modification of functional groups within the molecule.

The term "oxidoreductase" refers to enzymes that catalyze oxidation-reduction reactions, which are also known as redox reactions. These enzymes play a crucial role in various biological processes, including energy metabolism, detoxification, and biosynthesis.

It's important to note that intramolecular oxidoreductases should not be confused with intermolecular oxidoreductases, which catalyze redox reactions between two separate molecules.

Thyroglobulin is a protein produced and used by the thyroid gland in the production of thyroid hormones, primarily thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). It is composed of two subunits, an alpha and a beta or gamma unit, which bind iodine atoms necessary for the synthesis of the thyroid hormones. Thyroglobulin is exclusively produced by the follicular cells of the thyroid gland.

In clinical practice, measuring thyroglobulin levels in the blood can be useful as a tumor marker for monitoring treatment and detecting recurrence of thyroid cancer, particularly in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (papillary or follicular) who have had their thyroid gland removed. However, it is important to note that thyroglobulin is not specific to thyroid tissue and can be produced by some non-thyroidal cells under certain conditions, which may lead to false positive results in some cases.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

Auxilins are a type of protein that play a role in the regulation of intracellular trafficking, specifically in the recycling of clathrin-coated vesicles. These proteins help to disassemble the clathrin lattice after the vesicles have delivered their cargo, allowing the clathrin molecules to be reused for subsequent rounds of endocytosis. Auxilins are important for maintaining the efficiency and fidelity of intracellular trafficking in cells.

'Cercopithecus aethiops' is the scientific name for the monkey species more commonly known as the green monkey. It belongs to the family Cercopithecidae and is native to western Africa. The green monkey is omnivorous, with a diet that includes fruits, nuts, seeds, insects, and small vertebrates. They are known for their distinctive greenish-brown fur and long tail. Green monkeys are also important animal models in biomedical research due to their susceptibility to certain diseases, such as SIV (simian immunodeficiency virus), which is closely related to HIV.

Amyloid is a term used in medicine to describe abnormally folded protein deposits that can accumulate in various tissues and organs of the body. These misfolded proteins can form aggregates known as amyloid fibrils, which have a characteristic beta-pleated sheet structure. Amyloid deposits can be composed of different types of proteins, depending on the specific disease associated with the deposit.

In some cases, amyloid deposits can cause damage to organs and tissues, leading to various clinical symptoms. Some examples of diseases associated with amyloidosis include Alzheimer's disease (where amyloid-beta protein accumulates in the brain), systemic amyloidosis (where amyloid fibrils deposit in various organs such as the heart, kidneys, and liver), and type 2 diabetes (where amyloid deposits form in the pancreas).

It's important to note that not all amyloid deposits are harmful or associated with disease. However, when they do cause problems, treatment typically involves managing the underlying condition that is leading to the abnormal protein accumulation.

Apoptosis is a programmed and controlled cell death process that occurs in multicellular organisms. It is a natural process that helps maintain tissue homeostasis by eliminating damaged, infected, or unwanted cells. During apoptosis, the cell undergoes a series of morphological changes, including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, and fragmentation into membrane-bound vesicles called apoptotic bodies. These bodies are then recognized and engulfed by neighboring cells or phagocytic cells, preventing an inflammatory response. Apoptosis is regulated by a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways that involve proteins such as caspases, Bcl-2 family members, and inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs).

Membrane transport proteins are specialized biological molecules, specifically integral membrane proteins, that facilitate the movement of various substances across the lipid bilayer of cell membranes. They are responsible for the selective and regulated transport of ions, sugars, amino acids, nucleotides, and other molecules into and out of cells, as well as within different cellular compartments. These proteins can be categorized into two main types: channels and carriers (or pumps). Channels provide a passive transport mechanism, allowing ions or small molecules to move down their electrochemical gradient, while carriers actively transport substances against their concentration gradient, requiring energy usually in the form of ATP. Membrane transport proteins play a crucial role in maintaining cell homeostasis, signaling processes, and many other physiological functions.

A ligand, in the context of biochemistry and medicine, is a molecule that binds to a specific site on a protein or a larger biomolecule, such as an enzyme or a receptor. This binding interaction can modify the function or activity of the target protein, either activating it or inhibiting it. Ligands can be small molecules, like hormones or neurotransmitters, or larger structures, like antibodies. The study of ligand-protein interactions is crucial for understanding cellular processes and developing drugs, as many therapeutic compounds function by binding to specific targets within the body.

Mitochondrial proteins are any proteins that are encoded by the nuclear genome or mitochondrial genome and are located within the mitochondria, an organelle found in eukaryotic cells. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes including energy production, metabolism of lipids, amino acids, and steroids, regulation of calcium homeostasis, and programmed cell death or apoptosis.

Mitochondrial proteins can be classified into two main categories based on their origin:

1. Nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins (NEMPs): These are proteins that are encoded by genes located in the nucleus, synthesized in the cytoplasm, and then imported into the mitochondria through specific import pathways. NEMPs make up about 99% of all mitochondrial proteins and are involved in various functions such as oxidative phosphorylation, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, fatty acid oxidation, and mitochondrial dynamics.

2. Mitochondrial DNA-encoded proteins (MEPs): These are proteins that are encoded by the mitochondrial genome, synthesized within the mitochondria, and play essential roles in the electron transport chain (ETC), a key component of oxidative phosphorylation. The human mitochondrial genome encodes only 13 proteins, all of which are subunits of complexes I, III, IV, and V of the ETC.

Defects in mitochondrial proteins can lead to various mitochondrial disorders, which often manifest as neurological, muscular, or metabolic symptoms due to impaired energy production. These disorders are usually caused by mutations in either nuclear or mitochondrial genes that encode mitochondrial proteins.

Radiation scattering is a physical process in which radiation particles or waves deviate from their original direction due to interaction with matter. This phenomenon can occur through various mechanisms such as:

1. Elastic Scattering: Also known as Thomson scattering or Rayleigh scattering, it occurs when the energy of the scattered particle or wave remains unchanged after the collision. In the case of electromagnetic radiation (e.g., light), this results in a change of direction without any loss of energy.
2. Inelastic Scattering: This type of scattering involves an exchange of energy between the scattered particle and the target medium, leading to a change in both direction and energy of the scattered particle or wave. An example is Compton scattering, where high-energy photons (e.g., X-rays or gamma rays) interact with charged particles (usually electrons), resulting in a decrease in photon energy and an increase in electron kinetic energy.
3. Coherent Scattering: In this process, the scattered radiation maintains its phase relationship with the incident radiation, leading to constructive and destructive interference patterns. An example is Bragg scattering, which occurs when X-rays interact with a crystal lattice, resulting in diffraction patterns that reveal information about the crystal structure.

In medical contexts, radiation scattering can have both beneficial and harmful effects. For instance, in diagnostic imaging techniques like computed tomography (CT) scans, radiation scattering contributes to image noise and reduces contrast resolution. However, in radiation therapy for cancer treatment, controlled scattering of therapeutic radiation beams can help ensure that the tumor receives a uniform dose while minimizing exposure to healthy tissues.

Biological transport refers to the movement of molecules, ions, or solutes across biological membranes or through cells in living organisms. This process is essential for maintaining homeostasis, regulating cellular functions, and enabling communication between cells. There are two main types of biological transport: passive transport and active transport.

Passive transport does not require the input of energy and includes:

1. Diffusion: The random movement of molecules from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration until equilibrium is reached.
2. Osmosis: The diffusion of solvent molecules (usually water) across a semi-permeable membrane from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of higher solute concentration.
3. Facilitated diffusion: The assisted passage of polar or charged substances through protein channels or carriers in the cell membrane, which increases the rate of diffusion without consuming energy.

Active transport requires the input of energy (in the form of ATP) and includes:

1. Primary active transport: The direct use of ATP to move molecules against their concentration gradient, often driven by specific transport proteins called pumps.
2. Secondary active transport: The coupling of the movement of one substance down its electrochemical gradient with the uphill transport of another substance, mediated by a shared transport protein. This process is also known as co-transport or counter-transport.

Chloroplasts are specialized organelles found in the cells of green plants, algae, and some protists. They are responsible for carrying out photosynthesis, which is the process by which these organisms convert light energy from the sun into chemical energy in the form of organic compounds, such as glucose.

Chloroplasts contain the pigment chlorophyll, which absorbs light energy from the sun. They also contain a system of membranes and enzymes that convert carbon dioxide and water into glucose and oxygen through a series of chemical reactions known as the Calvin cycle. This process not only provides energy for the organism but also releases oxygen as a byproduct, which is essential for the survival of most life forms on Earth.

Chloroplasts are believed to have originated from ancient cyanobacteria that were engulfed by early eukaryotic cells and eventually became integrated into their host's cellular machinery through a process called endosymbiosis. Over time, chloroplasts evolved to become an essential component of plant and algal cells, contributing to their ability to carry out photosynthesis and thrive in a wide range of environments.

N-Terminal Acetyltransferase C (NatC) is not a medical term per se, but rather a biochemical term referring to a specific type of enzyme involved in post-translational modification of proteins. Here's a definition:

N-Terminal Acetyltransferase C (NatC) is an enzyme complex that belongs to the N-terminal acetyltransferase (NAT) family, which catalyzes the co-translational transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to the alpha-amino group of the initiator methionine residue at the N-terminus of newly synthesized proteins. The NatC complex is composed of three subunits: NatC catalytic subunit (Naa30), NatC auxiliary subunit A (Naa25), and NatC auxiliary subunit B (Naa20). This specific enzyme complex is responsible for acetylating a subset of proteins, primarily those beginning with the amino acid sequences of Ser-/Thr-, Ala-, or Cys- followed by any other amino acid. The NatC-mediated N-terminal acetylation plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including protein stability, localization, and interaction with other proteins.

Chaperones, also called molecular chaperones, are proteins that assist other proteins in assuming their three-dimensional fold ... Molecular evolution, Protein biosynthesis, Protein folding, Molecular chaperones, Proteomics). ... Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a diverse class of molecular chaperones that assist in folding under stress. While originally ... Feder ME, Hofmann GE (1999). "Heat-shock proteins, molecular chaperones, and the stress response: evolutionary and ecological ...
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... refers to the ensemble of all cellular molecular chaperone and co-chaperone proteins that assist protein folding of ... Molecular chaperone therapy Balch WE, Morimoto RI, Dillin A, Kelly JW (Feb 2008). "Adapting proteostasis for disease ... Douglas, P. M.; Summers, D. W.; Cyr, D. M. (2009). "Molecular chaperones antagonize proteotoxicity by differentially modulating ... 300 human chaperones and co-chaperones in human aging brains and in brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. ...
Mayer MP, Bukau B (Mar 2005). "Hsp70 chaperones: cellular functions and molecular mechanism". Cellular and Molecular Life ... Takayama S, Xie Z, Reed JC (Jan 1999). "An evolutionarily conserved family of Hsp70/Hsc70 molecular chaperone regulators". The ... Benaroudj N, Batelier G, Triniolles F, Ladjimi MM (Nov 1995). "Self-association of the molecular chaperone HSC70". Biochemistry ... cellular functions and molecular mechanism". Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences. 62 (6): 670-684. doi:10.1007/s00018-004-4464 ...
Freeman, B.C.; Toft, D.; Morimoto, R.I.; Chaperone Machines, Molecular (1996). "Chaperone Activities of the Cyclophilin CyP-40 ... Morley, J.F.; Morimoto, R.I. (2004). "Regulation of Longevity in C. elegans by Heat Shock Factor and Molecular Chaperones". Mol ... Freeman, B.C.; Morimoto, R.I. (1996). "The Human Molecular Chaperones HSP90, HSP70 (HSC70) and HDJ-1 have Distinct Roles in ... Morimoto, R.I. (2002). "Dynamic Remodeling of Transcription Complexes by Molecular Chaperones". Cell. 110 (3): 281-284. doi: ...
Anwar A, Siegel D, Kepa JK, Ross D (April 2002). "Interaction of the molecular chaperone Hsp70 with human NAD(P)H:quinone ... Freeman BC, Morimoto RI (June 1996). "The human cytosolic molecular chaperones hsp90, hsp70 (hsc70) and hdj-1 have distinct ... Shi Y, Mosser DD, Morimoto RI (March 1998). "Molecular chaperones as HSF1-specific transcriptional repressors". Genes & ... Hernández MP, Chadli A, Toft DO (April 2002). "HSP40 binding is the first step in the HSP90 chaperoning pathway for the ...
Mayer MP, Bukau B (Mar 2005). "Hsp70 chaperones: cellular functions and molecular mechanism". Cellular and Molecular Life ... Journal of Molecular Biology. Molecular Chaperones and Protein Quality Control (Part I). 427 (7): 1589-608. doi:10.1016/j.jmb. ... As an ER molecular chaperone, BiP is also required to import polypeptide into the ER lumen or ER membrane in an ATP-dependent ... Simons JF, Ferro-Novick S, Rose MD, Helenius A (Jul 1995). "BiP/Kar2p serves as a molecular chaperone during carboxypeptidase Y ...
... cellular functions and molecular mechanism". Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences. 62 (6): 670-684. doi:10.1007/s00018-004-4464 ... The unstructured region at the very end of the C-terminal is believed to be the docking site for co-chaperones. Since a cDNA ... It is a mode of cell death defined by characteristic morphological, biochemical and molecular changes. It was first described ... Nonetheless, effects of these mutations can still manifest when Hsp70 chaperones are overwhelmed during stress conditions. ...
... the Hsp90 chaperone machinery and the role of molecular chaperones in antibody folding. Buchner's work established sHsps as ... "Dissection of the ATP-induced conformational cycle of the molecular chaperone Hsp90". Nature Structural & Molecular Biology. ... Molecular chaperones are an essential class of proteins that aid other proteins to obtain their biologically active structure ... His work on protein folding and molecular chaperones has received several awards, among others the Hans Neurath Award of the ...
Shi Y, Mosser DD, Morimoto RI (March 1998). "Molecular chaperones as HSF1-specific transcriptional repressors". Genes & ... Shi Y, Mosser DD, Morimoto RI (March 1998). "Molecular chaperones as HSF1-specific transcriptional repressors". Genes & ... In the event of proteotoxic stress such as heat shock, these chaperones are released from HSF1 to perform their protein-folding ... Rabindran SK, Giorgi G, Clos J, Wu C (August 1991). "Molecular cloning and expression of a human heat shock factor, HSF1". ...
Benjamin IJ, McMillan DR (July 1998). "Stress (heat shock) proteins: molecular chaperones in cardiovascular biology and disease ... Walter S, Buchner J (April 2002). "Molecular chaperones--cellular machines for protein folding". Angewandte Chemie. 41 (7): ... Biology portal Cellular stress response Chaperone Chaperonin Co-chaperone Cold-shock domain FourU thermometer Hsp90 cis- ... Tumour cells express a lot of HSPs because they need to chaperone mutated and over-expressed oncogenes, tumour cells are also ...
Jensen MR, Massey A, Schoepfer J, Brough PA (23 October 2013). Inhibitors of Molecular Chaperones as Therapeutic Agents. pp. ... pyrimidine inhibitors of the Hsp90 molecular chaperone". Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. 52 (15): 4794-809. doi:10.1021/ ... January 2008). "4,5-diarylisoxazole Hsp90 chaperone inhibitors: potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer". ... Molecular Cancer Therapeutics. 9 (4): 906-19. doi:10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-10-0055. PMID 20371713. Casara P, Davidson J, Claperon ...
... new mechanisms for the regulation of molecular chaperones". Critical Reviews in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 39 (5-6): ... "The nucleotide exchange factors of Hsp70 molecular chaperones". Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences. 2: 10. doi:10.3389/fmolb. ... Brodsky JL, Bracher A (2013). Nucleotide Exchange Factors for Hsp70 Molecular Chaperones. Landes Bioscience. Winter J, Jakob U ... The networking of chaperones by co-chaperones : control of cellular protein homeostasis. Blatch, Gregory L.,, Edkins, Adrienne ...
... stress proteins and molecular chaperones in invertebrates; organization of enzymes and metabolic activity in the aqueous ... Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 128 (4): 613-624. doi:10.1016/S1096-4959(01)00300-1. ISSN 1096-4959. PMID 11290443. James S ...
Shi Y, Mosser DD, Morimoto RI (March 1998). "Molecular chaperones as HSF1-specific transcriptional repressors". Genes Dev. 12 ( ... cellular functions and molecular mechanism". Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences. 62 (6): 670-684. doi:10.1007/s00018-004-4464 ... The unstructured region at the very end of the C-terminal is believed to be the docking site for co-chaperones. This protein is ... As a member of the heat shock protein 70 family and a chaperone protein, it facilitates the proper folding of newly translated ...
"Molecular chaperones in protein folding and proteostasis". Nature. 475 (7356): 324-332. doi:10.1038/nature10317. PMID 21776078 ... Chaperone proteins work to stabilize newly synthesized proteins. They ensure the new protein folds into its correct functional ... 23-32 in Phage and the Origins of Molecular Biology, edited by J. Cairns, G. S. Stent and J. D. Watson. Cold Spring Harbor ... 2002). Molecular Biology of the Cell (4 ed.). New York: Garland Science. "General Transcription Factor / Transcription Factor ...
Chaperones, also called molecular chaperones, are proteins that assist other proteins in assuming their three-dimensional fold ... Molecular evolution, Protein biosynthesis, Protein folding, Molecular chaperones, Proteomics). ... Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a diverse class of molecular chaperones that assist in folding under stress. While originally ... Feder ME, Hofmann GE (1999). "Heat-shock proteins, molecular chaperones, and the stress response: evolutionary and ecological ...
To avoid these dangers, cells invest in a complex network of molecular chaperones, which use ingenious mechanisms to prevent ... Because protein molecules are highly dynamic, constant chaperone surveillance is required to ensure protein homeostasis ( ... Folding of nascent polypeptide chains in a high molecular mass assembly with molecular chaperones. Nature 370, 111-117 (1994). ... Cell 15, 657-664 (2004). This pioneering study provides important insight into the relationship between molecular chaperone ...
Molecular chaperones such as heat shock protein (Hsp) of 70 kDa have been found to protect cells from various stresses. We ... Induction of molecular chaperones in carbon tetrachloride-treated rat liver: implications in protection against liver damage. ... To better understand the significance of the induction of chaperones, the effect of preinduction of chaperones on CCl4-induced ... "Induction of molecular chaperones in carbon tetrachloride-treated rat liver: implications in protection against liver damage," ...
The allosteric interactions and regulation of molecular chaperones and protein kinases allow for molecular communication and ... Modeling, Design and Engineering of Allosteric Regulatory Mechanisms Mediated by Molecular Chaperones in Signal Transduction ... The overarching goal of understanding molecular principles underlying differentiation of protein kinase clients and chaperone- ... Among our primary findings is the emerging evidence that a small number of functional motifs may be utilized by the chaperone ...
Adenine derived inhibitors of the molecular chaperone HSP90-SAR explained through multiple X-ray structures. Posted June 8th, ... Multiple co-crystal structures of an adenine-based series of inhibitors bound to the molecular chaperone Hsp90 have been ... Adenine derived inhibitors of the molecular chaperone HSP90-SAR explained through multiple X-ray structures. ... Molecular Chaperones/antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism; Structure-Activity Relationship. Abstract. ...
Molecular Chaperones. Hum Mol Genet 2009 May 1;18(9):1556-65 tubulin-. specific chaperone E, Drosophila 0 *Molecular Chaperones ... Molecular Chaperones. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2009 Oct 6;106(40):17013-8 Cwc23 protein, S cerevisiae 0 *Molecular Chaperones * ... Molecular Chaperones. Biol Chem 2011 Mar;392(3):239-48 FOXRED1 protein, human 0 *Molecular Chaperones. Hum Mol Genet 2010 Dec ... Molecular Chaperones *Drosophila Proteins. EMBO J 2009 Feb 4;28(3):234-47 Bag2 protein, mouse 0 *Molecular Chaperones *Adaptor ...
Comprehensive analysis of aggregation-inhibition effects of three major molecular chaperones working in Escherichia coli was ... Journal Article] Amphiphilic Polysaccharide Nanogels as Artificial Chaperones in Cell-Free Protein Synthesis.2011. *. Author(s) ... Journal Article] Amphiphilic Polysaccharide Nanogels as Artificial Chaperones in Cell-Free Protein Synthesis2011. *. Author(s) ... The results revealed that many of the~ 800 aggregation-prone proteins were solubilized by either one of the two chaperones and ...
Previously characterized as a molecular chaperone, CLU is expressed prominently by epithelia at fluid-tissue interfaces and ... Previously characterized as a molecular chaperone, CLU is expressed prominently by epithelia at fluid-tissue interfaces and ... Therapeutic potential of the molecular chaperone and matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor clusterin for dry eye. ...
Molecular chaperones are proteins which act as agents that aid other proteins to fold accurately. The projects discusses about ... Molecular chaperones, Apoptosis, Caspases Methods, Cloning, mutagenesis, etc. ... We have done this projects to get a deep understanding of how chaperones communicate with unstable, aggregation prone, ... Molecular chaperones. BiP. Structure and mechanism of BiP. A role for BiP during translocation. The role of molecular ...
In addition it has been shown to have molecular chaperone properties similar to those of the sHsps (small heat-shock proteins) ... In order to study their relative contributions to the chaperone ability of total αs-casein, the individual subunits, αs1- and ... In addition it has been shown to have molecular chaperone properties similar to those of the sHsps (small heat-shock proteins) ... T. M. Treweek, W. E. Price & J. A. Carver (2006). Studies on the molecular chaperone abilities of alphaS1- and alphaS2-casein ...
"Molecular Chaperones" by people in this website by year, and whether "Molecular Chaperones" was a major or minor topic of these ... "Molecular Chaperones" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical ... Although they take part in the assembly process, molecular chaperones are not components of the final structures. ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Molecular Chaperones" by people in Profiles. ...
Molecular Chaperones. Description:. A family of cellular proteins that mediate the correct assembly or disassembly of ... Although they take part in the assembly process, molecular chaperones are not components of the final structures. ...
Molecular Chaperones is a family of cellular proteins that mediate the correct assembly or disassembly of polypeptides and ... Molecular Chaperones "Molecular Chaperones" In protein science, Molecular Chaperones, in our bodys cells, are a family of ... Molecular Chaperones ⌊Alchemy Center. ⌊Atoms. ⌊Polyatomic entities. ⌊Heteroatomic Molecular Entities. ⌊Organic Compounds. ⌊ ... Examples of cellular molecular chaperones include: *alpha-Crystallins *alpha-crystallin A chain *alpha-crystallin B chain * ...
Molecular chaperones as HSF1-specific transcriptional repressors. Author. Search for: Shi, Yanhong; Search for: Mosser, Dick D. ... Molecular chaperones as HSF1-specific transcriptional repressors. From National Research Council Canada ... Molecular chaperones as HSF1-specific transcriptional repressors ...
... dc.contributor.author. Pearl, LH. ... Molecular Biology web-of-science-categories: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology number-of-cited-references: 169 times-cited: 41 ...
Multiple-Valued Computing in Quantum Molecular Biology Hafiz Md. Hasan Babu Innbundet ...
1 Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, 1105 N. University Ave., Ann Arbor, ... Thiol-based switching mechanisms of stress-sensing chaperones Biol Chem. 2020 Oct 5;402(3):239-252. doi: 10.1515/hsz-2020-0262 ... Their chaperone activity is independent of ATP, a feature that becomes especially important under oxidative stress conditions, ... In this review, we focus on thiol-based activation mechanisms of stress-sensing chaperones. Upon stress exposure, these ...
Doctoral (PhD) student position in the project "Molecular Chaperones in Alzheimers and Parkinsons disease" - Hiring in ... and the implication of molecular chaperones, in particular the BRICHOS domain. The aims of the project are (I) to better ... medical science including aging, Alzheimer, biomaterial, molecular endocrinology, cancer biology,. functional genomics, systems ... molecular protein structure determination techniques and others. Suitable backgrounds include studies in protein biochemistry, ...
How molecular chaperones influence protein structures. Chaperones enable newly synthesized proteins to adopt the precise three- ... Little is known about the changes in molecular structure of chaperones as they help substrate proteins to fold. Now, ... researchers have been able to follow in real time the structural changes that occur in an important type of chaperone as it ... molecular manufacturing,and much more; overview page 1888 ...
Molecular Chaperones / metabolism* * Mutation * Protein Aggregation, Pathological / metabolism* * RNA Polymerase II / genetics ... transcription errors represent a new molecular mechanism by which cells can acquire disease phenotypes. We further find that ...
Possible role of sterol as molecular chaperone. Meleleo Daniela;SBLANO, CESARE 2019-01-01. Abstract. The interplay between ... and chaperones. In this work, we investigated the role of cholesterol in hCt incorporation and channel formation in planar ... and chaperones. In this work, we investigated the role of cholesterol in hCt incorporation and channel formation in planar ...
Zooming in on the Regulation of a Molecular Chaperone. Meredith Zimmerman / Tuesday, September 5, 2023. 0 264 ... There are a large number of co-chaperones that are known to bind to Hsp90 and regulate its ATP hydrolysis and chaperoning ... Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a master chaperone, regulating processes involved in cell cycle control, protein folding, and ... domain models of ADAM10 and BACE1 with all-atom and coarse-grained temperature replica exchange and conventional molecular ...
Protein folding is often mediated by molecular chaperones. Recently, a novel class of intramolecular chaperones has been ... Crystal structure of an intramolecular chaperone mediating triple-beta-helix folding.. Schulz, E.C., Dickmanns, A., Urlaub, H. ... The highly homologous chaperone domains are interchangeable between pre-proteins and release themselves after protein folding. ... Here we report the crystal structures of two intramolecular chaperone domains in either the released or the pre-cleaved form, ...
sacsin molecular chaperone To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript.. ...
"Molecular chaperones antagonize proteotoxicity by differentially modulating protein aggregation pathways". Prion. 3 (2): 51-8. ... It is hypothesized that chaperones and co-chaperones (proteins that assist protein folding) may antagonize proteotoxicity ... "Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences. 74 (1): 23-38. doi:10.1007/s00018-016-2386-8. PMC 5209436. PMID 27734094.. ... "Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences. 66 (1): 62-81. doi:10.1007/s00018-008-8327-4. PMID 18810322. S2CID 6580402. Archived from ...
Molecular chaperones play a wide range of roles in the cell and they are required to assist both parasites as they move from a ... Certain molecular chaperone proteins have been identified as essential to the survival of both parasites. The aim is to design ... The research is focused on the study of molecular chaperones from parasitic systems. Our group has been isolating and ... characterising molecular chaperones from Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of human and animal African trypanosomiasis as ...
... can be an abundant molecular chaperone that. shock protein 90 (Hsp90) can be an abundant molecular chaperone that mediates the ... Body 3 Proliferation assay of MM cells after 17-AAG remedies The Hsp70 and Hsp90 chaperone systems are connected with the ...
This project therefore aims to characterize the roles these molecular chaperones play in cancer pathology. ... The Hsp70 chaperone is of prime importance to cancer biology; supporting proliferative growth and stress survival, blocking ... The molecular basis of these interactions and pathway triaging, however, are unknown. ...
  • Figure 4: ATPase cycle of the HSP90 chaperone system. (nature.com)
  • Hsp90, another major cytosolic chaperone, also was induced by heat treatment. (bioone.org)
  • These results suggest that cytosolic chaperones of Hsp70 and DnaJ families or Hsp90 (or both) are induced in CCl 4 -treated rat liver to protect the hepatocytes from the damage being inflicted. (bioone.org)
  • The synergistic roles of the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone machinery and protein kinases in biology and disease have stimulated extensive structural and functional studies of regulatory mechanisms underlying the Hsp90-kinase interactions. (utoronto.ca)
  • We report the results of integrative systems biology studies of the Hsp90 chaperone and protein kinases with an atomic level analysis of the communication pathways regulating conformational equilibrium of theses protein systems in signaling networks. (utoronto.ca)
  • Integration of computational systems biology and machine learning analysis of the Hsp90 interactions with oncogenic kinase mutants is then used to construct models of allosteric regulation of oncogenic proteins by molecular chaperones in signaling cascades. (utoronto.ca)
  • Our studies have revealed how constitutively activating and kinase-dead mutations could play context-dependent opposing roles in cancer and may be simultaneously present in a variety of oncogenic kinases that are regulated by their interactions with the Hsp90 chaperone. (utoronto.ca)
  • We have also analyzed mechanisms by which kinase drugs and allosteric Hsp90 modulators that may act synergistically and exert their pharmacological effect by depriving the client kinase of access to the molecular chaperone. (utoronto.ca)
  • Multiple co-crystal structures of an adenine-based series of inhibitors bound to the molecular chaperone Hsp90 have been determined. (ub.edu)
  • There are a large number of co-chaperones that are known to bind to Hsp90 and regulate its ATP hydrolysis and chaperoning activity. (biophysics.org)
  • shock protein 90 (Hsp90) can be an abundant molecular chaperone that mediates the maturation and stability of a number of proteins from the promotion of cell growth and survival. (ecologicalsgardens.com)
  • Body 3 Proliferation assay of MM cells after 17-AAG remedies The Hsp70 and Hsp90 chaperone systems are connected with the adaptor proteins HOP/p60 which interacts with the C-terminals of both Hsp70 and Hsp90 via its tetracopeptide do it again domain30. (ecologicalsgardens.com)
  • Pertinent to AD pathophysiology, heat shock protein 90 (HSP90)/co-chaperone complex folds tau or hyperphosphorylated tau, whereas heat shock protein 70-carboxyl-terminus of HSP70 Interacting protein (HSP70-CHIP) complex mediates degradation 13 , 14 . (nature.com)
  • HSP90) and induction of chaperones promoting tau degradation (e.g. (nature.com)
  • in particular regarding the molecular chaperone HSP90. (cnio.es)
  • The results of these trials involving HSP90 and other molecular chaperones will be presented at the next CNIO-"la Caixa" Foundation Frontiers Meeting. (cnio.es)
  • Geldanamycin tweaks the activity of Hsp90, one of a class of proteins known as molecular chaperones. (scienceblog.com)
  • 2008. 4,5-diarylisoxazole Hsp90 chaperone inhibitors: potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer . (ub.edu)
  • 2009. Combining hit identification strategies: fragment-based and in silico approaches to orally active 2-aminothieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine inhibitors of the Hsp90 molecular chaperone . (ub.edu)
  • 2005. Novel, potent small-molecule inhibitors of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 discovered through structure-based design . (ub.edu)
  • Review: The HSP90 molecular chaperone-an enigmatic ATPase. (bvsalud.org)
  • Based on these findings, we developed a computational synthetic biology framework for design and re-engineering signal transduction networks and pathways that involve cross-talk between molecular chaperones and protein kinase clients. (utoronto.ca)
  • GENE-PRODUCT P185 research-areas: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology web-of-science-categories: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology number-of-cited-references: 169 times-cited: 41 usage-count-last-180-days: 0 usage-count-since-2013: 9 journal-iso: Adv.Protein Chem. (icr.ac.uk)
  • Department of Molecular Biology, Institute of Genetics and Animal Biotechnology of the Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. (mdpi.com)
  • A dynamic mix of experts in biology, chemistry, and medicine come together in the Sloan Kettering Institute lab of chemical biologist Gabriella Chiosis to investigate chaperone proteins involved in cancer. (mskcc.org)
  • Cancer biology has significantly benefited from the molecular-level detail provided by these tools, allowing elucidation of many perturbations underlying disease onset and progression. (nih.gov)
  • Figure 2: The HSP70 chaperone cycle. (nature.com)
  • We previously found that cytosolic chaperone pairs of the Hsp70 family and their DnaJ homolog cochaperones prevent nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis and heat-induced cell death. (bioone.org)
  • To better understand the significance of the induction of chaperones, the effect of preinduction of chaperones on CCl 4 -induced liver damage was analyzed. (bioone.org)
  • 2007. Inhibition of the heat shock protein 90 molecular chaperone in vitro and in vivo by novel, synthetic, potent resorcinylic pyrazole/isoxazole amide analogues . (ub.edu)
  • During the past 20 years, there has been a good deal focus on misfolding diseases within the areas of biochemistry and molecular biotechnology research. (projectsparadise.com)
  • The allosteric interactions and regulation of molecular chaperones and protein kinases allow for molecular communication and event coupling in signal transduction networks. (utoronto.ca)
  • Biophysical modeling of allosteric regulation in the protein kinases has offered additional insights into organizing principles of kinase activation by molecular chaperones that may be orchestrated by a cross-talk between key regulatory regions. (utoronto.ca)
  • Network-defined modularity of interacting components and cross-talk in signal transduction networks are quantified through molecular mechanism of allosteric regulation. (utoronto.ca)
  • These strategies involve rearrangements at the molecular level starting from transcription, regulation of mRNA processing, translation, and protein modification or its turnover. (intechopen.com)
  • D) Regulation of cellular α-synuclein by molecular chaperones. (unibas.ch)
  • Morimoto, R. I. Proteotoxic stress and inducible chaperone networks in neurodegenerative disease and aging. (nature.com)
  • Bonini, Auluck and colleagues showed last year that molecular chaperones can block the progression of neurodegenerative disease in Drosophila, suggesting that diseases like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's may result from reduced chaperone levels and might be averted by pharmacologically boosting chaperone activity. (scienceblog.com)
  • Chaperones are an integral part of a cell's protein quality control network by assisting in protein folding and are ubiquitous across diverse biological taxa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since protein folding, and therefore protein function, is susceptible to environmental conditions, chaperones could represent an important cellular aspect of biodiversity and environmental tolerance by organisms living in hazardous conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hartl, F. U. Molecular chaperones in cellular protein folding. (nature.com)
  • Protein folding is often mediated by molecular chaperones. (rcsb.org)
  • The highly homologous chaperone domains are interchangeable between pre-proteins and release themselves after protein folding. (rcsb.org)
  • Chaperone proteins play an essential role in protein folding, stability, and activity in healthy and pathological cells, including cancer cells", explains Djouder. (cnio.es)
  • Single-molecule fluorescence studies of Protein Folding and Molecular Chaperones. (uni-muenchen.de)
  • Comprehensive analysis of aggregation-inhibition effects of three major molecular chaperones working in Escherichia coli was conducted for~ 800 aggregation-prone cytosolic proteins. (nii.ac.jp)
  • The results revealed that many of the~ 800 aggregation-prone proteins were solubilized by either one of the two chaperones and most of the proteins that were not solubilized by either one of the three were solubilized by the combination of the three chaperone. (nii.ac.jp)
  • This projects was done to have a deep familiarity with how chaperones communicate with unstable, aggregation prone, misfolded proteins linked to human disease. (projectsparadise.com)
  • Small proteins fold spontaneously, but the development of increasingly larger proteins, which have more complex folding patterns and intramolecular interactions, would have required chaperones to prevent protein aggregation due to misfolding. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recently, a novel class of intramolecular chaperones has been identified in tailspike proteins of evolutionarily distant viruses, which require a C-terminal chaperone for correct folding. (rcsb.org)
  • Here we report the crystal structures of two intramolecular chaperone domains in either the released or the pre-cleaved form, revealing the role of the chaperone domain in the formation of a triple-beta-helix fold. (rcsb.org)
  • Sequence analysis shows a conservation of the intramolecular chaperones in functionally unrelated proteins sharing beta-helices as a common structural motif. (rcsb.org)
  • The oligomerization and fibrillation processes of hCt can be modulated by different factors such as pH, solvent, peptide concentration, and chaperones. (unifg.it)
  • Thus, in this study, the structure of the Keif peptide part have been investigated by using both atomisic molecular dynamics. (lu.se)
  • Molecular chaperone Hsp104 can promote yeast prion generation. (nih.gov)
  • By showcasing a family of cyclin-dependent (CDK) kinases that display a broad repertoire of chaperone dependencies, we discovered that unique functional dynamics signatures and chaperone addiction of CDK4 and CDK7 client proteins can explain divergences in their regulatory mechanisms that require a confluence of events, including formation of the inhibitory ternary complex, substrate recruitment and activation loop phosphorylation. (utoronto.ca)
  • In the research presented in our paper , we developed and characterized minimal congener transmembrane/juxtamembrane domain models of ADAM10 and BACE1 with all-atom and coarse-grained temperature replica exchange and conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in various membrane environments. (biophysics.org)
  • By increasing client backbone dynamics, the chaperone facilitates the search for the native structure. (unibas.ch)
  • We want to derive quantitative predictors for chaperone function, unravel atomic-level details of how clients are recognized, understand how the interplay works between chaperone and client dynamics and study how basic chaperone function is embedded into complex functional cycles. (unibas.ch)
  • To avoid these dangers, cells invest in a complex network of molecular chaperones, which use ingenious mechanisms to prevent aggregation and promote efficient folding. (nature.com)
  • In this review, we focus on thiol-based activation mechanisms of stress-sensing chaperones. (nih.gov)
  • The aims of the project are (I) to better understand the molecular mechanisms of Parkinson's disease and to find potential therapeutic strategies based on BRICHOS and (II) to develop new tools for diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders using biomarkers. (varbi.com)
  • We employ high-resolution NMR studies of large chaperone-client complexes to provide an atomic resolution description of their structure and conformation and understand molecular mechanisms underlying their function. (unibas.ch)
  • Molecular chaperones are proteins which have been classified as agents that aid other proteins to fold accurately and also avert aggregation. (projectsparadise.com)
  • Little is known about the changes in molecular structure of chaperones as they help substrate proteins to fold. (nanowerk.com)
  • Endothelial cell α-globin and its molecular chaperone α-hemoglobin-stabilizing protein regulate arteriolar contractility. (uthsc.edu)
  • Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a diverse class of molecular chaperones that assist in folding under stress. (wikipedia.org)
  • Previously characterized as a molecular chaperone, CLU is expressed prominently by epithelia at fluid-tissue interfaces and secreted into bodily fluids, where it protects cells and tissues against damaging stress. (edu.au)
  • Yan D. et al "Paeoniflorin, a novel heat shock protein-inducing compound" Cell Stress Chaperones. (wellnessadvantage.com)
  • Upon stress exposure, these chaperones convert into high affinity binding platforms for unfolding proteins and protect cells against the accumulation of potentially toxic protein aggregates. (nih.gov)
  • Their chaperone activity is independent of ATP, a feature that becomes especially important under oxidative stress conditions, where cellular ATP levels drop and canonical ATP-dependent chaperones no longer operate. (nih.gov)
  • We will give an overview over the different strategies that cells evolved to rapidly increase the pool of ATP-independent chaperones upon oxidative stress and provide mechanistic insights into how stress conditions are used to convert abundant cellular proteins into ATP-independent holding chaperones. (nih.gov)
  • Workplace exposures equivalent to no or low observable proteins and other molecular chaperones (valosin-containing pro- adverse effect concentrations in animals: Step by step tein or VCP) are up-regulated to handle the increase of misfolded approach and damaged proteins which are causing oxidative stress. (cdc.gov)
  • Heat shock protein 47 (HSP47) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident collagen-specific chaperone and essential for proper formation of the characteristic collagen triple helix. (uni-koeln.de)
  • This PhD project concerns the study of amyloid formation in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, and the implication of molecular chaperones, in particular the BRICHOS domain. (varbi.com)
  • Folding of early proteins would have been error-prone in ancient cell cytosol and chaperones would have been needed to assist in unfolding and re-folding. (wikipedia.org)
  • Figure 5: Organization of chaperone pathways in the cytosol. (nature.com)
  • thus, transcription errors represent a new molecular mechanism by which cells can acquire disease phenotypes. (nih.gov)
  • Now, researchers have been able to follow in real time the structural changes that occur in an important type of chaperone as it coaxes an unfolded substrate protein into shape. (nanowerk.com)
  • One of the researchers who will focus on the role of chaperones in the correct folding of cellular proteins is Johannes Buchner, from the Technical University of Munich, Germany. (cnio.es)
  • Both inhibition of chaperones supporting accumulation of hyperphosphorylated species (e.g. (nature.com)
  • Molecular Chaperones" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (jefferson.edu)
  • In protein science , Molecular Chaperones , in our body's cells, are a family of cellular proteins that mediate the correct assembly or disassembly of polypeptides and their associated ligands. (wellnessadvantage.com)
  • Therapeutic potential of the molecular chaperone and matrix metallopro" by M. Elizabeth Fini, Shinwu Jeong et al. (edu.au)
  • Our study offers a systems-based perspective on drug design and re-engineering of signaling networks by unravelling relationships between protein kinase networks with molecular chaperones and binding specificity of targeted kinase drugs. (utoronto.ca)
  • A peculiar family of proteins that could become the target of a new generation of cancer drugs, some of which are already undergoing clinical trials, are molecular chaperones. (cnio.es)
  • Optimized expression of a synthetic gene encoding a beta-glucosidase in E. coli using molecular chaperones. (lu.se)
  • We report 8 patients from 7 Jordanian families, 6 of whom underwent genetic testing and were found to have a 12 bp (155-166 del) deletion within the tubulin-specific chaperone E (TBCE gene) in exon 3 at 1q42-43. (who.int)
  • It is linked to the TBCE gene on chromosome 1q42-43 which encodes for the tubulin-specific chaperone E protein [2-4]. (who.int)
  • Insertion of proteins into the bacterial outer membrane is mediated by a dedicated chaperone machinery. (unibas.ch)
  • Although they take part in the assembly process, molecular chaperones are not components of the final structures. (reference.md)
  • In our body's cells, Molecular Chaperones take part in the assembly process of polypeptides, but are not components of the final structures. (wellnessadvantage.com)
  • Molecular chaperones play a wide range of roles in the cell and they are required to assist both parasites as they move from a cold blooded insect vector to a warm blooded mammalian host. (ru.ac.za)
  • This project therefore aims to characterize the roles these molecular chaperones play in cancer pathology. (weizmann.ac.il)
  • 2016. Copper delivery to the CNS by CuATSM effectively treats motor neuron disease in SOD(G93A) mice co-expressing the Copper-Chaperone-for-SOD. . (oregonstate.edu)
  • The overarching goal of understanding molecular principles underlying differentiation of protein kinase clients and chaperone-based modulation of kinase activity is fundamental to understanding activity of many tumor-inducing signaling proteins. (utoronto.ca)
  • Network modelling and percolation analysis approaches were used to emulate thermal unfolding and characterize conformational landscapes of a wide range of protein kinases, revealing that chaperone dependency of protein kinase clients may be linked with the elevated conformational mobility of their inactive states induced by dynamic and energetic polarization of kinase lobes. (utoronto.ca)
  • Dr Jamaspishvili has ongoing research interests in molecular and digital pathology of genitourinary cancers. (upstate.edu)
  • The evolutionary development of chaperones is highly linked to the evolution of proteins in general, as their primary function is dependent on the presence of proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular chaperones belong to a family of evolutionary highly preserved proteins known as heat shock proteins (HSP). (cnio.es)
  • As a result, despite our increased knowledge of the molecular bases of cancer, the translation to clinical medicine has lagged significantly behind. (nih.gov)
  • In other words, a tumour cell needs chaperone proteins to survive and proliferate. (cnio.es)
  • These potent effects are driven by curcumin's ability to induce G2/M cell cycle arrest, induce autophagy, activate apoptosis, disrupt molecular signaling, inhibit invasion and metastasis, and increase the efficacy of current chemotherapeutics. (hindawi.com)
  • To demonstrate the power of this technology, we will generate a molecular disease fingerprint allowing differentiation between three clinically indistinguishable yet biochemically distinct disease pathways underlying the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme. (nih.gov)
  • As explained by Paul Workman, president of The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) - one of the main cancer drug research centres in the world - cancer cells present specific types of damage due to their very nature, and chaperone proteins are precisely what enable them to survive that damage. (cnio.es)
  • Therefore, a possible strategy to combat cancer would be to block the chaperone proteins. (cnio.es)
  • More basic issues will also be addressed, such as our understanding of exactly how chaperone proteins carry out their functions in cells and what their role in cancer and other ageing processes are. (cnio.es)
  • Findings about proteins called molecular chaperones are shedding new light on possible approaches to cancer treatment. (mskcc.org)
  • Molecular cancer therapeutics. (ub.edu)
  • Our ongoing projects in the field of chaperone biophysics address fundamental questions. (unibas.ch)
  • Additionally we discovered improved expression of the molecular chaperone BiP in cells challenged with TTR oligomers. (projectsparadise.com)
  • Here, we exposed oysters to acidification and hypoxia to examine their physiological responses (molecular defense and immune response), changes in community structure of their associated microbial community, and changes in water nutrient concentrations to evaluate how acidification and hypoxia will alter the oyster holobiont's ecological role. (frontiersin.org)
  • The yeast prions [PSI+] and [URE3] are molecular degenerative diseases. (nih.gov)
  • les analyses génétiques réalisées sur six d'entre eux ont révélé une délétion de 12 bp (155-166 del) dans l'exon 3 localisé en 1q42-43 dans le gène TBCE codant la protéine chaperon E spécifique de la tubuline. (who.int)
  • One observation in line with this hypothesis is chaperone buffering, where the activity of a chaperone masks or "buffers" deleterious or destabilizing mutations in a client protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • This seminal study puts forward the idea that chaperones function in buffering the otherwise deleterious consequences of mutations. (nature.com)
  • Chaperones enable newly synthesized proteins to adopt the precise three-dimensional conformation that is necessary for their biological function. (nanowerk.com)
  • ApoJ (clusterin) , also known as testosterone repressed prostate message-2, sulfated glycoprotien-2, and Sp-40 and CLU, functions as a secreted molecular chaperone protein , which may have either an intracellular or extracellular function. (wellnessadvantage.com)
  • Molecular chaperones play a key role in cellular processes, including protein homeostasis, but also in membrane protein transport and biogenesis. (unibas.ch)
  • Chaperones also affect the evolution of proteins in general, as many proteins fundamentally require chaperones to fold or are naturally prone to misfolding, and therefore mitigates protein aggregation. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the fold of a protein is sensitive to environmental conditions, such as temperature and pH, and thus chaperones are needed to keep proteins in their functional fold across various environmental conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among our primary findings is the emerging evidence that a small number of functional motifs may be utilized by the chaperone and protein kinases to act collectively as central regulators of the intermolecular communications, ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding in signaling networks. (utoronto.ca)
  • The molecular basis of these interactions and pathway triaging, however, are unknown. (weizmann.ac.il)