Mites: Any arthropod of the subclass ACARI except the TICKS. They are minute animals related to the spiders, usually having transparent or semitransparent bodies. They may be parasitic on humans and domestic animals, producing various irritations of the skin (MITE INFESTATIONS). Many mite species are important to human and veterinary medicine as both parasite and vector. Mites also infest plants.Mite Infestations: Infestations with arthropods of the subclass ACARI, superorder Acariformes.Tetranychidae: Family of spider MITES, in the superfamily Tetranychoidea, suborder Trombidiformes.Pyroglyphidae: Family of house dust mites, in the superfamily Analgoidea, order Astigmata. They include the genera Dermatophagoides and Euroglyphus.Acari: A large, subclass of arachnids comprising the MITES and TICKS, including parasites of plants, animals, and humans, as well as several important disease vectors.Antigens, Dermatophagoides: Antigens from the house dust mites (DERMATOPHAGOIDES), mainly D. farinae and D. pteronyssinus. They are proteins, found in mite feces or mite extracts, that can cause ASTHMA and other allergic diseases such as perennial rhinitis (RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, PERENNIAL) and atopic dermatitis (DERMATITIS, ATOPIC). More than 11 groups of Dermatophagoides ALLERGENS have been defined. Group I allergens, such as Der f I and Der p I from the above two species, are among the strongest mite immunogens in humans.Sarcoptes scabiei: A species of mite that causes SCABIES in humans and sarcoptic mange in other animals. Specific variants of S. scabiei exist for humans and animals, but many have the ability to cross species and cause disease.Acaridae: Family of MITES, in the superfamily Acaroidea, order Astigmata. They are frequently found in cereal-based foodstuffs including GRAIN and FLOUR.Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus: Species of European house dust mite, in the family PYROGLYPHIDAE. It is the most commonly found house dust mite.Scabies: A contagious cutaneous inflammation caused by the bite of the mite SARCOPTES SCABIEI. It is characterized by pruritic papular eruptions and burrows and affects primarily the axillae, elbows, wrists, and genitalia, although it can spread to cover the entire body.Arthropod Proteins: Proteins synthesized by organisms belonging to the phylum ARTHROPODA. Included in this heading are proteins from the subdivisions ARACHNIDA; CRUSTACEA; and HORSESHOE CRABS. Note that a separate heading for INSECT PROTEINS is listed under this heading.Allergens: Antigen-type substances that produce immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Dermatophagoides farinae: Species of American house dust mite, in the family PYROGLYPHIDAE.Acaricides: A pesticide or chemical agent that kills mites and ticks. This is a large class that includes carbamates, formamides, organochlorines, organophosphates, etc, that act as antibiotics or growth regulators.Tick Control: Chemical, biological, or medical measures designed to prevent the spread of ticks or the concomitant infestations which result in tick-borne diseases. It includes the veterinary as well as the public health aspects of tick and mite control.Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Psoroptidae: Family of parasitic MITES, in the superfamily Sarcoptoidea, order Astigmata. Genera include Psoroptes and Chorioptes.Varroidae: A family of MITES in the subclass ACARI. It includes the single genus Varroa.Immunoglobulin E: An immunoglobulin associated with MAST CELLS. Overexpression has been associated with allergic hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial: Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the nose similar to that found in hay fever except that symptoms persist throughout the year. The causes are usually air-borne allergens, particularly dusts, feathers, molds, animal fur, etc.Inverted Repeat Sequences: Copies of nucleic acid sequence that are arranged in opposing orientation. They may lie adjacent to each other (tandem) or be separated by some sequence that is not part of the repeat (hyphenated). They may be true palindromic repeats, i.e. read the same backwards as forward, or complementary which reads as the base complement in the opposite orientation. Complementary inverted repeats have the potential to form hairpin loop or stem-loop structures which results in cruciform structures (such as CRUCIFORM DNA) when the complementary inverted repeats occur in double stranded regions.Hypersensitivity: Altered reactivity to an antigen, which can result in pathologic reactions upon subsequent exposure to that particular antigen.Skin Tests: Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.Household Articles: Various material objects and items in the home. It includes temporary or permanent machinery and appliances. It does not include furniture or interior furnishings (FURNITURE see INTERIOR DESIGN AND FURNISHINGS; INTERIOR FURNISHINGS see INTERIOR DESIGN AND FURNISHINGS).Floors and Floorcoverings: The surface of a structure upon which one stands or walks.Bees: Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.Predatory Behavior: Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.Bedding and Linens: Articles of cloth, usually cotton or rayon and other synthetic or cotton-blend fabrics, used in households, hospitals, physicians' examining rooms, nursing homes, etc., for sheets, pillow cases, toweling, gowns, drapes, and the like.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Cockroaches: Insects of the order Dictyoptera comprising several families including Blaberidae, BLATTELLIDAE, Blattidae (containing the American cockroach PERIPLANETA americana), Cryptocercidae, and Polyphagidae.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Citrus: A plant genus of the family RUTACEAE. They bear the familiar citrus fruits including oranges, grapefruit, lemons, and limes. There are many hybrids which makes the nomenclature confusing.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Silver: Silver. An element with the atomic symbol Ag, atomic number 47, and atomic weight 107.87. It is a soft metal that is used medically in surgical instruments, dental prostheses, and alloys. Long-continued use of silver salts can lead to a form of poisoning known as ARGYRIA.Sharks: A group of elongate elasmobranchs. Sharks are mostly marine fish, with certain species large and voracious.Citrus sinensis: A plant species of the genus CITRUS, family RUTACEAE that provides the familiar orange fruit which is also a source of orange oil.Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.ArchivesSoftware: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Spiders: Arthropods of the class ARACHNIDA, order Araneae. Except for mites and ticks, spiders constitute the largest order of arachnids, with approximately 37,000 species having been described. The majority of spiders are harmless, although some species can be regarded as moderately harmful since their bites can lead to quite severe local symptoms. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, p508; Smith, Insects and Other Arthropods of Medical Importance, 1973, pp424-430)Baths: The immersion or washing of the body or any of its parts in water or other medium for cleansing or medical treatment. It includes bathing for personal hygiene as well as for medical purposes with the addition of therapeutic agents, such as alkalines, antiseptics, oil, etc.Knowledge Bases: Collections of facts, assumptions, beliefs, and heuristics that are used in combination with databases to achieve desired results, such as a diagnosis, an interpretation, or a solution to a problem (From McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed).Spider Venoms: Venoms of arthropods of the order Araneida of the ARACHNIDA. The venoms usually contain several protein fractions, including ENZYMES, hemolytic, neurolytic, and other TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL.Hosta: A plant genus of the family LILIACEAE. Members contain steroidal saponins.Hazardous Waste: Waste products which threaten life, health, or the environment when improperly treated, stored, transported, disposed of, or otherwise managed.Hazardous Substances: Elements, compounds, mixtures, or solutions that are considered severely harmful to human health and the environment. They include substances that are toxic, corrosive, flammable, or explosive.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Tars: Viscous materials composed of complex, high-molecular-weight compounds derived from the distillation of petroleum or the destructive distillation of wood or coal. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Tobacco Products: Substances and products derived from NICOTIANA TABACUM.Aquatic Organisms: Organisms that live in water.

Evidence for suppressed activity of the transcription factor NFAT1 at its proximal binding element P0 in the IL-4 promoter associated with enhanced IL-4 gene transcription in T cells of atopic patients. (1/644)

Allergen-specific T cells in atopic patients are polarized IL-4-producing Th2 cells, promoting IgE synthesis by B cells. The molecular basis for increased IL-4 gene expression in atopy is not fully understood. IL-4 gene regulation in general involves the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors, of which NFAT1 and NFAT2 are most prominent in peripheral T cells. Recently, a unique inhibitory role of NFAT1 in IL-4 gene control was shown in the mouse. In a series of electrophoretic mobility shift assays with protein extracts of highly polarized Th2 clones from atopics and Th1 clones from controls we compared DNA-binding activities at the two NFAT-binding elements P0 and P1 of the crucial proximal human IL-4 promoter. At the most proximal P0 site, NFAT-containing complexes devoid of NFAT2 were readily inducible in the Th1 clones, but hardly or not in the Th2 clones. In contrast, both in Th1 and Th2 clones NFAT-containing complexes were strongly inducible at the P1 site, consisting of NFAT2 and a P0-compatible NFAT activity, without apparent differences between Th1 and Th2 clones. Like in Th2 clones, suppressed NFAT-P0 complex formation was observed also at the polyclonal level in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of three of five severe atopic dermatitis patients with strongly elevated serum IgE levels, but not in control PBMC. These findings suggest that high-level IL-4 production in atopic Th2 cells is associated with selective reduction of suppressive NFAT1 activity at the IL-4 P0 element and that some patients with this multifactorial disease may have a putative systemic disorder at this level.  (+info)

Role of the indoor environment in determining the severity of asthma. (2/644)

Allergen exposure can confound the management of asthma. To understand the potential mechanisms by which allergens increase the steroid requirements in atopic asthmatics, we examined the effects of allergens on glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) binding affinity and glucocorticoid (GC) responsiveness of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from atopic asthmatics. A significant reduction (p < 0.001) in the GCR binding affinity (Kd) was observed in ragweed-allergic asthmatics during ragweed pollen season compared with PBMC obtained before and after ragweed season. In vitro effects of allergen on PBMC GCR Kd were also examined by incubating PBMC from atopic asthmatics with allergen (ragweed and cat) versus Candida albicans. GCR binding affinity was significantly reduced after incubation with ragweed (p < 0.001) or cat allergen (p < 0.001) compared with baseline or C. albicans stimulation. This effect was limited to atopic asthmatics in that in vitro cat allergen incubation for 48 h failed to significantly alter GCR binding affinity in nonasthmatic, atopic individuals. These allergen-induced reductions in GCR binding affinity also rendered the PBMC less sensitive to the inhibitory effects of hydrocortisone and dexamethasone on allergen-induced proliferation (p < 0.01). To test the hypothesis that allergen-induced alterations in GCR binding affinity were cytokine-induced, we examined the effects of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-4 neutralization using anticytokine antibodies. Addition of both anti-IL-2 and anti-IL-4 antibodies resulted in a significant (p < 0.001) inhibition of allergen-induced alterations in GCR binding affinity. Furthermore incubation with cat allergen induced significantly higher concentrations of IL-2 (p = 0.03) and IL-4 (p = 0.02) by PBMC from atopic as compared with nonatopic subjects. Our current observations suggest that allergen exposure may contribute to poor asthma control by reducing GCR binding affinity in mononuclear cells. This appears to be mediated through IL-2 and IL-4. These findings may have important implications for novel approaches to the treatment of poorly controlled asthma.  (+info)

Effect of dampness at home in childhood on bronchial hyperreactivity in adolescence. (3/644)

BACKGROUND: Relatively little is known about risk factors for the persistence of asthma and respiratory symptoms from childhood into adolescence, and few studies have included objective measurements to assess outcomes and exposure. METHODS: From a large cross sectional study of all 4th grade school children in Munich (mean age 10.2 years), 234 children (5%) with active asthma were identified. Of these, 155 (66%) were reinvestigated with lung function measurements and bronchial provocation three years later (mean age 13.5 years). RESULTS: At follow up 35.5% still had active asthma. Risk factors for persisting asthma symptoms in adolescence were more severe asthma (OR 4.94; CI 1.65 to 14.76; p = 0.004) or allergic triggers (OR 3.54; CI 1.41 to 8.92; p = 0.007) in childhood. Dampness was associated with increased night time wheeze and shortness of breath but not with persisting asthma. Risk factors for bronchial hyperreactivity in adolescence were bronchial hyperreactivity in childhood (p = 0.004), symptoms triggered by allergen exposure (OR 5.47; CI 1.91 to 25.20; p = 0.029), and damp housing conditions (OR 16.14; CI 3.53 to 73.73; p < 0.001). In a subgroup in whom house dust mite antigen levels in the bed were measured (70% of the sample), higher mite antigen levels were associated with bronchial hyperreactivity (OR per quartile of mite antigen 2.30; CI 1.03 to 5.12; p = 0.042). Mite antigen levels were also significantly correlated with dampness (p = 0.05). However, the effect of dampness on bronchial hyperreactivity remained significant when adjusting for mite allergen levels (OR 5.77; CI 1.17 to 28.44; p = 0.031). CONCLUSION: Dampness at home is a significant risk factor for the persistence of bronchial hyperreactivity and respiratory symptoms in children with asthma. This risk is only partly explained by exposure to house dust mite antigen.  (+info)

Sensitivity and exposure to indoor allergens in adults with differing asthma severity. (4/644)

In asthma, it is uncertain whether there is an association between degrees of exposure to domestic allergens and asthma severity. The pattern of sensitivity and exposure to common indoor allergens was examined in subjects with differing asthma severity. Sensitivity to house dust mite, dog and cat allergen and exposure to Der p 1, Can f 1 and Fel d 1 were assessed by skin prick tests and settled dust analysis in 28 subjects with severe asthma and 28 age- and sex-matched subjects with mild asthma (two declined skin prick test). All severe asthmatic subjects had at least one positive skin test and 20 of the 28 subjects were positive to all three allergens. Fourteen of the 26 subjects with mild asthma who took skin prick tests were positive to at least one, and one of these subjects was positive to the three allergens tested. Except for bedroom Fel d 1, the proportion of severe asthmatics both sensitized and exposed to each allergen at each site was significantly greater than the proportion sensitized and exposed in the mild asthma group. The geometric mean allergen concentrations, with the exception of bedroom Fel d 1, were greater in sensitized severe asthmatics than the sensitized mild asthmatics, which was significant for Der p 1 in bedroom samples and Can f 1 in bedroom and living room samples. These results support an association between the degrees of domestic allergen exposure in sensitized individuals and asthma severity.  (+info)

Production of recombinant Der fI (a major mite allergen) by Aspergillus oryzae. (5/644)

Der fI is a major mite allergen. To produce Der fI by Aspergillus oryzae, we placed a DNA fragment encoding precursor-type recombinant Der fI E(-1)K (reDer fI E(-1) K), which had the C-terminal amino acid of the pro-sequence (Glu) changed to Lys, downstream of the glaA gene promoter and introduced it into Aspergillus oryzae. In liquid culture, most of the reDer fI E(-1)K produced by the transformants was degraded when culture was shaken vigorously. However, the degradation of reDer fI E(-1)K was suppressed when it was shaken gently. The processed reDer fI E(-1)K could be obtained after lysylendopeptidase and endoglycosidase Hf (Endo Hf) treatment. The yield of processed reDer fI E(-1)K was 8 mg/l. When the transformant was grown on a wheat bran culture, the yield of processed reDer fI E(-1)K reached 48 mg/kg. Because processed reDer fI E(-1)Ks obtained from both cultures had almost the same IgE-binding activity and elicited the same skin reaction as native Der fI, they could be very useful for diagnostic purposes or immunotherapy.  (+info)

IPD-1151T (suplatast tosilate) inhibits interleukin (IL)-13 release but not IL-4 release from basophils. (6/644)

The effect of suplatast tosilate (IPD-1151T), which is known to suppress interleukin (IL)-4 release from T cells, on the release of IL-4 and IL-13 from human peripheral basophils was investigated. Basophils were obtained from 16 mite-sensitive atopic asthmatic patients. IPD-1151T clearly inhibited the antigen-induced release of IL-13 but not IL-4. These results suggest that IPD-1151T possesses different activity for the regulation of cytokine release in basophils and T cells.  (+info)

A healthy home environment? (7/644)

Over the past seven years, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has consistently ranked indoor air pollution among the top five risks to public health. One of the most dangerous indoor air pollutants is carbon monoxide (CO). CO can be lethal, but perhaps more important, many people suffer ill health from chronic, often undetected exposure to low levels of this gas, resulting in fatigue, headache, dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. Another dangerous pollutant is volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which come from sources including building products, cleaning agents, and paints. One VOC, formaldehyde, can act as an irritant to the conjunctiva and upper and lower respiratory tract. Formaldehyde is also known to cause nasal cancer in test animals.  (+info)

Cloning and expression of Der f 6, a serine protease allergen from the house dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae. (8/644)

House dust mite allergen is thought to be a major cause of asthma. Characterization of these allergen molecules is therefore an important step for the development of effective diagnostic and therapeutic agents against mite-associated allergic disorders. Here we report molecular cloning and expression of the group 6 (chymotrypsin-like) allergen from the house dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae. Sequencing analysis indicates that cloned cDNA, designated Der f 6, encodes a 279 amino acid polypeptide which conserves a primary structure characteristic for chymotrypsin-like serine proteases found in mammals. Recombinant Der f 6 expressed in Escherichia coli bound IgE in a pool made of 20 sera, and induced histamine release from patients' peripheral blood cells.  (+info)

  • Diagnosis of mite infestations can be difficult because of the small size of most mites, but understanding how mites are adapted to feed within to the structure of the skin is useful. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chorioptes bovis infestations are found on cattle, sheep and horses but do not cause the severe reactions associated with Psoroptes mites. (wikipedia.org)
  • The house mouse mite, Liponyssoides sanguineus, may also be found in structures with house mouse infestations. (amazines.com)
  • Sparrows, starlings and pigeons are the birds most often associated with bird mite infestations in buildings. (iastate.edu)
  • This suggested to him (logically so) that immunity to the mites might develop, something that fits with the fact that ear mite infestations are more common in young animals. (kimberlymoynahan.com)
  • Children aged one - two years with a family history of allergy, who had a positive skin prick test to house dust mites, had a higher risk of developing asthma later in life. (healthcanal.com)
  • Lead author Dr Caroline Lodge from the University of Melbourne's School of Population Health said the identification of house dust mites as a predictor for asthma in high risk children, is a significant step forward in identifying high risk groups on whom we can trial interventions. (healthcanal.com)
  • House dust mite sensitivity amongst wheezy toddlers could be used as a clinical tool to assist parents in understanding the risk of asthma in their children. (healthcanal.com)
  • Researchers tested the children at the ages of one and two years, for single and multiple sensitivity to milk, egg, peanut, rye grass, cat and house hold dust mites and then again at the age of 12 for having asthma. (healthcanal.com)
  • We found in the children aged one - two years, that whatever the mix of sensitivity, if their skin reacted to house dust mites they had a higher chance of developing asthma later in life," Dr Lodge said. (healthcanal.com)
  • Our study did not show house dust mite caused asthma but it highlighted a strong correlation between sensitivity and more severe wheeze and asthma. (healthcanal.com)
  • HealthDay)-Occupational exposure to gas, dust, and fumes (GDF) increases the risk of mite sensitization, and is associated with asthma and wheeze in those who are mite-sensitized, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in Allergy . (medicalxpress.com)
  • The effect of GDF on asthma was modified by mite sensitization. (medicalxpress.com)
  • GDF correlated with physician-diagnosed asthma and wheeze in mite-sensitized subjects (adjusted odds ratios, 2.9 [95 percent confidence interval, 1.2 to 7.and 2.4 [95 percent confidence interval, 1.1 to 5. respectively). (medicalxpress.com)
  • However it's actually dust mites rather than dust itself that are troublesome for most asthmatics with 90% of people with asthma being sensitive to them. (allergybestbuys.co.uk)
  • If your asthma is triggered by dust mites, the best way to reduce asthma symptoms is to look after your asthma and make sure it's well managed, as this reduces the likelihood of you reacting to the dust mite droppings when you come into contact with them - they are impossible to avoid," says Dr Samantha Walker, Asthma UK's Research Director. (allergybestbuys.co.uk)
  • There is some evidence to suggest that children who are sensitised to house dust mites at an early age may go on to develop asthma. (purebiotics.co.nz)
  • If you suffer from asthma and are experiencing any of the above symptoms as well as difficulty breathing, pain or tightness in your chest, difficulty sleeping due to excessive coughing, or shortness of breath, then you may have a dust mite problem within your home. (purebiotics.co.nz)
  • Scientists at the Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin found which molecules of the house dust mites are initially targeted by the immune system of children developing, even years later, allergic rhinitis and asthma. (charite.de)
  • The discovery, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology *, will open up new avenues not only to novel and more precise therapies, but also to a successful prediction and prevention of chronic rhinitis and asthma caused or aggravated by allergy to house dust mites. (charite.de)
  • Atopy and house dust mite sensitization as risk factors for asthma in children. (stallergenesgreer.com)
  • Signs of dust mite allergy include asthma when you enter a dusty room or are dusting or vacuuming. (buteyko.co.nz)
  • Second, as I read and fully believe the first commenter on this post, he obviously has a great depth of knowledge and understanding of insects & mites, wherein it is fascinating to read his comment and sense even he isn't fully certain what the mite and it's characteristics are. (whatsthatbug.com)
  • At the IgNobel ceremony, he recited a poem he had written about ear mites and then handed out a selection of dead insects to the audience. (kimberlymoynahan.com)
  • The spiny rat mite ( Laelaps echidnina ) will hide in areas near nests and resting areas of rats and feed by night. (thermapure.com)
  • However, the survival of larvae laid on their hosts or in nests of their hosts is high, and the life-cycle is short, so mite populations can expand rapidly under favorable conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • An abundance of soil nutrients appears to be linked to clover mite populations. (missouri.edu)
  • Larger populations of clover mites are often associated with newly established lawns or old lawns that have been heavily fertilized. (missouri.edu)
  • Prevention is the most important step in controlling populations of clover mites. (missouri.edu)
  • Populations of mites in the soil under a dead body change over time, yielding clues to PMI and other forensic measurements, particularly when a body has been moved between death and discovery (Goff, 2000). (bugsinthenews.info)
  • Sarcoptic mites as adults are microscopic, nearly circular in outline, and their legs are short, adapted for burrowing. (wikipedia.org)
  • PureBiotics® works at the microscopic level, which is perfect for targeting and eliminating dust mites. (purebiotics.co.nz)
  • After all, mites suffer from the same kind of neglect as nematodes, a large grouping of sub-and-near-microscopic worms that I've spent years studying. (bugsinthenews.info)
  • Other common sarcoptic mites are in the genus Notoedres, and the genus Knemidokoptes (or Cnemidocoptes) which infest birds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cheyletiella ("walking dandruff") mites may also infest birds, but are more frequently found on pets such as dogs, cats and rabbits. (thermapure.com)
  • The life-cycle of mites begins with eggs are laid on the vertebrate animal host or within the nest or environment of the host. (wikipedia.org)
  • Female clover mites lay bright red eggs in protected areas such as cracks and crevices, where they stay relatively dry. (missouri.edu)
  • Adult mites and eggs overwinter in protected areas. (missouri.edu)
  • It takes just three weeks for a mite to emerge from its egg and start producing eggs itself. (dogsandtreats.com)
  • If a pet bird or rodent is infested with mites, it should be treated by a veterinarian. (amazines.com)
  • Bird and rodent mites normally live on the host or in their nests, but will migrate to human occupied areas of the structure if their host dies or leaves the nest. (thermapure.com)
  • There are several types of rodent mites that typically feed on humans. (thermapure.com)
  • Mites are small invertebrates, most of which are free living but some are parasitic. (wikipedia.org)
  • People who live or work in structures that are rat infested or that house nesting birds are frequently attacked by parasitic mites that migrate from their nests into the occupied portion of the building. (thermapure.com)
  • Regular cleaning is necessary, and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters for vacuuming have been shown to reduce dust mites. (staugustine.com)
  • Clover mites do not bite people or pets and do not damage the house or furniture, but they can stain light-colored walls, carpet, fabrics or papers when crushed. (missouri.edu)
  • Several types of mites can be found in homes and of these a few may bite humans. (amazines.com)
  • I am pretty certain that is a type of bird mite, and if that's the case you should check places on your body where they bite. (whatsthatbug.com)
  • The house mouse mite ( Liponyssoides saguineus ) prefers mice but will also bite rats and humans, often causing a rash around the bite. (thermapure.com)
  • Bird mites can bite humans but are not a health threat. (iastate.edu)
  • These novel findings suggest that components of GDF may act as adjuvants that facilitate sensitization to mites, and that mite-sensitized individuals may be especially susceptible to inhalant occupational exposures," the authors write. (medicalxpress.com)