Decapodiformes: A superorder of CEPHALOPODS comprised of squid, cuttlefish, and their relatives. Their distinguishing feature is the modification of their fourth pair of arms into tentacles, resulting in 10 limbs.MiningCoal MiningPneumoconiosis: A diffuse parenchymal lung disease caused by inhalation of dust and by tissue reaction to their presence. These inorganic, organic, particulate, or vaporized matters usually are inhaled by workers in their occupational environment, leading to the various forms (ASBESTOSIS; BYSSINOSIS; and others). Similar air pollution can also have deleterious effects on the general population.Radon: A naturally radioactive element with atomic symbol Rn, atomic number 86, and atomic weight 222. It is a member of the noble gas family found in soil, and is released during the decay of radium.Uranium: Uranium. A radioactive element of the actinide series of metals. It has an atomic symbol U, atomic number 92, and atomic weight 238.03. U-235 is used as the fissionable fuel in nuclear weapons and as fuel in nuclear power reactors.Silicosis: A form of pneumoconiosis resulting from inhalation of dust containing crystalline form of SILICON DIOXIDE, usually in the form of quartz. Amorphous silica is relatively nontoxic.Coal: A natural fuel formed by partial decomposition of vegetable matter under certain environmental conditions.Gold: A yellow metallic element with the atomic symbol Au, atomic number 79, and atomic weight 197. It is used in jewelry, goldplating of other metals, as currency, and in dental restoration. Many of its clinical applications, such as ANTIRHEUMATIC AGENTS, are in the form of its salts.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Anthracosis: A diffuse parenchymal lung disease caused by accumulation of inhaled CARBON or coal dust. The disease can progress from asymptomatic anthracosis to massive lung fibrosis. This lung lesion usually occurs in coal MINERS, but can be seen in urban dwellers and tobacco smokers.Tin: A trace element that is required in bone formation. It has the atomic symbol Sn, atomic number 50, and atomic weight 118.71.Silicon Dioxide: Transparent, tasteless crystals found in nature as agate, amethyst, chalcedony, cristobalite, flint, sand, QUARTZ, and tridymite. The compound is insoluble in water or acids except hydrofluoric acid.Air Pollutants, Radioactive: Pollutants, present in air, which exhibit radioactivity.Radon Daughters: Short-lived radioactive decay products of radon that include 216-Po, 214-Pb, 214-Bi, and 214-Po. They have an effective half-life of about 30 minutes and are solids that can deposit on the bronchial airways during inhalation and exhalation. This results in exposure of the respiratory airways to alpha radiation and can lead to diseases of the respiratory system, including lung cancer. (From Casarett and Doull's Toxicology, 4th ed, p740)Silicotuberculosis: Pulmonary or extrapulmonary infection caused by MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS or nontuberculous mycobacteria in a patient with silicosis.Asbestos, Amphibole: A class of asbestos that includes silicates of magnesium, iron, calcium, and sodium. The fibers are generally brittle and cannot be spun, but are more resistant to chemicals and heat than ASBESTOS, SERPENTINE. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (U.S.): An institute of the CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION which is responsible for assuring safe and healthful working conditions and for developing standards of safety and health. Research activities are carried out pertinent to these goals.Asbestos, Serpentine: A type of asbestos that occurs in nature as the dihydrate of magnesium silicate. It exists in two forms: antigorite, a plated variety, and chrysotile, a fibrous variety. The latter makes up 95% of all asbestos products. (From Merck Index, 11th ed, p.893)Czechoslovakia: Created as a republic in 1918 by Czechs and Slovaks from territories formerly part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The country split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia 1 January 1993.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Anthracosilicosis: A form of pneumoconiosis caused by inhalation of dust that contains both CARBON and crystalline SILICON DIOXIDE. These foreign matters induce fibrous nodule formation in the lung.Maximum Allowable Concentration: The maximum exposure to a biologically active physical or chemical agent that is allowed during an 8-hour period (a workday) in a population of workers, or during a 24-hour period in the general population, which does not appear to cause appreciable harm, whether immediate or delayed for any period, in the target population. (From Lewis Dictionary of Toxicology, 1st ed)Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced: Tumors, cancer or other neoplasms produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.Air Pollutants, Occupational: Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.Silicic Acid: A hydrated form of silicon dioxide. It is commonly used in the manufacture of TOOTHPASTES and as a stationary phase for CHROMATOGRAPHY.Asbestosis: A form of pneumoconiosis caused by inhalation of asbestos fibers which elicit potent inflammatory responses in the parenchyma of the lung. The disease is characterized by interstitial fibrosis of the lung, varying from scattered sites to extensive scarring of the alveolar interstitium.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Africa, Southern: The geographical area of Africa comprising ANGOLA; BOTSWANA; LESOTHO; MALAWI; MOZAMBIQUE; NAMIBIA; SOUTH AFRICA; SWAZILAND; ZAMBIA; and ZIMBABWE.Asbestos: Asbestos. Fibrous incombustible mineral composed of magnesium and calcium silicates with or without other elements. It is relatively inert chemically and used in thermal insulation and fireproofing. Inhalation of dust causes asbestosis and later lung and gastrointestinal neoplasms.Vital Capacity: The volume of air that is exhaled by a maximal expiration following a maximal inspiration.Quartz: Quartz (SiO2). A glassy or crystalline form of silicon dioxide. Many colored varieties are semiprecious stones. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Workers' Compensation: Insurance coverage providing compensation and medical benefits to individuals because of work-connected injuries or disease.Forced Expiratory Volume: Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.Appalachian Region: A geographical area of the United States with no definite boundaries but comprising northeastern Alabama, northwestern Georgia, northwestern South Carolina, western North Carolina, eastern Kentucky, eastern Tennessee, western Virginia, West Virginia, western Maryland, southwestern Pennsylvania, southern Ohio, and southern New York.Thorium: Thorium. A radioactive element of the actinide series of metals. It has an atomic symbol Th, atomic number 90, and atomic weight 232.04. It is used as fuel in nuclear reactors to produce fissionable uranium isotopes. Because of its radioopacity, various thorium compounds are used to facilitate visualization in roentgenography.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Wolfram Syndrome: A hereditary condition characterized by multiple symptoms including those of DIABETES INSIPIDUS; DIABETES MELLITUS; OPTIC ATROPHY; and DEAFNESS. This syndrome is also known as DIDMOAD (first letter of each word) and is usually associated with VASOPRESSIN deficiency. It is caused by mutations in gene WFS1 encoding wolframin, a 100-kDa transmembrane protein.Job Description: Statement of the position requirements, qualifications for the position, wage range, and any special conditions expected of the employee.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.ColoradoRespiratory Tract NeoplasmsMesothelioma: A tumor derived from mesothelial tissue (peritoneum, pleura, pericardium). It appears as broad sheets of cells, with some regions containing spindle-shaped, sarcoma-like cells and other regions showing adenomatous patterns. Pleural mesotheliomas have been linked to exposure to asbestos. (Dorland, 27th ed)Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Accidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.Luffa: A plant genus of the family CUCURBITACEAE known for the fruit which is the source of the luffa sponge and the seeds which contain luffin.Air Pollution, RadioactiveMercury: A silver metallic element that exists as a liquid at room temperature. It has the atomic symbol Hg (from hydrargyrum, liquid silver), atomic number 80, and atomic weight 200.59. Mercury is used in many industrial applications and its salts have been employed therapeutically as purgatives, antisyphilitics, disinfectants, and astringents. It can be absorbed through the skin and mucous membranes which leads to MERCURY POISONING. Because of its toxicity, the clinical use of mercury and mercurials is diminishing.Asbestos, Crocidolite: A lavender, acid-resistant asbestos.Inhalation Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents by inhaling them.Geological Phenomena: The inanimate matter of Earth, the structures and properties of this matter, and the processes that affect it.Pulmonary Fibrosis: A process in which normal lung tissues are progressively replaced by FIBROBLASTS and COLLAGEN causing an irreversible loss of the ability to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream via PULMONARY ALVEOLI. Patients show progressive DYSPNEA finally resulting in death.Vehicle Emissions: Gases, fumes, vapors, and odors escaping from the cylinders of a gasoline or diesel internal-combustion engine. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Mass Chest X-Ray: X-ray screening of large groups of persons for diseases of the lung and heart by means of radiography of the chest.Aluminum Silicates: Any of the numerous types of clay which contain varying proportions of Al2O3 and SiO2. They are made synthetically by heating aluminum fluoride at 1000-2000 degrees C with silica and water vapor. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)Tattooing: The indelible marking of TISSUES, primarily SKIN, by pricking it with NEEDLES to imbed various COLORING AGENTS. Tattooing of the CORNEA is done to colorize LEUKOMA spots.Autopsy: Postmortem examination of the body.Occupational Medicine: Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.Arsenic: A shiny gray element with atomic symbol As, atomic number 33, and atomic weight 75. It occurs throughout the universe, mostly in the form of metallic arsenides. Most forms are toxic. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), arsenic and certain arsenic compounds have been listed as known carcinogens. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Western Australia: A state in western Australia. Its capital is Perth. It was first visited by the Dutch in 1616 but the English took possession in 1791 and permanent colonization began in 1829. It was a penal settlement 1850-1888, became part of the colonial government in 1886, and was granted self government in 1890. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1329)Epidemiological Monitoring: Collection, analysis, and interpretation of data about the frequency, distribution, and consequences of disease or health conditions, for use in the planning, implementing, and evaluating public health programs.Marburg Virus Disease: An RNA virus infection of rhesus, vervet, and squirrel monkeys transmissible to man.Geology: The science of the earth and other celestial bodies and their history as recorded in the rocks. It includes the study of geologic processes of an area such as rock formations, weathering and erosion, and sedimentation. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Tinea Pedis: Dermatological pruritic lesion in the feet, caused by Trichophyton rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, or Epidermophyton floccosum.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Metallurgy: The science, art, or technology dealing with processes involved in the separation of metals from their ores, the technique of making or compounding the alloys, the techniques of working or heat-treating metals, and the mining of metals. It includes industrial metallurgy as well as metallurgical techniques employed in the preparation and working of metals used in dentistry, with special reference to orthodontic and prosthodontic appliances. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p494)Retirement: The state of being retired from one's position or occupation.Mineral Fibers: Long, pliable, cohesive natural or manufactured filaments of various lengths. They form the structure of some minerals. The medical significance lies in their potential ability to cause various types of PNEUMOCONIOSIS (e.g., ASBESTOSIS) after occupational or environmental exposure. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p708)Occupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Asbestos, Amosite: Asbestos, grunerite. A monoclinic amphibole form of asbestos having long fibers and a high iron content. It is used in insulation. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Healthy Worker Effect: Phenomenon of workers' usually exhibiting overall death rates lower than those of the general population due to the fact that the severely ill and disabled are ordinarily excluded from employment.Passeriformes: A widely distributed order of perching BIRDS, including more than half of all bird species.Gasoline: Volative flammable fuel (liquid hydrocarbons) derived from crude petroleum by processes such as distillation reforming, polymerization, etc.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Respiration Disorders: Diseases of the respiratory system in general or unspecified or for a specific respiratory disease not available.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Bronchitis: Inflammation of the large airways in the lung including any part of the BRONCHI, from the PRIMARY BRONCHI to the TERTIARY BRONCHI.Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Pulmonary Emphysema: Enlargement of air spaces distal to the TERMINAL BRONCHIOLES where gas-exchange normally takes place. This is usually due to destruction of the alveolar wall. Pulmonary emphysema can be classified by the location and distribution of the lesions.Southwestern United States: The geographic area of the southwestern region of the United States. The states usually included in this region are Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah.
  • OK, so you can "get" all of the airy fairy, mumbo jumbo, make believe, pretending friend soul stuff but you can't accept or maybe even entertain that there could be bacteria that want the chlorides from gold chloride and expell the gold as waste? (abovetopsecret.com)
  • If you're not into holistic medicine, this may just sound like mumbo jumbo , but it's important to see how the inhaler works before you discount it. (tiphero.com)
  • It is the kind of mystic Mumbo-Jumbo to which capitalism is driven when austere reason pronounces sentence of death upon it. (wikiquote.org)
  • Ever ponder what path the Star Wars films might have taken had they focused upon the Han Solos and Bobba Fetts of the galaxy instead of all those mumbo jumbo-ing Jedi? (dvdmoviecentral.com)
  • The Jumbo Asphalt Company established mining operations there and, by 1904, the community was known as Jumbo Mines. (wikipedia.org)
  • By 1906, Jumbo Mines was home to at least 40 families. (wikipedia.org)
  • Within a minute I am on his settee in the tiny front room and am having my ears pinned back about Siglo XX - or '20th Century' - one of the largest and most infamous tin mines in the world: terrible working condittions, miners dying with lungs full of silica dust, pitiful wages. (newint.org)
  • A study conducted by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) revealed that by the age 50 approximately 90% of miners have hearing impairment, compared to only 10% of non-occupationally noise-exposed workers. (cdc.gov)
  • Impoverished, in poor health, and hungry, the miners encourage Étienne to aim a rebel opposed to the corporate, an overthrow of "the tyranny of capital, which used to be ravenous the employee. (alusdomundo.com)
  • Fully enclosing the jumbo drill operator location within a cab is an effective method of reducing noise exposure for the operator. (cdc.gov)
  • Whereas modern jumbos usually fitted with rubber tyres and diesel powered, there are also exist variants with steel wheels, to ride on rails and even single carriaged sled-mounted ones. (wikipedia.org)
  • After each blast a haze of silica dust hangs in the air ready to be sucked into the miners lungs. (newint.org)
  • An expert miner, "Miner Mike," sees this potentially disastrous situation and educates the young miners about what could happen if they continued to leave supports out. (cdc.gov)
  • A drilling jumbo consists of one, two or three rock drill carriages, sometimes a platform, which the miner stands on to load the holes with explosives, clear the face of the tunnel or else. (wikipedia.org)
  • How holes for bolts are drilled correctly using jacklegs, In response, training videos that focus on safe practices during drill jumbos, and bolting jumbos. (cdc.gov)
  • During World War II Jumbo and Moyers were the site of mishaps with international repercussions, two of them fatal. (wikipedia.org)
  • Based on data provided by the Parker Bay Company & Raw Materials Group, which does market research on mining equipment, NIOSH estimates that roughly 50% of the jumbo drill machines used in the world do not have enclosed cabs. (cdc.gov)
  • The largest aircraft in the world must transport the heaviest load ever carried by air, miners in So. (wn.com)
  • The line stretched from Jumbo south through the Impson Valley, rounding the foot of Parker Mountain into Moyers, where it connected with the railhead at the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway. (wikipedia.org)
  • To the south miners penetrated the expected and projected fault below the 2400-foot level. (origsix.com)
  • Bevan was born in Tredegar , Monmouthshire , in the South Wales Valleys and on the northern edge of the South Wales coalfield , the son of miner David Bevan. (thefullwiki.org)
  • His son (Aneurin Bevan) also joined the Tredegar branch of the South Wales Miners' Federation and became a trade union activist: he was head of his local Miners' Lodge at only 19. (thefullwiki.org)
  • In 1919, he won a scholarship to the Central Labour College in London, sponsored by the South Wales Miners' Federation. (thefullwiki.org)
  • When the strike started on 3 May 1926, Bevan soon emerged as one of the leaders of the South Wales miners. (thefullwiki.org)
  • In recent years the territory to the west of Jumbo has been incorporated into McGee Creek State Park, particularly the area of Wildcat and Bugaboo canyons. (wikipedia.org)
  • He introduces the young miners to several expert miners, who explain how to install different types of supports correctly, as well as share what experience has taught them over the years. (cdc.gov)
  • The Jumbo specimen was displayed for the first time. (origsix.com)
  • MOSS reduces expenditure due to the real-time data directly provided to the miner. (mining-technology.com)
  • His new job arrived in time for him to head the local miners against the colliery companies in what would become the General Strike . (thefullwiki.org)
  • Miners are often excessively exposed for prolonged periods of time to loud noise that can cause debilitating hearing problems and lead to industrial deafness. (prochoice.com.au)
  • A miner in rubber boots says he knows where one of the Cussis lives however, Not the Cussi, not Mario Cussi, but his brother Higon. (newint.org)
  • When the explosion is to be nearby, the miners hurry into a tunnel refuge and sit placidly chewing coca leaves until the danger is past. (newint.org)
  • The post office took its name from the Jumbo Asphalt Company, a prominent local employer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite improvements in the local roadways, Jumbo remains physically isolated from other communities in Pushmataha and Atoka counties. (wikipedia.org)
  • It features no interchange for Jumbo, however, causing local residents to venture to Daisy on the north to enter or exit the turnpike. (wikipedia.org)
  • His wage of £5 a week was paid by the members of the local Miners' Lodge. (thefullwiki.org)
  • The jumbo drill drifter and drill string were confirmed as prominent noise contributors to the sound level at the operator location. (cdc.gov)
  • Developed by Northern Survey Supply (NSS), MOSS incorporates a robotic total station to control layout activities related to surveying and the design location of the jumbo drill pattern layouts on active headings. (mining-technology.com)
  • We stocked up the fridge with supplies, then lounged on the wraparound couch to watch evening sports and movies on the jumbo satellite TV. (amazonaws.com)
  • Modern drilling jumbos are relatively large, there are however smaller ones for use in cramped conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The monopod wall mount is subsequently secured to the wall insert and becomes a steady platform for a laser theodolite, giving miners a synchronised control station to lay out line and grade measurements. (mining-technology.com)
  • This remained the case through recent decades, when the countryside around Jumbo emptied due to lack of economic opportunities and its churches, school, and post office closed. (wikipedia.org)
  • But, with the support of the Miners' Federation, the case was judged as one of victimisation and the company was forced to re-employ him. (thefullwiki.org)
  • A retired Queensland miner has told a black lung forum that he was disappointed that a mining company-appointed doctors - who told him he had bronchitis - did not know how to read chest X-rays. (aprs.com.au)
  • NEW YORK - It all started with Canadian mining company Inco Ltd. saying that it wanted to acquire nickel miner Falconbridge Ltd. (nbcnews.com)
  • Climbing to the top deck of the houseboat, I once again enjoyed the peace of the desert, feeling like one of those old miners who first explored the area for hidden treasures. (amazonaws.com)
  • More information on Jumbo and the Impson Valley may be found in the Pushmataha County Historical Society. (wikipedia.org)
  • Miners dropped 1.2%, with heavyweights Rio Tinto and BHP Group losing 2.3% and 2.4%, respectively. (reuters.com)
  • A project to contribute to improving the health and safety of miners by providing essential information technology development activities for the NIOSH Mining Program. (cdc.gov)
  • I am sure other Jumbos are on the same page, so I wanted to share some useful apps that I use to keep myself on track, no matter how inclined I am to procrastinate at home. (tufts.edu)
  • This practice apparently started when experts realized that salt miners had less sinus issues than the rest of the population. (tiphero.com)