Micrococcus: A genus of gram-positive, spherical bacteria found in soils and fresh water, and frequently on the skin of man and other animals.Micrococcus luteus: A species of gram-positive, spherical bacteria whose organisms occur in tetrads and in irregular clusters of tetrads. The primary habitat is mammalian skin.Micrococcaceae: A family of bacteria ranging from free living and saprophytic to parasitic and pathogenic forms.Staphylococcus: A genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, coccoid bacteria. Its organisms occur singly, in pairs, and in tetrads and characteristically divide in more than one plane to form irregular clusters. Natural populations of Staphylococcus are found on the skin and mucous membranes of warm-blooded animals. Some species are opportunistic pathogens of humans and animals.Food Irradiation: Treatment of food with RADIATION.Lysostaphin: A 25-kDa peptidase produced by Staphylococcus simulans which cleaves a glycine-glcyine bond unique to an inter-peptide cross-bridge of the STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS cell wall. EC 3.4.24.75.Muramidase: A basic enzyme that is present in saliva, tears, egg white, and many animal fluids. It functions as an antibacterial agent. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-linkages between N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues in peptidoglycan and between N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues in chitodextrin. EC 3.2.1.17.Uronic Acids: Acids derived from monosaccharides by the oxidation of the terminal (-CH2OH) group farthest removed from the carbonyl group to a (-COOH) group. (From Stedmans, 26th ed)PeptidoglycanTheaceae: A plant family of the order THEALES, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida, best known for CAMELLIA SINENSIS, which is the source of Oriental TEA.Bacteriolysis: Rupture of bacterial cells due to mechanical force, chemical action, or the lytic growth of BACTERIOPHAGES.Sarcina: A genus of gram-positive, anaerobic bacteria whose organisms divide in three perpendicular planes and occur in packets of eight or more cells. It has been isolated from soil, grains, and clinical specimens.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Cell Wall: The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Gaultheria: A plant genus of the family ERICACEAE. The common name of "wintergreen" is also used for PYROLA and "snowberry" is also used for SYMPHORICARPOS.Taxus: Genus of coniferous yew trees or shrubs, several species of which have medicinal uses. Notable is the Pacific yew, Taxus brevifolia, which is used to make the anti-neoplastic drug taxol (PACLITAXEL).MuseumsAlstonia: A plant genus of the family APOCYNACEAE. Members contain echitovenidine, echitamine, venenatine (an indole alkaloid), and anti-inflammatory triterpenoidsGlycolysis: A metabolic process that converts GLUCOSE into two molecules of PYRUVIC ACID through a series of enzymatic reactions. Energy generated by this process is conserved in two molecules of ATP. Glycolysis is the universal catabolic pathway for glucose, free glucose, or glucose derived from complex CARBOHYDRATES, such as GLYCOGEN and STARCH.Gluconeogenesis: Biosynthesis of GLUCOSE from nonhexose or non-carbohydrate precursors, such as LACTATE; PYRUVATE; ALANINE; and GLYCEROL.Decarboxylation: The removal of a carboxyl group, usually in the form of carbon dioxide, from a chemical compound.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Operon: In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.Riboflavin: Nutritional factor found in milk, eggs, malted barley, liver, kidney, heart, and leafy vegetables. The richest natural source is yeast. It occurs in the free form only in the retina of the eye, in whey, and in urine; its principal forms in tissues and cells are as FLAVIN MONONUCLEOTIDE and FLAVIN-ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE.Riboflavin Synthase: An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of riboflavin from two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine, utilizing a four-carbon fragment from one molecule which is transferred to the second molecule. EC 2.5.1.9.Pyridines: Compounds with a six membered aromatic ring containing NITROGEN. The saturated version is PIPERIDINES.Biotechnology: Body of knowledge related to the use of organisms, cells or cell-derived constituents for the purpose of developing products which are technically, scientifically and clinically useful. Alteration of biologic function at the molecular level (i.e., GENETIC ENGINEERING) is a central focus; laboratory methods used include TRANSFECTION and CLONING technologies, sequence and structure analysis algorithms, computer databases, and gene and protein structure function analysis and prediction.Pigments, Biological: Any normal or abnormal coloring matter in PLANTS; ANIMALS or micro-organisms.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Microscopy, Electron, Transmission: Electron microscopy in which the ELECTRONS or their reaction products that pass down through the specimen are imaged below the plane of the specimen.Bacteria, AerobicNitrobacter: A genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that oxidizes nitrites to nitrates. Its organisms occur in aerobic environments where organic matter is being mineralized, including soil, fresh water, and sea water.Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Gram-Positive Bacteria: Bacteria which retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.Nitrosomonas: A genus of gram-negative, ellipsoidal or rod-shaped bacteria whose major source of energy and reducing power is from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. Its species occur in soils, oceans, lakes, rivers, and sewage disposal systems.Cercocebus: A genus of the subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE inhabiting the African forests. They are also known as mangabeys.Deinococcus: A genus of gram-positive aerobic cocci found in the soil, that is highly resistant to radiation, especially ionizing radiation (RADIATION, IONIZING). Deinococcus radiodurans is the type species.Strontium: An element of the alkaline earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Sr, atomic number 38, and atomic weight 87.62.Cobalt Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of cobalt that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Co atoms with atomic weights of 54-64, except 59, are radioactive cobalt isotopes.Radiation Effects: The effects of ionizing and nonionizing radiation upon living organisms, organs and tissues, and their constituents, and upon physiologic processes. It includes the effect of irradiation on food, drugs, and chemicals.Calcium Chloride: A salt used to replenish calcium levels, as an acid-producing diuretic, and as an antidote for magnesium poisoning.Resuscitation: The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Mouth: The oval-shaped oral cavity located at the apex of the digestive tract and consisting of two parts: the vestibule and the oral cavity proper.Alexander Disease: Rare leukoencephalopathy with infantile-onset accumulation of Rosenthal fibers in the subpial, periventricular, and subependymal zones of the brain. Rosenthal fibers are GLIAL FIBRILLARY ACIDIC PROTEIN aggregates found in ASTROCYTES. Juvenile- and adult-onset types show progressive atrophy of the lower brainstem instead. De novo mutations in the GFAP gene are associated with the disease with propensity for paternal inheritance.ArtAerobiosis: Life or metabolic reactions occurring in an environment containing oxygen.

Quantitative studies on competitive activities of skin bacteria growing on solid media. (1/728)

Earlier quantitative investigations of antagonism between skin bacteria were based on the use of liquid cultures, but a more realistic model has now been devised, based on the use of the surfaces of solid media. Pure or mixed inocula were spread evenly over suitable agar media in Petri dishes marked out with a standard grid. Growth curves were constructed from viable counts of the surface bacteria after they had been removed from excised squares of the agar media and dispersed. The method was highly reproducible, and competitive interactions were revealed more clearly than in studies with liquid media. An antibiotic-producing strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis (S6+) readily suppressed strains of Micrococcus, Corynebacterium and Streptococcus species. However, a Staphylococcus aureus strain which was less sensitive to the antibiotic effect of S6+ interacted in a complex manner, depending on the absolute and relative size of the S6+ inoculum.  (+info)

Use of the cell wall precursor lipid II by a pore-forming peptide antibiotic. (2/728)

Resistance to antibiotics is increasing in some groups of clinically important pathogens. For instance, high vancomycin resistance has emerged in enterococci. Promising alternative antibiotics are the peptide antibiotics, abundant in host defense systems, which kill their targets by permeabilizing the plasma membrane. These peptides generally do not act via specific receptors and are active in the micromolar range. Here it is shown that vancomycin and the antibacterial peptide nisin Z use the same target: the membrane-anchored cell wall precursor Lipid II. Nisin combines high affinity for Lipid II with its pore-forming ability, thus causing the peptide to be highly active (in the nanomolar range).  (+info)

A beta1,3-glucan recognition protein from an insect, Manduca sexta, agglutinates microorganisms and activates the phenoloxidase cascade. (3/728)

Pattern recognition proteins function in innate immune responses by binding to molecules on the surface of invading pathogens and initiating host defense reactions. We report the purification and molecular cloning of a cDNA for a 53-kDa beta1,3-glucan-recognition protein from the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. This protein is constitutively expressed in fat body and secreted into hemolymph. The protein contains a region with sequence similarity to several glucanases, but it lacks glucanase activity. It binds to the surface of and agglutinates yeast, as well as gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Beta1,3-glucan-recognition protein in the presence of laminarin, a soluble glucan, stimulated activation of prophenoloxidase in plasma, whereas laminarin alone did not. These results suggest that beta1,3-glucan-recognition protein serves as a pattern recognition molecule for beta1,3-glucan on the surface of fungal cell walls. After binding to beta1,3-glucan, the protein may interact with a serine protease, leading to the activation of the prophenoloxidase cascade, a pathway in insects for defense against microbial infection.  (+info)

Antimicrobial activity of human cervical mucus. (4/728)

The antibacterial activity of human cervical mucus (CM) was examined on standardized microbial colonized agar plates (agar diffusion test). In parallel, the lysozyme content of CM was determined by means of a turbidimetric test system in aliquots of the same CM specimens. Suspensions of living lyophilized Micrococcus lysedeikticus were used as bacterial substrate. Testing was performed in a total of 133 CM samples, obtained at mid-cycle from sexually active women from unselected infertile couples with a median age of 30 (range 21-42) years. All mucus specimens showed considerable antibacterial activity with clearly visible circular inhibition zones around the CM-filled holes in the colonized agar plates. Related to the effect of hen's egg white (HEW)-lysozyme on the same plates, the median activity of the CM specimens in the agar diffusion test was equivalent to 33.0 (range 6.4-391.4) microg/ml HEW-lysozyme. However, there was a wide inter-individual range of antibacterial effects of cervical secretions. The cervical index did not significantly influence the outcome of either test. The pH of the endocervical CM also was not correlated with the antibacterial effect. Sexual activity leading to the presence of spermatozoa in CM considerably increased its antibacterial effect. The activity was markedly higher in samples obtained within hours after intercourse compared with those taken after sexual abstinence of >/=5 days (P < 0.05). In microbially colonized CM specimens compared to sterile CM, all obtained under hormonally standardized conditions, the antibacterial activity in the agar plate test was significantly lower (P < 0.05). The results of this pilot study demonstrate the considerable antibacterial activity of human CM.  (+info)

Characterization of Micrococcus antarcticus sp. nov., a psychrophilic bacterium from Antarctica. (5/728)

A Gram-positive, cold-adapted, aerobic, spherical actinobacterium (strain T2T) with a quite low cardinal growth temperature was isolated from Chinese Great-Wall station in Antarctica. Sequence comparisons of the 16S rDNA indicated the isolate to be a phylogenetic member of the genus Micrococcus, family Micrococcaceae, in which it represents a novel lineage. The phylogenetic distinctness of the isolate with respect to the type strains Micrococcus luteus and Micrococcus lylae was supported by DNA-DNA similarity values of less than 40%. Chemotaxonomic properties supported the placement of the isolate in the genus Micrococcus. The diagnostic diamino acid of the cell-wall peptidoglycan is lysine. The predominant menaquinones are MK-8 and MK-8(H2). The G + C content of the DNA of the isolate is 66.4 mol%. Genotypic, morphological and physiological characteristics were used to describe a new species of Micrococcus, for which the name Micrococcus antarcticus is proposed. The type strain is T2T (= AS 1.2372T).  (+info)

Kinetic studies on the phosphorolysis of polynucleotides by polynucleotide phosphorylase. (6/728)

The kinetics of the phosphorolysis of polynucleotide (as differentiated from oligonucleotide) by polynucleotide phosphorylase of Micrococcus luteus has been investigated. Double reciprocal plots of initial velocity against either inorganic phosphate or polynucleotide concentration are linear, and furthermore, the affinity of the enzyme for either substrate is unaffected by the presence of the other. dADP, an analogue of ADP product, is a competitive inhibitor with respect to Pi and polynucleotidy. (Ap)tA-cyclic-p is a competitive inhibitor with respect to Pi. The results are almost identical with both primer-independent (Form-I) and primer-dependent (Form-T) enzymes, although the various kinetic constants differ. On the vasis of these data a rapid equilibrium random Bi Bi mechanism is proposed. The demonstration of two different inhibitor constants for dADP and the difference between the Michaelis and the inhibitor constant for polyadenylic acid in polynucleotide phosphorolysis indicate at least two binding sites for polyadenylic acid and dADP on M. luteus polynucleotide phosphorylase. Its is suggested that in the phosphorolysis of long chain polymers the second binding site permits the polynucleotide to snap right back into position after removal of I mononucleotide unit and thus leads to the observed processive degradation. A general discussion of oligonucleotide and polynucleotide phosphorolysis and the differences between Form-I and Form-T enzymes in de novo synthesis and degradation of polynucleotides is presented.  (+info)

Use of an enzyme-linked lectinsorbent assay to monitor the shift in polysaccharide composition in bacterial biofilms. (7/728)

An enzyme-linked lectinsorbent assay (ELLA) was developed for quantification and characterization of extracellular polysaccharides produced by 1- and 4-day biofilms of 10 bacterial strains isolated from food industry premises. Peroxidase-labeled concanavalin A (ConA) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) were used, as they specifically bind to saccharide residues most frequently encountered in biofilms matrices: D-glucose or D-mannose for ConA and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine or N-acetylneuraminic acid for WGA. The ELLA applied to 1- and 4-day biofilms colonizing wells of microtiter plates was able to detect that for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and to a lesser extent Staphylococcus sciuri, the increase in production of exopolysaccharides over time was not the same for sugars binding with ConA and those binding with WGA. Differences in extracellular polysaccharides produced were observed among strains belonging to the same species. These results demonstrate that ELLA is a useful tool not only for rapid characterization of biofilm extracellular polysaccharides but also, in studies of individual strains, for detection of changes over time in the proportion of the exopolysaccharidic component within the polymeric matrix.  (+info)

Preparation and antibacterial activity upon Micrococcus luteus of derivatives of iturin A, mycosubtilin and bacillomycin L, antibiotics from Bacillus subtilis. (8/728)

Methylated and acetylated derivatives of iturin A and mycosubtilin and methylated derivatives of bacillomycin L were prepared and their antibacterial activity on Micrococcus luteus was compared with the activity of the original substance. the results obtained show the importance of polar groups for the antibiotic activity of the substances of iturin group.  (+info)

  • The DNA-DNA relatedness of strain V3M1T to Micrococcus luteus CGMCC 1.2299T, M. antarcticus CGMCC 1.2373T and M. lylae CGMCC 1.2300T was 57.5, 45.4 and 39.0%, respectively. (mysciencework.com)
  • A preparation of ATPase from the membranes of Micrococcus lysodeikticus, solubilized and more than 95% pure, showed two main bands in analytical polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. (meta.org)
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa (o bacil piociànic , bacil del pus blau , bacil del pus verd ) és un bacteri comú que causa malalties en animals i plantes, incloent-hi els humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • From [http://faculty.plattsburgh.edu/jose.deondarza/MicroWorld/Tour/Micrococcus.html Plattsburgh State University of New York. (kenyon.edu)
  • Analysis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strains DNG5T and V3M1T were phylogenetically related to members of the genus Agrococcus (96.0-98.4% similarity) and Micrococcus (96.7-98.0% similarity), respectively, within the order Actinomycetales. (mysciencework.com)
  • Hershler R, Liu H-P, Bradford C (2013) Systematics of a widely distributed western North American springsnail, Pyrgulopsis micrococcus (Caenogastropoda, Hydrobiidae), with descriptions of three new congeners. (pensoft.net)
  • Micrococcus are Gram-positive cocci that are 0.5 to 3.5 micrometers in diameter and usually arranged in tetrads or irregular clusters. (kenyon.edu)
  • Micrococcus rubens, a gram-positive occus, usually forms large, cubic packets of more than 500 cells that are regularly arranged in three-dimensional cell groups. (asm.org)
  • Micrococcus is a gram-positive, aerobic prokaryote that is relatively harmless to humans. (gettyimages.fr)
  • Amino acids in cell wall of Gram-positive bacterium Micrococcus sp. (usda.gov)
  • The aim of this work was to investigate the flocculation mechanism by Gram-positive bacterium, Micrococcus sp. (usda.gov)
  • Micrococcus is generally thought to be a saprotrophic or commensal organism, though it can be an opportunistic pathogen, particularly in hosts with compromised immune systems, such as HIV patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • It can be difficult to identify Micrococcus as the cause of an infection, since the organism is a normally present in skin microflora, and the genus is seldom linked to disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conservation measures are needed to ensure the long term persistence of populations of P. micrococcus and a genetically differentiated lineage of P. sanchezi which live in disturbed habitats on private lands. (pensoft.net)
  • Carpentier-Edwards aortic bioprosthe- cal isolate ROG140 and type strains of members of the former Micrococcus genus. (cdc.gov)
  • There were four tiny colony candidates and by looking at them I was suspecting that I might not have any micrococcus at all! (uoguelph.ca)
Conformational and molecular responses to pH variation of the purified membrane adenosine triphosphatase of Micrococcus...
Conformational and molecular responses to pH variation of the purified membrane adenosine triphosphatase of Micrococcus... (meta.org)
Internet Scientific Publications
Internet Scientific Publications (ispub.com)
Micrococcus yunnanensis ATCC ® 7468™
Micrococcus yunnanensis ATCC ® 7468™ (atcc.org)
Search Results -   - 22 Results - Digital Library
Search Results - - 22 Results - Digital Library (digital.library.unt.edu)
Micrococcus luteus bacteria, SEM - Stock Image C021/7448 - Science Photo Library
Micrococcus luteus bacteria, SEM - Stock Image C021/7448 - Science Photo Library (sciencephoto.com)
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Difference between revisions of "Micrococcus" - microbewiki (microbewiki.kenyon.edu)
Microbiological indoor air quality in an office building in Gliwice, Poland: analysis of the case study | SpringerLink
Microbiological indoor air quality in an office building in Gliwice, Poland: analysis of the case study | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Skin Microbiota
Skin Microbiota (news-medical.net)
Commercial Buildings | SpringerLink
Commercial Buildings | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Numerical approach to reference identification of Staphylococcus, Stomatococcus, and Micrococcus spp. | Journal of Clinical...
Numerical approach to reference identification of Staphylococcus, Stomatococcus, and Micrococcus spp. | Journal of Clinical... (jcm.asm.org)
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ACM 2644 Strain Passport - StrainInfo (straininfo.net)
Surmounting antimicrobial resistance in the Millennium Superbug: Staphylococcus aureus | SpringerLink
Surmounting antimicrobial resistance in the Millennium Superbug: Staphylococcus aureus | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Microorganism - Wikipedia
Microorganism - Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org)
McDonald's touch screen poo: London microbiologist found bacteria on fast-food chain equipment - The Washington Post
McDonald's touch screen poo: London microbiologist found bacteria on fast-food chain equipment - The Washington Post (washingtonpost.com)
Combination of PCT, sNFI and dCHC for the diagnosis of ascites infection in cirrhotic patients | SpringerLink
Combination of PCT, sNFI and dCHC for the diagnosis of ascites infection in cirrhotic patients | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Category:Biotechnology - Wikimedia Commons
Category:Biotechnology - Wikimedia Commons (commons.wikimedia.org)
Fatal Case Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Small Colony Variants in an AIDS Patient - Volume 5, Number 3...
Fatal Case Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Small Colony Variants in an AIDS Patient - Volume 5, Number 3... (wwwnc.cdc.gov)
Products › Page 24 › Micronaut: The fine art of microscopy by science photographer Martin Oeggerli
Products › Page 24 › Micronaut: The fine art of microscopy by science photographer Martin Oeggerli (micronaut.ch)
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Bacteria › Page 2 › Micronaut: The fine art of microscopy by science photographer Martin Oeggerli (micronaut.ch)
Poo found on every McDonald's touchscreen tested | Metro News
Poo found on every McDonald's touchscreen tested | Metro News (metro.co.uk)
Pseudomonas aeruginosa - Viquipèdia, l'enciclopèdia lliure
Pseudomonas aeruginosa - Viquipèdia, l'enciclopèdia lliure (ca.wikipedia.org)
DailyMed - MOXIFLOXACIN solution/ drops
DailyMed - MOXIFLOXACIN solution/ drops (dailymed.nlm.nih.gov)
Use of Shell-Vial Cell Culture Assay for Isolation of Bacteria from Clinical Specimens: 13 Years of Experience | Journal of...
Use of Shell-Vial Cell Culture Assay for Isolation of Bacteria from Clinical Specimens: 13 Years of Experience | Journal of... (jcm.asm.org)
PureYield™ RNA Midiprep System
PureYield™ RNA Midiprep System (promega.com)
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PIGMENTOS BACTERIANOS by valentina manquez on Prezi (prezi.com)
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Pitted Keratolysis: Background, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology (emedicine.medscape.com)
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Micrococcus Bacteria On Agar Micrococcus Is A Grampositive Aerobic Prokaryote That Is Relatively Harmless To Humans It Forms... (gettyimages.fr)
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Frontiers | Insight Into Microbial Applications for the Biodegradation of Pyrethroid Insecticides | Microbiology (frontiersin.org)