The study of microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, algae, archaea, and viruses.
Techniques used in microbiology.
The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of bacteria, and BACTERIAL INFECTIONS.
Hospital facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.
Facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
Techniques used in studying bacteria.
Aerobic bacteria are types of microbes that require oxygen to grow and reproduce, and use it in the process of respiration to break down organic matter and produce energy, often found in environments where oxygen is readily available such as the human body's skin, mouth, and intestines.
Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.
'Anaerobic Bacteria' are types of bacteria that do not require oxygen for growth and can often cause diseases in humans, including dental caries, gas gangrene, and tetanus, among others.
Accidentally acquired infection in laboratory workers.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
Techniques used to carry out clinical investigative procedures in the diagnosis and therapy of disease.
The study of microorganisms living in a variety of environments (air, soil, water, etc.) and their pathogenic relationship to other organisms including man.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.
Bacteria which lose crystal violet stain but are stained pink when treated by Gram's method.
Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).
Process that is gone through in order for a device to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required preclinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance. It is not restricted to FDA.
Freedom of equipment from actual or potential hazards.
Controlled operation of an apparatus, process, or system by mechanical or electronic devices that take the place of human organs of observation, effort, and decision. (From Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 1993)
Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.
The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of fungi, and MYCOSES.
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
Communicable diseases, also known as infectious diseases, are medical conditions that result from the infection, transmission, or colonization of pathogenic microorganisms like bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites, which can be spread from one host to another through various modes of transmission.
A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.
A family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that do not form endospores. Its organisms are distributed worldwide with some being saprophytes and others being plant and animal parasites. Many species are of considerable economic importance due to their pathogenic effects on agriculture and livestock.
Information systems, usually computer-assisted, designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling administrative and clinical activities associated with the provision and utilization of clinical laboratory services.
Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.
Bacteria which retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.
A genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, coccoid bacteria. Its organisms occur singly, in pairs, and in tetrads and characteristically divide in more than one plane to form irregular clusters. Natural populations of Staphylococcus are found on the skin and mucous membranes of warm-blooded animals. Some species are opportunistic pathogens of humans and animals.
Health care professionals, technicians, and assistants staffing LABORATORIES in research or health care facilities.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
The presence of viable bacteria circulating in the blood. Fever, chills, tachycardia, and tachypnea are common acute manifestations of bacteremia. The majority of cases are seen in already hospitalized patients, most of whom have underlying diseases or procedures which render their bloodstreams susceptible to invasion.
Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.
Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.
Infections with bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.
Mycoses are a group of diseases caused by fungal pathogens that can infect various tissues and organs, potentially leading to localized or systemic symptoms, depending on the immune status of the host.
Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.
A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, nonsporeforming, nonmotile rods or coccobacilli. Organisms in this genus had originally been classified as members of the BACTEROIDES genus but overwhelming biochemical and chemical findings indicated the need to separate them from other Bacteroides species, and hence, this new genus was created.
The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Hospitals controlled by agencies and departments of the U.S. federal government.
Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.
Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the ETHMOID SINUS. It may present itself as an acute (infectious) or chronic (allergic) condition.
Invasion of the site of trauma by pathogenic microorganisms.
'History of Medicine' is a branch of knowledge that deals with the evolution, development, and progression of healthcare practices, medical theories, institutions, and personalities from ancient times to the present.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
Procedures for collecting, preserving, and transporting of specimens sufficiently stable to provide accurate and precise results suitable for clinical interpretation.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
The specialty related to the performance of techniques in clinical pathology such as those in hematology, microbiology, and other general clinical laboratory applications.
Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the MAXILLARY SINUS. In many cases, it is caused by an infection of the bacteria HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE; STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE; or STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS.
The study of serum, especially of antigen-antibody reactions in vitro.
Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.
Commercially prepared reagent sets, with accessory devices, containing all of the major components and literature necessary to perform one or more designated diagnostic tests or procedures. They may be for laboratory or personal use.
The body fluid that circulates in the vascular system (BLOOD VESSELS). Whole blood includes PLASMA and BLOOD CELLS.
A dye that is a mixture of violet rosanilinis with antibacterial, antifungal, and anthelmintic properties.
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY techniques used in the diagnosis of disease.
Potentially pathogenic bacteria found in nasal membranes, skin, hair follicles, and perineum of warm-blooded animals. They may cause a wide range of infections and intoxications.
Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.
A genus of gram-positive, anaerobic, coccoid bacteria that is part of the normal flora of humans. Its organisms are opportunistic pathogens causing bacteremias and soft tissue infections.
Infections caused by bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain (positive) when treated by the gram-staining method.
A complex sulfated polymer of galactose units, extracted from Gelidium cartilagineum, Gracilaria confervoides, and related red algae. It is used as a gel in the preparation of solid culture media for microorganisms, as a bulk laxative, in making emulsions, and as a supporting medium for immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis.
Enzymes that cause coagulation in plasma by forming a complex with human PROTHROMBIN. Coagulases are produced by certain STAPHYLOCOCCUS and YERSINIA PESTIS. Staphylococci produce two types of coagulase: Staphylocoagulase, a free coagulase that produces true clotting of plasma, and Staphylococcal clumping factor, a bound coagulase in the cell wall that induces clumping of cells in the presence of fibrinogen.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
Hospital department which administers and provides pathology services.
'Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over' refers to the maximum number of hospital beds equaling or exceeding 500 that are medically staffed and equipped to provide patient care and accommodation within a healthcare facility.
Material coughed up from the lungs and expectorated via the mouth. It contains MUCUS, cellular debris, and microorganisms. It may also contain blood or pus.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, coccoid bacteria whose organisms are part of the normal flora of the oropharynx, nasopharynx, and genitourinary tract. Some species are primary pathogens for humans.
A pathologic process consisting in the formation of pus.
Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.
An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
Liquid by-product of excretion produced in the kidneys, temporarily stored in the bladder until discharge through the URETHRA.
An autosomal recessive genetic disease of the EXOCRINE GLANDS. It is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CYSTIC FIBROSIS TRANSMEMBRANE CONDUCTANCE REGULATOR expressed in several organs including the LUNG, the PANCREAS, the BILIARY SYSTEM, and the SWEAT GLANDS. Cystic fibrosis is characterized by epithelial secretory dysfunction associated with ductal obstruction resulting in AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION; chronic RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS; PANCREATIC INSUFFICIENCY; maldigestion; salt depletion; and HEAT PROSTRATION.
Phenazines are nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds that have been widely studied for their antibacterial, antifungal, and antiparasitic properties, and can be found in various natural sources such as bacteria and fungi, or synthesized chemically.
The presence of an infectious agent on instruments, prostheses, or other inanimate articles.
The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
The oval-shaped oral cavity located at the apex of the digestive tract and consisting of two parts: the vestibule and the oral cavity proper.
A genus of yeast-like mitosporic Saccharomycetales fungi characterized by producing yeast cells, mycelia, pseudomycelia, and blastophores. It is commonly part of the normal flora of the skin, mouth, intestinal tract, and vagina, but can cause a variety of infections, including CANDIDIASIS; ONYCHOMYCOSIS; vulvovaginal candidiasis (CANDIDIASIS, VULVOVAGINAL), and thrush (see CANDIDIASIS, ORAL). (From Dorland, 28th ed)
The study, utilization, and manipulation of those microorganisms capable of economically producing desirable substances or changes in substances, and the control of undesirable microorganisms.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
The presence of bacteria in the urine which is normally bacteria-free. These bacteria are from the URINARY TRACT and are not contaminants of the surrounding tissues. Bacteriuria can be symptomatic or asymptomatic. Significant bacteriuria is an indicator of urinary tract infection.
Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.
The construction or arrangement of a task so that it may be done with the greatest possible efficiency.
A species of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria originally classified within the BACTEROIDES genus. This bacterium is a common commensal in the gingival crevice and is often isolated from cases of gingivitis and other purulent lesions related to the mouth.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
INFLAMMATION of the PERITONEUM lining the ABDOMINAL CAVITY as the result of infectious, autoimmune, or chemical processes. Primary peritonitis is due to infection of the PERITONEAL CAVITY via hematogenous or lymphatic spread and without intra-abdominal source. Secondary peritonitis arises from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY itself through RUPTURE or ABSCESS of intra-abdominal organs.
Physiological processes and properties of microorganisms, including ARCHAEA; BACTERIA; RICKETTSIA; VIRUSES; FUNGI; and others.
Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases.
The destroying of all forms of life, especially microorganisms, by heat, chemical, or other means.
A large group of aerobic bacteria which show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method. This is because the cell walls of gram-negative bacteria are low in peptidoglycan and thus have low affinity for violet stain and high affinity for the pink dye safranine.
A species of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria commonly isolated from clinical specimens (wound, burn, and urinary tract infections). It is also found widely distributed in soil and water. P. aeruginosa is a major agent of nosocomial infection.
A genus of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria consisting of organisms causing variable hemolysis that are normal flora of the intestinal tract. Previously thought to be a member of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS, it is now recognized as a separate genus.
The functions, behavior, and activities of bacteria.
A medical specialty concerned with the hypersensitivity of the individual to foreign substances and protection from the resultant infection or disorder.
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
Infections with bacteria of the family ENTEROBACTERIACEAE.
Minute infectious agents whose genomes are composed of DNA or RNA, but not both. They are characterized by a lack of independent metabolism and the inability to replicate outside living host cells.
A method where a culturing surface inoculated with microbe is exposed to small disks containing known amounts of a chemical agent resulting in a zone of inhibition (usually in millimeters) of growth of the microbe corresponding to the susceptibility of the strain to the agent.
Infections in the inner or external eye caused by microorganisms belonging to several families of bacteria. Some of the more common genera found are Haemophilus, Neisseria, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Chlamydia.
Assessments aimed at determining agreement in diagnostic test results among laboratories. Identical survey samples are distributed to participating laboratories, with results stratified according to testing methodologies.
Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.
Invasion of the host RESPIRATORY SYSTEM by microorganisms, usually leading to pathological processes or diseases.
Physiological processes and properties of BACTERIA.
Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.
Infections with bacteria of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS.
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms arrange singly, in pairs, or short chains. This genus is commonly found in the intestinal tract and is an opportunistic pathogen that can give rise to bacteremia, pneumonia, urinary tract and several other types of human infection.
The use of biological agents in TERRORISM. This includes the malevolent use of BACTERIA; VIRUSES; or other BIOLOGICAL TOXINS against people, ANIMALS; or PLANTS.
A genus of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria whose organisms occur in pairs or chains. No endospores are produced. Many species exist as commensals or parasites on man or animals with some being highly pathogenic. A few species are saprophytes and occur in the natural environment.
One of the three domains of life (the others being BACTERIA and Eukarya), formerly called Archaebacteria under the taxon Bacteria, but now considered separate and distinct. They are characterized by: (1) the presence of characteristic tRNAs and ribosomal RNAs; (2) the absence of peptidoglycan cell walls; (3) the presence of ether-linked lipids built from branched-chain subunits; and (4) their occurrence in unusual habitats. While archaea resemble bacteria in morphology and genomic organization, they resemble eukarya in their method of genomic replication. The domain contains at least four kingdoms: CRENARCHAEOTA; EURYARCHAEOTA; NANOARCHAEOTA; and KORARCHAEOTA.
Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.
DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.
A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, nonsporeforming, nonmotile rods. Organisms of this genus had originally been classified as members of the BACTEROIDES genus but overwhelming biochemical and chemical findings in 1990 indicated the need to separate them from other Bacteroides species, and hence, this new genus was established.
Infections with bacteria of the genus PSEUDOMONAS.
A subset of VIRIDANS STREPTOCOCCI, but the species in this group differ in their hemolytic pattern and diseases caused. These species are often beta-hemolytic and produce pyogenic infections.
Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).
Enzymes found in many bacteria which catalyze the hydrolysis of the amide bond in the beta-lactam ring. Well known antibiotics destroyed by these enzymes are penicillins and cephalosporins.
Inflammatory responses of the epithelium of the URINARY TRACT to microbial invasions. They are often bacterial infections with associated BACTERIURIA and PYURIA.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Narrow pieces of material impregnated or covered with a substance used to produce a chemical reaction. The strips are used in detecting, measuring, producing, etc., other substances. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Mucus-secreting glands situated on the posterior and lateral aspect of the vestibule of the vagina.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
The full collection of microbes (bacteria, fungi, virus, etc.) that naturally exist within a particular biological niche such as an organism, soil, a body of water, etc.
The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of viruses, and VIRUS DISEASES.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
Provision of physical and biological barriers to the dissemination of potentially hazardous biologically active agents (bacteria, viruses, recombinant DNA, etc.). Physical containment involves the use of special equipment, facilities, and procedures to prevent the escape of the agent. Biological containment includes use of immune personnel and the selection of agents and hosts that will minimize the risk should the agent escape the containment facility.
Complexes of iodine and non-ionic SURFACE-ACTIVE AGENTS acting as carrier and solubilizing agent for the iodine in water. Iodophors usually enhance bactericidal activity of iodine, reduce vapor pressure and odor, minimize staining, and allow wide dilution with water. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
A collective genome representative of the many organisms, primarily microorganisms, existing in a community.
Suppurative inflammation of the tissues of the internal structures of the eye frequently associated with an infection.
The aggregate enterprise of technically producing packaged meat.
Non-susceptibility of a microbe to the action of METHICILLIN, a semi-synthetic penicillin derivative.
A species of MORGANELLA formerly classified as a Proteus species. It is found in the feces of humans, dogs, other mammals, and reptiles. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The observation and analysis of movements in a task with an emphasis on the amount of time required to perform the task.
A general term for single-celled rounded fungi that reproduce by budding. Brewers' and bakers' yeasts are SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE; therapeutic dried yeast is YEAST, DRIED.
Procedures for identifying types and strains of fungi.
A discipline concerned with studying biological phenomena in terms of the chemical and physical interactions of molecules.
A fulminating bacterial infection of the deep layers of the skin and FASCIA. It can be caused by many different organisms, with STREPTOCOCCUS PYOGENES being the most common.
Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa.
Infection by a variety of fungi, usually through four possible mechanisms: superficial infection producing conjunctivitis, keratitis, or lacrimal obstruction; extension of infection from neighboring structures - skin, paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx; direct introduction during surgery or accidental penetrating trauma; or via the blood or lymphatic routes in patients with underlying mycoses.
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that occurs in the intestines of humans and a wide variety of animals, as well as in manure, soil, and polluted waters. Its species are pathogenic, causing urinary tract infections and are also considered secondary invaders, causing septic lesions at other sites of the body.
Organized services for the purpose of providing diagnosis to promote and maintain health.
Programs of disease surveillance, generally within health care facilities, designed to investigate, prevent, and control the spread of infections and their causative microorganisms.
Encrustations, formed from microbes (bacteria, algae, fungi, plankton, or protozoa) embedding in extracellular polymers, that adhere to surfaces such as teeth (DENTAL DEPOSITS); PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; and catheters. Biofilms are prevented from forming by treating surfaces with DENTIFRICES; DISINFECTANTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS; and antifouling agents.
Gram-negative, non-motile, capsulated, gas-producing rods found widely in nature and associated with urinary and respiratory infections in humans.
The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that utilizes citrate as a sole carbon source. It is pathogenic for humans, causing enteric fevers, gastroenteritis, and bacteremia. Food poisoning is the most common clinical manifestation. Organisms within this genus are separated on the basis of antigenic characteristics, sugar fermentation patterns, and bacteriophage susceptibility.
The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs simultaneously. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
An antibiotic similar to FLUCLOXACILLIN used in resistant staphylococci infections.
The inanimate matter of Earth, the structures and properties of this matter, and the processes that affect it.
Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.
A urinary anti-infective agent effective against most gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. Although sulfonamides and antibiotics are usually the agents of choice for urinary tract infections, nitrofurantoin is widely used for prophylaxis and long-term suppression.
Loss of epithelial tissue from the surface of the cornea due to progressive erosion and necrosis of the tissue; usually caused by bacterial, fungal, or viral infection.
A computer in a medical context is an electronic device that processes, stores, and retrieves data, often used in medical settings for tasks such as maintaining patient records, managing diagnostic images, and supporting clinical decision-making through software applications and tools.
Positive test results in subjects who do not possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of healthy persons as diseased when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
A general term for diseases produced by viruses.
Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.
'Osteomyelitis' is a medical condition defined as an inflammation or infection of the bone or marrow, often caused by bacteria or fungi, which can lead to symptoms such as pain, swelling, warmth, and redness in the affected area, and may require antibiotics or surgical intervention for treatment.
Immunologic techniques involved in diagnosis.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.
Body of knowledge related to the use of organisms, cells or cell-derived constituents for the purpose of developing products which are technically, scientifically and clinically useful. Alteration of biologic function at the molecular level (i.e., GENETIC ENGINEERING) is a central focus; laboratory methods used include TRANSFECTION and CLONING technologies, sequence and structure analysis algorithms, computer databases, and gene and protein structure function analysis and prediction.
Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.
Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.
A group of different species of microorganisms that act together as a community.
The inter- and intra-relationships between various microorganisms. This can include both positive (like SYMBIOSIS) and negative (like ANTIBIOSIS) interactions. Examples include virus - bacteria and bacteria - bacteria.
Colorless, endogenous or exogenous pigment precursors that may be transformed by biological mechanisms into colored compounds; used in biochemical assays and in diagnosis as indicators, especially in the form of enzyme substrates. Synonym: chromogens (not to be confused with pigment-synthesizing bacteria also called chromogens).
Infections with bacteria of the order ACTINOMYCETALES.
The flowing of blood from the marginal gingival area, particularly the sulcus, seen in such conditions as GINGIVITIS, marginal PERIODONTITIS, injury, and ASCORBIC ACID DEFICIENCY.
Infections with bacteria of the genus BURKHOLDERIA.
Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.
Controlled operations of analytic or diagnostic processes, or systems by mechanical or electronic devices.
Nucleic acid which complements a specific mRNA or DNA molecule, or fragment thereof; used for hybridization studies in order to identify microorganisms and for genetic studies.
The genomic analysis of assemblages of organisms.
Nonexpendable items used in examination.
Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.
DYSENTERY caused by gram-negative rod-shaped enteric bacteria (ENTEROBACTERIACEAE), most often by the genus SHIGELLA. Shigella dysentery, Shigellosis, is classified into subgroups according to syndrome severity and the infectious species. Group A: SHIGELLA DYSENTERIAE (severest); Group B: SHIGELLA FLEXNERI; Group C: SHIGELLA BOYDII; and Group D: SHIGELLA SONNEI (mildest).
A genus of gram-negative bacteria of the family MORAXELLACEAE, found in soil and water and of uncertain pathogenicity.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Proficiency of clinical laboratories in and near Monterrey, Mexico, to detect vancomycin-resistant enterococci. (1/356)

Early detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci is important for preventing its spread among hospitalized patients. We surveyed the ability of eight hospital laboratories in and near Monterrey, Mexico, to detect vancomycin resistance in Enterococcus spp. and found that although laboratories can reliably detect high-level vancomycin resistance, many have difficulty detecting low-level resistance.  (+info)

How microbial ancient DNA, found in association with human remains, can be interpreted. (2/356)

The analysis of the DNA of ancient micro-organisms in archaeological and palaeontological human remains can contribute to the understanding of issues as different as the spreading of a new disease, a mummification process or the effect of diets on historical human populations. The quest for this type of DNA, however, can represent a particularly demanding task. This is mainly due to the abundance and diffusion of bacteria, fungi, yeasts, algae and protozoans in the most diverse environments of the present-day biosphere and the resulting difficulty in distinguishing between ancient and modern DNA. Nevertheless, at least under some special circumstances, by using rigorous protocols, which include an archaeometric survey of the specimens and evaluation of the palaeoecological consistency of the results of DNA sequence analysis, glimpses of the composition of the original microbial flora (e.g. colonic flora) can be caught in ancient human remains. Potentials and pitfalls of this research field are illustrated by the results of research works performed on prehistoric, pre-Columbian and Renaissance human mummies.  (+info)

Plasmid-encoded AmpC beta-lactamases: how far have we gone 10 years after the discovery? (3/356)

The dogma that ampC genes are located exclusively on the chromosome was dominant until about 10 years ago. Since 1989 over 15 different plasmid-encoded AmpC beta-lactamases have been reported from several countries. Most of these enzymes evolved in two clusters. The major cluster includes several enzymes with a high similarity to CMY-2, which is the closest related chromosomal AmpC enzyme of Citrobacter freundii. A second cluster centers around CMY-1. It is less homogeneous and not closely related chromosomal AmpC enzymes. Molecular diversification by amino acid substitutions does not usually translate into a change in the resistance phenotype. At this time, CMY-2 appears to be the most prevalent and widely distributed. Further global increase of prevalence and diversity of plasmidic AmpC beta-lactamases have to be anticipated in the next millenium.  (+info)

Clinical Microbiology Reviews: genesis of a journal. (4/356)

In 1986 planning for a new ASM review journal, Clinical Microbiology Reviews (CMR), began. CMR would publish articles primarily of interest to persons concerned with pathogenesis, laboratory diagnosis, epidemiology, and control of human and veterinary pathogens. The first issue was published in January 1988, with quarterly publication since then. The journal quickly became successful in terms of subscribers and impact on the field, earning a strong national and international reputation. The achievements of CMR are owed to many persons, including the editorial board, the production team, and especially the contributing authors.  (+info)

Diffusion through agar blocks of finite dimensions: a theoretical analysis of three systems of practical significance in microbiology. (5/356)

A number of experimental methods in biology depend on the kinetics of diffusion of a substance through a gel. This paper reviews the diffusion equations, gives the experimental limitations for some useful cases, and presents computer simulations for cases that cannot be treated analytically. While double diffusion is not considered, three single-diffusion situations are treated. (1) Systems for the study of chemotaxis in the gliding bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. Experimental designs used for this in many cases in the literature were inappropriate and mathematical analysis of these is presented. (2) The development of gradient plates. The time necessary for vertical diffusion to become substantially complete and before diffusion in the direction of the original slant has proceeded significantly is calculated. (3) The application to antimicrobial disk susceptibility tests. The basis of the measurement of antibiotic sensitivities with disks containing antimicrobial agents, as routinely used in clinical microbiological and testing laboratories, is analysed and the limitations are assessed and improvements suggested.  (+info)

Use of bar code readers and programmable keypads to improve the speed and accuracy of manual data entry in the clinical microbiology laboratory: experience of two laboratories. (6/356)

AIM: To assess the effect of the use of bar code readers and programmable keypads for entry of specimen details and results in two microbiology laboratories. METHODS: The solutions selected in each laboratory are described. The benefits resulting from the implementation were measured in two ways. The speed of data entry and error reduction were measured by observation. A questionnaire was completed by users of bar codes. RESULTS: There were savings in time and in reduced data entry errors. Average time to enter a report by keyboard was 21.1 s v 14.1 s for bar coded results entry. There were no observed errors with the bar code readers but 55 errors with keystroke entries. The laboratory staff of all grades found the system fast, easy to use, and less stressful than conventional keyboard entry. CONCLUSIONS: Indirect time savings should accrue from the observed reduction in incorrectly entered data. Any microbiology laboratory seeking to improve the accuracy and efficiency of data entry into their laboratory information systems should consider the adoption of this technology which can be readily interfaced to existing terminals.  (+info)

A bit of history. (7/356)

Reviews of scientific literature began to appear in the 17th century. Journals dedicated to them soon followed, leading eventually to this one, which emerged in the 1930s as Bacteriological Reviews; it adapted to the many changes in our fluid discipline, evolving into the present, much broader Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews.  (+info)

A paean to Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews. (8/356)

This article celebrates the accomplishments of Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews from its early days to the present time. The importance of this journal in the professional lives of microbiologists is emphasized, and examples of outstanding reviews are presented.  (+info)

Microbiology is the branch of biology that deals with the study of microorganisms, which are tiny living organisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, algae, and some types of yeasts and molds. These organisms are usually too small to be seen with the naked eye and require the use of a microscope for observation.

Microbiology encompasses various subdisciplines, including bacteriology (the study of bacteria), virology (the study of viruses), mycology (the study of fungi), parasitology (the study of parasites), and protozoology (the study of protozoa).

Microbiologists study the structure, function, ecology, evolution, and classification of microorganisms. They also investigate their role in human health and disease, as well as their impact on the environment, agriculture, and industry. Microbiology has numerous applications in medicine, including the development of vaccines, antibiotics, and other therapeutic agents, as well as in the diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases.

Microbiological techniques refer to the various methods and procedures used in the laboratory for the cultivation, identification, and analysis of microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites. These techniques are essential in fields like medical microbiology, food microbiology, environmental microbiology, and industrial microbiology.

Some common microbiological techniques include:

1. Microbial culturing: This involves growing microorganisms on nutrient-rich media in Petri dishes or test tubes to allow them to multiply. Different types of media are used to culture different types of microorganisms.
2. Staining and microscopy: Various staining techniques, such as Gram stain, acid-fast stain, and methylene blue stain, are used to visualize and identify microorganisms under a microscope.
3. Biochemical testing: These tests involve the use of specific biochemical reactions to identify microorganisms based on their metabolic characteristics. Examples include the catalase test, oxidase test, and sugar fermentation tests.
4. Molecular techniques: These methods are used to identify microorganisms based on their genetic material. Examples include polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA sequencing, and gene probes.
5. Serological testing: This involves the use of antibodies or antigens to detect the presence of specific microorganisms in a sample. Examples include enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting.
6. Immunofluorescence: This technique uses fluorescent dyes to label antibodies or antigens, allowing for the visualization of microorganisms under a fluorescence microscope.
7. Electron microscopy: This method uses high-powered electron beams to produce detailed images of microorganisms, allowing for the identification and analysis of their structures.

These techniques are critical in diagnosing infectious diseases, monitoring food safety, assessing environmental quality, and developing new drugs and vaccines.

Bacteriology is the branch of biology that deals with the study of bacteria, including their classification, physiology, genetics, and ecology. It is a subset of microbiology, which is the broader field that includes the study of all microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites.

Bacteriologists use various techniques to isolate, culture, and identify different species of bacteria. They also study the interactions between bacteria and their hosts, as well as the role that bacteria play in disease processes. In addition, bacteriology involves research into the development of new antibiotics and other treatments for bacterial infections.

Overall, bacteriology is an important field of study that has contributed significantly to our understanding of infectious diseases and their prevention and treatment.

A hospital laboratory is a specialized facility within a healthcare institution that provides diagnostic and research services. It is responsible for performing various tests and examinations on patient samples, such as blood, tissues, and bodily fluids, to assist in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. Hospital laboratories may offer a wide range of services, including clinical chemistry, hematology, microbiology, immunology, molecular biology, toxicology, and blood banking/transfusion medicine. These labs are typically staffed by trained medical professionals, such as laboratory technologists, technicians, and pathologists, who work together to ensure accurate and timely test results, which ultimately contribute to improved patient care.

A laboratory (often abbreviated as lab) is a facility that provides controlled conditions in which scientific or technological research, experiments, and measurements may be performed. In the medical field, laboratories are specialized spaces for conducting diagnostic tests and analyzing samples of bodily fluids, tissues, or other substances to gain insights into patients' health status.

There are various types of medical laboratories, including:

1. Clinical Laboratories: These labs perform tests on patient specimens to assist in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. They analyze blood, urine, stool, CSF (cerebrospinal fluid), and other samples for chemical components, cell counts, microorganisms, and genetic material.
2. Pathology Laboratories: These labs focus on the study of disease processes, causes, and effects. Histopathology involves examining tissue samples under a microscope to identify abnormalities or signs of diseases, while cytopathology deals with individual cells.
3. Microbiology Laboratories: In these labs, microorganisms like bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites are cultured, identified, and studied to help diagnose infections and determine appropriate treatments.
4. Molecular Biology Laboratories: These labs deal with the study of biological molecules, such as DNA, RNA, and proteins, to understand their structure, function, and interactions. They often use techniques like PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and gene sequencing for diagnostic purposes.
5. Immunology Laboratories: These labs specialize in the study of the immune system and its responses to various stimuli, including infectious agents and allergens. They perform tests to diagnose immunological disorders, monitor immune function, and assess vaccine effectiveness.
6. Toxicology Laboratories: These labs analyze biological samples for the presence and concentration of chemicals, drugs, or toxins that may be harmful to human health. They help identify potential causes of poisoning, drug interactions, and substance abuse.
7. Blood Banks: Although not traditionally considered laboratories, blood banks are specialized facilities that collect, test, store, and distribute blood and its components for transfusion purposes.

Medical laboratories play a crucial role in diagnosing diseases, monitoring disease progression, guiding treatment decisions, and assessing patient outcomes. They must adhere to strict quality control measures and regulatory guidelines to ensure accurate and reliable results.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that are among the earliest known life forms on Earth. They are typically characterized as having a cell wall and no membrane-bound organelles. The majority of bacteria have a prokaryotic organization, meaning they lack a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles.

Bacteria exist in diverse environments and can be found in every habitat on Earth, including soil, water, and the bodies of plants and animals. Some bacteria are beneficial to their hosts, while others can cause disease. Beneficial bacteria play important roles in processes such as digestion, nitrogen fixation, and biogeochemical cycling.

Bacteria reproduce asexually through binary fission or budding, and some species can also exchange genetic material through conjugation. They have a wide range of metabolic capabilities, with many using organic compounds as their source of energy, while others are capable of photosynthesis or chemosynthesis.

Bacteria are highly adaptable and can evolve rapidly in response to environmental changes. This has led to the development of antibiotic resistance in some species, which poses a significant public health challenge. Understanding the biology and behavior of bacteria is essential for developing strategies to prevent and treat bacterial infections and diseases.

Bacteriological techniques refer to the various methods and procedures used in the laboratory for the cultivation, identification, and study of bacteria. These techniques are essential in fields such as medicine, biotechnology, and research. Here are some common bacteriological techniques:

1. **Sterilization**: This is a process that eliminates or kills all forms of life, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and spores. Common sterilization methods include autoclaving (using steam under pressure), dry heat (in an oven), chemical sterilants, and radiation.

2. **Aseptic Technique**: This refers to practices used to prevent contamination of sterile materials or environments with microorganisms. It includes the use of sterile equipment, gloves, and lab coats, as well as techniques such as flaming, alcohol swabbing, and using aseptic transfer devices.

3. **Media Preparation**: This involves the preparation of nutrient-rich substances that support bacterial growth. There are various types of media, including solid (agar), liquid (broth), and semi-solid (e.g., stab agar). The choice of medium depends on the type of bacteria being cultured and the purpose of the investigation.

4. **Inoculation**: This is the process of introducing a bacterial culture into a medium. It can be done using a loop, swab, or needle. The inoculum should be taken from a pure culture to avoid contamination.

5. **Incubation**: After inoculation, the bacteria are allowed to grow under controlled conditions of temperature, humidity, and atmospheric composition. This process is called incubation.

6. **Staining and Microscopy**: Bacteria are too small to be seen with the naked eye. Therefore, they need to be stained and observed under a microscope. Gram staining is a common method used to differentiate between two major groups of bacteria based on their cell wall composition.

7. **Biochemical Tests**: These are tests used to identify specific bacterial species based on their biochemical characteristics, such as their ability to ferment certain sugars, produce particular enzymes, or resist certain antibiotics.

8. **Molecular Techniques**: Advanced techniques like PCR and DNA sequencing can provide more precise identification of bacteria. They can also be used for genetic analysis and epidemiological studies.

Remember, handling microorganisms requires careful attention to biosafety procedures to prevent accidental infection or environmental contamination.

Aerobic bacteria are a type of bacteria that require oxygen to live and grow. These bacteria use oxygen as the final electron acceptor in their respiratory chain to generate energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate). Aerobic bacteria can be found in various environments, including soil, water, and the air, as well as on the surfaces of living things. Some examples of aerobic bacteria include species of Pseudomonas, Bacillus, and Staphylococcus.

It's worth noting that some bacteria can switch between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism depending on the availability of oxygen. These bacteria are called facultative anaerobes. In contrast, obligate anaerobes are bacteria that cannot tolerate oxygen and will die in its presence.

Bacterial infections are caused by the invasion and multiplication of bacteria in or on tissues of the body. These infections can range from mild, like a common cold, to severe, such as pneumonia, meningitis, or sepsis. The symptoms of a bacterial infection depend on the type of bacteria invading the body and the area of the body that is affected.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that can live in many different environments, including in the human body. While some bacteria are beneficial to humans and help with digestion or protect against harmful pathogens, others can cause illness and disease. When bacteria invade the body, they can release toxins and other harmful substances that damage tissues and trigger an immune response.

Bacterial infections can be treated with antibiotics, which work by killing or inhibiting the growth of bacteria. However, it is important to note that misuse or overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, making treatment more difficult. It is also essential to complete the full course of antibiotics as prescribed, even if symptoms improve, to ensure that all bacteria are eliminated and reduce the risk of recurrence or development of antibiotic resistance.

Anaerobic bacteria are a type of bacteria that do not require oxygen to grow and survive. Instead, they can grow in environments that have little or no oxygen. Some anaerobic bacteria can even be harmed or killed by exposure to oxygen. These bacteria play important roles in many natural processes, such as decomposition and the breakdown of organic matter in the digestive system. However, some anaerobic bacteria can also cause disease in humans and animals, particularly when they infect areas of the body that are normally oxygen-rich. Examples of anaerobic bacterial infections include tetanus, gas gangrene, and dental abscesses.

A Laboratory Infection, also known as a laboratory-acquired infection (LAI), is an infection that occurs in individuals who are exposed to pathogens or other harmful microorganisms while working in a laboratory setting. These infections can occur through various routes of exposure, including inhalation, skin contact, or ingestion of contaminated materials.

Laboratory infections pose significant risks to laboratory workers, researchers, and even visitors who may come into contact with infectious agents during their work or visit. To minimize these risks, laboratories follow strict biosafety protocols, including the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), proper handling and disposal of contaminated materials, and adherence to established safety guidelines.

Examples of laboratory infections include tuberculosis, salmonella, hepatitis B and C, and various other bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic infections. Prompt diagnosis, treatment, and implementation of appropriate infection control measures are crucial to prevent the spread of these infections within the laboratory setting and beyond.

Anti-bacterial agents, also known as antibiotics, are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by bacteria. These agents work by either killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth and reproduction. There are several different classes of anti-bacterial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and tetracyclines, among others. Each class of antibiotic has a specific mechanism of action and is used to treat certain types of bacterial infections. It's important to note that anti-bacterial agents are not effective against viral infections, such as the common cold or flu. Misuse and overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which is a significant global health concern.

Clinical laboratory techniques are methods and procedures used in medical laboratories to perform various tests and examinations on patient samples. These techniques help in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases by analyzing body fluids, tissues, and other specimens. Some common clinical laboratory techniques include:

1. Clinical chemistry: It involves the analysis of bodily fluids such as blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid to measure the levels of chemicals, hormones, enzymes, and other substances in the body. These measurements can help diagnose various medical conditions, monitor treatment progress, and assess overall health.

2. Hematology: This technique focuses on the study of blood and its components, including red and white blood cells, platelets, and clotting factors. Hematological tests are used to diagnose anemia, infections, bleeding disorders, and other hematologic conditions.

3. Microbiology: It deals with the identification and culture of microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. Microbiological techniques are essential for detecting infectious diseases, determining appropriate antibiotic therapy, and monitoring the effectiveness of treatment.

4. Immunology: This technique involves studying the immune system and its response to various antigens, such as bacteria, viruses, and allergens. Immunological tests are used to diagnose autoimmune disorders, immunodeficiencies, and allergies.

5. Histopathology: It is the microscopic examination of tissue samples to identify any abnormalities or diseases. Histopathological techniques are crucial for diagnosing cancer, inflammatory conditions, and other tissue-related disorders.

6. Molecular biology: This technique deals with the study of DNA, RNA, and proteins at the molecular level. Molecular biology tests can be used to detect genetic mutations, identify infectious agents, and monitor disease progression.

7. Cytogenetics: It involves analyzing chromosomes and genes in cells to diagnose genetic disorders, cancer, and other diseases. Cytogenetic techniques include karyotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH).

8. Flow cytometry: This technique measures physical and chemical characteristics of cells or particles as they flow through a laser beam. Flow cytometry is used to analyze cell populations, identify specific cell types, and detect abnormalities in cells.

9. Diagnostic radiology: It uses imaging technologies such as X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound to diagnose various medical conditions.

10. Clinical chemistry: This technique involves analyzing body fluids, such as blood and urine, to measure the concentration of various chemicals and substances. Clinical chemistry tests are used to diagnose metabolic disorders, electrolyte imbalances, and other health conditions.

Environmental Microbiology is a branch of microbiology that deals with the study of microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, and other microscopic entities, that are found in various environments such as water, soil, air, and organic matter. This field focuses on understanding how these microbes interact with their surroundings, their role in various ecological systems, and their impact on human health and the environment. It also involves studying the genetic and biochemical mechanisms that allow microorganisms to survive and thrive in different environmental conditions, as well as the potential uses of microbes for bioremediation, bioenergy, and other industrial applications.

Food microbiology is the study of the microorganisms that are present in food, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. This field examines how these microbes interact with food, how they affect its safety and quality, and how they can be controlled during food production, processing, storage, and preparation. Food microbiology also involves the development of methods for detecting and identifying pathogenic microorganisms in food, as well as studying the mechanisms of foodborne illnesses and developing strategies to prevent them. Additionally, it includes research on the beneficial microbes found in certain fermented foods and their potential applications in improving food quality and safety.

Gram-negative bacteria are a type of bacteria that do not retain the crystal violet stain used in the Gram staining method, a standard technique used in microbiology to classify and identify different types of bacteria based on their structural differences. This method was developed by Hans Christian Gram in 1884.

The primary characteristic distinguishing Gram-negative bacteria from Gram-positive bacteria is the composition and structure of their cell walls:

1. Cell wall: Gram-negative bacteria have a thin peptidoglycan layer, making it more susceptible to damage and less rigid compared to Gram-positive bacteria.
2. Outer membrane: They possess an additional outer membrane that contains lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which are endotoxins that can trigger strong immune responses in humans and animals. The outer membrane also contains proteins, known as porins, which form channels for the passage of molecules into and out of the cell.
3. Periplasm: Between the inner and outer membranes lies a compartment called the periplasm, where various enzymes and other molecules are located.

Some examples of Gram-negative bacteria include Escherichia coli (E. coli), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp., and Neisseria meningitidis. These bacteria are often associated with various infections, such as urinary tract infections, pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis. Due to their complex cell wall structure, Gram-negative bacteria can be more resistant to certain antibiotics, making them a significant concern in healthcare settings.

Microbial sensitivity tests, also known as antibiotic susceptibility tests (ASTs) or bacterial susceptibility tests, are laboratory procedures used to determine the effectiveness of various antimicrobial agents against specific microorganisms isolated from a patient's infection. These tests help healthcare providers identify which antibiotics will be most effective in treating an infection and which ones should be avoided due to resistance. The results of these tests can guide appropriate antibiotic therapy, minimize the potential for antibiotic resistance, improve clinical outcomes, and reduce unnecessary side effects or toxicity from ineffective antimicrobials.

There are several methods for performing microbial sensitivity tests, including:

1. Disk diffusion method (Kirby-Bauer test): A standardized paper disk containing a predetermined amount of an antibiotic is placed on an agar plate that has been inoculated with the isolated microorganism. After incubation, the zone of inhibition around the disk is measured to determine the susceptibility or resistance of the organism to that particular antibiotic.
2. Broth dilution method: A series of tubes or wells containing decreasing concentrations of an antimicrobial agent are inoculated with a standardized microbial suspension. After incubation, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) is determined by observing the lowest concentration of the antibiotic that prevents visible growth of the organism.
3. Automated systems: These use sophisticated technology to perform both disk diffusion and broth dilution methods automatically, providing rapid and accurate results for a wide range of microorganisms and antimicrobial agents.

The interpretation of microbial sensitivity test results should be done cautiously, considering factors such as the site of infection, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the antibiotic, potential toxicity, and local resistance patterns. Regular monitoring of susceptibility patterns and ongoing antimicrobial stewardship programs are essential to ensure optimal use of these tests and to minimize the development of antibiotic resistance.

"Device approval" is a term used to describe the process by which a medical device is determined to be safe and effective for use in patients by regulatory authorities, such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The approval process typically involves a rigorous evaluation of the device's design, performance, and safety data, as well as a review of the manufacturer's quality systems and labeling.

The FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) is responsible for regulating medical devices in the United States. The CDRH uses a risk-based classification system to determine the level of regulatory control needed for each device. Class I devices are considered low risk, Class II devices are moderate risk, and Class III devices are high risk.

For Class III devices, which include life-sustaining or life-supporting devices, as well as those that present a potential unreasonable risk of illness or injury, the approval process typically involves a premarket approval (PMA) application. This requires the submission of comprehensive scientific evidence to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of the device.

For Class II devices, which include moderate-risk devices such as infusion pumps and powered wheelchairs, the approval process may involve a premarket notification (510(k)) submission. This requires the manufacturer to demonstrate that their device is substantially equivalent to a predicate device that is already legally marketed in the United States.

Once a medical device has been approved for marketing, the FDA continues to monitor its safety and effectiveness through post-market surveillance programs. Manufacturers are required to report any adverse events or product problems to the FDA, and the agency may take regulatory action if necessary to protect public health.

Equipment safety in a medical context refers to the measures taken to ensure that medical equipment is free from potential harm or risks to patients, healthcare providers, and others who may come into contact with the equipment. This includes:

1. Designing and manufacturing the equipment to meet safety standards and regulations.
2. Properly maintaining and inspecting the equipment to ensure it remains safe over time.
3. Providing proper training for healthcare providers on how to use the equipment safely.
4. Implementing safeguards, such as alarms and warnings, to alert users of potential hazards.
5. Conducting regular risk assessments to identify and address any potential safety concerns.
6. Reporting and investigating any incidents or accidents involving the equipment to determine their cause and prevent future occurrences.

Automation in the medical context refers to the use of technology and programming to allow machines or devices to operate with minimal human intervention. This can include various types of medical equipment, such as laboratory analyzers, imaging devices, and robotic surgical systems. Automation can help improve efficiency, accuracy, and safety in healthcare settings by reducing the potential for human error and allowing healthcare professionals to focus on higher-level tasks. It is important to note that while automation has many benefits, it is also essential to ensure that appropriate safeguards are in place to prevent accidents and maintain quality of care.

Gram-negative bacterial infections refer to illnesses or diseases caused by Gram-negative bacteria, which are a group of bacteria that do not retain crystal violet dye during the Gram staining procedure used in microbiology. This characteristic is due to the structure of their cell walls, which contain a thin layer of peptidoglycan and an outer membrane composed of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), proteins, and phospholipids.

The LPS component of the outer membrane is responsible for the endotoxic properties of Gram-negative bacteria, which can lead to severe inflammatory responses in the host. Common Gram-negative bacterial pathogens include Escherichia coli (E. coli), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Proteus mirabilis, among others.

Gram-negative bacterial infections can cause a wide range of clinical syndromes, such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections, bloodstream infections, meningitis, and soft tissue infections. The severity of these infections can vary from mild to life-threatening, depending on the patient's immune status, the site of infection, and the virulence of the bacterial strain.

Effective antibiotic therapy is crucial for treating Gram-negative bacterial infections, but the increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant strains has become a significant global health concern. Therefore, accurate diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial stewardship are essential to ensure optimal patient outcomes and prevent further spread of resistance.

Mycology is the branch of biology that deals with the study of fungi, including their genetic and biochemical properties, their taxonomy and classification, their role in diseases and decomposition processes, and their potential uses in industry, agriculture, and medicine. It involves the examination and identification of various types of fungi, such as yeasts, molds, and mushrooms, and the investigation of their ecological relationships with other organisms and their environments. Mycologists may also study the medical and veterinary importance of fungi, including the diagnosis and treatment of fungal infections, as well as the development of antifungal drugs and vaccines.

Culture media is a substance that is used to support the growth of microorganisms or cells in an artificial environment, such as a petri dish or test tube. It typically contains nutrients and other factors that are necessary for the growth and survival of the organisms being cultured. There are many different types of culture media, each with its own specific formulation and intended use. Some common examples include blood agar, which is used to culture bacteria; Sabouraud dextrose agar, which is used to culture fungi; and Eagle's minimum essential medium, which is used to culture animal cells.

Communicable diseases, also known as infectious diseases, are illnesses that can be transmitted from one person to another through various modes of transmission. These modes include:

1. Direct contact: This occurs when an individual comes into physical contact with an infected person, such as touching or shaking hands, or having sexual contact.
2. Indirect contact: This happens when an individual comes into contact with contaminated objects or surfaces, like doorknobs, towels, or utensils.
3. Airborne transmission: Infectious agents can be spread through the air when an infected person coughs, sneezes, talks, or sings, releasing droplets containing the pathogen into the environment. These droplets can then be inhaled by nearby individuals.
4. Droplet transmission: Similar to airborne transmission, but involving larger respiratory droplets that don't remain suspended in the air for long periods and typically travel shorter distances (usually less than 6 feet).
5. Vector-borne transmission: This occurs when an infected animal or insect, such as a mosquito or tick, transmits the disease to a human through a bite or other means.

Examples of communicable diseases include COVID-19, influenza, tuberculosis, measles, hepatitis B, and malaria. Preventive measures for communicable diseases often involve public health initiatives like vaccination programs, hygiene promotion, and vector control strategies.

Fungi, in the context of medical definitions, are a group of eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as the more familiar mushrooms. The study of fungi is known as mycology.

Fungi can exist as unicellular organisms or as multicellular filamentous structures called hyphae. They are heterotrophs, which means they obtain their nutrients by decomposing organic matter or by living as parasites on other organisms. Some fungi can cause various diseases in humans, animals, and plants, known as mycoses. These infections range from superficial, localized skin infections to systemic, life-threatening invasive diseases.

Examples of fungal infections include athlete's foot (tinea pedis), ringworm (dermatophytosis), candidiasis (yeast infection), histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and aspergillosis. Fungal infections can be challenging to treat due to the limited number of antifungal drugs available and the potential for drug resistance.

Enterobacteriaceae is a family of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in the intestines of humans and animals. Many species within this family are capable of causing various types of infections, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems. Some common examples of Enterobacteriaceae include Escherichia coli (E. coli), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Salmonella enterica.

These bacteria are typically characterized by their ability to ferment various sugars and produce acid and gas as byproducts. They can also be distinguished by their biochemical reactions, such as their ability to produce certain enzymes or resist specific antibiotics. Infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae can range from mild to severe, depending on the species involved and the overall health of the infected individual.

Some infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae include urinary tract infections, pneumonia, bloodstream infections, and foodborne illnesses. Proper hygiene, such as handwashing and safe food handling practices, can help prevent the spread of these bacteria and reduce the risk of infection.

A Clinical Laboratory Information System (CLIS) is a type of healthcare information system that is designed to automate and manage the workflow, data management, and reporting capabilities of a clinical laboratory. It serves as a centralized repository for all laboratory data and test results, allowing for efficient communication between healthcare providers, laboratorians, and patients.

The CLIS typically includes modules for specimen tracking, order entry, result reporting, data analysis, and quality control. It interfaces with other hospital information systems such as the electronic health record (EHR), radiology information system (RIS), and pharmacy information system (PIS) to provide a comprehensive view of the patient's medical history and test results.

The CLIS is used to manage a wide range of laboratory tests, including clinical chemistry, hematology, microbiology, immunology, molecular diagnostics, and toxicology. It helps laboratories to streamline their operations, reduce errors, improve turnaround times, and enhance the overall quality of patient care.

In summary, a Clinical Laboratory Information System is an essential tool for modern clinical laboratories that enables them to manage large volumes of data, improve efficiency, and provide accurate and timely test results to healthcare providers and patients.

"Evaluation studies" is a broad term that refers to the systematic assessment or examination of a program, project, policy, intervention, or product. The goal of an evaluation study is to determine its merits, worth, and value by measuring its effects, efficiency, and impact. There are different types of evaluation studies, including formative evaluations (conducted during the development or implementation of a program to provide feedback for improvement), summative evaluations (conducted at the end of a program to determine its overall effectiveness), process evaluations (focusing on how a program is implemented and delivered), outcome evaluations (assessing the short-term and intermediate effects of a program), and impact evaluations (measuring the long-term and broad consequences of a program).

In medical contexts, evaluation studies are often used to assess the safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of new treatments, interventions, or technologies. These studies can help healthcare providers make informed decisions about patient care, guide policymakers in developing evidence-based policies, and promote accountability and transparency in healthcare systems. Examples of evaluation studies in medicine include randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compare the outcomes of a new treatment to those of a standard or placebo treatment, observational studies that examine the real-world effectiveness and safety of interventions, and economic evaluations that assess the costs and benefits of different healthcare options.

Gram-positive bacteria are a type of bacteria that stain dark purple or blue when subjected to the Gram staining method, which is a common technique used in microbiology to classify and identify different types of bacteria based on their structural differences. This staining method was developed by Hans Christian Gram in 1884.

The key characteristic that distinguishes Gram-positive bacteria from other types, such as Gram-negative bacteria, is the presence of a thick layer of peptidoglycan in their cell walls, which retains the crystal violet stain used in the Gram staining process. Additionally, Gram-positive bacteria lack an outer membrane found in Gram-negative bacteria.

Examples of Gram-positive bacteria include Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Bacillus subtilis. Some Gram-positive bacteria can cause various human diseases, while others are beneficial or harmless.

Staphylococcus is a genus of Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacteria that are commonly found on the skin and mucous membranes of humans and other animals. Many species of Staphylococcus can cause infections in humans, but the most notable is Staphylococcus aureus, which is responsible for a wide range of illnesses, from minor skin infections to life-threatening conditions such as pneumonia, endocarditis, and sepsis.

Staphylococcus species are non-motile, non-spore forming, and typically occur in grape-like clusters when viewed under a microscope. They can be coagulase-positive or coagulase-negative, with S. aureus being the most well-known coagulase-positive species. Coagulase is an enzyme that causes the clotting of plasma, and its presence is often used to differentiate S. aureus from other Staphylococcus species.

These bacteria are resistant to many commonly used antibiotics, including penicillin, due to the production of beta-lactamases. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a particularly problematic strain that has developed resistance to multiple antibiotics and can cause severe, difficult-to-treat infections.

Proper hand hygiene, use of personal protective equipment, and environmental cleaning are crucial measures for preventing the spread of Staphylococcus in healthcare settings and the community.

Medical Laboratory Personnel are professionals who perform and interpret various laboratory tests to assist physicians in diagnosing, monitoring, and treating diseases and other medical conditions. They work in different areas of the clinical laboratory such as chemistry, hematology, immunology, microbiology, and transfusion medicine.

Their responsibilities may include collecting and processing specimens, operating and maintaining laboratory equipment, performing tests and procedures, analyzing results, conducting quality control, maintaining records, and reporting findings to healthcare providers. Medical Laboratory Personnel play a critical role in ensuring the accuracy and timeliness of diagnostic information, which is essential for providing effective medical care.

Medical Laboratory Personnel may hold various job titles, including Medical Laboratory Technologist (MLT), Medical Laboratory Scientist (MLS), Clinical Laboratory Scientist (CLS), Medical Technologist (MT), Medical Laboratory Technician (MLT), and Clinical Laboratory Technician (CLT). The specific duties and educational requirements for these positions may vary depending on the laboratory setting, state regulations, and professional certification.

Water microbiology is not a formal medical term, but rather a branch of microbiology that deals with the study of microorganisms found in water. It involves the identification, enumeration, and characterization of bacteria, viruses, parasites, and other microscopic organisms present in water sources such as lakes, rivers, oceans, groundwater, drinking water, and wastewater.

In a medical context, water microbiology is relevant to public health because it helps to assess the safety of water supplies for human consumption and recreational activities. It also plays a critical role in understanding and preventing waterborne diseases caused by pathogenic microorganisms that can lead to illnesses such as diarrhea, skin infections, and respiratory problems.

Water microbiologists use various techniques to study water microorganisms, including culturing, microscopy, genetic analysis, and biochemical tests. They also investigate the ecology of these organisms, their interactions with other species, and their response to environmental factors such as temperature, pH, and nutrient availability.

Overall, water microbiology is a vital field that helps ensure the safety of our water resources and protects public health.

Bacteremia is the presence of bacteria in the bloodstream. It is a medical condition that occurs when bacteria from another source, such as an infection in another part of the body, enter the bloodstream. Bacteremia can cause symptoms such as fever, chills, and rapid heart rate, and it can lead to serious complications such as sepsis if not treated promptly with antibiotics.

Bacteremia is often a result of an infection elsewhere in the body that allows bacteria to enter the bloodstream. This can happen through various routes, such as during medical procedures, intravenous (IV) drug use, or from infected wounds or devices that come into contact with the bloodstream. In some cases, bacteremia may also occur without any obvious source of infection.

It is important to note that not all bacteria in the bloodstream cause harm, and some people may have bacteria in their blood without showing any symptoms. However, if bacteria in the bloodstream multiply and cause an immune response, it can lead to bacteremia and potentially serious complications.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "History, 20th Century" is a broad and complex topic that refers to the events, developments, and transformations that occurred throughout the world during the 1900s. It is not a medical term or concept. If you're interested in learning more about this historical period, I would recommend consulting a history textbook, reputable online resources, or speaking with a historian. They can provide detailed information about the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that took place during the 20th century.

Bacterial typing techniques are methods used to identify and differentiate bacterial strains or isolates based on their unique characteristics. These techniques are essential in epidemiological studies, infection control, and research to understand the transmission dynamics, virulence, and antibiotic resistance patterns of bacterial pathogens.

There are various bacterial typing techniques available, including:

1. **Bacteriophage Typing:** This method involves using bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) to identify specific bacterial strains based on their susceptibility or resistance to particular phages.
2. **Serotyping:** It is a technique that differentiates bacterial strains based on the antigenic properties of their cell surface components, such as capsules, flagella, and somatic (O) and flagellar (H) antigens.
3. **Biochemical Testing:** This method uses biochemical reactions to identify specific metabolic pathways or enzymes present in bacterial strains, which can be used for differentiation. Commonly used tests include the catalase test, oxidase test, and various sugar fermentation tests.
4. **Molecular Typing Techniques:** These methods use genetic markers to identify and differentiate bacterial strains at the DNA level. Examples of molecular typing techniques include:
* **Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE):** This method uses restriction enzymes to digest bacterial DNA, followed by electrophoresis in an agarose gel under pulsed electrical fields. The resulting banding patterns are analyzed and compared to identify related strains.
* **Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST):** It involves sequencing specific housekeeping genes to generate unique sequence types that can be used for strain identification and phylogenetic analysis.
* **Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS):** This method sequences the entire genome of a bacterial strain, providing the most detailed information on genetic variation and relatedness between strains. WGS data can be analyzed using various bioinformatics tools to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), gene deletions or insertions, and other genetic changes that can be used for strain differentiation.

These molecular typing techniques provide higher resolution than traditional methods, allowing for more accurate identification and comparison of bacterial strains. They are particularly useful in epidemiological investigations to track the spread of pathogens and identify outbreaks.

Staphylococcal infections are a type of infection caused by Staphylococcus bacteria, which are commonly found on the skin and nose of healthy people. However, if they enter the body through a cut, scratch, or other wound, they can cause an infection.

There are several types of Staphylococcus bacteria, but the most common one that causes infections is Staphylococcus aureus. These infections can range from minor skin infections such as pimples, boils, and impetigo to serious conditions such as pneumonia, bloodstream infections, and toxic shock syndrome.

Symptoms of staphylococcal infections depend on the type and severity of the infection. Treatment typically involves antibiotics, either topical or oral, depending on the severity and location of the infection. In some cases, hospitalization may be necessary for more severe infections. It is important to note that some strains of Staphylococcus aureus have developed resistance to certain antibiotics, making them more difficult to treat.

Mycoses are a group of diseases caused by fungal infections. These infections can affect various parts of the body, including the skin, nails, hair, lungs, and internal organs. The severity of mycoses can range from superficial, mild infections to systemic, life-threatening conditions, depending on the type of fungus and the immune status of the infected individual. Some common types of mycoses include candidiasis, dermatophytosis, histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and aspergillosis. Treatment typically involves antifungal medications, which can be topical or systemic, depending on the location and severity of the infection.

Cross infection, also known as cross-contamination, is the transmission of infectious agents or diseases between patients in a healthcare setting. This can occur through various means such as contaminated equipment, surfaces, hands of healthcare workers, or the air. It is an important concern in medical settings and measures are taken to prevent its occurrence, including proper hand hygiene, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), environmental cleaning and disinfection, and safe injection practices.

"Porphyromonas" is a genus of gram-negative, anaerobic bacteria that are commonly found in the human oral cavity and other areas of the body. One species, "Porphyromonas gingivalis," is a major contributor to chronic periodontitis, a severe form of gum disease. These bacteria are also associated with various systemic diseases, including atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and aspiration pneumonia. The name "Porphyromonas" comes from the Greek words "porphyra," meaning purple, and "monas," meaning unit, referring to the bacteria's ability to produce porphyrins, which are pigments that can give a purple color to their colonies.

Bacterial drug resistance is a type of antimicrobial resistance that occurs when bacteria evolve the ability to survive and reproduce in the presence of drugs (such as antibiotics) that would normally kill them or inhibit their growth. This can happen due to various mechanisms, including genetic mutations or the acquisition of resistance genes from other bacteria.

As a result, bacterial infections may become more difficult to treat, requiring higher doses of medication, alternative drugs, or longer treatment courses. In some cases, drug-resistant infections can lead to serious health complications, increased healthcare costs, and higher mortality rates.

Examples of bacterial drug resistance include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE), and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Preventing the spread of bacterial drug resistance is crucial for maintaining effective treatments for infectious diseases.

"Quality control" is a term that is used in many industries, including healthcare and medicine, to describe the systematic process of ensuring that products or services meet certain standards and regulations. In the context of healthcare, quality control often refers to the measures taken to ensure that the care provided to patients is safe, effective, and consistent. This can include processes such as:

1. Implementing standardized protocols and guidelines for care
2. Training and educating staff to follow these protocols
3. Regularly monitoring and evaluating the outcomes of care
4. Making improvements to processes and systems based on data and feedback
5. Ensuring that equipment and supplies are maintained and functioning properly
6. Implementing systems for reporting and addressing safety concerns or errors.

The goal of quality control in healthcare is to provide high-quality, patient-centered care that meets the needs and expectations of patients, while also protecting their safety and well-being.

Federal hospitals are healthcare facilities that are owned, operated, or funded by the federal government of a country. In the United States, for example, federal hospitals can be run by various agencies including the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals for military veterans, the Indian Health Service (IHS) hospitals for Native Americans, and the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) hospitals for inmates. These hospitals provide medical care to specific populations as part of the government's responsibility to ensure the health and well-being of its citizens. They must adhere to federal regulations and standards of care, and may also conduct research and train healthcare professionals.

An abscess is a localized collection of pus caused by an infection. It is typically characterized by inflammation, redness, warmth, pain, and swelling in the affected area. Abscesses can form in various parts of the body, including the skin, teeth, lungs, brain, and abdominal organs. They are usually treated with antibiotics to eliminate the infection and may require drainage if they are large or located in a critical area. If left untreated, an abscess can lead to serious complications such as sepsis or organ failure.

Ethmoid sinusitis is a medical condition that refers to the inflammation or infection of the ethmoid sinuses. The ethmoid sinuses are a pair of small, air-filled cavities located in the upper part of the nasal cavity, near the eyes. They are surrounded by delicate bone structures and are connected to the nasal cavity by narrow channels.

Ethmoid sinusitis can occur as a result of a viral, bacterial, or fungal infection, or it may be caused by allergies, environmental factors, or structural abnormalities in the nasal passages. When the ethmoid sinuses become inflamed or infected, they can cause symptoms such as:

* Nasal congestion or stuffiness
* Pain or pressure in the forehead, between the eyes, or in the cheeks
* Headaches or facial pain
* Thick, discolored nasal discharge
* Postnasal drip
* Coughing or sneezing
* Fever
* Fatigue

Ethmoid sinusitis can be acute (lasting for a short period of time) or chronic (persisting for several weeks or months). If left untreated, ethmoid sinusitis can lead to complications such as the spread of infection to other parts of the body, including the eyes and brain. Treatment for ethmoid sinusitis may include antibiotics, decongestants, nasal sprays, or surgery in severe cases.

A wound infection is defined as the invasion and multiplication of microorganisms in a part of the body tissue, which has been damaged by a cut, blow, or other trauma, leading to inflammation, purulent discharge, and sometimes systemic toxicity. The symptoms may include redness, swelling, pain, warmth, and fever. Treatment typically involves the use of antibiotics and proper wound care. It's important to note that not all wounds will become infected, but those that are contaminated with bacteria, dirt, or other foreign substances, or those in which the skin's natural barrier has been significantly compromised, are at a higher risk for infection.

The "History of Medicine" refers to the evolution and development of medical knowledge, practices, and institutions over time. It includes the study of key figures, discoveries, theories, treatments, and societal attitudes that have shaped the way medicine is practiced and understood in different cultures and historical periods. This can encompass various fields such as clinical medicine, public health, medical ethics, and healthcare systems. The history of medicine provides valuable insights into the advances and setbacks in medical knowledge and offers lessons for addressing current and future medical challenges.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

Specimen handling is a set of procedures and practices followed in the collection, storage, transportation, and processing of medical samples or specimens (e.g., blood, tissue, urine, etc.) for laboratory analysis. Proper specimen handling ensures accurate test results, patient safety, and data integrity. It includes:

1. Correct labeling of the specimen container with required patient information.
2. Using appropriate containers and materials to collect, store, and transport the specimen.
3. Following proper collection techniques to avoid contamination or damage to the specimen.
4. Adhering to specific storage conditions (temperature, time, etc.) before testing.
5. Ensuring secure and timely transportation of the specimen to the laboratory.
6. Properly documenting all steps in the handling process for traceability and quality assurance.

Sensitivity and specificity are statistical measures used to describe the performance of a diagnostic test or screening tool in identifying true positive and true negative results.

* Sensitivity refers to the proportion of people who have a particular condition (true positives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true positive rate" or "recall." A highly sensitive test will identify most or all of the people with the condition, but may also produce more false positives.
* Specificity refers to the proportion of people who do not have a particular condition (true negatives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true negative rate." A highly specific test will identify most or all of the people without the condition, but may also produce more false negatives.

In medical testing, both sensitivity and specificity are important considerations when evaluating a diagnostic test. High sensitivity is desirable for screening tests that aim to identify as many cases of a condition as possible, while high specificity is desirable for confirmatory tests that aim to rule out the condition in people who do not have it.

It's worth noting that sensitivity and specificity are often influenced by factors such as the prevalence of the condition in the population being tested, the threshold used to define a positive result, and the reliability and validity of the test itself. Therefore, it's important to consider these factors when interpreting the results of a diagnostic test.

Medical Laboratory Science, also known as Clinical Laboratory Science, is a healthcare profession that involves the performance and interpretation of laboratory tests to detect, diagnose, monitor, and treat diseases. Medical Laboratory Scientists (MLS) work in various settings such as hospitals, clinics, research institutions, and diagnostic laboratories. They analyze body fluids, tissues, and cells using sophisticated instruments and techniques to provide accurate and timely results that aid in the clinical decision-making process.

MLS professionals perform a range of laboratory tests including hematology, clinical chemistry, microbiology, immunology, molecular biology, urinalysis, and blood banking. They follow standardized procedures and quality control measures to ensure the accuracy and reliability of test results. MLS professionals also evaluate complex data, correlate test findings with clinical symptoms, and communicate their findings to healthcare providers.

MLS education typically requires a bachelor's degree in Medical Laboratory Science or a related field, followed by a clinical internship or residency program. Many MLS professionals are certified or licensed by professional organizations such as the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) and the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS).

Maxillary sinusitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation or infection of the maxillary sinuses, which are air-filled cavities located in the upper part of the cheekbones. These sinuses are lined with mucous membranes that produce mucus to help filter and humidify the air we breathe.

When the maxillary sinuses become inflamed or infected, they can fill with fluid and pus, leading to symptoms such as:

* Pain or pressure in the cheeks, upper teeth, or behind the eyes
* Nasal congestion or stuffiness
* Runny nose or postnasal drip
* Reduced sense of smell or taste
* Headache or facial pain
* Fatigue or fever (in cases of bacterial infection)

Maxillary sinusitis can be caused by viruses, bacteria, or fungi, and may also result from allergies, structural abnormalities, or exposure to environmental irritants such as smoke or pollution. Treatment typically involves managing symptoms with over-the-counter remedies or prescription medications, such as decongestants, antihistamines, or antibiotics. In some cases, more invasive treatments such as sinus surgery may be necessary.

Serology is a branch of medical laboratory science that involves the identification and measurement of antibodies or antigens in a serum sample. Serum is the liquid component of blood that remains after clotting and removal of cells. Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to an antigen, which can be a foreign substance such as bacteria, viruses, or other microorganisms.

Serological tests are used to diagnose infectious diseases, monitor the progression of an infection, and determine the effectiveness of treatment. These tests can also help identify the presence of immune disorders or allergies. The results of serological tests are typically reported as a titer, which is the highest dilution of the serum that still shows a positive reaction to the antigen. Higher titers indicate a stronger immune response and may suggest a more recent infection or a greater severity of illness.

"History, 19th Century" is not a medical term or concept. It refers to the historical events, developments, and figures related to the 1800s in various fields, including politics, culture, science, and technology. However, if you are looking for medical advancements during the 19th century, here's a brief overview:

The 19th century was a period of significant progress in medicine, with numerous discoveries and innovations that shaped modern medical practices. Some notable developments include:

1. Edward Jenner's smallpox vaccine (1796): Although not strictly within the 19th century, Jenner's discovery laid the foundation for vaccination as a preventive measure against infectious diseases.
2. Germ theory of disease: The work of Louis Pasteur, Robert Koch, and others established that many diseases were caused by microorganisms, leading to the development of antiseptic practices and vaccines.
3. Anesthesia: In 1842, Crawford Long first used ether as an anesthetic during surgery, followed by the introduction of chloroform in 1847 by James Simpson.
4. Antisepsis and asepsis: Joseph Lister introduced antiseptic practices in surgery, significantly reducing postoperative infections. Later, the concept of asepsis (sterilization) was developed to prevent contamination during surgical procedures.
5. Microbiology: The development of techniques for culturing and staining bacteria allowed for better understanding and identification of pathogens.
6. Physiology: Claude Bernard's work on the regulation of internal body functions, or homeostasis, contributed significantly to our understanding of human physiology.
7. Neurology: Jean-Martin Charcot made significant contributions to the study of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.
8. Psychiatry: Sigmund Freud developed psychoanalysis, a new approach to understanding mental illnesses.
9. Public health: The 19th century saw the establishment of public health organizations and initiatives aimed at improving sanitation, water quality, and vaccination programs.
10. Medical education reforms: The Flexner Report in 1910 led to significant improvements in medical education standards and practices.

Reagent kits, diagnostic are prepackaged sets of chemical reagents and other components designed for performing specific diagnostic tests or assays. These kits are often used in clinical laboratories to detect and measure the presence or absence of various biomarkers, such as proteins, antibodies, antigens, nucleic acids, or small molecules, in biological samples like blood, urine, or tissues.

Diagnostic reagent kits typically contain detailed instructions for their use, along with the necessary reagents, controls, and sometimes specialized equipment or supplies. They are designed to simplify the testing process, reduce human error, and increase standardization, ensuring accurate and reliable results. Examples of diagnostic reagent kits include those used for pregnancy tests, infectious disease screening, drug testing, genetic testing, and cancer biomarker detection.

Blood is the fluid that circulates in the body of living organisms, carrying oxygen and nutrients to the cells and removing carbon dioxide and other waste products. It is composed of red and white blood cells suspended in a liquid called plasma. The main function of blood is to transport oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues and carbon dioxide from the tissues to the lungs. It also transports nutrients, hormones, and other substances to the cells and removes waste products from them. Additionally, blood plays a crucial role in the body's immune system by helping to fight infection and disease.

Gentian Violet is not a medical term per se, but it is a substance that has been used in medicine. According to the US National Library of Medicine's MedlinePlus, Gentian Violet is a type of crystal violet dye that has antifungal and antibacterial properties. It is often used as a topical treatment for minor cuts, burns, and wounds, as well as for fungal infections such as thrush (oral candidiasis) and athlete's foot. Gentian Violet can also be used to treat ringworm and impetigo. However, it should not be used in the eyes or mouth, and it should be used with caution on broken skin, as it can cause irritation. Additionally, there is some concern that long-term use of Gentian Violet may be carcinogenic (cancer-causing), so its use should be limited to short periods of time and under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Molecular diagnostic techniques are a group of laboratory methods used to analyze biological markers in DNA, RNA, and proteins to identify specific health conditions or diseases at the molecular level. These techniques include various methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA sequencing, gene expression analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and mass spectrometry.

Molecular diagnostic techniques are used to detect genetic mutations, chromosomal abnormalities, viral and bacterial infections, and other molecular changes associated with various diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, infectious diseases, and neurological disorders. These techniques provide valuable information for disease diagnosis, prognosis, treatment planning, and monitoring of treatment response.

Compared to traditional diagnostic methods, molecular diagnostic techniques offer several advantages, such as higher sensitivity, specificity, and speed. They can detect small amounts of genetic material or proteins, even in early stages of the disease, and provide accurate results with a lower risk of false positives or negatives. Additionally, molecular diagnostic techniques can be automated, standardized, and performed in high-throughput formats, making them suitable for large-scale screening and research applications.

Staphylococcus aureus is a type of gram-positive, round (coccal) bacterium that is commonly found on the skin and mucous membranes of warm-blooded animals and humans. It is a facultative anaerobe, which means it can grow in the presence or absence of oxygen.

Staphylococcus aureus is known to cause a wide range of infections, from mild skin infections such as pimples, impetigo, and furuncles (boils) to more severe and potentially life-threatening infections such as pneumonia, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and sepsis. It can also cause food poisoning and toxic shock syndrome.

The bacterium is often resistant to multiple antibiotics, including methicillin, which has led to the emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains that are difficult to treat. Proper hand hygiene and infection control practices are critical in preventing the spread of Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA.

Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is a type of RNA that combines with proteins to form ribosomes, which are complex structures inside cells where protein synthesis occurs. The "16S" refers to the sedimentation coefficient of the rRNA molecule, which is a measure of its size and shape. In particular, 16S rRNA is a component of the smaller subunit of the prokaryotic ribosome (found in bacteria and archaea), and is often used as a molecular marker for identifying and classifying these organisms due to its relative stability and conservation among species. The sequence of 16S rRNA can be compared across different species to determine their evolutionary relationships and taxonomic positions.

Peptostreptococcus is a genus of Gram-positive, anaerobic, coccus-shaped bacteria that are commonly found as normal flora in the human mouth, gastrointestinal tract, and female genital tract. These organisms can become pathogenic and cause a variety of infections, particularly in individuals with compromised immune systems or following surgical procedures. Infections caused by Peptostreptococcus species can include abscesses, endocarditis, bacteremia, and joint infections. Proper identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing are essential for the effective treatment of these infections.

Gram-positive bacterial infections refer to illnesses or diseases caused by Gram-positive bacteria, which are a group of bacteria that turn purple when stained using the Gram stain method. This staining technique is used in microbiology to differentiate between two main types of bacteria based on their cell wall composition.

Gram-positive bacteria have a thick layer of peptidoglycan in their cell walls, which retains the crystal violet stain used in the Gram staining process. Some common examples of Gram-positive bacteria include Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Enterococcus faecalis.

Gram-positive bacterial infections can range from mild skin infections to severe and life-threatening conditions such as pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis. The symptoms of these infections depend on the type of bacteria involved and the location of the infection in the body. Treatment typically involves the use of antibiotics that are effective against Gram-positive bacteria, such as penicillin, vancomycin, or clindamycin. However, the emergence of antibiotic resistance among Gram-positive bacteria is a growing concern and can complicate treatment in some cases.

Agar is a substance derived from red algae, specifically from the genera Gelidium and Gracilaria. It is commonly used in microbiology as a solidifying agent for culture media. Agar forms a gel at relatively low temperatures (around 40-45°C) and remains stable at higher temperatures (up to 100°C), making it ideal for preparing various types of culture media.

In addition to its use in microbiology, agar is also used in other scientific research, food industry, and even in some artistic applications due to its unique gelling properties. It is important to note that although agar is often used in the preparation of food, it is not typically consumed as a standalone ingredient by humans or animals.

Coagulase is a type of enzyme produced by some bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus. This enzyme helps the bacteria to clot blood plasma by converting an inactive precursor (prothrombin) into thrombin, which then converts fibrinogen into fibrin to form a clot. The ability of S. aureus to produce coagulase is often used as a diagnostic criterion for this bacterium, and it also plays a role in the virulence of the organism by helping it to evade the host's immune system.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a laboratory technique used to amplify specific regions of DNA. It enables the production of thousands to millions of copies of a particular DNA sequence in a rapid and efficient manner, making it an essential tool in various fields such as molecular biology, medical diagnostics, forensic science, and research.

The PCR process involves repeated cycles of heating and cooling to separate the DNA strands, allow primers (short sequences of single-stranded DNA) to attach to the target regions, and extend these primers using an enzyme called Taq polymerase, resulting in the exponential amplification of the desired DNA segment.

In a medical context, PCR is often used for detecting and quantifying specific pathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in clinical samples, identifying genetic mutations or polymorphisms associated with diseases, monitoring disease progression, and evaluating treatment effectiveness.

A Pathology Department in a hospital is a division that is responsible for the examination and diagnosis of diseases through the laboratory analysis of tissue, fluid, and other samples. It plays a crucial role in providing accurate diagnoses, treatment planning, and monitoring of patients' health statuses. The department is typically staffed by pathologists (physicians who specialize in interpreting medical tests and diagnosing diseases), as well as laboratory technologists, technicians, and assistants.

The Pathology Department provides various services, including:

1. Anatomical Pathology - Examination of tissue specimens to identify abnormalities, such as cancerous growths or other diseases. This includes surgical pathology, cytopathology (examining individual cells), and autopsy pathology.
2. Clinical Pathology - Analysis of bodily fluids, such as blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid, to assess chemical, hematological, immunological, and microbiological aspects. This includes hematology (study of blood cells), clinical chemistry (analysis of body chemicals), immunopathology (study of immune system disorders), and microbiology (identification and classification of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites).
3. Molecular Pathology - Analysis of DNA, RNA, and proteins to identify genetic mutations or abnormalities that contribute to diseases, particularly cancer. This information can help guide targeted therapies and personalized treatment plans.
4. Forensic Pathology - Examination of bodies to determine the cause and manner of death in cases of suspected criminal activity, accidents, or other suspicious circumstances.

The Pathology Department's work is essential for providing accurate diagnoses, determining appropriate treatments, monitoring disease progression, and conducting medical research.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over" is not a medical term or concept itself. However, I can provide some context related to hospital bed capacity in general.

Hospital bed capacity refers to the total number of beds that are available for patients in a healthcare facility. This includes both regular beds and any specialized beds, such as intensive care unit (ICU) beds.

When we say "500 and over," it's simply indicating a threshold for the size of the hospital. A hospital with a bed capacity of 500 or more is considered a large hospital. This can have implications for the range of services offered, the complexity of cases handled, and the resources available. However, it doesn't change the basic definition or nature of what a hospital bed capacity is.

I hope this helps! If you have any other questions about medical definitions or concepts, feel free to ask.

Sputum is defined as a mixture of saliva and phlegm that is expelled from the respiratory tract during coughing, sneezing or deep breathing. It can be clear, mucoid, or purulent (containing pus) depending on the underlying cause of the respiratory issue. Examination of sputum can help diagnose various respiratory conditions such as infections, inflammation, or other lung diseases.

"Neisseria" is a genus of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that are commonly found as part of the normal flora in the human body, particularly in the mouth, nose, and genital tract. Some species of Neisseria can cause diseases in humans, the most well-known being Neisseria meningitidis (meningococcus), which can cause meningitis and sepsis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonococcus), which causes the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea. These bacteria are named after German physician and bacteriologist Albert Neisser, who first described them in the late 19th century.

Suppuration is the process of forming or discharging pus. It is a condition that results from infection, tissue death (necrosis), or injury, where white blood cells (leukocytes) accumulate to combat the infection and subsequently die, forming pus. The pus consists of dead leukocytes, dead tissue, debris, and microbes (bacteria, fungi, or protozoa). Suppuration can occur in various body parts such as the lungs (empyema), brain (abscess), or skin (carbuncle, furuncle). Treatment typically involves draining the pus and administering appropriate antibiotics to eliminate the infection.

Diagnostic errors refer to inaccurate or delayed diagnoses of a patient's medical condition, which can lead to improper or unnecessary treatment and potentially serious harm to the patient. These errors can occur due to various factors such as lack of clinical knowledge, failure to consider all possible diagnoses, inadequate communication between healthcare providers and patients, and problems with testing or interpretation of test results. Diagnostic errors are a significant cause of preventable harm in medical care and have been identified as a priority area for quality improvement efforts.

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is a federal government agency responsible for protecting public health by ensuring the safety, efficacy, and security of human and veterinary drugs, biological products, medical devices, our country's food supply, cosmetics, and products that emit radiation. The FDA also provides guidance on the proper use of these products, and enforces laws and regulations related to them. It is part of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

I apologize, but there seems to be a misunderstanding. "Soil microbiology" is not a medical term; rather, it is a branch of microbiology that deals with the study of microorganisms in soil. It involves understanding the diversity, ecology, and biochemistry of bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa, and other microscopic life forms found in soil. This field has applications in agriculture, environmental science, and waste management but is not directly related to medical definitions or human health.

Urine is a physiological excretory product that is primarily composed of water, urea, and various ions (such as sodium, potassium, chloride, and others) that are the byproducts of protein metabolism. It also contains small amounts of other substances like uric acid, creatinine, ammonia, and various organic compounds. Urine is produced by the kidneys through a process called urination or micturition, where it is filtered from the blood and then stored in the bladder until it is excreted from the body through the urethra. The color, volume, and composition of urine can provide important diagnostic information about various medical conditions.

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disorder that primarily affects the lungs and digestive system. It is caused by mutations in the CFTR gene, which regulates the movement of salt and water in and out of cells. When this gene is not functioning properly, thick, sticky mucus builds up in various organs, leading to a range of symptoms.

In the lungs, this mucus can clog the airways, making it difficult to breathe and increasing the risk of lung infections. Over time, lung damage can occur, which may lead to respiratory failure. In the digestive system, the thick mucus can prevent the release of digestive enzymes from the pancreas, impairing nutrient absorption and leading to malnutrition. CF can also affect the reproductive system, liver, and other organs.

Symptoms of cystic fibrosis may include persistent coughing, wheezing, lung infections, difficulty gaining weight, greasy stools, and frequent greasy diarrhea. The severity of the disease can vary significantly among individuals, depending on the specific genetic mutations they have inherited.

Currently, there is no cure for cystic fibrosis, but treatments are available to help manage symptoms and slow the progression of the disease. These may include airway clearance techniques, medications to thin mucus, antibiotics to treat infections, enzyme replacement therapy, and a high-calorie, high-fat diet. Lung transplantation is an option for some individuals with advanced lung disease.

Phenazines are a class of heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds that consist of two nitrogen atoms connected by a five-membered ring. They are naturally occurring in various species of bacteria and fungi, where they play a role in chemical defense and communication. Some phenazines have been found to have antibiotic, antifungal, and antiparasitic properties. Synthetic phenazines are also used in various industrial applications, such as dyes and pigments, and as components in some pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals.

Equipment contamination in a medical context refers to the presence of harmful microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses, or fungi, on the surfaces of medical equipment or devices. This can occur during use, storage, or transportation of the equipment and can lead to the transmission of infections to patients, healthcare workers, or other individuals who come into contact with the contaminated equipment.

Equipment contamination can occur through various routes, including contact with contaminated body fluids, airborne particles, or environmental surfaces. To prevent equipment contamination and the resulting infection transmission, it is essential to follow strict infection control practices, such as regular cleaning and disinfection of equipment, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), and proper handling and storage of medical devices.

Microbial drug resistance is a significant medical issue that refers to the ability of microorganisms (such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites) to withstand or survive exposure to drugs or medications designed to kill them or limit their growth. This phenomenon has become a major global health concern, particularly in the context of bacterial infections, where it is also known as antibiotic resistance.

Drug resistance arises due to genetic changes in microorganisms that enable them to modify or bypass the effects of antimicrobial agents. These genetic alterations can be caused by mutations or the acquisition of resistance genes through horizontal gene transfer. The resistant microbes then replicate and multiply, forming populations that are increasingly difficult to eradicate with conventional treatments.

The consequences of drug-resistant infections include increased morbidity, mortality, healthcare costs, and the potential for widespread outbreaks. Factors contributing to the emergence and spread of microbial drug resistance include the overuse or misuse of antimicrobials, poor infection control practices, and inadequate surveillance systems.

To address this challenge, it is crucial to promote prudent antibiotic use, strengthen infection prevention and control measures, develop new antimicrobial agents, and invest in research to better understand the mechanisms underlying drug resistance.

In medical terms, the mouth is officially referred to as the oral cavity. It is the first part of the digestive tract and includes several structures: the lips, vestibule (the space enclosed by the lips and teeth), teeth, gingiva (gums), hard and soft palate, tongue, floor of the mouth, and salivary glands. The mouth is responsible for several functions including speaking, swallowing, breathing, and eating, as it is the initial point of ingestion where food is broken down through mechanical and chemical processes, beginning the digestive process.

'Candida' is a type of fungus (a form of yeast) that is commonly found on the skin and inside the body, including in the mouth, throat, gut, and vagina, in small amounts. It is a part of the normal microbiota and usually does not cause any problems. However, an overgrowth of Candida can lead to infections known as candidiasis or thrush. Common sites for these infections include the skin, mouth, throat, and genital areas. Some factors that can contribute to Candida overgrowth are a weakened immune system, certain medications (such as antibiotics and corticosteroids), diabetes, pregnancy, poor oral hygiene, and wearing damp or tight-fitting clothing. Common symptoms of candidiasis include itching, redness, pain, and discharge. Treatment typically involves antifungal medication, either topical or oral, depending on the site and severity of the infection.

Industrial microbiology is not strictly a medical definition, but it is a branch of microbiology that deals with the use of microorganisms for the production of various industrial and commercial products. In a broader sense, it can include the study of microorganisms that are involved in diseases of animals, humans, and plants, as well as those that are beneficial in industrial processes.

In the context of medical microbiology, industrial microbiology may involve the use of microorganisms to produce drugs, vaccines, or other therapeutic agents. For example, certain bacteria and yeasts are used to ferment sugars and produce antibiotics, while other microorganisms are used to create vaccines through a process called attenuation.

Industrial microbiology may also involve the study of microorganisms that can cause contamination in medical settings, such as hospitals or pharmaceutical manufacturing facilities. These microorganisms can cause infections and pose a risk to patients or workers, so it is important to understand their behavior and develop strategies for controlling their growth and spread.

Overall, industrial microbiology plays an important role in the development of new medical technologies and therapies, as well as in ensuring the safety and quality of medical products and environments.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Feces are the solid or semisolid remains of food that could not be digested or absorbed in the small intestine, along with bacteria and other waste products. After being stored in the colon, feces are eliminated from the body through the rectum and anus during defecation. Feces can vary in color, consistency, and odor depending on a person's diet, health status, and other factors.

Bacteriuria is a medical term that refers to the presence of bacteria in the urine. The condition can be asymptomatic or symptomatic, and it can occur in various populations, including hospitalized patients, pregnant women, and individuals with underlying urologic abnormalities.

There are different types of bacteriuria, including:

1. Significant bacteriuria: This refers to the presence of a large number of bacteria in the urine (usually greater than 100,000 colony-forming units per milliliter or CFU/mL) and is often associated with urinary tract infection (UTI).
2. Contaminant bacteriuria: This occurs when bacteria from the skin or external environment enter the urine sample during collection, leading to a small number of bacteria present in the urine.
3. Asymptomatic bacteriuria: This refers to the presence of bacteria in the urine without any symptoms of UTI. It is more common in older adults, pregnant women, and individuals with diabetes or other underlying medical conditions.

The diagnosis of bacteriuria typically involves a urinalysis and urine culture to identify the type and quantity of bacteria present in the urine. Treatment depends on the type and severity of bacteriuria and may involve antibiotics to eliminate the infection. However, asymptomatic bacteriuria often does not require treatment unless it occurs in pregnant women or individuals undergoing urologic procedures.

I believe there might be a bit of confusion in your question. "History" is a subject that refers to events, ideas, and developments of the past. It's not something that has a medical definition. However, if you're referring to the "21st century" in a historical context, it relates to the period from 2001 to the present. It's an era marked by significant advancements in technology, medicine, and society at large. But again, it doesn't have a medical definition. If you meant something else, please provide more context so I can give a more accurate response.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "work simplification" is not a medical term. It is a general term used in various fields such as industrial engineering, ergonomics, and management to refer to the process of redesigning or modifying work methods, processes, or environments to make them more efficient, less strenuous, and easier to perform.

Work simplification can involve various techniques, including task analysis, process mapping, eliminating unnecessary steps, standardizing work procedures, and using appropriate tools and equipment. While not a medical term, work simplification may have applications in occupational therapy, rehabilitation, and disability management to help individuals with injuries or disabilities perform their job tasks more easily and safely.

Prevotella intermedia is a gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that is commonly found in the oral cavity, upper respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. It is a normal resident of the human microbiota but can also be an opportunistic pathogen, causing various types of infections such as periodontitis, endocarditis, and brain abscesses. P. intermedia has been associated with several diseases, including respiratory tract infections, bacteremia, and joint infections. It is often found in mixed infections with other anaerobic bacteria. Proper identification of this organism is important for the selection of appropriate antimicrobial therapy.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

Peritonitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the peritoneum, which is the serous membrane that lines the inner wall of the abdominal cavity and covers the abdominal organs. The peritoneum has an important role in protecting the abdominal organs and providing a smooth surface for them to move against each other.

Peritonitis can occur as a result of bacterial or fungal infection, chemical irritation, or trauma to the abdomen. The most common cause of peritonitis is a rupture or perforation of an organ in the abdominal cavity, such as the appendix, stomach, or intestines, which allows bacteria from the gut to enter the peritoneal cavity.

Symptoms of peritonitis may include abdominal pain and tenderness, fever, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, and decreased bowel movements. In severe cases, peritonitis can lead to sepsis, a life-threatening condition characterized by widespread inflammation throughout the body.

Treatment for peritonitis typically involves antibiotics to treat the infection, as well as surgical intervention to repair any damage to the abdominal organs and remove any infected fluid or tissue from the peritoneal cavity. In some cases, a temporary or permanent drain may be placed in the abdomen to help remove excess fluid and promote healing.

Microbiological phenomena refer to the observable characteristics, processes, and events that occur in microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites. These phenomena can include growth and reproduction, metabolic processes, genetic regulation and expression, communication and signaling, pathogenesis and host-microbe interactions, among others. Understanding these phenomena is crucial for the study of infectious diseases, development of diagnostic tests, design of vaccines and antimicrobial agents, and investigation of microbial ecology and evolution.

Infection is defined medically as the invasion and multiplication of pathogenic microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites within the body, which can lead to tissue damage, illness, and disease. This process often triggers an immune response from the host's body in an attempt to eliminate the infectious agents and restore homeostasis. Infections can be transmitted through various routes, including airborne particles, direct contact with contaminated surfaces or bodily fluids, sexual contact, or vector-borne transmission. The severity of an infection may range from mild and self-limiting to severe and life-threatening, depending on factors such as the type and quantity of pathogen, the host's immune status, and any underlying health conditions.

Sterilization, in a medical context, refers to the process of eliminating or removing all forms of microbial life, including fungi, bacteria, viruses, spores, and any other biological agents from a surface, object, or environment. This is typically achieved through various methods such as heat (using autoclaves), chemical processes, irradiation, or filtration.

In addition, sterilization can also refer to the surgical procedure that renders individuals unable to reproduce. This is often referred to as "permanent contraception" and can be performed through various methods such as vasectomy for men and tubal ligation for women. It's important to note that these procedures are typically permanent and not easily reversible.

Gram-negative aerobic bacteria are a type of bacteria that do not retain the crystal violet stain used in the Gram staining method, which is a technique used to differentiate bacterial species based on their cell wall composition. These bacteria have a thin peptidoglycan layer and an outer membrane containing lipopolysaccharides (LPS), making them resistant to many antibiotics and disinfectants. They are called aerobic because they require oxygen for their growth and metabolism. Examples of Gram-negative aerobic bacteria include Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. These bacteria can cause various infections in humans, such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections, and sepsis.

"Pseudomonas aeruginosa" is a medically important, gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that is widely found in the environment, such as in soil, water, and on plants. It's an opportunistic pathogen, meaning it usually doesn't cause infection in healthy individuals but can cause severe and sometimes life-threatening infections in people with weakened immune systems, burns, or chronic lung diseases like cystic fibrosis.

P. aeruginosa is known for its remarkable ability to resist many antibiotics and disinfectants due to its intrinsic resistance mechanisms and the acquisition of additional resistance determinants. It can cause various types of infections, including respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, gastrointestinal infections, dermatitis, and severe bloodstream infections known as sepsis.

The bacterium produces a variety of virulence factors that contribute to its pathogenicity, such as exotoxins, proteases, and pigments like pyocyanin and pyoverdine, which aid in iron acquisition and help the organism evade host immune responses. Effective infection control measures, appropriate use of antibiotics, and close monitoring of high-risk patients are crucial for managing P. aeruginosa infections.

Enterococcus is a genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacteria that are commonly found in the intestinal tracts of humans and animals. They are part of the normal gut microbiota but can also cause a variety of infections, particularly in hospital settings. Enterococci are known for their ability to survive in harsh environments and can be resistant to many antibiotics, making them difficult to treat. Some species, such as Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, are more commonly associated with human infections.

In medical terms, an "Enterococcus infection" refers to an infection caused by any species of the Enterococcus genus. These infections can occur in various parts of the body, including the urinary tract, bloodstream, and abdominal cavity. They can cause symptoms such as fever, chills, and pain, depending on the location of the infection. Treatment typically involves the use of antibiotics that are effective against Enterococcus species, although resistance to multiple antibiotics is a growing concern.

Bacterial processes refer to the various metabolic and cellular activities that bacteria carry out to survive, grow, and reproduce. These processes include:

1. Metabolism: Bacteria use different types of metabolic pathways to break down organic matter and obtain energy for growth and reproduction. Some bacteria are aerobic, requiring oxygen to carry out their metabolic processes, while others are anaerobic and cannot tolerate oxygen.
2. Cell division: Bacteria reproduce asexually by dividing into two identical daughter cells through a process called binary fission. This process involves the replication of bacterial DNA and the separation of the resulting chromosomes into two new cells.
3. Protein synthesis: Bacteria produce proteins using their own genetic material, which is encoded in their DNA. They use ribosomes to translate genetic information into proteins that are necessary for various cellular functions.
4. Cell wall biosynthesis: Bacteria have a unique cell wall made of peptidoglycan, which provides structural support and protection. The synthesis of the cell wall involves several enzymes and complex biochemical pathways.
5. Motility: Some bacteria are motile and can move around in their environment using flagella or other structures. This movement allows them to seek out nutrients and avoid harmful substances.
6. Quorum sensing: Bacteria can communicate with each other through a process called quorum sensing, which involves the release and detection of signaling molecules. This communication helps bacteria coordinate their behavior and respond to changes in their environment.
7. Antibiotic resistance: Bacteria have developed various mechanisms to resist antibiotics, including enzymatic degradation, efflux pumps, and target modification. These processes can make bacterial infections more difficult to treat and pose a significant public health threat.

Allergy and Immunology is a medical specialty that deals with the diagnosis and treatment of allergic diseases and immune system disorders. An Allergist/Immunologist is a physician who has undergone specialized training in this field.

Allergies occur when the immune system overreacts to normally harmless substances, such as pollen, dust mites, or certain foods, resulting in symptoms like sneezing, itching, runny nose, and rashes. Immunology, on the other hand, deals with disorders of the immune system, which can be caused by either an overactive or underactive immune response. Examples of immune disorders include autoimmune diseases (where the body attacks its own tissues), immunodeficiency disorders (where the immune system is weakened and unable to fight off infections), and hypersensitivity reactions (overreactions of the immune system to harmless substances).

The Allergist/Immunologist uses various diagnostic tests, such as skin prick tests, blood tests, and challenge tests, to identify the specific allergens or immune triggers that are causing a patient's symptoms. Once the diagnosis is made, they can recommend appropriate treatments, which may include medications, immunotherapy (allergy shots), lifestyle changes, or avoidance of certain substances.

In addition to treating patients, Allergist/Immunologists also conduct research into the underlying causes and mechanisms of allergic diseases and immune disorders, with the goal of developing new and more effective treatments.

A disease outbreak is defined as the occurrence of cases of a disease in excess of what would normally be expected in a given time and place. It may affect a small and localized group or a large number of people spread over a wide area, even internationally. An outbreak may be caused by a new agent, a change in the agent's virulence or host susceptibility, or an increase in the size or density of the host population.

Outbreaks can have significant public health and economic impacts, and require prompt investigation and control measures to prevent further spread of the disease. The investigation typically involves identifying the source of the outbreak, determining the mode of transmission, and implementing measures to interrupt the chain of infection. This may include vaccination, isolation or quarantine, and education of the public about the risks and prevention strategies.

Examples of disease outbreaks include foodborne illnesses linked to contaminated food or water, respiratory infections spread through coughing and sneezing, and mosquito-borne diseases such as Zika virus and West Nile virus. Outbreaks can also occur in healthcare settings, such as hospitals and nursing homes, where vulnerable populations may be at increased risk of infection.

Enterobacteriaceae are a large family of gram-negative bacteria that are commonly found in the human gut and surrounding environment. Infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae can occur when these bacteria enter parts of the body where they are not normally present, such as the bloodstream, urinary tract, or abdominal cavity.

Enterobacteriaceae infections can cause a range of symptoms depending on the site of infection. For example:

* Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by Enterobacteriaceae may cause symptoms such as frequent urination, pain or burning during urination, and lower abdominal pain.
* Bloodstream infections (bacteremia) caused by Enterobacteriaceae can cause fever, chills, and sepsis, a potentially life-threatening condition characterized by a whole-body inflammatory response to infection.
* Pneumonia caused by Enterobacteriaceae may cause cough, chest pain, and difficulty breathing.
* Intra-abdominal infections (such as appendicitis or diverticulitis) caused by Enterobacteriaceae can cause abdominal pain, fever, and changes in bowel habits.

Enterobacteriaceae infections are typically treated with antibiotics, but the increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant strains of these bacteria has made treatment more challenging in recent years. Preventing the spread of Enterobacteriaceae in healthcare settings and promoting good hygiene practices can help reduce the risk of infection.

A virus is a small infectious agent that replicates inside the living cells of an organism. It is not considered to be a living organism itself, as it lacks the necessary components to independently maintain its own metabolic functions. Viruses are typically composed of genetic material, either DNA or RNA, surrounded by a protein coat called a capsid. Some viruses also have an outer lipid membrane known as an envelope.

Viruses can infect all types of organisms, from animals and plants to bacteria and archaea. They cause various diseases by invading the host cell, hijacking its machinery, and using it to produce numerous copies of themselves, which can then infect other cells. The resulting infection and the immune response it triggers can lead to a range of symptoms, depending on the virus and the host organism.

Viruses are transmitted through various means, such as respiratory droplets, bodily fluids, contaminated food or water, and vectors like insects. Prevention methods include vaccination, practicing good hygiene, using personal protective equipment, and implementing public health measures to control their spread.

Disk diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility tests, also known as Kirby-Bauer tests, are laboratory methods used to determine the effectiveness of antibiotics against a specific bacterial strain. This test provides a simple and standardized way to estimate the susceptibility or resistance of a microorganism to various antibiotics.

In this method, a standardized inoculum of the bacterial suspension is spread evenly on the surface of an agar plate. Antibiotic-impregnated paper disks are then placed on the agar surface, allowing the diffusion of the antibiotic into the agar. After incubation, the zone of inhibition surrounding each disk is measured. The size of the zone of inhibition correlates with the susceptibility or resistance of the bacterial strain to that specific antibiotic.

The results are interpreted based on predefined criteria established by organizations such as the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) or the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). These interpretive criteria help categorize the susceptibility of the bacterial strain into one of three categories: susceptible, intermediate, or resistant.

It is important to note that disk diffusion tests have limitations and may not always accurately predict clinical outcomes. However, they remain a valuable tool in guiding empirical antibiotic therapy and monitoring antimicrobial resistance trends.

Bacterial eye infections, also known as bacterial conjunctivitis or bacterial keratitis, are caused by the invasion of bacteria into the eye. The most common types of bacteria that cause these infections include Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae.

Bacterial conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the conjunctiva, the thin membrane that covers the white part of the eye and the inner surface of the eyelids. Symptoms include redness, swelling, pain, discharge, and a gritty feeling in the eye. Bacterial keratitis is an infection of the cornea, the clear front part of the eye. Symptoms include severe pain, sensitivity to light, tearing, and decreased vision.

Bacterial eye infections are typically treated with antibiotic eye drops or ointments. It is important to seek medical attention promptly if you suspect a bacterial eye infection, as untreated infections can lead to serious complications such as corneal ulcers and vision loss. Preventive measures include good hygiene practices, such as washing your hands frequently and avoiding touching or rubbing your eyes.

Laboratory proficiency testing (PT) is a systematic process used to evaluate the performance of a laboratory in accurately and consistently performing specific tests or procedures. It involves the analysis of blinded samples with known or expected values, which are distributed by an independent proficiency testing provider to participating laboratories. The results from each laboratory are then compared to the target value or the range of acceptable values, allowing for the assessment of a laboratory's accuracy, precision, and consistency over time.

Proficiency testing is an essential component of quality assurance programs in clinical, research, and industrial laboratories. It helps laboratories identify and address sources of error, improve their analytical methods, and maintain compliance with regulatory requirements and accreditation standards. Regular participation in proficiency testing programs also promotes confidence in the accuracy and reliability of laboratory test results, ultimately benefiting patient care, research outcomes, and public health.

A "colony count" is a method used to estimate the number of viable microorganisms, such as bacteria or fungi, in a sample. In this technique, a known volume of the sample is spread onto the surface of a solid nutrient medium in a petri dish and then incubated under conditions that allow the microorganisms to grow and form visible colonies. Each colony that grows on the plate represents an individual cell (or small cluster of cells) from the original sample that was able to divide and grow under the given conditions. By counting the number of colonies that form, researchers can make a rough estimate of the concentration of microorganisms in the original sample.

The term "microbial" simply refers to microscopic organisms, such as bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Therefore, a "colony count, microbial" is a general term that encompasses the use of colony counting techniques to estimate the number of any type of microorganism in a sample.

Colony counts are used in various fields, including medical research, food safety testing, and environmental monitoring, to assess the levels of contamination or the effectiveness of disinfection procedures. However, it is important to note that colony counts may not always provide an accurate measure of the total number of microorganisms present in a sample, as some cells may be injured or unable to grow under the conditions used for counting. Additionally, some microorganisms may form clusters or chains that can appear as single colonies, leading to an overestimation of the true cell count.

Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are infections that affect the respiratory system, which includes the nose, throat (pharynx), voice box (larynx), windpipe (trachea), bronchi, and lungs. These infections can be caused by viruses, bacteria, or, less commonly, fungi.

RTIs are classified into two categories based on their location: upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). URTIs include infections of the nose, sinuses, throat, and larynx, such as the common cold, flu, laryngitis, and sinusitis. LRTIs involve the lower airways, including the bronchi and lungs, and can be more severe. Examples of LRTIs are pneumonia, bronchitis, and bronchiolitis.

Symptoms of RTIs depend on the location and cause of the infection but may include cough, congestion, runny nose, sore throat, difficulty breathing, wheezing, fever, fatigue, and chest pain. Treatment for RTIs varies depending on the severity and underlying cause of the infection. For viral infections, treatment typically involves supportive care to manage symptoms, while antibiotics may be prescribed for bacterial infections.

Bacterial physiological phenomena refer to the various functional processes and activities that occur within bacteria, which are necessary for their survival, growth, and reproduction. These phenomena include:

1. Metabolism: This is the process by which bacteria convert nutrients into energy and cellular components. It involves a series of chemical reactions that break down organic compounds such as carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins to produce energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate).
2. Respiration: This is the process by which bacteria use oxygen to convert organic compounds into carbon dioxide and water, releasing energy in the form of ATP. Some bacteria can also perform anaerobic respiration, using alternative electron acceptors such as nitrate or sulfate instead of oxygen.
3. Fermentation: This is a type of anaerobic metabolism in which bacteria convert organic compounds into simpler molecules, releasing energy in the form of ATP. Unlike respiration, fermentation does not require an external electron acceptor.
4. Motility: Many bacteria are capable of moving independently, using various mechanisms such as flagella or twitching motility. This allows them to move towards favorable environments and away from harmful ones.
5. Chemotaxis: Bacteria can sense and respond to chemical gradients in their environment, allowing them to move towards attractants and away from repellents.
6. Quorum sensing: Bacteria can communicate with each other using signaling molecules called autoinducers. When the concentration of autoinducers reaches a certain threshold, the bacteria can coordinate their behavior, such as initiating biofilm formation or producing virulence factors.
7. Sporulation: Some bacteria can form spores, which are highly resistant to heat, radiation, and chemicals. Spores can remain dormant for long periods of time and germinate when conditions are favorable.
8. Biofilm formation: Bacteria can form complex communities called biofilms, which are composed of cells embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Biofilms can provide protection from environmental stressors and host immune responses.
9. Cell division: Bacteria reproduce by binary fission, where the cell divides into two identical daughter cells. This process is regulated by various cell cycle checkpoints and can be influenced by environmental factors such as nutrient availability.

I believe there might be a bit of confusion in your question. A "history" in medical terms usually refers to the detailed account of a patient's symptoms, illnesses, and treatments received, which is used by healthcare professionals to understand their health status and provide appropriate care. It is not typically associated with a specific century like the 18th century.

If you are asking for information about the medical practices or significant developments in the field of medicine during the 18th century, I would be happy to provide some insight into that! The 18th century was a time of great advancement and change in the medical field, with many notable discoveries and innovations. Some examples include:

* The development of smallpox vaccination by Edward Jenner in 1796
* The discovery of oxygen by Joseph Priestley in 1774
* The invention of the thermometer by Gabriel Fahrenheit in 1714
* The publication of "An Inquiry into the Causes and Effects of the Variolae Vaccinae" by Edward Jenner in 1798, which helped to establish the concept of vaccination
* The founding of the Royal Society of Medicine in London in 1773
* The development of new surgical techniques and instruments, such as the use of tourniquets and catgut sutures.

Streptococcal infections are a type of infection caused by group A Streptococcus bacteria (Streptococcus pyogenes). These bacteria can cause a variety of illnesses, ranging from mild skin infections to serious and potentially life-threatening conditions such as sepsis, pneumonia, and necrotizing fasciitis (flesh-eating disease).

Some common types of streptococcal infections include:

* Streptococcal pharyngitis (strep throat) - an infection of the throat and tonsils that can cause sore throat, fever, and swollen lymph nodes.
* Impetigo - a highly contagious skin infection that causes sores or blisters on the skin.
* Cellulitis - a bacterial infection of the deeper layers of the skin and underlying tissue that can cause redness, swelling, pain, and warmth in the affected area.
* Scarlet fever - a streptococcal infection that causes a bright red rash on the body, high fever, and sore throat.
* Necrotizing fasciitis - a rare but serious bacterial infection that can cause tissue death and destruction of the muscles and fascia (the tissue that covers the muscles).

Treatment for streptococcal infections typically involves antibiotics to kill the bacteria causing the infection. It is important to seek medical attention if you suspect a streptococcal infection, as prompt treatment can help prevent serious complications.

Klebsiella is a genus of Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, encapsulated, non-motile, rod-shaped bacteria that are part of the family Enterobacteriaceae. They are commonly found in the normal microbiota of the mouth, skin, and intestines, but can also cause various types of infections, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems.

Klebsiella pneumoniae is the most common species and can cause pneumonia, urinary tract infections, bloodstream infections, and wound infections. Other Klebsiella species, such as K. oxytoca, can also cause similar types of infections. These bacteria are resistant to many antibiotics, making them difficult to treat and a significant public health concern.

Bioterrorism is the intentional use of microorganisms or toxins derived from living organisms to cause disease, death, or disruption in noncombatant populations. Biological agents can be spread through the air, water, or food and may take hours to days to cause illness, depending on the agent and route of exposure. Examples of biological agents that could be used as weapons include anthrax, smallpox, plague, botulism toxin, and viruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers, such as Ebola. Bioterrorism is a form of terrorism and is considered a public health emergency because it has the potential to cause widespread illness and death, as well as social disruption and economic loss.

The medical definition of bioterrorism focuses on the use of biological agents as weapons and the public health response to such attacks. It is important to note that the majority of incidents involving the intentional release of biological agents have been limited in scope and have not resulted in widespread illness or death. However, the potential for large-scale harm makes bioterrorism a significant concern for public health officials and emergency responders.

Preparation and response to bioterrorism involve a multidisciplinary approach that includes medical professionals, public health officials, law enforcement agencies, and government organizations at the local, state, and federal levels. Preparedness efforts include developing plans and procedures for responding to a bioterrorism event, training healthcare providers and first responders in the recognition and management of biological agents, and stockpiling vaccines, medications, and other resources that may be needed during a response.

In summary, bioterrorism is the intentional use of biological agents as weapons to cause illness, death, or disruption in noncombatant populations. It is considered a public health emergency due to its potential for widespread harm and requires a multidisciplinary approach to preparedness and response.

Streptococcus is a genus of Gram-positive, spherical bacteria that typically form pairs or chains when clustered together. These bacteria are facultative anaerobes, meaning they can grow in the presence or absence of oxygen. They are non-motile and do not produce spores.

Streptococcus species are commonly found on the skin and mucous membranes of humans and animals. Some strains are part of the normal flora of the body, while others can cause a variety of infections, ranging from mild skin infections to severe and life-threatening diseases such as sepsis, meningitis, and toxic shock syndrome.

The pathogenicity of Streptococcus species depends on various virulence factors, including the production of enzymes and toxins that damage tissues and evade the host's immune response. One of the most well-known Streptococcus species is Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A streptococcus (GAS), which is responsible for a wide range of clinical manifestations, including pharyngitis (strep throat), impetigo, cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis, and rheumatic fever.

It's important to note that the classification of Streptococcus species has evolved over time, with many former members now classified as different genera within the family Streptococcaceae. The current classification system is based on a combination of phenotypic characteristics (such as hemolysis patterns and sugar fermentation) and genotypic methods (such as 16S rRNA sequencing and multilocus sequence typing).

Archaea are a domain of single-celled microorganisms that lack membrane-bound nuclei and other organelles. They are characterized by the unique structure of their cell walls, membranes, and ribosomes. Archaea were originally classified as bacteria, but they differ from bacteria in several key ways, including their genetic material and metabolic processes.

Archaea can be found in a wide range of environments, including some of the most extreme habitats on Earth, such as hot springs, deep-sea vents, and highly saline lakes. Some species of Archaea are able to survive in the absence of oxygen, while others require oxygen to live.

Archaea play important roles in global nutrient cycles, including the nitrogen cycle and the carbon cycle. They are also being studied for their potential role in industrial processes, such as the production of biofuels and the treatment of wastewater.

Fermentation is a metabolic process in which an organism converts carbohydrates into alcohol or organic acids using enzymes. In the absence of oxygen, certain bacteria, yeasts, and fungi convert sugars into carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and various end products, such as alcohol, lactic acid, or acetic acid. This process is commonly used in food production, such as in making bread, wine, and beer, as well as in industrial applications for the production of biofuels and chemicals.

Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) refers to the specific regions of DNA in a cell that contain the genes for ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Ribosomes are complex structures composed of proteins and rRNA, which play a crucial role in protein synthesis by translating messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins.

In humans, there are four types of rRNA molecules: 18S, 5.8S, 28S, and 5S. These rRNAs are encoded by multiple copies of rDNA genes that are organized in clusters on specific chromosomes. In humans, the majority of rDNA genes are located on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes 13, 14, 15, 21, and 22.

Each cluster of rDNA genes contains both transcribed and non-transcribed spacer regions. The transcribed regions contain the genes for the four types of rRNA, while the non-transcribed spacers contain regulatory elements that control the transcription of the rRNA genes.

The number of rDNA copies varies between species and even within individuals of the same species. The copy number can also change during development and in response to environmental factors. Variations in rDNA copy number have been associated with various diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Preventella is a genus of Gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in the human oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, and urogenital tract. They are part of the normal microbiota but can also be associated with various infections, particularly in individuals with compromised immune systems or underlying medical conditions.

Prevotella species have been implicated in a variety of diseases, including periodontal disease, dental caries, respiratory tract infections, bacteremia, soft tissue infections, and joint infections. They can also be found in association with abscesses, wound infections, and other types of infections, particularly in the head and neck region.

Prevotella species are generally resistant to antibiotics commonly used to treat anaerobic infections, such as clindamycin and metronidazole, making them difficult to eradicate. Therefore, accurate identification and susceptibility testing of Prevotella isolates is important for the appropriate management of infections caused by these organisms.

Pseudomonas infections are infections caused by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa or other species of the Pseudomonas genus. These bacteria are gram-negative, opportunistic pathogens that can cause various types of infections, including respiratory, urinary tract, gastrointestinal, dermatological, and bloodstream infections.

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections, particularly in patients with weakened immune systems, chronic lung diseases, or those who are hospitalized for extended periods. The bacteria can also infect wounds, burns, and medical devices such as catheters and ventilators.

Pseudomonas infections can be difficult to treat due to the bacteria's resistance to many antibiotics. Treatment typically involves the use of multiple antibiotics that are effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In severe cases, intravenous antibiotics or even hospitalization may be necessary.

Prevention measures include good hand hygiene, contact precautions for patients with known Pseudomonas infections, and proper cleaning and maintenance of medical equipment.

Streptococcus milleri Group (SMG) is not a single species, but a group of closely related streptococcal species that are often difficult to distinguish from each other using conventional laboratory methods. The group includes Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus intermedius, and Streptococcus constellatus. These bacteria are part of the normal flora in the human mouth, upper respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal system. However, they can cause a variety of infectious diseases, particularly in immunocompromised individuals or when they invade deep tissues or sterile sites. Infections caused by SMG can range from mild to severe, including abscesses, endocarditis, and sepsis. Due to the complexity of identifying these organisms to the species level, they are often reported together as the Streptococcus milleri Group.

Prosthesis-related infections, also known as prosthetic joint infections (PJIs), are infections that occur around or within a prosthetic device, such as an artificial joint. These infections can be caused by bacteria, fungi, or other microorganisms and can lead to serious complications if not treated promptly and effectively.

Prosthesis-related infections can occur soon after the implantation of the prosthetic device (early infection) or months or even years later (late infection). Early infections are often caused by bacteria that enter the surgical site during the procedure, while late infections may be caused by hematogenous seeding (i.e., when bacteria from another source spread through the bloodstream and settle in the prosthetic device) or by contamination during a subsequent medical procedure.

Symptoms of prosthesis-related infections can include pain, swelling, redness, warmth, and drainage around the affected area. In some cases, patients may also experience fever, chills, or fatigue. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, laboratory tests (such as blood cultures, joint fluid analysis, and tissue biopsy), and imaging studies (such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI).

Treatment of prosthesis-related infections usually involves a combination of antibiotics and surgical intervention. The specific treatment approach will depend on the type and severity of the infection, as well as the patient's overall health status. In some cases, it may be necessary to remove or replace the affected prosthetic device.

Beta-lactamases are enzymes produced by certain bacteria that can break down and inactivate beta-lactam antibiotics, such as penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems. This enzymatic activity makes the bacteria resistant to these antibiotics, limiting their effectiveness in treating infections caused by these organisms.

Beta-lactamases work by hydrolyzing the beta-lactam ring, a structural component of these antibiotics that is essential for their antimicrobial activity. By breaking down this ring, the enzyme renders the antibiotic ineffective against the bacterium, allowing it to continue growing and potentially causing harm.

There are different classes of beta-lactamases (e.g., Ambler Class A, B, C, and D), each with distinct characteristics and mechanisms for breaking down various beta-lactam antibiotics. The emergence and spread of bacteria producing these enzymes have contributed to the growing problem of antibiotic resistance, making it increasingly challenging to treat infections caused by these organisms.

To overcome this issue, researchers have developed beta-lactamase inhibitors, which are drugs that can bind to and inhibit the activity of these enzymes, thus restoring the effectiveness of certain beta-lactam antibiotics. Examples of such combinations include amoxicillin/clavulanate (Augmentin) and piperacillin/tazobactam (Zosyn).

Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are defined as the presence of pathogenic microorganisms, typically bacteria, in any part of the urinary system, which includes the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra, resulting in infection and inflammation. The majority of UTIs are caused by Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, but other organisms such as Klebsiella, Proteus, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, and Enterococcus can also cause UTIs.

UTIs can be classified into two types based on the location of the infection:

1. Lower UTI or bladder infection (cystitis): This type of UTI affects the bladder and urethra. Symptoms may include a frequent and urgent need to urinate, pain or burning during urination, cloudy or strong-smelling urine, and discomfort in the lower abdomen or back.

2. Upper UTI or kidney infection (pyelonephritis): This type of UTI affects the kidneys and can be more severe than a bladder infection. Symptoms may include fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, and pain in the flanks or back.

UTIs are more common in women than men due to their shorter urethra, which makes it easier for bacteria to reach the bladder. Other risk factors for UTIs include sexual activity, use of diaphragms or spermicides, urinary catheterization, diabetes, and weakened immune systems.

UTIs are typically diagnosed through a urinalysis and urine culture to identify the causative organism and determine the appropriate antibiotic treatment. In some cases, imaging studies such as ultrasound or CT scan may be necessary to evaluate for any underlying abnormalities in the urinary tract.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

Reagent strips, also known as diagnostic or test strips, are narrow pieces of plastic material that have been impregnated with chemical reagents. They are used in the qualitative or semi-quantitative detection of various substances, such as glucose, proteins, ketones, blood, and white blood cells, in body fluids like urine or blood.

Reagent strips typically contain multiple pad areas, each with a different reagent that reacts to a specific substance. To perform the test, a small amount of the fluid is applied to the strip, and the reaction between the reagents and the target substance produces a visible color change. The resulting color can then be compared to a standardized color chart to determine the concentration or presence of the substance.

Reagent strips are widely used in point-of-care testing, providing quick and convenient results for healthcare professionals and patients alike. They are commonly used for monitoring conditions such as diabetes (urine or blood glucose levels), urinary tract infections (leukocytes and nitrites), and kidney function (protein and blood).

Bartholin's glands are two small exocrine glands located in the female reproductive system. They are named after the Danish anatomist and surgeon Caspar Bartholin the Younger, who described them in 1677. These glands are about the size of a pea and are situated on either side of the vaginal opening, just inside the labia majora (the outer folds of skin surrounding the vaginal opening).

Bartholin's glands produce and secrete a mucus-like fluid that helps lubricate the vaginal opening, making sexual intercourse more comfortable. The fluid is released through small ducts that open into the vestibule, the area between the labia minora (the inner folds of skin surrounding the vaginal opening) and the hymen.

In some cases, Bartholin's glands can become blocked, causing a cyst or abscess to form. These conditions may require medical treatment, such as antibiotics, drainage, or surgical removal of the cyst or abscess.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

Medical Definition of Microbiota:

The community of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other microscopic life forms, that inhabit a specific environment or body part. In the human body, microbiota can be found on the skin, in the mouth, gut, and other areas. The largest concentration of microbiota is located in the intestines, where it plays an essential role in digestion, immune function, and overall health.

The composition of the microbiota can vary depending on factors such as age, diet, lifestyle, genetics, and environmental exposures. Dysbiosis, or imbalance of the microbiota, has been linked to various health conditions, including gastrointestinal disorders, allergies, autoimmune diseases, and neurological disorders.

Therefore, maintaining a healthy and diverse microbiota is crucial for overall health and well-being. This can be achieved through a balanced diet, regular exercise, adequate sleep, stress management, and other lifestyle practices that support the growth and maintenance of beneficial microorganisms in the body.

Virology is the study of viruses, their classification, and their effects on living organisms. It involves the examination of viral genetic material, viral replication, how viruses cause disease, and the development of antiviral drugs and vaccines to treat or prevent virus infections. Virologists study various types of viruses that can infect animals, plants, and microorganisms, as well as understand their evolution and transmission patterns.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

Containment of biohazards refers to the measures and practices aimed at preventing the dissemination or escape of potentially infectious biological agents from a restricted area, such as a laboratory or healthcare facility. The goal is to protect both people and the environment from exposure to these harmful agents.

Biohazard containment typically involves the use of specialized equipment, facilities, and protocols designed to minimize the risk of infection or contamination. These may include:

1. Biological Safety Cabinets (BSCs): Enclosed laboratory workstations that use high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters to contain aerosols generated during experiments involving biohazardous materials.
2. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE): The use of gloves, gowns, masks, face shields, or other protective garments to prevent direct contact with biohazardous agents.
3. Biosafety Levels: A classification system that categorizes laboratories based on the level of containment required for various types of biological research. These levels range from BSL-1 (minimal risk) to BSL-4 (high risk).
4. Decontamination Procedures: The use of chemical disinfectants, autoclaving, or incineration to inactivate and safely dispose of biohazardous waste materials.
5. Training and Education: Providing laboratory personnel with the necessary knowledge and skills to work safely with biohazardous agents, including proper handling techniques, emergency response procedures, and waste disposal methods.
6. Security Measures: Implementing access controls, surveillance systems, and other security measures to prevent unauthorized access to areas where biohazardous materials are stored or handled.

By following these containment strategies, researchers and healthcare professionals can help ensure the safe handling and management of potentially harmful biological agents while minimizing the risk of accidental exposure or release.

Iodophors are antiseptic solutions or preparations that contain iodine complexed with a solubilizing agent, usually a nonionic surfactant. The most common example is povidone-iodine (polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine). Iodophors are widely used for skin disinfection before surgical procedures and injections, as well as for the treatment of wounds and burns.

The advantage of iodophors over traditional tincture of iodine is that they provide a more sustained release of iodine, which results in a longer-lasting antimicrobial effect while being less irritating to the skin. The complexation with the solubilizing agent also helps to reduce staining of the skin and clothing compared to traditional iodine solutions.

A metagenome is the collective genetic material contained within a sample taken from a specific environment, such as soil or water, or within a community of organisms, like the microbiota found in the human gut. It includes the genomes of all the microorganisms present in that environment or community, including bacteria, archaea, fungi, viruses, and other microbes, whether they can be cultured in the lab or not. By analyzing the metagenome, scientists can gain insights into the diversity, abundance, and functional potential of the microbial communities present in that environment.

Endophthalmitis is a serious inflammatory eye condition that occurs when an infection develops inside the eyeball, specifically within the vitreous humor (the clear, gel-like substance that fills the space between the lens and the retina). This condition can be caused by bacteria, fungi, or other microorganisms that enter the eye through various means, such as trauma, surgery, or spread from another infected part of the body.

Endophthalmitis is often characterized by symptoms like sudden onset of pain, redness, decreased vision, and increased sensitivity to light (photophobia). If left untreated, it can lead to severe complications, including blindness. Treatment typically involves administering antibiotics or antifungal medications, either systemically or directly into the eye, and sometimes even requiring surgical intervention to remove infected tissues and relieve intraocular pressure.

I believe there may be a slight confusion in your question. The "meat-packing industry" is not a term that has a medical definition, as it pertains to the industrial process and business practice of slaughtering animals, processing their carcasses into edible meats, and packaging them for distribution and sale to consumers.

However, if you are interested in occupational health or workplace safety aspects related to this industry, there are numerous medical and epidemiological studies that discuss the potential health risks and hazards faced by workers in meat-packing plants, such as exposure to infectious diseases, musculoskeletal injuries, and chemical hazards.

"Methicillin resistance" is a term used in medicine to describe the resistance of certain bacteria to the antibiotic methicillin and other related antibiotics, such as oxacillin and nafcillin. This type of resistance is most commonly associated with Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) bacteria.

Bacteria that are methicillin-resistant have acquired the ability to produce an additional penicillin-binding protein, known as PBP2a or PBP2'', which has a low affinity for beta-lactam antibiotics, including methicillin. This results in the bacteria being able to continue growing and dividing despite the presence of these antibiotics, making infections caused by these bacteria more difficult to treat.

Methicillin resistance is a significant concern in healthcare settings, as it can lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs associated with treating infections caused by these bacteria. In recent years, there has been an increase in the prevalence of methicillin-resistant bacteria, highlighting the need for ongoing surveillance, infection control measures, and the development of new antibiotics to treat these infections.

"Morganella morganii" is a species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that is commonly found in the environment, including in soil, water, and associated with various animals. In humans, it can be part of the normal gut flora but can also cause infections, particularly in immunocompromised individuals or following surgical procedures. It is known to cause a variety of infections, such as urinary tract infections, wound infections, pneumonia, and bacteremia (bloodstream infection). The bacteria can produce a number of virulence factors, including enzymes that help it evade the host's immune system and cause tissue damage. It is resistant to many antibiotics, which can make treatment challenging.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

"Time and motion studies" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, it is a term commonly used in the field of industrial engineering and ergonomics to describe a systematic analytical approach to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of a particular task or process. This method involves carefully observing and measuring the time and motion required to complete a task, with the goal of identifying unnecessary steps, reducing wasted motion, and optimizing the workflow. While not a medical term per se, time and motion studies can be applied in healthcare settings to improve patient care, staff efficiency, and overall operational performance.

Yeasts are single-celled microorganisms that belong to the fungus kingdom. They are characterized by their ability to reproduce asexually through budding or fission, and they obtain nutrients by fermenting sugars and other organic compounds. Some species of yeast can cause infections in humans, known as candidiasis or "yeast infections." These infections can occur in various parts of the body, including the skin, mouth, genitals, and internal organs. Common symptoms of a yeast infection may include itching, redness, irritation, and discharge. Yeast infections are typically treated with antifungal medications.

Mycological typing techniques are methods used to identify and classify fungi at the species or strain level, based on their unique biological characteristics. These techniques are often used in clinical laboratories to help diagnose fungal infections and determine the most effective treatment approaches.

There are several different mycological typing techniques that may be used, depending on the specific type of fungus being identified and the resources available in the laboratory. Some common methods include:

1. Phenotypic methods: These methods involve observing and measuring the physical characteristics of fungi, such as their growth patterns, colonial morphology, and microscopic features. Examples include macroscopic and microscopic examination, as well as biochemical tests to identify specific metabolic properties.

2. Genotypic methods: These methods involve analyzing the DNA or RNA of fungi to identify unique genetic sequences that can be used to distinguish between different species or strains. Examples include PCR-based methods, such as restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis, as well as sequencing-based methods, such as internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST).

3. Proteotypic methods: These methods involve analyzing the proteins expressed by fungi to identify unique protein profiles that can be used to distinguish between different species or strains. Examples include matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS).

Mycological typing techniques are important tools for understanding the epidemiology of fungal infections, tracking outbreaks, and developing effective treatment strategies. By accurately identifying the specific fungi causing an infection, healthcare providers can tailor their treatments to target the most vulnerable aspects of the pathogen, improving patient outcomes and reducing the risk of drug resistance.

Molecular biology is a branch of biology that deals with the structure, function, and organization of molecules involved in biological processes, especially informational molecules such as DNA, RNA, and proteins. It includes the study of molecular mechanisms of genetic inheritance, gene expression, protein synthesis, and cellular regulation. Molecular biology also involves the use of various experimental techniques to investigate and manipulate these molecules, including recombinant DNA technology, genomic sequencing, protein crystallography, and bioinformatics. The ultimate goal of molecular biology is to understand how biological systems work at a fundamental level and to apply this knowledge to improve human health and the environment.

Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious bacterial infection that affects the fascia, which is the tissue that surrounds muscles, nerves, and blood vessels. The infection can also spread to the muscle and skin. It is often caused by a combination of different types of bacteria, including group A Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus.

The infection causes extensive tissue damage and necrosis (death) of the fascia and surrounding tissues. It can progress rapidly and can be fatal if not treated promptly with aggressive surgical debridement (removal of dead tissue) and antibiotics.

Symptoms of necrotizing fasciitis include severe pain, swelling, redness, and warmth in the affected area; fever; chills; and general weakness. It is important to seek medical attention immediately if these symptoms occur, as early diagnosis and treatment can significantly improve outcomes.

Protozoan infections are diseases caused by microscopic, single-celled organisms known as protozoa. These parasites can enter the human body through contaminated food, water, or contact with an infected person or animal. Once inside the body, they can multiply and cause a range of symptoms depending on the type of protozoan and where it infects in the body. Some common protozoan infections include malaria, giardiasis, amoebiasis, and toxoplasmosis. Symptoms can vary widely but may include diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, fatigue, and skin rashes. Treatment typically involves the use of antiprotozoal medications to kill the parasites and alleviate symptoms.

Fungal eye infections, also known as fungal keratitis or ocular fungal infections, are caused by the invasion of fungi into the eye. The most common types of fungi that cause these infections include Fusarium, Aspergillus, and Candida. These infections can affect any part of the eye, including the cornea, conjunctiva, sclera, and vitreous humor.

Fungal eye infections often present with symptoms such as redness, pain, sensitivity to light, tearing, blurred vision, and discharge. In severe cases, they can lead to corneal ulcers, perforation of the eye, and even blindness if left untreated. Risk factors for fungal eye infections include trauma to the eye, contact lens wear, immunosuppression, and pre-existing eye conditions such as dry eye or previous eye surgery.

Diagnosis of fungal eye infections typically involves a thorough eye examination, including visual acuity testing, slit lamp examination, and sometimes corneal scrapings for microbiological culture and sensitivity testing. Treatment usually involves topical antifungal medications, such as natamycin or amphotericin B, and in some cases may require oral or intravenous antifungal therapy. In severe cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to remove infected tissue or repair any damage caused by the infection.

'Proteus' doesn't have a specific medical definition itself, but it is related to a syndrome in medicine. Proteus syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by the overgrowth of various tissues and organs in the body. The name "Proteus" comes from the Greek god Proteus, who could change his form at will, reflecting the diverse and ever-changing nature of this condition's symptoms.

People with Proteus syndrome experience asymmetric overgrowth of bones, skin, and other tissues, leading to abnormalities in body shape and function. The disorder can also affect blood vessels, causing benign tumors called hamartomas to develop. Additionally, individuals with Proteus syndrome are at an increased risk of developing certain types of cancer.

The genetic mutation responsible for Proteus syndrome is found in the AKT1 gene, which plays a crucial role in cell growth and division. This disorder is typically not inherited but instead arises spontaneously as a new mutation in the affected individual. Early diagnosis and management of Proteus syndrome can help improve patients' quality of life and reduce complications associated with the condition.

Diagnostic services refer to medical tests, procedures, and evaluations performed by healthcare professionals to identify the nature and cause of a patient's health condition or symptom. These services may include various imaging techniques such as X-rays, CT scans, MRI, and ultrasound; laboratory tests such as blood tests, urine tests, and cultures; genetic testing; and specialized diagnostic procedures such as endoscopy, colonoscopy, and biopsy.

The goal of diagnostic services is to provide accurate and timely information about a patient's health status, which can help healthcare providers make informed decisions about treatment plans, monitor disease progression, and evaluate the effectiveness of therapy. Diagnostic services are an essential component of modern medicine and play a critical role in the prevention, diagnosis, and management of various medical conditions.

'Infection Control' is a set of practices, procedures, and protocols designed to prevent the spread of infectious agents in healthcare settings. It includes measures to minimize the risk of transmission of pathogens from both recognized and unrecognized sources, such as patients, healthcare workers, visitors, and the environment.

Infection control strategies may include:

* Hand hygiene (handwashing and use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers)
* Use of personal protective equipment (PPE), such as gloves, masks, gowns, and eye protection
* Respiratory etiquette, including covering the mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing
* Environmental cleaning and disinfection
* Isolation precautions for patients with known or suspected infectious diseases
* Immunization of healthcare workers
* Safe injection practices
* Surveillance and reporting of infections and outbreaks

The goal of infection control is to protect patients, healthcare workers, and visitors from acquiring and transmitting infections.

Biofilms are defined as complex communities of microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi, that adhere to surfaces and are enclosed in a matrix made up of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The EPS matrix is composed of polysaccharides, proteins, DNA, and other molecules that provide structural support and protection to the microorganisms within.

Biofilms can form on both living and non-living surfaces, including medical devices, implants, and biological tissues. They are resistant to antibiotics, disinfectants, and host immune responses, making them difficult to eradicate and a significant cause of persistent infections. Biofilms have been implicated in a wide range of medical conditions, including chronic wounds, urinary tract infections, middle ear infections, and device-related infections.

The formation of biofilms typically involves several stages, including initial attachment, microcolony formation, maturation, and dispersion. Understanding the mechanisms underlying biofilm formation and development is crucial for developing effective strategies to prevent and treat biofilm-associated infections.

"Klebsiella pneumoniae" is a medical term that refers to a type of bacteria belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. It's a gram-negative, encapsulated, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterium that can be found in various environments, including soil, water, and the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals.

"Klebsiella pneumoniae" is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause a range of infections, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems or underlying medical conditions. It's a common cause of healthcare-associated infections, such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections, bloodstream infections, and wound infections.

The bacterium is known for its ability to produce a polysaccharide capsule that makes it resistant to phagocytosis by white blood cells, allowing it to evade the host's immune system. Additionally, "Klebsiella pneumoniae" has developed resistance to many antibiotics, making infections caused by this bacterium difficult to treat and a growing public health concern.

A bacterial genome is the complete set of genetic material, including both DNA and RNA, found within a single bacterium. It contains all the hereditary information necessary for the bacterium to grow, reproduce, and survive in its environment. The bacterial genome typically includes circular chromosomes, as well as plasmids, which are smaller, circular DNA molecules that can carry additional genes. These genes encode various functional elements such as enzymes, structural proteins, and regulatory sequences that determine the bacterium's characteristics and behavior.

Bacterial genomes vary widely in size, ranging from around 130 kilobases (kb) in Mycoplasma genitalium to over 14 megabases (Mb) in Sorangium cellulosum. The complete sequencing and analysis of bacterial genomes have provided valuable insights into the biology, evolution, and pathogenicity of bacteria, enabling researchers to better understand their roles in various diseases and potential applications in biotechnology.

Salmonella is a genus of rod-shaped, Gram-negative bacteria that are facultative anaerobes and are motile due to peritrichous flagella. They are non-spore forming and often have a single polar flagellum when grown in certain conditions. Salmonella species are important pathogens in humans and other animals, causing foodborne illnesses known as salmonellosis.

Salmonella can be found in the intestinal tracts of humans, birds, reptiles, and mammals. They can contaminate various foods, including meat, poultry, eggs, dairy products, and fresh produce. The bacteria can survive and multiply in a wide range of temperatures and environments, making them challenging to control completely.

Salmonella infection typically leads to gastroenteritis, characterized by symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, fever, and vomiting. In some cases, the infection may spread beyond the intestines, leading to more severe complications like bacteremia (bacterial infection of the blood) or focal infections in various organs.

There are two main species of Salmonella: S. enterica and S. bongori. S. enterica is further divided into six subspecies and numerous serovars, with over 2,500 distinct serotypes identified to date. Some well-known Salmonella serovars include S. Typhi (causes typhoid fever), S. Paratyphi A, B, and C (cause paratyphoid fever), and S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium (common causes of foodborne salmonellosis).

Multiple bacterial drug resistance (MDR) is a medical term that refers to the resistance of multiple strains of bacteria to several antibiotics or antimicrobial agents. This means that these bacteria have developed mechanisms that enable them to survive and multiply despite being exposed to drugs that were previously effective in treating infections caused by them.

MDR is a significant public health concern because it limits the treatment options available for bacterial infections, making them more difficult and expensive to treat. In some cases, MDR bacteria may cause severe or life-threatening infections that are resistant to all available antibiotics, leaving doctors with few or no effective therapeutic options.

MDR can arise due to various mechanisms, including the production of enzymes that inactivate antibiotics, changes in bacterial cell membrane permeability that prevent antibiotics from entering the bacteria, and the development of efflux pumps that expel antibiotics out of the bacteria. The misuse or overuse of antibiotics is a significant contributor to the emergence and spread of MDR bacteria.

Preventing and controlling the spread of MDR bacteria requires a multifaceted approach, including the judicious use of antibiotics, infection control measures, surveillance, and research into new antimicrobial agents.

Oxacillin is a type of antibiotic known as a penicillinase-resistant penicillin. It is used to treat infections caused by bacteria that are resistant to other types of penicillins. Oxacillin is commonly used to treat infections of the skin, soft tissue, and bone.

Here is the medical definition of oxacillin:

Oxacillin is a semisynthetic antibiotic derived from penicillin that is resistant to staphylococcal penicillinases. It is used to treat infections caused by susceptible strains of staphylococci and some streptococci, including penicillinase-producing staphylococci. Oxacillin is available as a sterile powder for injection or as a oral capsule.

It is important to note that the overuse or misuse of antibiotics like oxacillin can lead to the development of antibiotic resistance, which makes infections harder to treat. It's essential to use antibiotics only when necessary and as directed by a healthcare professional.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "geological phenomena" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Geological phenomena refer to natural processes and features related to the earth's physical structure, composition, and the various changes it undergoes over time. This could include things like volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, rock formations, or the formation of fossil fuels. If you have a term that you would like me to provide a medical definition for, I'd be happy to help!

Indwelling catheters, also known as Foley catheters, are medical devices that are inserted into the bladder to drain urine. They have a small balloon at the tip that is inflated with water once the catheter is in the correct position in the bladder, allowing it to remain in place and continuously drain urine. Indwelling catheters are typically used for patients who are unable to empty their bladders on their own, such as those who are bedridden or have nerve damage that affects bladder function. They are also used during and after certain surgical procedures. Prolonged use of indwelling catheters can increase the risk of urinary tract infections and other complications.

Nitrofurantoin is an antibacterial medication used to treat urinary tract infections caused by susceptible strains of bacteria. According to the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) of the National Library of Medicine, its medical definition is: "Antibacterial agent with nitrofuran ring and furazan moiety. It is used to treat urinary tract infections and is also used for prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections."

Nitrofurantoin works by inhibiting bacterial DNA synthesis, leading to bacterial death. It is typically administered orally and is available under various brand names, such as Macrobid® and Furadantin®. The medication is generally well-tolerated; however, potential side effects include gastrointestinal symptoms (nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal pain), headaches, dizziness, and pulmonary reactions. Rare but severe adverse events include peripheral neuropathy and hepatotoxicity.

It is essential to note that nitrofurantoin's effectiveness depends on the susceptibility of the infecting bacteria, and resistance has been reported in some cases. Therefore, it is crucial to consider local resistance patterns when prescribing this antibiotic.

A corneal ulcer is a medical condition that affects the eye, specifically the cornea. It is characterized by an open sore or lesion on the surface of the cornea, which can be caused by various factors such as bacterial or fungal infections, viruses, or injury to the eye.

The cornea is a transparent tissue that covers the front part of the eye and protects it from harmful particles, bacteria, and other foreign substances. When the cornea becomes damaged or infected, it can lead to the development of an ulcer. Symptoms of a corneal ulcer may include pain, redness, tearing, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, and a white spot on the surface of the eye.

Corneal ulcers require prompt medical attention to prevent further damage to the eye and potential loss of vision. Treatment typically involves antibiotics or antifungal medications to eliminate the infection, as well as pain management and measures to protect the eye while it heals. In severe cases, surgery may be necessary to repair the damage to the cornea.

A computer is a programmable electronic device that can store, retrieve, and process data. It is composed of several components including:

1. Hardware: The physical components of a computer such as the central processing unit (CPU), memory (RAM), storage devices (hard drive or solid-state drive), and input/output devices (monitor, keyboard, and mouse).
2. Software: The programs and instructions that are used to perform specific tasks on a computer. This includes operating systems, applications, and utilities.
3. Input: Devices or methods used to enter data into a computer, such as a keyboard, mouse, scanner, or digital camera.
4. Processing: The function of the CPU in executing instructions and performing calculations on data.
5. Output: The results of processing, which can be displayed on a monitor, printed on paper, or saved to a storage device.

Computers come in various forms and sizes, including desktop computers, laptops, tablets, and smartphones. They are used in a wide range of applications, from personal use for communication, entertainment, and productivity, to professional use in fields such as medicine, engineering, finance, and education.

A "false positive reaction" in medical testing refers to a situation where a diagnostic test incorrectly indicates the presence of a specific condition or disease in an individual who does not actually have it. This occurs when the test results give a positive outcome, while the true health status of the person is negative or free from the condition being tested for.

False positive reactions can be caused by various factors including:

1. Presence of unrelated substances that interfere with the test result (e.g., cross-reactivity between similar molecules).
2. Low specificity of the test, which means it may detect other conditions or irrelevant factors as positive.
3. Contamination during sample collection, storage, or analysis.
4. Human errors in performing or interpreting the test results.

False positive reactions can have significant consequences, such as unnecessary treatments, anxiety, and increased healthcare costs. Therefore, it is essential to confirm any positive test result with additional tests or clinical evaluations before making a definitive diagnosis.

Viral diseases are illnesses caused by the infection and replication of viruses in host organisms. These infectious agents are obligate parasites, meaning they rely on the cells of other living organisms to survive and reproduce. Viruses can infect various types of hosts, including animals, plants, and microorganisms, causing a wide range of diseases with varying symptoms and severity.

Once a virus enters a host cell, it takes over the cell's machinery to produce new viral particles, often leading to cell damage or death. The immune system recognizes the viral components as foreign and mounts an immune response to eliminate the infection. This response can result in inflammation, fever, and other symptoms associated with viral diseases.

Examples of well-known viral diseases include:

1. Influenza (flu) - caused by influenza A, B, or C viruses
2. Common cold - usually caused by rhinoviruses or coronaviruses
3. HIV/AIDS - caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
4. Measles - caused by measles morbillivirus
5. Hepatitis B and C - caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), respectively
6. Herpes simplex - caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or type 2 (HSV-2)
7. Chickenpox and shingles - both caused by varicella-zoster virus (VZV)
8. Rabies - caused by rabies lyssavirus
9. Ebola - caused by ebolaviruses
10. COVID-19 - caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)

Prevention and treatment strategies for viral diseases may include vaccination, antiviral medications, and supportive care to manage symptoms while the immune system fights off the infection.

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that arises when the body's response to an infection injures its own tissues and organs. It is characterized by a whole-body inflammatory state (systemic inflammation) that can lead to blood clotting issues, tissue damage, and multiple organ failure.

Sepsis happens when an infection you already have triggers a chain reaction throughout your body. Infections that lead to sepsis most often start in the lungs, urinary tract, skin, or gastrointestinal tract.

Sepsis is a medical emergency. If you suspect sepsis, seek immediate medical attention. Early recognition and treatment of sepsis are crucial to improve outcomes. Treatment usually involves antibiotics, intravenous fluids, and may require oxygen, medication to raise blood pressure, and corticosteroids. In severe cases, surgery may be required to clear the infection.

Osteomyelitis is a medical condition characterized by an infection that involves the bone or the bone marrow. It can occur as a result of a variety of factors, including bacterial or fungal infections that spread to the bone from another part of the body, or direct infection of the bone through trauma or surgery.

The symptoms of osteomyelitis may include pain and tenderness in the affected area, fever, chills, fatigue, and difficulty moving the affected limb. In some cases, there may also be redness, swelling, and drainage from the infected area. The diagnosis of osteomyelitis typically involves imaging tests such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans, as well as blood tests and cultures to identify the underlying cause of the infection.

Treatment for osteomyelitis usually involves a combination of antibiotics or antifungal medications to eliminate the infection, as well as pain management and possibly surgical debridement to remove infected tissue. In severe cases, hospitalization may be necessary to monitor and manage the condition.

Immunologic tests are a type of diagnostic assay that detect and measure the presence or absence of specific immune responses in a sample, such as blood or tissue. These tests can be used to identify antibodies, antigens, immune complexes, or complement components in a sample, which can provide information about the health status of an individual, including the presence of infection, autoimmune disease, or immunodeficiency.

Immunologic tests use various methods to detect these immune components, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), Western blots, immunofluorescence assays, and radioimmunoassays. The results of these tests can help healthcare providers diagnose and manage medical conditions, monitor treatment effectiveness, and assess immune function.

It's important to note that the interpretation of immunologic test results should be done by a qualified healthcare professional, as false positives or negatives can occur, and the results must be considered in conjunction with other clinical findings and patient history.

Species specificity is a term used in the field of biology, including medicine, to refer to the characteristic of a biological entity (such as a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism) that allows it to interact exclusively or preferentially with a particular species. This means that the biological entity has a strong affinity for, or is only able to infect, a specific host species.

For example, HIV is specifically adapted to infect human cells and does not typically infect other animal species. Similarly, some bacterial toxins are species-specific and can only affect certain types of animals or humans. This concept is important in understanding the transmission dynamics and host range of various pathogens, as well as in developing targeted therapies and vaccines.

A "University Hospital" is a type of hospital that is often affiliated with a medical school or university. These hospitals serve as major teaching institutions where medical students, residents, and fellows receive their training and education. They are equipped with advanced medical technology and resources to provide specialized and tertiary care services. University hospitals also conduct research and clinical trials to advance medical knowledge and practices. Additionally, they often treat complex and rare cases and provide a wide range of medical services to the community.

Biotechnology is defined in the medical field as a branch of technology that utilizes biological processes, organisms, or systems to create products that are technologically useful. This can include various methods and techniques such as genetic engineering, cell culture, fermentation, and others. The goal of biotechnology is to harness the power of biology to produce drugs, vaccines, diagnostic tests, biofuels, and other industrial products, as well as to advance our understanding of living systems for medical and scientific research.

The use of biotechnology has led to significant advances in medicine, including the development of new treatments for genetic diseases, improved methods for diagnosing illnesses, and the creation of vaccines to prevent infectious diseases. However, it also raises ethical and societal concerns related to issues such as genetic modification of organisms, cloning, and biosecurity.

Costs refer to the total amount of resources, such as money, time, and labor, that are expended in the provision of a medical service or treatment. Costs can be categorized into direct costs, which include expenses directly related to patient care, such as medication, supplies, and personnel; and indirect costs, which include overhead expenses, such as rent, utilities, and administrative salaries.

Cost analysis is the process of estimating and evaluating the total cost of a medical service or treatment. This involves identifying and quantifying all direct and indirect costs associated with the provision of care, and analyzing how these costs may vary based on factors such as patient volume, resource utilization, and reimbursement rates.

Cost analysis is an important tool for healthcare organizations to understand the financial implications of their operations and make informed decisions about resource allocation, pricing strategies, and quality improvement initiatives. It can also help policymakers and payers evaluate the cost-effectiveness of different treatment options and develop evidence-based guidelines for clinical practice.

Anti-infective agents are a class of medications that are used to treat infections caused by various microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. These agents work by either killing the microorganism or inhibiting its growth, thereby helping to control the infection and alleviate symptoms.

There are several types of anti-infective agents, including:

1. Antibiotics: These are medications that are used to treat bacterial infections. They work by either killing bacteria (bactericidal) or inhibiting their growth (bacteriostatic).
2. Antivirals: These are medications that are used to treat viral infections. They work by interfering with the replication of the virus, preventing it from spreading and causing further damage.
3. Antifungals: These are medications that are used to treat fungal infections. They work by disrupting the cell membrane of the fungus, killing it or inhibiting its growth.
4. Antiparasitics: These are medications that are used to treat parasitic infections. They work by either killing the parasite or inhibiting its growth and reproduction.

It is important to note that anti-infective agents are not effective against all types of infections, and it is essential to use them appropriately to avoid the development of drug-resistant strains of microorganisms.

Microbial consortia refer to a group or community of microorganisms, including bacteria, archaea, fungi, and viruses, that naturally exist together in a specific environment and interact with each other. These interactions can be synergistic, where the organisms benefit from each other's presence, or competitive, where they compete for resources.

Microbial consortia play important roles in various biological processes, such as biogeochemical cycling, plant growth promotion, and wastewater treatment. The study of microbial consortia is essential to understanding the complex interactions between microorganisms and their environment, and has implications for fields such as medicine, agriculture, and environmental science.

Microbial interactions refer to the various ways in which different microorganisms, such as bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites, influence each other's growth, survival, and behavior in a shared environment. These interactions can be categorized into several types:

1. Commensalism: One organism benefits from the interaction while the other is neither harmed nor benefited (e.g., certain gut bacteria that feed on host-derived nutrients without affecting the host's health).
2. Mutualism: Both organisms benefit from the interaction (e.g., the partnership between rhizobia bacteria and leguminous plants, where the bacteria fix nitrogen for the plant, and the plant provides carbohydrates for the bacteria).
3. Parasitism: One organism benefits at the expense of the other, causing harm or disease to the host (e.g., the malaria parasite infecting human red blood cells).
4. Competition: Both organisms struggle for limited resources, like nutrients or space, leading to a negative impact on one or both parties (e.g., different bacterial species competing for limited iron sources in the environment).
5. Amensalism: One organism is harmed or inhibited while the other remains unaffected (e.g., antibiotic-producing bacteria inhibiting the growth of nearby susceptible bacteria).
6. Synergism: Multiple organisms work together to produce a combined effect greater than the sum of their individual effects (e.g., certain bacterial and fungal communities in soil that enhance plant growth and nutrient uptake).
7. Antagonism: One organism inhibits or kills another through various mechanisms, such as the production of antibiotics or enzymes (e.g., some bacteria producing bacteriocins to inhibit the growth of closely related species).

Understanding microbial interactions is crucial for developing strategies in areas like infectious disease control, probiotic applications, and managing microbial communities in various ecosystems, including the human body.

Chromogenic compounds are substances that can be converted into a colored product through a chemical reaction. These compounds are often used in various diagnostic tests, including microbiological assays and immunoassays, to detect the presence or absence of a specific analyte (such as a particular bacterium, enzyme, or antigen).

In these tests, a chromogenic substrate is added to the sample, and if the target analyte is present, it will react with the substrate and produce a colored product. The intensity of the color can often be correlated with the amount of analyte present in the sample, allowing for quantitative analysis.

Chromogenic compounds are widely used in clinical laboratories because they offer several advantages over other types of diagnostic tests. They are typically easy to use and interpret, and they can provide rapid results with high sensitivity and specificity. Additionally, chromogenic assays can be automated, which can help increase throughput and reduce the potential for human error.

Actinomycetales are a group of gram-positive bacteria that can cause various types of infections in humans. The term "Actinomycetales infections" is used to describe a range of diseases caused by these organisms, which are characterized by the formation of characteristic granules or "actinomycetes" composed of bacterial cells and inflammatory tissue.

Some common examples of Actinomycetales infections include:

1. Actinomycosis: A chronic infection that typically affects the face, neck, and mouth, but can also occur in other parts of the body such as the lungs or abdomen. It is caused by various species of Actinomyces, which are normal inhabitants of the mouth and gastrointestinal tract.
2. Nocardiosis: A rare but serious infection that can affect the lungs, brain, or skin. It is caused by the bacterium Nocardia, which is found in soil and water.
3. Mycetoma: A chronic infection that affects the skin and underlying tissues, causing the formation of nodules and sinuses that discharge pus containing grains composed of fungal or bacterial elements. It is caused by various species of Actinomyces, Nocardia, and other related bacteria.
4. Streptomyces infections: While Streptomyces species are best known for their role in producing antibiotics, they can also cause infections in humans, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. These infections can affect various organs, including the lungs, skin, and soft tissues.

Treatment of Actinomycetales infections typically involves the use of antibiotics, often for prolonged periods of time. The specific antibiotic regimen will depend on the type of infection and the susceptibility of the causative organism to various antimicrobial agents. Surgical intervention may also be necessary in some cases to drain abscesses or remove infected tissue.

Gingival hemorrhage is the medical term for bleeding of the gingiva, or gums. It refers to the condition where the gums bleed, often as a result of trauma or injury, but also can be caused by various systemic conditions such as disorders of coagulation, leukemia, or scurvy.

Gingival hemorrhage is commonly seen in individuals with poor oral hygiene and periodontal disease, which can cause inflammation and damage to the gums. This can lead to increased susceptibility to bleeding, even during routine activities such as brushing or flossing. It's important to address any underlying causes of gingival hemorrhage to prevent further complications.

Burkholderia infections are caused by bacteria belonging to the Burkholderia genus, which includes several species that can cause various types of infection in humans. The most well-known and medically significant species include Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), Burkholderia pseudomallei, and Burkholderia mallei.

1. Burkholderia cepacia Complex (Bcc): These are a group of closely related bacteria that can be found in various environments such as soil, water, and plants. They can cause respiratory infections, particularly in people with weakened immune systems or chronic lung diseases like cystic fibrosis. Bcc infections can be difficult to treat due to their resistance to many antibiotics.

2. Burkholderia pseudomallei: This species is the causative agent of melioidosis, a potentially severe and life-threatening infection endemic in tropical and subtropical regions, particularly in Southeast Asia and northern Australia. The bacteria can be found in contaminated water and soil, and people can get infected through direct contact with contaminated sources, ingestion, or inhalation of the bacteria. Melioidosis symptoms may vary widely, from mild flu-like illness to severe pneumonia, abscesses, and sepsis.

3. Burkholderia mallei: This species is responsible for glanders, a rare but serious disease primarily affecting horses, donkeys, and mules. Human infections are usually associated with occupational exposure to infected animals or their secretions. Glanders can cause severe symptoms such as fever, pneumonia, sepsis, and skin ulcers.

Treatment of Burkholderia infections typically involves the use of specific antibiotics, often in combination therapy, depending on the species and severity of infection. In some cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to drain abscesses or remove infected tissues. Preventive measures include avoiding contact with contaminated sources, practicing good hygiene, and using appropriate personal protective equipment when handling animals or working in high-risk environments.

A surgical wound infection, also known as a surgical site infection (SSI), is defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as an infection that occurs within 30 days after surgery (or within one year if an implant is left in place) and involves either:

1. Purulent drainage from the incision;
2. Organisms isolated from an aseptically obtained culture of fluid or tissue from the incision;
3. At least one of the following signs or symptoms of infection: pain or tenderness, localized swelling, redness, or heat; and
4. Diagnosis of surgical site infection by the surgeon or attending physician.

SSIs can be classified as superficial incisional, deep incisional, or organ/space infections, depending on the depth and extent of tissue involvement. They are a common healthcare-associated infection and can lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs.

Automation in a laboratory refers to the use of technology and machinery to automatically perform tasks that were previously done manually by lab technicians or scientists. This can include tasks such as mixing and dispensing liquids, tracking and monitoring experiments, and analyzing samples. Automation can help increase efficiency, reduce human error, and allow lab personnel to focus on more complex tasks.

There are various types of automation systems used in laboratory settings, including:

1. Liquid handling systems: These machines automatically dispense precise volumes of liquids into containers or well plates, reducing the potential for human error and increasing throughput.
2. Robotic systems: Robots can be programmed to perform a variety of tasks, such as pipetting, centrifugation, and incubation, freeing up lab personnel for other duties.
3. Tracking and monitoring systems: These systems automatically track and monitor experiments, allowing scientists to remotely monitor their progress and receive alerts when an experiment is complete or if there are any issues.
4. Analysis systems: Automated analysis systems can quickly and accurately analyze samples, such as by measuring the concentration of a particular molecule or identifying specific genetic sequences.

Overall, automation in the laboratory can help improve accuracy, increase efficiency, and reduce costs, making it an essential tool for many scientific research and diagnostic applications.

Nucleic acid probes are specialized single-stranded DNA or RNA molecules that are used in molecular biology to identify and detect specific nucleic acid sequences, such as genes or fragments of DNA or RNA. These probes are typically labeled with a marker, such as a radioactive isotope or a fluorescent dye, which allows them to be detected and visualized.

Nucleic acid probes work by binding or "hybridizing" to their complementary target sequence through base-pairing interactions between the nucleotides that make up the probe and the target. This specificity of hybridization allows for the detection and identification of specific sequences within a complex mixture of nucleic acids, such as those found in a sample of DNA or RNA from a biological specimen.

Nucleic acid probes are used in a variety of applications, including gene expression analysis, genetic mapping, diagnosis of genetic disorders, and detection of pathogens, among others. They are an essential tool in modern molecular biology research and have contributed significantly to our understanding of genetics and disease.

Metagenomics is the scientific study of genetic material recovered directly from environmental samples. This field of research involves analyzing the collective microbial genomes found in a variety of environments, such as soil, ocean water, or the human gut, without the need to culture individual species in a lab. By using high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies and computational tools, metagenomics allows researchers to identify and study the functional potential and ecological roles of diverse microbial communities, contributing to our understanding of their impacts on ecosystems, health, and disease.

Diagnostic equipment refers to the instruments, tools, and machines used by healthcare professionals to identify and diagnose various medical conditions and diseases. These devices can range from simple handheld tools to complex imaging systems and laboratory analyzers. Some common examples of diagnostic equipment include:

1. Stethoscope: A handheld device used to listen to the internal sounds of the body, such as heartbeats, lung sounds, and intestinal movements.
2. Blood pressure monitor: A device that measures a person's blood pressure using an inflatable cuff placed around the arm or wrist.
3. Otoscope: A tool used to examine the ear canal and eardrum for signs of infection, injury, or other abnormalities.
4. Thermometer: A device used to measure body temperature, which can help identify fever or hypothermia.
5. Pulse oximeter: A non-invasive device that measures a person's oxygen saturation levels in the blood.
6. Electrocardiogram (ECG) machine: A device that records the electrical activity of the heart, which can help diagnose heart conditions such as arrhythmias or heart attacks.
7. X-ray machines: Equipment used to produce images of internal structures, such as bones and organs, to detect fractures, tumors, or other abnormalities.
8. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners: Machines that use magnetic fields and radio waves to create detailed images of the body's internal structures, which can help diagnose a wide range of medical conditions.
9. Computed tomography (CT) scanners: Devices that use X-rays to produce cross-sectional images of the body, allowing healthcare professionals to visualize internal structures in three dimensions.
10. Laboratory analyzers: Machines used to analyze various bodily fluids, such as blood and urine, to detect signs of infection, disease, or other medical conditions.

A hospital is a healthcare facility where patients receive medical treatment, diagnosis, and care for various health conditions, injuries, or diseases. It is typically staffed with medical professionals such as doctors, nurses, and other healthcare workers who provide round-the-clock medical services. Hospitals may offer inpatient (overnight) stays or outpatient (same-day) services, depending on the nature of the treatment required. They are equipped with various medical facilities like operating rooms, diagnostic equipment, intensive care units (ICUs), and emergency departments to handle a wide range of medical situations. Hospitals may specialize in specific areas of medicine, such as pediatrics, geriatrics, oncology, or trauma care.

Bacillary dysentery is a type of dysentery caused by the bacterium Shigella. It is characterized by the inflammation of the intestines, particularly the colon, resulting in diarrhea that may contain blood and mucus. The infection is typically spread through contaminated food or water, or close contact with an infected person. Symptoms usually appear within 1-4 days after exposure and can include abdominal cramps, fever, nausea, vomiting, and tenesmus (the strong, frequent urge to have a bowel movement). In severe cases, bacillary dysentery can lead to dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, and other complications. Treatment typically involves antibiotics to kill the bacteria, as well as fluid replacement to prevent dehydration.

'Acinetobacter' is a genus of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that are commonly found in the environment, including water, soil, and healthcare settings. They are known for their ability to survive in a wide range of temperatures and pH levels, as well as their resistance to many antibiotics.

Some species of Acinetobacter can cause healthcare-associated infections, particularly in patients who are hospitalized, have weakened immune systems, or have been exposed to medical devices such as ventilators or catheters. These infections can include pneumonia, bloodstream infections, wound infections, and meningitis.

Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most common species associated with human infection and is often resistant to multiple antibiotics, making it a significant public health concern. Infections caused by Acinetobacter can be difficult to treat and may require the use of last-resort antibiotics.

Preventing the spread of Acinetobacter in healthcare settings is important and includes practices such as hand hygiene, environmental cleaning, and contact precautions for patients with known or suspected infection.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

Debridement is a medical procedure that involves the removal of dead, damaged, or infected tissue to improve the healing process or prevent further infection. This can be done through various methods such as surgical debridement (removal of tissue using scalpel or scissors), mechanical debridement (use of wound irrigation or high-pressure water jet), autolytic debridement (using the body's own enzymes to break down and reabsorb dead tissue), and enzymatic debridement (application of topical enzymes to dissolve necrotic tissue). The goal of debridement is to promote healthy tissue growth, reduce the risk of infection, and improve overall wound healing.

... you can learn more and teach others about Microbiology at the Department of Microbiology Media related to Microbiology at ... Scientific microbiology developed in the 19th century through the work of Louis Pasteur and in medical microbiology Robert Koch ... Wainwright M (2003). An Alternative View of the Early History of Microbiology. Advances in Applied Microbiology. Vol. 52. pp. ... can extend beyond the traditional scope of microbiology A pure research branch of microbiology is termed cellular microbiology ...
... , the large subset of microbiology that is applied to medicine, is a branch of medical science concerned ... although in reality there is a fluid continuum between public health microbiology and clinical microbiology, just as the state ... Medical microbiology is not only about diagnosing and treating disease, it also involves the study of beneficial microbes. ... Medical Microbiology (CS1 maint: multiple names: editors list, Articles with short description, Short description is different ...
... is the study of microorganisms in soil, their functions, and how they affect soil properties. It is believed ... Soil Microbiology. Fourth ed. Enfield: Science Publishers, 1999. Print. Islam, Waqar; Saqib, Hafiz Sohaib Ahmad; Adnan, ... Principles and Applications of Soil Microbiology. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 1998. Print. Msimbira, Levini A.; Smith, ... Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, Microbiology, Soil biology). ...
Cady, P. (1978). Progress in impedance measurements in microbiology. Springfield: Chapter 14 in "Mechanizing microbiology" ... Impedance microbiology has been extensively used in the past decades to measure the concentration of bacteria and yeasts in ... In impedance microbiology technique works this way, the sample with the initial unknown bacterial concentration (C0) is placed ... Impedance microbiology is a microbiological technique used to measure the microbial number density (mainly bacteria but also ...
... is the area of food microbiology where controlling factors in foods and responses of pathogenic and ... Ross, T.; McMeekin, T. A. (November 1994). "Predictive microbiology". International Journal of Food Microbiology. 23 (3-4): 241 ... "PMIP - Overview of Predictive Microbiology". Predictive Microbiology Information Portal. Retrieved 2022-09-08. Perez-Rodriguez ... "Predictive Microbiology - an overview , ScienceDirect Topics". Sciencedirect. Retrieved 2022-09-08. " ...
Flaming is done to inoculation loops and straight-wires in microbiology labs for streaking. Leaving the loop in the flame of a ... Journal of Applied Microbiology. 108 (2): 521-31. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2672.2009.04453.x. PMID 19659696. S2CID 25835705. Casolari ... Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 77 (3): 1145-7. Bibcode:2011ApEnM..77.1145E. doi:10.1128/aem.00403-10. PMC 3028702. ...
Biofilms Dental plaque Environmental microbiology Human microbiota Human Microbiome Project Microbiology Theodor Rosebury List ... Oral microbiology is the study of the microorganisms (microbiota) of the oral cavity and their interactions between oral ... 2008). Molecular Oral Microbiology. Caister Academic Press. ISBN 978-1-904455-24-0. Lamont RJ, Hajishengallis G, Jenkinson HF ( ... Microbiology. 14 (3): 132-133. doi:10.1038/nrmicro.2016.21. PMID 26853115. S2CID 31853510. Rogers AH (2008). Molecular Oral ...
The Microbiology Outreach Prize was established in 2009. Source: Microbiology Society "Microbiology Society Home". Homepage. ... "Microbiology Outreach Prize". Microbiology Society. Official website Microbiology Society - education website (Articles with ... Microbiology Society. "Annual Conference". microbiologysociety.org. Microbiology Society. "Microbiology Today Magazine". ... The Microbiology Society (previously the Society for General Microbiology) is a learned society based in the United Kingdom ...
Ray, C. George; Ryan, Kenneth J.; Kenneth, Ryan (July 2004). Sherris Medical Microbiology: An Introduction to Infectious ... "Chapter 25: Streptococci and Enterococci". Sherris Medical Microbiology, 6th ed. Access Medicine. Retrieved 16 August 2016. The ... Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, Blood, Microbiology terms). ...
In microbiology, streaking is a technique used to isolate a pure strain from a single species of microorganism, often bacteria ... A very common type of media used in microbiology labs is known as agar, a gelatinous substance derived from seaweed. The ... American Society for Microbiology (ASM). S2CID 133454707. Streaking agar plate method for getting isolated colonies (video). ( ... Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Microbiology techniques, Bacteriology). ...
In microbiology, pleomorphism (from Ancient Greek πλέω-, pléō, "more", and -μορφή, morphḗ, form), also pleiomorphism, is the ... Penn, M Dworkin, M (June 1976). Robert Koch and two visions of microbiology. OCLC 679603238.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: multiple ... Rosenthal, Ken S.; Tan, Michael J. (2011), "Gram-Negative Cocci and Coccobacilli", Rapid Review Microbiology and Immunology, ... Frontiers in Microbiology. 5: 670. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2014.00670. ISSN 1664-302X. PMC 4273665. PMID 25566200. Coyle, M B; Lipsky ...
In the context of microbiology, enucleation refers to removing the nucleus of a cell and replacing it with a different nucleus ...
... is a peer-reviewed medical journal that was established in 2006 and is published by Future Medicine. The ... Microbiology journals, Academic journals established in 2006, Future Science Group academic journals, Journals published ... between 13 and 25 times per year, All stub articles, Microbiology journal stubs). ...
Soil carbon Nutrient cycle Soil chemistry Soil biology Environmental microbiology Microbial biodegradation Bird, Jeffrey A.; ...
... is a branch of microbiology that deals with the study of microorganisms that can metabolize or alter ... "Applied Microbiology_Petroleum and Hydrocarbon Microbiology" (PDF). Magot, Michel; Ollivier, Bernard; K.C. Patel, Bharat (Feb ... Petroleum Microbiology. Editions OPHRYS. ISBN 978-2710811350. Ollivier, Bernard; Magot, Michel (2005). Petroleum Microbiology_ ... JD, Van Hamme; A, Singh; OP., Ward (2003). "Recent advances in petroleum microbiology". Microbiology and Molecular Biology ...
... is a branch of microbiology dealing with plant-associated microbes and plant and animal diseases. It ... G. Rangaswami (2004). Agricultural Microbiology. Prentice-Hall of India Pvt.Ltd. ISBN 81-203-0668-6. (Agriculture, Microbiology ... also deals with the microbiology of soil fertility, such as microbial degradation of organic matter and soil nutrient ...
... which is used in environmental microbiology and food microbiology (e.g. dairy testing) to establish the so-called 'aerobic ... In microbiology, the term isolation refers to the separation of a strain from a natural, mixed population of living microbes, ... In clinical microbiology numerous other staining techniques for particular organisms are used (acid fast bacterial stain for ... To make a subculture, one again works in aseptic technique in microbiology, lifting a single colony off the agar surface with a ...
A borg is a "giant extrachromosomal element with the potential to augment methane oxidation", described by Basem Al-Shayeb and Jill Banfield. Borgs are long DNA sequences existing alongside the main chromosome in the archaea Methanoperedens, in oxygen-starved environments such as deep mud. Borgs were discovered by Professor Jill Banfield and her team in the soil of a wetland, an aquifer, a riverbed, and a deserted mercury mine in the states of California and Colorado. Borgs are considered to be a new form of "giant linear plasmids" or giant viruses rather than unknown DNA elements. They co-occur within a species of archaea which likely hosts them and shares many of their genes. The archaeon's main chromosome is only three times larger, and their capacity for anaerobic oxidation of methane as well as other biological functions - such as production of proteins - may be augmented by borgs. They were discovered in March 8 2020 by Jill and others. The structure of Borg genomes are conserved and are ...
... , or exo microbiology, is the study of microorganisms in outer space. It stems from an interdisciplinary ... Rahamathulla M. "Exo microbiology (or Astro microbiology)". Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University. Retrieved 12 May 2016. ... Horneck G, Klaus DM, Mancinelli RL (March 2010). "Space microbiology". Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews. 74 (1): 121- ... approach, which incorporates both microbiology and astrobiology. Astrobiology's efforts are aimed at understanding the origins ...
In microbiology, collective bacteria and other microorganisms in a host are historically known as flora. Although microflora is ... Public Health Microbiology, Humana Press, vol. 268, pp. 491-502, doi:10.1385/1-59259-766-1:491, ISBN 1-59259-766-1, PMID ...
... is a branch of biotechnology that applies microbial sciences to create industrial products in mass ... The medical application to industrial microbiology is the production of new drugs synthesized in a specific organism for ... "Industrial Production of Antibiotics [in: Section - Microbial Products in the Health Industry]". Microbiology. LibreTexts: ...
Microbiology is a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal that covers research in all aspects of microbiology, including ... The journal is published monthly by the Microbiology Society. It was established in January 1947 as the Journal of General ... "Source details: Microbiology". Scopus preview. Elsevier. Retrieved 2017-04-13. Official website (Articles with short ... It also covers plant-microbe interactions and environmental and theoretical microbiology. ...
In microbiology, efflux is the moving of a variety of different compounds out of cells, such as antibiotics, heavy metals, ... BMC Microbiology. 14: 13. doi:10.1186/1471-2180-14-13. PMC 3915751. PMID 24443882. Morita Y, Sobel ML, Poole K (March 2006). " ... Molecular Microbiology. 33 (3): 651-8. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2958.1999.01517.x. PMID 10417654. Pletzer D, Weingart H (January 2014 ... Clinical Microbiology Reviews. 28 (2): 337-418. doi:10.1128/CMR.00117-14. PMC 4402952. PMID 25788514. Blanco P, Hernando-Amado ...
"The rebirth of culture in microbiology through the example of culturomics to study human gut microbiota". Clinical Microbiology ... Greub, G. (December 2012). "Culturomics: a new approach to study the human microbiome". Clinical Microbiology and Infection. 18 ... December 2016). "Culture of previously uncultured members of the human gut microbiota by culturomics". Nature Microbiology. 1 ( ... December 2012). "Microbial culturomics: paradigm shift in the human gut microbiome study". Clinical Microbiology and Infection ...
"Nature microbiology". PubMed. United States National Library of Medicine. Retrieved 2022-07-13. "Nature Microbiology". Web of ... Nature Microbiology is a monthly online-only peer reviewed scientific journal published by Nature Portfolio. It was established ... "Nature Microbiology". Scopus. Retrieved 2022-07-13. 2022 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Science ed.). Clarivate. ... "Displaying Record for Publication: Nature Microbiology". CASSI. American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2022-07-13. "About the ...
... is the study of microbial identification. Since the discovery of the germ theory of disease, scientists ... The lag phase is not well known in microbiology, but it is speculated that this phase consists of the microorganism adjusting ... Methods used in diagnostic microbiology are often used to take advantage of a particular difference in organisms and attain ... Histological methods used for microbiology are useful because of their ability to quickly identify a disease present in a ...
... is a discipline that bridges microbiology and cell biology. The term "cellular microbiology" was coined ... "The field of cellular microbiology is a coalescence of two fields: molecular microbiology and cell biology," said Professor ... Cellular microbiology attempts to use pathogenic microorganisms as tools for cell-biology research, and to employ cell-biology ... Cellular microbiology tries to understand these processes and how they promote infection. Other eukaryotic processes that ...
"Spanish Microbiology Journal". Spanish Society of Microbiology. 18 January 2021. Retrieved 2022-04-02. "Revista Microbiología ... Business Media and the official journal of the Spanish Society of Microbiology [es]. It covers all aspects of microbiology. The ... Microbiology journals, Academic journals established in 1998, Quarterly journals, All stub articles, Microbiology journal stubs ... "International Microbiology". 2022 Journal Citation Reports (Science ed.). Clarivate. 2023. Official website v t e (CS1 Spanish- ...
... educational resources Pharmaceutical Microbiology Company Microbiology Network (CS1 errors: generic ... Pharmaceutical microbiology is an applied branch of microbiology. It involves the study of microorganisms associated with the ... Dr Scott Sutton's Microbiology Network, and the UK and Ireland Pharmaceutical Microbiology Interest Group (Pharmig). Saghee M, ... Another major focus of pharmaceutical microbiology is to determine how a product will react in cases of contamination. For ...
... is the study of the microorganisms that inhabit, create, or contaminate food. This includes the study of ... Food safety is a major focus of food microbiology. Numerous agents of disease and pathogens are readily transmitted via food ... ISBN 978-1-904455-68-4. Ray, B. Fundamental Food Microbiology, 3rd Ed. (2005), pp 29-32 Sillankorva, Sanna M.; Oliveira, Hugo; ... CDC, Food Safety Institute of Food Technologists Food Microbiology Division Descriptions of the common food pathogens (Articles ...
Basic Microbiology eLearning Curriculum. Basic Microscopy. To function effectively in a microbiology laboratory, laboratorians ... The Microbiology eLearning Series provides online training for public health laboratory professionals in the area of basic ... This eLearning course is designed to familiarize laboratorians with routine microscopy procedures used in the microbiology ... This eLearning course familiarizes laboratory professionals with basic culture media used in the microbiology laboratory. ...
... you can learn more and teach others about Microbiology at the Department of Microbiology Media related to Microbiology at ... Scientific microbiology developed in the 19th century through the work of Louis Pasteur and in medical microbiology Robert Koch ... Wainwright M (2003). An Alternative View of the Early History of Microbiology. Advances in Applied Microbiology. Vol. 52. pp. ... can extend beyond the traditional scope of microbiology A pure research branch of microbiology is termed cellular microbiology ...
https://www.mediafire.com/file/arp3w0zpkabrwn6/Applied_Microbiology.pdf/file. .header { position: absolute; width: 230px; ...
Browse the archive of articles on Nature Reviews Microbiology ... Nature Reviews Microbiology (Nat Rev Microbiol) ISSN 1740-1534 ...
Nature Reviews Microbiology (Nat Rev Microbiol) ISSN 1740-1534 (online) ISSN 1740-1526 (print) ... Nature Reviews Microbiology thanks B. Neilan, B. Qin and the other anonymous reviewer(s) for their contribution to the peer ... Nature Reviews Microbiology volume 16, pages 471-483 (2018)Cite this article ...
American Society for Microbiology, Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada, Royal College of ... Microbiology. HSV belongs to the alpha herpesvirus group. It is an enveloped virus that is approximately 160 nm in diameter ... Charles V Sanders, MD Edgar Hull Professor and Chairman, Department of Internal Medicine, Professor of Microbiology, Immunology ... American Society for Microbiology, Infectious Diseases Society of America, Infectious Diseases Society of New York, ...
Numerous scholarships are available for Veterinary Microbiology and Immunobiology students. Awards may be merit or academic ... Scholarships for Veterinary Microbiology and Immunobiology Majors Bullet name award deadline Link ... Matching Veterinary Microbiology and Immunobiology Colleges The Pennsylvania State University Four or more years; Public; $ ...
A peer-reviewed, open access journal in epidemiology, molecular epidemiology, diagnosis, vaccines, antimicrobial resistance & infection.
RSS , MapMicrobiology Platypus of microbiology bacterium pushes boundaries of evolution. Thursday, 2 February 2017. Evolution ... Subjects: microbiology, greatmomentsinscience, drkarl, podcasts The microscopic high tech wizardry of bacteria. Tuesday, 23 ... Subjects: child-health-and-behaviour, asthma, microbiology, news Aroma and taste of wine may be influenced by microbes. Friday ... Subjects: biology, microbiology, news Are gut microbes involved with Parkinsons disease?. Friday, 2 December 2016. Gut brain ...
Society for General Microbiology. Symposium, 26 books United States. Food Safety and Inspection Service, 26 books Karl ... Food, Congresses, Medical microbiology, Microorganisms, Microbiologie, Water, Bacteria, Immunology, Laboratory manuals, Biology ... SCIENCE, Communicable diseases, Life Sciences, Biotechnology, Food, microbiology, Microbial ecology, Technique, Analysis, ...
Microbiology is an 2-year English-taught Masters specialisation of Biology at the Faculty of Science of the Radboud University ... The Masters specialisation in Microbiology is offered in close collaboration with the research departments Microbiology at ... and molecular microbiology. You can choose to focus on one the following themes: Environmental Microbiology & Biotechnology, ... Masters specialisationMicrobiology Focus on the functioning of microorganisms and their potential to improve our health and ...
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This article will look at the increasing use of automation in microbiology and how it is aiding modern laboratory-based ... How Can Automation Help Microbiology?. Microbiology laboratories are undergoing a rapid transformation, with several changes ... www.mlo-online.com/diagnostics/microbiology/article/21106582/automation-enables-the-future-of-clinical-microbiology [Accessed ... How Can Automation Help Microbiology?. Workflow. Using Automation for Assays. Special Sample Types. Artificial Intelligence. ...
... a series of lectures and seminars by active researchers that discuss novel concepts within the field of molecular microbiology ... skills and capacity to evaluate experimental data and to understand how bacteria underpin research in molecular microbiology. ...
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Most major advances in microbiology... , Find, read and cite all the research you need on ResearchGate ... Microbiology is the study of microorganisms-biological entities too small to be seen with the unaided eye. ... ucts, and industrial microbiology and biotechnology are the sub-. disciplines of microbiology focused on these tasks (Table 1). ... Agricultural/soil microbiology Microbial diversity and processes in soils. Aquatic microbiology Microbial processes in water ...
... gholamreza ahmadian via microbio%40net.bio.net (by gholamrezaahmadian from yahoo.ca). Wed May 5 04:37 ...
... a series of lectures and seminars by active researchers that discuss novel concepts within the field of molecular microbiology ... skills and capacity to evaluate experimental data and to understand how bacteria underpin research in molecular microbiology. ...
Learn about the application of contemporary microbiology in health, food biosecurity and environmental sustainability to help ... Advances in molecular microbiology. × 20 credits You will advance your knowledge in the areas of infection and immunity and ... Specialise in microbiology. Microbes present global challenges, such as the rise in antibiotic resistance, as well as ... Molecular Biosciences (Microbiology) MSc 2 years with professional placement, starting in September 2024 ...
... is a research-based program designed to enhance awareness of current research in different fields of microbiology and to ... Microbiology (PhD) The Microbiology (PhD) is a research-based program designed to enhance awareness of current research in ... Department of Microbiology. We are the only stand-alone microbiology department in Canada, sustained through the active ... Microbiology MSc and PhD programs are research-intensive and because of this, applicants are required to select one of our ...
The Produce Safety and Microbiology Research is located in Albany, CA and is part of the Pacific West Area.. The Research ... The Produce Safety and Microbiology Research Unit conducts fundamental and applied research to improve the safety of the ... The Produce Safety and Microbiology Research Unit conducts research on microbial pathogens which have been associated with ...
The M&I Training Program is comprised of research trainees across the microbiology and immunology department promoting ...
Molecular Microbiology is highly relevant to all aspects of modern microbiology. MICR 335 will provide a fundamental knowledge ... Molecular Microbiology is highly relevant to all aspects of modern microbiology. MICR 335 will provide a fundamental knowledge ... Appropriate for students majoring in Microbiology, Genetics, Biochemistry or Molecular Biotechnology.. Contact. greg.cook@otago ... Appropriate for students majoring in Microbiology, Genetics, Biochemistry or Molecular Biotechnology.. Contact. greg.cook@otago ...
Microbial Lipidomics & Environmental Microbiology. David Giles. Microbial Ecology, Bioremediation & Biogeochemistry. Henry ...
... Steven Lindow icelab at SOCRATES.BERKELEY.EDU Wed Jun 23 17:40:43 EST 1999 *Previous message ... biotechnology and applied microbiology Dr. Virginia Stockwell (Oregon State University) Microbiology of deciduous fruit flowers ... The 7th International Symposium on the Microbiology of the Aerial Plant Surfaces will be held in Berkeley, California, from ... Dear Colleague, We are pleased to announce an upcoming meeting in phyllosphere microbiology. ...
"Microbiology is a critical science behind the manufacture of safe and effective sterile drug products, which is one of the ... "PDA is grateful to our member volunteers who have made the annual global microbiology conference one of the associations ... is celebrating the tenth anniversary of its Annual Global Conference on Pharmaceutical Microbiology. This annual event brings ...
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Microbiology Research, an international, peer-reviewed Open Access journal. ...
IFT Food Microbiology Division Undergraduate Scholarship by Feeding Tomorrow: The Foundation of the Institute of Food ... IFT Food Microbiology Division Undergraduate Scholarship. Feeding Tomorrow: The Foundation of the Institute of Food ... Feeding Tomorrow has established the IFT Food Microbiology Division Undergraduate Scholarship to assist students who plan to ...
The Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology researches marine bacteria that transform carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and iron ... Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology The Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology researches marine bacteria that ... IMPRS of Marine Microbiology. In addition, there is the possibility of individual doctoral research. Please contact the ... Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen +49 421 2028-9470 [email protected] ...
  • The Rapid Microbiology Testing Market 2023 Global Industry Research Report is a comprehensive business study on the current state of the Rapid Microbiology Testing Industry providing competitive analysis in form of 10 company profiles along with their product picture and specification, capacity production price cost production value and contact information says a latest report at The Insight Partners. (openpr.com)
  • Most major advances in microbiology have occurred within the past 150 years, and several important subdisciplines of microbiology have developed during this time, including microbial ecology, molecular biology, immunology, industrial microbiology, and biotechnology. (researchgate.net)
  • The M&I Training Program is comprised of research trainees across the microbiology and immunology department promoting excellence in scientific investigation. (stanford.edu)
  • The Department of Microbiology and Immunology is focused on research and educational programs which relate to microbial pathogens (viruses and prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes) and the host immune defenses which protect against these organisms. (rochester.edu)
  • The Department of Microbiology & Immunology fosters collaborative research between laboratories and investigators. (rochester.edu)
  • We provide a comprehensive background in the various fields of modern microbiology including microbial genetics, clinical microbiology, applied microbiology, immunology, molecular biology and microbial physiology. (wagner.edu)
  • The Department of Microbiology and Immunology comprises an interactive faculty engaged in research in infectious disease and host immune response . (cornell.edu)
  • Gerlinde Van de Walle named the Alfred H. Caspary Professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology. (cornell.edu)
  • The module will comprise of a series of lectures and seminars by active researchers that discuss novel concepts within the field of molecular microbiology mostly in the form of two hour lectures. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • This course is for you if you've graduated from any bioscience, medical, veterinary or related discipline and you're interested in specialising in a career within the field of molecular microbiology. (bath.ac.uk)
  • The field of bacteriology (later a subdiscipline of microbiology) was founded in the 19th century by Ferdinand Cohn, a botanist whose studies on algae and photosynthetic bacteria led him to describe several bacteria including Bacillus and Beggiatoa. (wikipedia.org)
  • The interpretation of the content of a research paper is to assess the student's knowledge of the subject and their analytical skills and capacity to evaluate experimental data and to understand how bacteria underpin research in molecular microbiology. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • The Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology researches marine bacteria that transform carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and iron compounds, thus playing crucial roles in the global material cycle. (mpg.de)
  • The objective of this reference book is to accumulate scientific information in the discipline of glucose nonfermenting bacteria encountered in clinical microbiology by assembling a group of specialists in this area. (routledge.com)
  • In summary, the main recommendations for the scale-up of the microbiology laboratory at the national and zonal levels included ensuring (1) urgent training of staff on sample analysis, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, biosafety and quality assurance, (2) improving of bacterial identification through introduction of bacteria identification kits (such as API kits), (3) purchasing international standards, and (4) renovating the NHL microbiology laboratory to meet the biosafety standards. (who.int)
  • This outbreak is a reminder that bacteria used in microbiology laboratories can sicken people who work in labs. (cdc.gov)
  • Microbiology laboratories are undergoing a rapid transformation, with several changes presenting challenges for researchers. (news-medical.net)
  • The term 'classic workflow' describes the manual processes currently in use in many microbiology laboratories worldwide. (news-medical.net)
  • Gerald L. Gilardi, Ph.D., is head of the Microbiology Division, Department of Laboratories, Hospital for Joint Diseases and Medical Centre, New York City, New York. (routledge.com)
  • The objectives of this technical support were to (1) conduct a situation analysis for the current activities at the microbiology laboratory, (2) define minimal requirements for the microbiology national reference laboratory (NRL) to support the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance, and (3) develop a road map for the upgrading of the microbiology laboratories at national and zonal level. (who.int)
  • CDC and public health officials in several states have identified a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium infections linked to various clinical, commercial, and teaching microbiology laboratories. (cdc.gov)
  • WGS showed that the strain of Salmonella Typhimurium causing illness in this outbreak is closely related genetically to a strain from an outbreak in 2014 and an outbreak in 2011 , both of which were linked to microbiology laboratories. (cdc.gov)
  • This outbreak highlights the potential risk of Salmonella infection associated with working in microbiology laboratories. (cdc.gov)
  • All students and staff in clinical and teaching microbiology laboratories should receive laboratory safety training. (cdc.gov)
  • More information is available on the Advice to Students and Employees in Microbiology Laboratories page. (cdc.gov)
  • The Microbiology eLearning Series provides online training for public health laboratory professionals in the area of basic microbiology laboratory skills and procedures necessary to identify microorganisms from clinical specimens. (cdc.gov)
  • Currently, microbiology is a massive field with endless numbers of industrial and clinical applications. (wikibooks.org)
  • Molecular Microbiology deal with clinical aspects of legionellosis. (cdc.gov)
  • Clinical microbiology : an introduction for healthcare professionals / Jennie Wilson. (who.int)
  • Microbiology (from Ancient Greek μῑκρος (mīkros) 'small', βίος (bíos) 'life', and -λογία (-logía) 'study of') is the scientific study of microorganisms, those being of unicellular (single-celled), multicellular (consisting of complex cells), or acellular (lacking cells). (wikipedia.org)
  • Microbiology is the study of microorganisms-biological entities too small to be seen with the unaided eye. (researchgate.net)
  • Together with his team from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen, he hopes to discover how microorganisms degrade methane and other hydrocarbons on the seabed. (mpg.de)
  • We place a strong emphasis on integrating molecular biology, medical, biochemical, environment and applied aspects of microbiology. (umanitoba.ca)
  • The National Health Laboratory (NHL) of Eritrea hosts the unique microbiology (bacteriology) site for culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing for the whole country, which receives an average of 1300-1500 samples (mostly urine (44%) and blood culture (28.5%)) every year. (who.int)
  • The report covers key developments in the Rapid Microbiology Testing Market as organic and inorganic growth strategies. (openpr.com)
  • The market players from Rapid Microbiology Testing Market are anticipated to have lucrative growth opportunities in the future with the rising demand for Rapid Microbiology Testing Market in the global market. (openpr.com)
  • Below mentioned is the list of few companies engaged in the Rapid Microbiology Testing Market. (openpr.com)
  • Based on product, the global rapid microbiology testing market is segmented into instruments, reagents and kits, and consumables. (openpr.com)
  • It provides overview and forecast of the Rapid Microbiology Testing Market based on various segments. (openpr.com)
  • The Rapid Microbiology Testing Market by each region is later sub-segmented by respective countries and segments. (openpr.com)
  • You'll also have the opportunity to use our specialist facilities, including computational methods to analyse large biological datasets to answer the 'big' questions in microbiology, from bacterial epidemiology to evolution. (bath.ac.uk)
  • One week gives an introduction to medical microbiology, including bacterial toxins, antibiotics and resistance. (lu.se)
  • The Produce Safety and Microbiology Research Unit conducts research on microbial pathogens which have been associated with foodborne illness. (usda.gov)
  • The focus at EML is on microbiology with numerous projects dedicated to geomicrobiology - the study of the role of microbes in geochemical processes - and a growing number of projects focused on gut microbiology. (epfl.ch)
  • Aquatic Microbiology is devoted to advancing the study of microbes in aqueous environments, with a focus on freshwater, estuarine and oceanic ecosystems. (frontiersin.org)
  • We also offer the Molecular Biosciences course with specialisms in Microbiology and Medical Biosciences and we have a new dedicated MSc Biotechnology with specialisms available in Healthcare Technologies , Sustainable Biotechnologies or with Entrepreneurship . (bath.ac.uk)
  • Appropriate for students majoring in Microbiology, Genetics, Biochemistry or Molecular Biotechnology. (otago.ac.nz)
  • This eLearning course is designed to familiarize laboratorians with routine microscopy procedures used in the microbiology laboratory. (cdc.gov)
  • Through these experiences, you'll gain the knowledge and critical thinking skills needed to apply the scientific method, as well as practical laboratory skills required for modern laboratory-based microbiology. (wagner.edu)
  • Antonie van Leeuwenhoek is considered a father of microbiology as he observed and experimented with microscopic organisms in the 1670s, using simple microscopes of his design. (wikipedia.org)
  • Microbiology is the study of microscopic organisms, i.e. those we cannot readily observe with our naked eyes. (wikibooks.org)
  • The 7th International Symposium on the Microbiology of the Aerial Plant Surfaces will be held in Berkeley, California, from August 3-8 2000. (bio.net)
  • The Department of Microbiology is the only stand-alone department of its kind in Canada. (umanitoba.ca)
  • The Microbiology Graduate Students Association (MicroGSA) improves the graduate student experience by offering you the chance to participate in social, networking and career building activities and events within the department. (umanitoba.ca)
  • Department of Microbiology offers customer support on a daily basis. (folkhalsomyndigheten.se)
  • The University offers a doctor of philosophy (PhD) in biology with a specialization in microbiology. (indstate.edu)
  • Marine biologist Greta Giljan is a doctoral student at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen. (mpg.de)
  • ABSTRACT To determine the microbiology of wound infection following caesarean section and to evaluate the use of Gram stain for the predicton of subsequent microbiological culture results, 1319 surgical wounds were followed up. (who.int)
  • The Faculty of Graduate Studies and the Faculty of Science offer a four- to six-year program of study leading to a Microbiology (PhD). (umanitoba.ca)
  • Microbiology is the branch of biology which deals with the study of micro organisms. (wikibooks.org)
  • Why Study Microbiology? (wikibooks.org)
  • Finally, you learn about several industrial, agricultural, and biotechnological applications of microbiology, and make study visits to see microbiology in action at real working places for microbiologists. (lu.se)
  • Scientific microbiology developed in the 19th century through the work of Louis Pasteur and in medical microbiology Robert Koch. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antje Boetius from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen always has multiple objectives in her sights: from discovery and precautionary research to technological development and scientific communication. (mpg.de)
  • Feeding Tomorrow has established the IFT Food Microbiology Division Undergraduate Scholarship to assist students who plan to continue their education by pursuing an undergraduate degree in food science. (petersons.com)
  • Learn about the application of contemporary microbiology in health, food biosecurity and environmental sustainability to help address the world's biggest challenges. (bath.ac.uk)
  • Microbiology MSc and PhD programs are research-intensive and because of this, applicants are required to select one of our faculty members to be their supervisor and preside over an applicant's program before they are accepted for admission. (umanitoba.ca)
  • We also offer a research-intensive program, where you can obtain both a BS and MS degree in microbiology in five years. (wagner.edu)
  • The General Chapters-Microbiology Expert Committee is responsible for developing new and revising existing general chapters related to microbiology and sterility assurance. (usp.org)
  • The Produce Safety and Microbiology Research Unit conducts fundamental and applied research to improve the safety of the nation's food supply. (usda.gov)
  • Builds on the level of understanding obtained in the unit of Microbiology. (edu.au)
  • Although the NHL microbiology unit is doing well in many of the key functions the situational analysis of the current activities revealed gaps in 5 modules of organisation and managements, documents, consumables and reagents, biosafety and public health. (who.int)
  • Amongst the current goals of microbiology are reducing costs, improving turnaround time, and improving testing efficiency. (news-medical.net)
  • The Microbiology (PhD) is a research-based program designed to enhance awareness of current research in different fields of microbiology and to develop the ability to communicate experimental results. (umanitoba.ca)
  • Here you are introduced to important current topics in microbiology. (lu.se)
  • Microbiology is a critical science behind the manufacture of safe and effective sterile drug products, which is one of the primary fields of work for the majority of the Association's 10,000 members. (prnewswire.com)
  • This article will look at the increasing use of automation in microbiology and how it is aiding modern laboratory-based research. (news-medical.net)
  • Molecular Microbiology is highly relevant to all aspects of modern microbiology. (otago.ac.nz)
  • Our aim is to give broad and thorough insight into modern microbiology that will be valuable and useful for all biology students. (lu.se)
  • How Can Automation Help Microbiology? (news-medical.net)
  • Comprehensive automation of the entire testing process provides enormous advantages for microbiology studies. (news-medical.net)
  • The project is independently planned and carried out by groups of 2-3 students and gives training in many aspects of microbiology, as well as in general laboratory practice and project planning. (lu.se)
  • Like other cells, micro organisms as a general rule obey the central dogma of microbiology and thus have DNA that code for the proteins that allow them to function. (wikibooks.org)
  • The lecture course is complemented by a laboratory course that aims to help students develop research skills relevant to molecular microbiology. (otago.ac.nz)