Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring: Self evaluation of whole blood glucose levels outside the clinical laboratory. A digital or battery-operated reflectance meter may be used. It has wide application in controlling unstable insulin-dependent diabetes.Flowmeters: Devices used to measure the flow of fluids (see RHEOLOGY) or the AIR to measure RESPIRATION.Peak Expiratory Flow Rate: Measurement of the maximum rate of airflow attained during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination. Common abbreviations are PEFR and PFR.Myosin Light Chains: The smaller subunits of MYOSINS that bind near the head groups of MYOSIN HEAVY CHAINS. The myosin light chains have a molecular weight of about 20 KDa and there are usually one essential and one regulatory pair of light chains associated with each heavy chain. Many myosin light chains that bind calcium are considered "calmodulin-like" proteins.Altitude: A vertical distance measured from a known level on the surface of a planet or other celestial body.Darkness: The absence of light.Extraterrestrial Environment: The environment outside the earth or its atmosphere. The environment may refer to a closed cabin (such as a space shuttle or space station) or to space itself, the moon, or other planets.Light Signal Transduction: The conversion of absorbed light energy into molecular signals.Reagent Strips: Narrow pieces of material impregnated or covered with a substance used to produce a chemical reaction. The strips are used in detecting, measuring, producing, etc., other substances. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Curing Lights, Dental: Light sources used to activate polymerization of light-cured DENTAL CEMENTS and DENTAL RESINS. Degree of cure and bond strength depends on exposure time, wavelength, and intensity of the curing light.Mars: The fourth planet in order from the sun. Its two natural satellites are Deimos and Phobos. It is one of the four inner or terrestrial planets of the solar system.Diagnostic Equipment: Nonexpendable items used in examination.Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Equipment and Supplies: Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Spacecraft: Devices, manned and unmanned, which are designed to be placed into an orbit about the Earth or into a trajectory to another celestial body. (NASA Thesaurus, 1988)Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Scattering, Radiation: The diversion of RADIATION (thermal, electromagnetic, or nuclear) from its original path as a result of interactions or collisions with atoms, molecules, or larger particles in the atmosphere or other media. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.Calibration: Determination, by measurement or comparison with a standard, of the correct value of each scale reading on a meter or other measuring instrument; or determination of the settings of a control device that correspond to particular values of voltage, current, frequency or other output.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Mobile Applications: Computer programs or software installed on mobile electronic devices which support a wide range of functions and uses which include television, telephone, video, music, word processing, and Internet service.Glare: Relatively bright light, or the dazzling sensation of relatively bright light, which produces unpleasantness or discomfort, or which interferes with optimal VISION, OCULAR. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Monitoring, Ambulatory: The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.Point-of-Care Systems: Laboratory and other services provided to patients at the bedside. These include diagnostic and laboratory testing using automated information entry.Ultraviolet Rays: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum immediately below the visible range and extending into the x-ray frequencies. The longer wavelengths (near-UV or biotic or vital rays) are necessary for the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D and are also called antirachitic rays; the shorter, ionizing wavelengths (far-UV or abiotic or extravital rays) are viricidal, bactericidal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic and are used as disinfectants.Photoreceptor Cells: Specialized cells that detect and transduce light. They are classified into two types based on their light reception structure, the ciliary photoreceptors and the rhabdomeric photoreceptors with MICROVILLI. Ciliary photoreceptor cells use OPSINS that activate a PHOSPHODIESTERASE phosphodiesterase cascade. Rhabdomeric photoreceptor cells use opsins that activate a PHOSPHOLIPASE C cascade.Efficiency: Ratio of output to effort, or the ratio of effort produced to energy expended.Monitoring, Physiologic: The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.Photosynthesis: The synthesis by organisms of organic chemical compounds, especially carbohydrates, from carbon dioxide using energy obtained from light rather than from the oxidation of chemical compounds. Photosynthesis comprises two separate processes: the light reactions and the dark reactions. In higher plants; GREEN ALGAE; and CYANOBACTERIA; NADPH and ATP formed by the light reactions drive the dark reactions which result in the fixation of carbon dioxide. (from Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2001)Ice: The solid substance formed by the FREEZING of water.Myosin-Light-Chain Kinase: An enzyme that phosphorylates myosin light chains in the presence of ATP to yield myosin-light chain phosphate and ADP, and requires calcium and CALMODULIN. The 20-kDa light chain is phosphorylated more rapidly than any other acceptor, but light chains from other myosins and myosin itself can act as acceptors. The enzyme plays a central role in the regulation of smooth muscle contraction.Spirometry: Measurement of volume of air inhaled or exhaled by the lung.Mountaineering: A sport involving mountain climbing techniques.Photoperiod: The time period of daily exposure that an organism receives from daylight or artificial light. It is believed that photoperiodic responses may affect the control of energy balance and thermoregulation.Blood Chemical Analysis: An examination of chemicals in the blood.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Dark Adaptation: Adjustment of the eyes under conditions of low light. The sensitivity of the eye to light is increased during dark adaptation.Jupiter: The fifth planet in order from the sun. It is one of the five outer planets of the solar system. Its sixteen natural satellites include Callisto, Europa, Ganymede, and Io.Saturn: The sixth planet in order from the sun. It is one of the five outer planets of the solar system. Its twelve natural satellites include Phoebe and Titan.Dry Ice: A solid form of carbon dioxide used as a refrigerant.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Insulin, Short-Acting: Insulin derivatives and preparations that are designed to induce a rapid HYPOGLYCEMIC EFFECT.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Phytochrome: A blue-green biliprotein widely distributed in the plant kingdom.Myosins: A diverse superfamily of proteins that function as translocating proteins. They share the common characteristics of being able to bind ACTINS and hydrolyze MgATP. Myosins generally consist of heavy chains which are involved in locomotion, and light chains which are involved in regulation. Within the structure of myosin heavy chain are three domains: the head, the neck and the tail. The head region of the heavy chain contains the actin binding domain and MgATPase domain which provides energy for locomotion. The neck region is involved in binding the light-chains. The tail region provides the anchoring point that maintains the position of the heavy chain. The superfamily of myosins is organized into structural classes based upon the type and arrangement of the subunits they contain.Electrolysis: Destruction by passage of a galvanic electric current, as in disintegration of a chemical compound in solution.Adaptation, Ocular: The adjustment of the eye to variations in the intensity of light. Light adaptation is the adjustment of the eye when the light threshold is increased; DARK ADAPTATION when the light is greatly reduced. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Rheology: The study of the deformation and flow of matter, usually liquids or fluids, and of the plastic flow of solids. The concept covers consistency, dilatancy, liquefaction, resistance to flow, shearing, thixotrophy, and VISCOSITY.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Photometry: Measurement of the various properties of light.Forced Expiratory Flow Rates: The rate of airflow measured during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination.Drug Dosage Calculations: Math calculations done for preparing appropriate doses of medicines, taking into account conversions of WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. Mistakes are one of the sources of MEDICATION ERRORS.Disinfection: Rendering pathogens harmless through the use of heat, antiseptics, antibacterial agents, etc.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Geographic Information Systems: Computer systems capable of assembling, storing, manipulating, and displaying geographically referenced information, i.e. data identified according to their locations.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Biosensing Techniques: Any of a variety of procedures which use biomolecular probes to measure the presence or concentration of biological molecules, biological structures, microorganisms, etc., by translating a biochemical interaction at the probe surface into a quantifiable physical signal.Geologic Sediments: A mass of organic or inorganic solid fragmented material, or the solid fragment itself, that comes from the weathering of rock and is carried by, suspended in, or dropped by air, water, or ice. It refers also to a mass that is accumulated by any other natural agent and that forms in layers on the earth's surface, such as sand, gravel, silt, mud, fill, or loess. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1689)Retina: The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.Ergometry: Any method of measuring the amount of work done by an organism, usually during PHYSICAL EXERTION. Ergometry also includes measures of power. Some instruments used in these determinations include the hand crank and the bicycle ergometer.Diving: An activity in which the organism plunges into water. It includes scuba and bell diving. Diving as natural behavior of animals goes here, as well as diving in decompression experiments with humans or animals.Lasers: An optical source that emits photons in a coherent beam. Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER) is brought about using devices that transform light of varying frequencies into a single intense, nearly nondivergent beam of monochromatic radiation. Lasers operate in the infrared, visible, ultraviolet, or X-ray regions of the spectrum.Blood-Aqueous Barrier: The selectively permeable barrier, in the EYE, formed by the nonpigmented layer of the EPITHELIUM of the CILIARY BODY, and the ENDOTHELIUM of the BLOOD VESSELS of the IRIS. TIGHT JUNCTIONS joining adjacent cells keep the barrier between cells continuous.Exobiology: The interdisciplinary science that studies evolutionary biology, including the origin and evolution of the major elements required for life, their processing in the interstellar medium and in protostellar systems. This field also includes the study of chemical evolution and the subsequent interactions between evolving biota and planetary evolution as well as the field of biology that deals with the study of extraterrestrial life.Air Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the air. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Cryptochromes: Flavoproteins that function as circadian rhythm signaling proteins in ANIMALS and as blue-light photoreceptors in PLANTS. They are structurally-related to DNA PHOTOLYASES and it is believed that both classes of proteins may have originated from an earlier protein that played a role in protecting primitive organisms from the cyclical exposure to UV LIGHT.Chlorophyll: Porphyrin derivatives containing magnesium that act to convert light energy in photosynthetic organisms.Immunoglobulin lambda-Chains: One of the types of light chain subunits of the immunoglobulins with a molecular weight of approximately 22 kDa.Radar: A system using beamed and reflected radio signals to and from an object in such a way that range, bearing, and other characteristics of the object may be determined.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Atmosphere: The gaseous envelope surrounding a planet or similar body. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Jaundice, Neonatal: Yellow discoloration of the SKIN; MUCOUS MEMBRANE; and SCLERA in the NEWBORN. It is a sign of NEONATAL HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA. Most cases are transient self-limiting (PHYSIOLOGICAL NEONATAL JAUNDICE) occurring in the first week of life, but some can be a sign of pathological disorders, particularly LIVER DISEASES.Photobiology: The branch of biology dealing with the effect of light on organisms.Reflex, Pupillary: Constriction of the pupil in response to light stimulation of the retina. It refers also to any reflex involving the iris, with resultant alteration of the diameter of the pupil. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Wind: The motion of air relative to the earth's surface.Atmospheric Pressure: The pressure at any point in an atmosphere due solely to the weight of the atmospheric gases above the point concerned.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.PhotochemistryEquipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Radiation Monitoring: The observation, either continuously or at intervals, of the levels of radiation in a given area, generally for the purpose of assuring that they have not exceeded prescribed amounts or, in case of radiation already present in the area, assuring that the levels have returned to those meeting acceptable safety standards.Transducers: Any device or element which converts an input signal into an output signal of a different form. Examples include the microphone, phonographic pickup, loudspeaker, barometer, photoelectric cell, automobile horn, doorbell, and underwater sound transducer. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Aircraft: A weight-carrying structure for navigation of the air that is supported either by its own buoyancy or by the dynamic action of the air against its surfaces. (Webster, 1973)Photochemotherapy: Therapy using oral or topical photosensitizing agents with subsequent exposure to light.Tumor Necrosis Factor Ligand Superfamily Member 14: A member of tumor necrosis factor superfamily found on activated LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES. It occurs as transmembrane protein that can be cleaved to release a secreted form that specifically binds to LYMPHOTOXIN BETA RECEPTOR and TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR RECEPTOR SUPERFAMILY, MEMBER 14.Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Melatonin: A biogenic amine that is found in animals and plants. In mammals, melatonin is produced by the PINEAL GLAND. Its secretion increases in darkness and decreases during exposure to light. Melatonin is implicated in the regulation of SLEEP, mood, and REPRODUCTION. Melatonin is also an effective antioxidant.Electricity: The physical effects involving the presence of electric charges at rest and in motion.Vision, Ocular: The process in which light signals are transformed by the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS into electrical signals which can then be transmitted to the brain.Health Physics: The science concerned with problems of radiation protection relevant to reducing or preventing radiation exposure, and the effects of ionizing radiation on humans and their environment.Geology: The science of the earth and other celestial bodies and their history as recorded in the rocks. It includes the study of geologic processes of an area such as rock formations, weathering and erosion, and sedimentation. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Spatial Analysis: Techniques which study entities using their topological, geometric, or geographic properties.Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Rats, Hairless: Mutant strains of rats that produce little or no hair. Several different homozygous recessive mutations can cause hairlessness in rats including rnu/rnu (Rowett nude), fz/fz (fuzzy), shn/shn (shorn), and nznu/nznu (New Zealand nude). Note that while NUDE RATS are often hairless, they are most characteristically athymic.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Photosensitizing Agents: Drugs that are pharmacologically inactive but when exposed to ultraviolet radiation or sunlight are converted to their active metabolite to produce a beneficial reaction affecting the diseased tissue. These compounds can be administered topically or systemically and have been used therapeutically to treat psoriasis and various types of neoplasms.Photoreceptor Cells, Invertebrate: Specialized cells in the invertebrates that detect and transduce light. They are predominantly rhabdomeric with an array of photosensitive microvilli. Illumination depolarizes invertebrate photoreceptors by stimulating Na+ influx across the plasma membrane.Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.Phytochrome B: A plant photo regulatory protein that exists in two forms that are reversibly interconvertible by LIGHT. In response to light it moves to the CELL NUCLEUS and regulates transcription of target genes. Phytochrome B plays an important role in shade avoidance and mediates plant de-etiolation in red light.Spectrometry, Gamma: Determination of the energy distribution of gamma rays emitted by nuclei. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Hematocrit: The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.Pacific OceanInfrared Rays: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum usually sensed as heat. Infrared wavelengths are longer than those of visible light, extending into the microwave frequencies. They are used therapeutically as heat, and also to warm food in restaurants.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Insulin Infusion Systems: Portable or implantable devices for infusion of insulin. Includes open-loop systems which may be patient-operated or controlled by a pre-set program and are designed for constant delivery of small quantities of insulin, increased during food ingestion, and closed-loop systems which deliver quantities of insulin automatically based on an electronic glucose sensor.Microscopy, Polarization: Microscopy using polarized light in which phenomena due to the preferential orientation of optical properties with respect to the vibration plane of the polarized light are made visible and correlated parameters are made measurable.Rod Opsins: Photosensitive proteins expressed in the ROD PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. They are the protein components of rod photoreceptor pigments such as RHODOPSIN.Intermittent Claudication: A symptom complex characterized by pain and weakness in SKELETAL MUSCLE group associated with exercise, such as leg pain and weakness brought on by walking. Such muscle limpness disappears after a brief rest and is often relates to arterial STENOSIS; muscle ISCHEMIA; and accumulation of LACTATE.Microscopy: The use of instrumentation and techniques for visualizing material and details that cannot be seen by the unaided eye. It is usually done by enlarging images, transmitted by light or electron beams, with optical or magnetic lenses that magnify the entire image field. With scanning microscopy, images are generated by collecting output from the specimen in a point-by-point fashion, on a magnified scale, as it is scanned by a narrow beam of light or electrons, a laser, a conductive probe, or a topographical probe.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Radiation ProtectionClathrin Light Chains: The light chain subunits of clathrin.Gait: Manner or style of walking.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Photochemical Processes: Chemical reactions effected by light.Phytochrome A: The primary plant photoreceptor responsible for perceiving and mediating responses to far-red light. It is a PROTEIN-SERINE-THREONINE KINASE that is translocated to the CELL NUCLEUS in response to light signals.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Arabidopsis Proteins: Proteins that originate from plants species belonging to the genus ARABIDOPSIS. The most intensely studied species of Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis thaliana, is commonly used in laboratory experiments.Phototropism: The directional growth of organisms in response to light. In plants, aerial shoots usually grow towards light. The phototropic response is thought to be controlled by auxin (= AUXINS), a plant growth substance. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Photosystem II Protein Complex: A large multisubunit protein complex found in the THYLAKOID MEMBRANE. It uses light energy derived from LIGHT-HARVESTING PROTEIN COMPLEXES to catalyze the splitting of WATER into DIOXYGEN and of reducing equivalents of HYDROGEN.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Hypocotyl: The region of the stem beneath the stalks of the seed leaves (cotyledons) and directly above the young root of the embryo plant. It grows rapidly in seedlings showing epigeal germination and lifts the cotyledons above the soil surface. In this region (the transition zone) the arrangement of vascular bundles in the root changes to that of the stem. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Urine Specimen Collection: Methods or procedures used to obtain samples of URINE.Retinal Rod Photoreceptor Cells: Photosensitive afferent neurons located in the peripheral retina, with their density increases radially away from the FOVEA CENTRALIS. Being much more sensitive to light than the RETINAL CONE CELLS, the rod cells are responsible for twilight vision (at scotopic intensities) as well as peripheral vision, but provide no color discrimination.Biomass: Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Decompression: Decompression external to the body, most often the slow lessening of external pressure on the whole body (especially in caisson workers, deep sea divers, and persons who ascend to great heights) to prevent DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS. It includes also sudden accidental decompression, but not surgical (local) decompression or decompression applied through body openings.Wireless Technology: Techniques using energy such as radio frequency, infrared light, laser light, visible light, or acoustic energy to transfer information without the use of wires, over both short and long distances.Spectrum Analysis: The measurement of the amplitude of the components of a complex waveform throughout the frequency range of the waveform. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Automation: Controlled operation of an apparatus, process, or system by mechanical or electronic devices that take the place of human organs of observation, effort, and decision. (From Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 1993)Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Electromagnetic Fields: Fields representing the joint interplay of electric and magnetic forces.Altitude Sickness: Multiple symptoms associated with reduced oxygen at high ALTITUDE.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Optics and Photonics: A specialized field of physics and engineering involved in studying the behavior and properties of light and the technology of analyzing, generating, transmitting, and manipulating ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION in the visible, infrared, and ultraviolet range.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Fluorescence: The property of emitting radiation while being irradiated. The radiation emitted is usually of longer wavelength than that incident or absorbed, e.g., a substance can be irradiated with invisible radiation and emit visible light. X-ray fluorescence is used in diagnosis.Oceans and Seas: A great expanse of continuous bodies of salt water which together cover more than 70 percent of the earth's surface. Seas may be partially or entirely enclosed by land, and are smaller than the five oceans (Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Antarctic).Noise, Occupational: Noise present in occupational, industrial, and factory situations.Photoreceptor Cells, Vertebrate: Specialized PHOTOTRANSDUCTION neurons in the vertebrates, such as the RETINAL ROD CELLS and the RETINAL CONE CELLS. Non-visual photoreceptor neurons have been reported in the deep brain, the PINEAL GLAND and organs of the circadian system.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Volcanic Eruptions: The ash, dust, gases, and lava released by volcanic explosion. The gases are volatile matter composed principally of about 90% water vapor, and carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen. The ash or dust is pyroclastic ejecta and lava is molten extrusive material consisting mainly of magnesium silicate. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Gait Disorders, Neurologic: Gait abnormalities that are a manifestation of nervous system dysfunction. These conditions may be caused by a wide variety of disorders which affect motor control, sensory feedback, and muscle strength including: CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or MUSCULAR DISEASES.Light-Harvesting Protein Complexes: Complexes containing CHLOROPHYLL and other photosensitive molecules. They serve to capture energy in the form of PHOTONS and are generally found as components of the PHOTOSYSTEM I PROTEIN COMPLEX or the PHOTOSYSTEM II PROTEIN COMPLEX.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Syringes: Instruments used for injecting or withdrawing fluids. (Stedman, 25th ed)Water Movements: The flow of water in enviromental bodies of water such as rivers, oceans, water supplies, aquariums, etc. It includes currents, tides, and waves.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A subtype of DIABETES MELLITUS that is characterized by INSULIN deficiency. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe HYPERGLYCEMIA, rapid progression to DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS, and DEATH unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence.Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Muscle Strength: The amount of force generated by MUSCLE CONTRACTION. Muscle strength can be measured during isometric, isotonic, or isokinetic contraction, either manually or using a device such as a MUSCLE STRENGTH DYNAMOMETER.Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complex Proteins: Protein complexes that take part in the process of PHOTOSYNTHESIS. They are located within the THYLAKOID MEMBRANES of plant CHLOROPLASTS and a variety of structures in more primitive organisms. There are two major complexes involved in the photosynthetic process called PHOTOSYSTEM I and PHOTOSYSTEM II.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Mobility Limitation: Difficulty in walking from place to place.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Remote Sensing Technology: Observation and acquisition of physical data from a distance by viewing and making measurements from a distance or receiving transmitted data from observations made at distant location.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Chloroplasts: Plant cell inclusion bodies that contain the photosynthetic pigment CHLOROPHYLL, which is associated with the membrane of THYLAKOIDS. Chloroplasts occur in cells of leaves and young stems of plants. They are also found in some forms of PHYTOPLANKTON such as HAPTOPHYTA; DINOFLAGELLATES; DIATOMS; and CRYPTOPHYTA.Radiation Dosage: The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).Blood Specimen Collection: The taking of a blood sample to determine its character as a whole, to identify levels of its component cells, chemicals, gases, or other constituents, to perform pathological examination, etc.Meteoroids: Any solid objects moving in interplanetary space that are smaller than a planet or asteroid but larger than a molecule. Meteorites are any meteoroid that has fallen to a planetary surface. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Oceanography: The science that deals with the ocean and its phenomena. (Webster, 3d ed)Geological Phenomena: The inanimate matter of Earth, the structures and properties of this matter, and the processes that affect it.Retinal Pigments: Photosensitive protein complexes of varied light absorption properties which are expressed in the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. They are OPSINS conjugated with VITAMIN A-based chromophores. Chromophores capture photons of light, leading to the activation of opsins and a biochemical cascade that ultimately excites the photoreceptor cells.Pupil: The aperture in the iris through which light passes.Refractometry: Measurement of the index of refraction (the ratio of the velocity of light or other radiation in the first of two media to its velocity in the second as it passes from one into the other).Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Gravitation: Acceleration produced by the mutual attraction of two masses, and of magnitude inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the two centers of mass. It is also the force imparted by the earth, moon, or a planet to an object near its surface. (From NASA Thesaurus, 1988)Radiation Injuries, Experimental: Experimentally produced harmful effects of ionizing or non-ionizing RADIATION in CHORDATA animals.Fukushima Nuclear Accident: Nuclear power accident that occurred following the Tohoku-Kanto earthquake of March 11, 2011 in the northern region of Japan.Hospital Design and Construction: The architecture, functional design, and construction of hospitals.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Railroads: Permanent roads having a line of rails fixed to ties and laid to gage, usually on a leveled or graded ballasted roadbed and providing a track for freight cars, passenger cars, and other rolling stock. Cars are designed to be drawn by locomotives or sometimes propelled by self-contained motors. (From Webster's 3d) The concept includes the organizational and administrative aspects of railroads as well.Methods: A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.Ecchymosis: Extravasation of blood into the skin, resulting in a nonelevated, rounded or irregular, blue or purplish patch, larger than a petechia.Cariogenic Agents: Substances that promote DENTAL CARIES.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Exercise Tolerance: The exercise capacity of an individual as measured by endurance (maximal exercise duration and/or maximal attained work load) during an EXERCISE TEST.Retinal Degeneration: A retrogressive pathological change in the retina, focal or generalized, caused by genetic defects, inflammation, trauma, vascular disease, or aging. Degeneration affecting predominantly the macula lutea of the retina is MACULAR DEGENERATION. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p304)
The first Light was established on the 17 March 1813. The height of the tower was approx. 12.8 metres. Later a dioptric ... It is 23 metres tall to the balcony, and has a Lantern of 19 feet tall. In 1987, the 1958 optic had to be replaced to comply ... In 1952 the Commissioners of Irish Lights decided to update the fog signal the lighthouse. It was decided that the best way to ... Commissioners of Irish Lights Coordinates: 55°25′48″N 7°14′31″W / 55.4301°N 7.2419°W / 55.4301; -7.2419. ...
Men's 4x400 metres Relay 02 ! Yvonne Murray, Women's 3000 metres 03 ! Geoff Parsons, Men's High Jump 03 ! Liz McColgan, Women's ... Men's Light Welterweight 03 ! David Anderson, Men's Lightweight 01 ! Loretta Cusack, Women's Lightweight 02 ! Mark Preston, ... 01 ! Liz McColgan, Women's 10,000 metres 02 ! Mark Davidson, David Strang, Tom McKean, Brian Whittle and Duncan Mathieson, ... 3000 metres 01 ! Denis Love, George Adrain, Ian Bruce and Willie Wood, Men's Fours 03 ! Richard Corsie, Men's Singles 01 ! ...
Light coloured layers in Eos Chaos, as seen by HiRISE. Image is in Oxia Palus quadrangle. Map of Phaethontis quadrangle. Click ... The tilted and flat topped blocks form depressions hundreds of metres deep. A chaotic region can be recognized by a rat's nest ... There may be hundreds of metres of ice covered by a thin layer of sediments. Location is Casius quadrangle. Some regions of ... Scale bar is 1000 metres long. Image in Oxia Palus quadrangle. Hydaspis Chaos, as seen by HiRISE. Image in Oxia Palus ...
It's 1,534 metres (5,033 ft) tall. List of mountains in Bosnia and Herzegovina Planine i planinski vrhovi viši od 1500 metara ... Ivan planina (Serbo-Croatian: Иван планина; lit. Ivan Mountain) is a mountain near Hadžići, Konjic and Kreševo, in central ...
The minimum recorded depth is 0 metres. The maximum recorded depth is 26 metres. It was found on hydroids in Panama. This ... Oral tentacles are translucent or light blue at the base, becoming white towards the tips. Cerata are translucent gray, often ...
Bays Tree broad, to 6 metres (20 ft) fruits round, medium size, light green, skin shows fingerprint like marks. Flavor good, ... Tree 6 metres (20 ft) to 9 metres (30 ft) high. Fruit is conical, medium size, rather seedy, with flavor that suggests papaya. ... Fruits smooth, light green, conical, .7 kilograms (1.5 lb) to 1.1 kilograms (2.4 lb). Skin thin, tender. Flavor has good sweet- ... White Tree open, unkempt; to 11 metres (36 ft), needs forming. Fruit large, to 2 kilograms (4.4 lb)4 pounds, conical, with ...
The airstrip is 700 metres of grass; it is mainly for use by ultralights and light aircraft. The airfield is home to quite a ... It is built in a light Victorian neo-Gothic version of the French 13th-century Gothic style. Located opposite the Cathedral, at ...
The floor area is 5,641.9 square metres; the building's area is 2,311.9 square metres. The "single quiet and tranquil room ... ... resembles a forest, filled with soft light and a feeling of openness reminiscent of the outdoors". Hiroshi Horiba and Kazumi ...
This is often the case as a result of the changes in microclimate of the top layers, the light factor being of particular ... They can be about 45 metres high. The trees (and sometimes shrubs) are of various heights. One tree has its crown at the height ... The shrub layer is the stratum of vegetation within a habitat with heights of between one and a half to about five metres. ... This stratum only receives light filtered by the canopy. i.e. it is preferred by semi-shade or shade-loving plants that would ...
19 metres (62 ft). Focal height. 67 metres (220 ft). Light source. diesel engines. ... The lighthouse, standing 67 metres high, was first operational by 1804, and is now listed as a building of architectural and ...
10 metres (33 ft). Focal height. 89 metres (292 ft). Light source. solar power. ...
Light Rail Transit Association (UK). Tramways & Urban Transit, September 2003, p. 347. Light Rail Transit Association (UK). ... The overall length is 20.13 metres (66.0 ft). The Inekon 01 Trio is a single-ended (uni-directional) version, buyers of which ...
The tower is 18 metres (59 ft) tall. and stands 81 metres (266 ft) above sea level. The light has a range of 21 nautical miles ... Cromer Pier dominates the sea front and is 151 metres (495 ft) long. It features the Pavilion Theatre and dates from 1901. ... Cromer stands between stretches of coastal cliffs which, to the east, are up to 70 metres (230 ft) high. According to ...
The Tumlare (lit. Porpoise) is a class of canoe-sterned (or 'double-ended') yacht designed by Knud Reimers. The design dates ... 1, Aibe was built the next year for Bengt Kinde). The Tumlaren is 8.30 metres (27.2 ft) overall; the design was strongly ... the class carries 20 square metres (220 sq ft) of sail, however a variant known as the Hocco is a class with the same hull but ... 28 square metres (300 sq ft) of sail, conceived for sailing on inland waters, specifically Lake Geneva. The larger sister class ...
The height of the lighthouse is 41.2 metres; with the lighthouse's light having a focal length of 50.1 metres. Originally it ... Light characteristic Darkness: 1.2 s. Light: 2.5 s. Darkness: 1.2 s. Light: 2.5 s Darkness: 1.2 s. Light: 6.4 s. Period: 15 s. ... The lighthouse is located about 100 metres from the coast of the Baltic Sea; situated next to the road between Ustronie Morskie ... The current range of the lighthouse's light glare is about 43.5 kilometres. The lighthouse is open to the public - allowing ...
It is built of brick and is 40 metres high. The light is 40 metres above sea level. The original red and white painting was ... The tower has since been used as a warning light displaying red and yellow signals when live firing is conducted in the ... It was replaced by a rotating mirror optic in 1996 when the regular light was deactivated and the tower was transferred to the ...
The present kitchen has pressed metal sheets to the walls with wall mounted gas light fittings. The split-log slab kitchen, ... The principal rooms have ceilings 5 metres high. Most rooms have pressed metal ceilings, with the entry hall ceiling raking ... The water closet contains an early flushing cistern, and gas piping for the light fittings. ...
The islet also has its own lighthouse, its class of light is Fl (3) W 15s. and has a focla height of 7 metres. Its range is 16- ...
According to the List of Lights. 77 metres (253 ft) according to "La Lanterna". List of Lights, Pub. 113: The West Coasts of ... The Marina Militare has been responsible for all lights on the Italian coast since 1910, and employs both military and civil ... the whole structure is crowned by a lantern from which the light is shone. Rebuilt in its current shape in 1543 replacing the ... Europe and Africa, the Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea and Azovskoye More (Sea of Azov) (PDF). List of Lights. United States ...
It has an elevation of 640 metres (2,100 ft). The hamlet is located in census division No. 17 and in the federal riding of ... Dixonville is a hamlet in Alberta, Canada within the County of Northern Lights. It is located along the Mackenzie Highway ( ...
The academic buildings has corridors each 340 metres long. The corridors are lined with inset gardens and remain well lit, day ...
In 1822 the construction of the first tower was completed and it was first lit on 29 October 1822. The tower was a 22 metres ( ... The light was electrified in 1924 and a Brandaris 80V 50A lamp was fitted. In 1940, during World War II, this light system was ... List of Lights, Pub. 112: Western Pacific and Indian Oceans Including the Persian Gulf and Red Sea (PDF). List of Lights. ... That may be the case if the height is as specified in that source (63.5 metres (208 ft)). However, if the height is 55.5 metres ...
... (lit. Mt. Sell) is a mountain in Veneto, Italy. It's elevation tops off at 1,978 ft. (603 metres). Coordinates: 45° ...
The light tower is 13.9 metres (46 ft) tall. The occulting light has a 6-second cycle, emitting a 26,100-candela light. The ... This lighthouse was operational from 1904 until 1984, when the old lighthouse was decommissioned and a new automated light ... light can be seen for about 12.7 nautical miles (23.5 km; 14.6 mi). Norway portal Lighthouses in Norway List of lighthouses in ...
The light characteristic remains unchanged since this relocation. Its height is 2 metres (6 ft 7 in). The light's range was 6 ... The height above sea level of the North peak, South peak and saddle are 43 metres, 40 metres and 30 metres respectively. Smooth ... Sea level calibrated to 0 metres when tide was at 1.11 metres (3 ft 8 in). After the first set of measurements the device was ... "M46-14 Smooth Island Light". MAST. Retrieved 14 February 2015. Prostar Nga List of Lights, Radio AIDS and Fog Signals 2006 West ...
The lowest point of Buehlau is located at the Loschwitzgrund (lit. Loschwitz Ground) at abundant 200 metres above sea level. In ... In the west it is bordered along the Nachtfluegelweg (lit. Night Wings Way) to the Weisser Hirsch (lit. White Deer) and ... Murder Ground Bridge), where it is called then called Bautzner Strasse (lit. Bautzen Street). It is served by the tram line 11 ... A more major road link is the basic Road downhill leading miracle as Staatsstrasse 167 (lit. State Street 167) through the ...
Light Heavyweight. Ian Freeman. Cage Rage 26. Vitor Belfort. Cage Rage 23 ... The canvas is marked with a line that is a metre away from the fence at all points. ... Fighters must use approved light gloves (4-6 ounces) that allow fingers to grab. ...
It has an elevation of 420 metres (1,380 ft). The community is located in census division No. 17 and in the federal riding of ... It is administered by the County of Northern Lights. List of communities in Alberta "Alberta Private Sewage Systems 2009 ...
Macduffs loop measured eight metres in diameter, stood 12 metres high, was constructed of wood and inspired by a cycling ... I thought, youre dead: The day a daredevil mountain biker fell off of his 12-metre-high Loop of Doom. The modern day ... I thought, youre dead: The day a daredevil mountain biker fell off of his 12-metre-high Loop of Doom ...
A light slit 50 metres high …. … cuts through the whole building.. Learn more ...
3.5-metre-wide house. Residential. 3.5-metre-wide house. * News. The Tulip tower cancelled. ... Living Light was presented at Veem during Dutch Design Week, which took place in Eindhoven last month. Dezeen hosted five Good ... These light up when a user touches the plants leaves.. Van Oers claims that future cities could be powered exclusively by ... The Living Light encases a plant inside a glass tube. As the plant photosynthesises, it releases organic compounds into a soil ...
19-square-metre apartment Residential. 19-square-metre apartment * Fashion Craig Greens raft-like accessories ... Called Light Wind, the freestanding design is topped by a 2m-diameter propeller. Photos are by Ingmar Cramers. ... I would like to feature the Light Wind in the Going Green department of our spring issue and wondered if this product is ... Can you give me more info regarding the actual material and working of the rotor blades at top of the light. ...
Its just as much fun at traffic lights as a Porsche. Youre in with a serious chance, at least for the first 30 - 40 metres. ... "Its just as much fun at traffic lights as a Porsche. At least for the first 30 - 40 metres.". ... Since 01 September 2018 all new cars are approved in accordance with the Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicles Test Procedure ( ...
To do this, they redefined the metre as: "The metre is the length of the path travelled by light in vacuum during a time ... Milonni, PW (2004). Fast light, slow light and left-handed light. CRC Press. p. 25. ISBN 0-7503-0926-1.. ... Milonni, PW (2004). "2". Fast light, slow light and left-handed light. CRC Press. ISBN 0-7503-0926-1.. ... Speed of light illustration (Speed of light as Live-Counter). *The Speed of Light, BBC Radio 4 discussion with John Barrow, ...
In light of that the bronze medal is good." Green denotes finalists [1] FINA. ...
Light and Airy, Comfortable Atmosphere. Two story with wood floors; outdoor & indoor second floor balconies; patio doors in all ... Light and Airy, Comfortable Atmosphere. Two story with wood floors; outdoor & indoor second floor balconies; patio doors in all ... Light and Airy, Comfortable Atmosphere. Two story with wood floors; outdoor & indoor second floor balconies; patio doors in all ... Light and Airy, Comfortable Atmosphere. Two story with wood floors; outdoor & indoor second floor balconies; patio doors in all ...
19 metres (62 ft). Focal height. 67 metres (220 ft). Light source. diesel engines. ... The lighthouse, standing 67 metres high, was first operational by 1804, and is now listed as a building of architectural and ...
The first Light was established on the 17 March 1813. The height of the tower was approx. 12.8 metres. Later a dioptric ... It is 23 metres tall to the balcony, and has a Lantern of 19 feet tall. In 1987, the 1958 optic had to be replaced to comply ... In 1952 the Commissioners of Irish Lights decided to update the fog signal the lighthouse. It was decided that the best way to ... Commissioners of Irish Lights Coordinates: 55°25′48″N 7°14′31″W / 55.4301°N 7.2419°W / 55.4301; -7.2419. ...
It is merely a coincidence that the remains of the old dinosaur now see the light of day again, or more precisely, parts of the ... Norways first dinosaur fossil is a Plateosaurus, a species that could be up to nine metres long and weigh up to four tons. It ... Norways first dinosaur fossil is a Plateosaurus, a species that could be up to nine metres long and weigh up to four tons. It ... The somewhat rough uncovering of Norways first dinosaur happened in the North Sea, at an entire 2256 metres below the seabed. ...
The 2016 drilling continues to encounter high grade values in previously untested portions of the Northern Lights zone, ... Ascot Resources Intersects 261.00 g/t Gold Over 1.00 Metre at Premier. ...
Musgrave Minerals Ltds Rob Waugh delighted after hitting 85 metres at 11.6... Musgrave Minerals Ltds (ASX:MGV) (FRA:6MU) Rob ... Mining Musgrave Minerals announces new discovery, "White Light Lode" at... 1 week, 1 day ago ... Musgrave Minerals shines on hitting up to 85 metres at 11.6 g/t at... 1 day, 22 hours ago ... Musgrave Minerals discovers new gold lode just 75 metres from... 1 week, 2 days ago ...
From underneath it is blue light. Twelve metres. Murky. Colours disappear. Fifteen metres. Darkness. Simon is probably ... He hauls in more and more of the line, metre after metre. Eventually he is holding the end of the line in his hand. Wilma is ... Two metres. As bright as day. The ice above us acts as a window, letting the sunlight in. When we were standing up there the ... Its hard to imagine that just up there, not far away at all, a mere few metres, the sun is shining on a sheet of sparkling ice ...
269 Square Feet / 25 Square Metres. Beautifully designed in a calm palette of white and gray with touches of light red to ... 1,163 Square Feet / 108 Square Metres. Illuminated by an uninterrupted flood of natural light, the Presidential Suite creates a ... This inviting space extends the living quarters by 22 square metres in a Junior Suite Sea View, and 45 square metres in a ... enlivened by touches of red and light purple to capture the intensity of the light, each room embraces the gorgeous ...
Hwy 395 Fwy 18 miles, 2 signal lights. Nearest Restaurant 40 Metres ...
sterilisable, flexible, light and durable. Specifications. * temperature range: -55°C to +200°C ... Silicone hose reinforced 9 x 14.5 mm per 20 metres. € 119,95 incl. VAT ... Silicone hose reinforced 28 x 38 mm per 2 metres. € 64,95 incl. VAT ... Silicone hose reinforced 28 x 38 mm per 5 metres. € 149,95 incl. VAT ...
Then, a hundred metres or so away, the whale blew. The landscape appeared to freeze around its plume and, with an unforgettable ... The light looked tired, as if it wanted to go to sleep, but couldnt. ... Expert photographers helped us as we groped after Icelands ethereal light; historians and naturalists of all stripes were ...
2X CLIP ON SPOT LIGHT HOLDER PORTABLE FLEXIBLE BULBS 1/2 METRE CABLE 3 PIN MAINS. £7.99 to £8.99 ... DYNAMO LIGHT SET BICYCLE HEADLIGHT REAR LIGHT NO BATTERIES CYCLE LIGHTS BIKE NEW. £8.95 ... LED CLUSTER LIGHTS SUPER BRIGHT INDOOR OUTDOOR CHRISTMAS LIGHTS WHITE BLUE MULTI. £12.99 to £21.99 ... Dimmable light bulbs 30W SES R39 E14 Edison Screw Reflector Bulb Halogen Lava £3.99 to £14.99 ...
Type: Inland, Pleasure Craft, >20 metres Vessel, Registered in Netherlands. Find dead-weight-tonnage, Gross Tonnage and the ... "font-160 line-110 text-default text-light"> NLAMS ...
Webb is designed to look at the first light of the Universe and will be able to peer back in time to when the first stars and ... The image resolution is 5.3 metres/pixel. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA. "We ... Webb is designed to look at the first light of the Universe and will be able to peer back in time to when the first stars and ... The image resolution is 55 metres per pixel. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA. ...
Approximately 500 metres (550 yards) light. Illusion knitting (which is sometimes called shadow knitting) is very easy to do. ...
Large secure external yard area •Clear span steel portal frame construction •Eaves height of approximately 6.34 metres •9 tail ... Light industrial for sale Lyncastle Road, Warrington WA4 • ...
The seas rose by 130 metres. If we take the low end of climate sensitivty, and predict a 1C change every century from BAU, then ... Yamal FOI Sheds New Light on Flawed Data. Phil Jones first instinct on learning about Climategate was that it was linked to ... A flawed theory would be absolutely crushed if new data were to come to light that seriously put that theory to question. ... Congratulations on this success, and not to detract from it: In light of this partial success it would be interesting to ...
2 Metres (78 in) Weight: .12 per sq ft Width: 60 Centimetres (23.5 in) ... If using light-colored UltraCote® (such as white or yellow), use a tan-colored filler that matches the wood color to prevent ... When applying covering with a second color, its important that the light color be applied first (under the dark color) to ... Hangar 9 UltraCote Lite, Transparent Yellow HANU967 is compatible with EFL4905, EFL4915 ...
  • It comprises a coherent system of units of measurement built on seven base units that are ampere , kelvin , second , metre , kilogram , candela , mole , and a set of twenty prefixes to the unit names and unit symbols that may be used when specifying multiples and fractions of the units. (wikipedia.org)
  • The larger capacity bucket, 6.4 cubic feet (.2 cu. m.), is great for handling larger loads of lighter materials. (toro.com)
  • In the case of BP in Geel, this is a concentration of 100 micrograms per cubic metre (a microgram is a millionth of a gram). (bp.com)
  • A light characteristic is a graphic and text description of a navigational light sequence or colour displayed on a nautical chart or in a Light List with the chart symbol for a lighthouse , lightvessel , buoy or sea mark with a light on it. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, as the colour and intensity of sunlight changes throughout the day - from warm amber light at sunrise, to cool bright light during the day, and back to amber light at sunset - electric lighting also needs to reproduce these changing colours and intensities to maximise human function. (hia.com.au)
  • These are units that describe the intensity of light on a surface, or illuminance . (wikihow.com)
  • The base units are derived from invariant constants of nature, such as the speed of light and the triple point of water , which can be observed and measured with great accuracy, and one physical artefact. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is based on the metre-kilogram-second system of units (MKS) rather than any variant of the CGS. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is done by holding the seaweed against the nursery rope with a light continuous tubular cotton stocking. (fao.org)
  • Aim higher than the result for rooms with dark walls, and aim lower for rooms with other major light sources. (wikihow.com)
  • The rays of light that shine through the domes and the roof, illuminating the white walls, create a magical ambiance. (klm.com)
  • A total of 51 lower jaws and 64 individual mammoth skulls were used to construct the walls of the 80 square metre structure. (sciencefocus.com)
  • All around us, in the cracks and crevices of the cavern ceiling and walls, stretches a galaxy of tiny blue-green lights. (abc.net.au)
  • The speed of light in vacuum , commonly denoted c , is a universal physical constant important in many areas of physics . (wikipedia.org)
  • Though this speed is most commonly associated with light , it is in fact the speed at which all massless particles and changes of the associated fields travel in vacuum (including electromagnetic radiation and gravitational waves ). (wikipedia.org)
  • It was fascinating: huge hangars, lights, forklift trucks and so much colourful fruit and veg. (forbes.com)
  • In 1905, Albert Einstein postulated that the speed of light c with respect to any inertial frame is a constant and is independent of the motion of the light source. (wikipedia.org)
  • Use a taut string or other straightedge to mark the line from the light source to this point. (wikihow.com)
  • This is the "beam angle," and describes the angle illuminated brightly by the light source. (wikihow.com)
  • Since he had no source of light, Jamal assumed he'll have to come closer. (nairaland.com)
  • In the past, windows facing into a natural light source has been the go-to solution - but more and more, architects and builders are asking for solutions beyond wall-framed apertures. (hia.com.au)
  • This file can then be provided to a lighting engineer for sign off as a working source of light, which is what artificial light suppliers offer. (hia.com.au)
  • Once the desired amount and source of natural light has been established, there is often the parallel need to control the light that has been artificially installed. (hia.com.au)
  • Ushering me nearer, she points out the source of one blue-green light. (abc.net.au)
  • Beautifully designed in a calm palette of white and gray with touches of light red to diffuse the natural light, every Classic Room serves as a quiet retreat that overlooks the hotel's private inner courtyard. (starwoodhotels.com)
  • Classic Room in contemporary style, flooded with natural light from floor-to-ceiling windows. (slh.com)
  • We're dwarfed by the enormous caverns, immersed in a dazzling natural light show. (abc.net.au)
  • The natural-light-filled area is 1,460 square feet (136 square metres) and an ideal location for meals or breaks. (fourseasons.com)
  • Natural light. (flexioffices.co.uk)
  • One possibility is that the mammoths and humans could have come to the area en masse because it had a natural spring that would have provided unfrozen liquid water throughout the winter - rare in this period of extreme cold. (sciencefocus.com)
  • Using natural light to lower energy ratings is a key focus for Solatube - but it's important to understand the difference between a tubular skylight and the relatively new market of tubular daylighting systems, which are fitted with tubular daylight devices (TDDs),' says Solatube general manager, Brett Dickson. (hia.com.au)
  • The confusion lies in the fact that until recently, architects have been restricted to using natural light as a feature through glazing, roof windows and other products due to issues such as glare, lighting consistency, energy efficiency and impact of UV on a space. (hia.com.au)
  • The combination of the gold and light that pours in through the windows create a magical ambiance. (klm.com)
  • From the corner of his eye, he saw that the little light of the corridor had blocked off. (nairaland.com)
  • Still, some sunlight penetrates to these depths, and this light is hundreds of times brighter than anything reflected horizontally or upwards. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • The adjoining bathroom is appointed in cream and light brown tiles and features a deep bathtub, a tray of luxurious bath amenities and thick white towels stored in a large wicker basket. (starwoodhotels.com)
  • If a light bulb or lamp label or advertisement mentions "lumens," it is describing how much total energy is emitted as visible light, a concept called luminance . (wikihow.com)
  • Climbing plants can make their own ways up the trees and shrubs towards the light, and shade-tolerant herbaceous plants and bulbs can grow on the woodland floor. (pfaf.org)
  • The front light shows white and red flashes every two and a half seconds (Fl.W.R. 2.5s). (wikipedia.org)
  • Decorated in sophisticated hues of gray, brown and white, enlivened by touches of red and light purple to capture the intensity of the light, each room embraces the gorgeous Mediterranean setting with effortless style. (starwoodhotels.com)
  • Crown moulding frames the ceiling, while white shutters on either side of the picture window close to black out the light. (starwoodhotels.com)
  • If using light-colored UltraCote® (such as white or yellow), use a tan-colored filler that matches the wood color to prevent the filler from showing through. (horizonhobby.com)
  • Flashing white every three seconds", lists of lights and navigation chart annotations use abbreviations. (wikipedia.org)
  • If no color is given, a white light is generally implied. (wikipedia.org)
  • For many practical purposes, light and other electromagnetic waves will appear to propagate instantaneously, but for long distances and very sensitive measurements, their finite speed has noticeable effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Norway's first dinosaur fossil is a Plateosaurus, a species that could be up to nine metres long and weigh up to four tons. (innovations-report.com)
  • Flashlights and other devices that emit light in a certain direction can be described using these two additional terms. (wikihow.com)
  • In 1865, James Clerk Maxwell proposed that light was an electromagnetic wave, and therefore travelled at the speed c appearing in his theory of electromagnetism. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first 2 rows point up and reach 34 metres at their highest point. (klm.com)
  • Goods Island Light is an active lighthouse located on the highest point of Goods Island (Palilag), an island in the Torres Strait, belonging to Queensland, Australia. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was the third in a group of eight lighthouses in Queensland made of hardwood frame clad with corrugated iron, which includes, in order of establishment Little Sea Hill Light, Grassy Hill Light, itself, Bay Rock Light, Old Caloundra Light, North Point Hummock Light (demolished), Gatcombe Head Light (demolished) and Bulwer Island Light. (wikipedia.org)
  • The wood is reddish brown to yellowish brown, with a distinctive figuring, or marking, of light and dark streaks. (britannica.com)
  • As such, any predator looking upwards at a glass squid would see the squid's eyes in dark silhouette against a relatively light background. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • A telescope's power depends on its mirror - the bigger the mirror, the more light it can capture and the more detail it can see. (newscientist.com)
  • A temporary light installed on the signalman's quarters was finally replaced by the lighthouse, constructed in 1886. (wikipedia.org)
  • The lighthouse is located 505 meters at 199° from this front light. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is merely a coincidence that the remains of the old dinosaur now see the light of day again, or more precisely, parts of the dinosaur. (innovations-report.com)
  • Hotel Mosaic Amsterdam is only 150 metres from the tram stop, Overtoom . (hotels.nl)
  • 700 metres from the hotel is the Max Euweplein with its life-size street chess board. (hotels.nl)
  • A flat-screen TV, minibar and tea/coffee facilities are standard at Arctic Light Hotel. (lonelyplanet.com)
  • Facilities at Arctic Light Hotel include a sauna, a terrace and a lounge bar. (lonelyplanet.com)
  • The hotel is 200 metres from Sampokeskus Shopping Centre and 800 metres from Arktikum Science Centre. (lonelyplanet.com)
  • Please inform Arctic Light Hotel in advance of your expected arrival time. (lonelyplanet.com)
  • Neighbouring Åre's ski slopes, this lodge-style hotel is just 250 metres from Åre Train Station. (booking.com)
  • Situated 150 metres from Undersåker Station, this hotel is within 15 minutes' drive of the Trillervallen and Åre ski resorts. (booking.com)
  • He recalled that photometric testing had shown the airfield lighting standards at UK airports are currently "pretty high", though when photometric testing was first introduced, the brilliance of one British airport's runway lights had fallen to just 20% of the expected standard. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The speed of light can be used with time of flight measurements to measure large distances to high precision. (wikipedia.org)
  • A quick light, abbreviated "Q", is a special case of a flashing light with a large frequency (more than 30 or 50 per minute). (wikipedia.org)
  • They're like the diffusers that you can stick on a camera to spread the light from a flash over a large area. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • They have large eyes to see in the dim light, and also enhanced pressure-sensitivity. (kottke.org)
  • Australian-owned and -operated daylighting expert Solatube , whose innovation and advanced technology have kept it at the forefront of the industry for 30 years, is keen to shine a light on the issues. (hia.com.au)
  • a bow-down hill) is, at 171.5 metres, one of the highest spots in Moscow. (prezi.com)