MethemoglobinMethemoglobinemia: The presence of methemoglobin in the blood, resulting in cyanosis. A small amount of methemoglobin is present in the blood normally, but injury or toxic agents convert a larger proportion of hemoglobin into methemoglobin, which does not function reversibly as an oxygen carrier. Methemoglobinemia may be due to a defect in the enzyme NADH methemoglobin reductase (an autosomal recessive trait) or to an abnormality in hemoglobin M (an autosomal dominant trait). (Dorland, 27th ed)Oxyhemoglobins: A compound formed by the combination of hemoglobin and oxygen. It is a complex in which the oxygen is bound directly to the iron without causing a change from the ferrous to the ferric state.Sodium Nitrite: Nitrous acid sodium salt. Used in many industrial processes, in meat curing, coloring, and preserving, and as a reagent in ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES. It is used therapeutically as an antidote in cyanide poisoning. The compound is toxic and mutagenic and will react in vivo with secondary or tertiary amines thereby producing highly carcinogenic nitrosamines.Cytochrome-B(5) Reductase: A FLAVOPROTEIN oxidoreductase that occurs both as a soluble enzyme and a membrane-bound enzyme due to ALTERNATIVE SPLICING of a single mRNA. The soluble form is present mainly in ERYTHROCYTES and is involved in the reduction of METHEMOGLOBIN. The membrane-bound form of the enzyme is found primarily in the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM and outer mitochondrial membrane, where it participates in the desaturation of FATTY ACIDS; CHOLESTEROL biosynthesis and drug metabolism. A deficiency in the enzyme can result in METHEMOGLOBINEMIA.Hemoglobins: The oxygen-carrying proteins of ERYTHROCYTES. They are found in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The number of globin subunits in the hemoglobin quaternary structure differs between species. Structures range from monomeric to a variety of multimeric arrangements.CarboxyhemoglobinHemoglobin, Sickle: An abnormal hemoglobin resulting from the substitution of valine for glutamic acid at position 6 of the beta chain of the globin moiety. The heterozygous state results in sickle cell trait, the homozygous in sickle cell anemia.Hemin: Chloro(7,12-diethenyl-3,8,13,17-tetramethyl-21H,23H-porphine-2,18-dipropanoato(4-)-N(21),N(22),N(23),N(24)) ferrate(2-) dihydrogen.Spectrophotometry: The art or process of comparing photometrically the relative intensities of the light in different parts of the spectrum.Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Heme: The color-furnishing portion of hemoglobin. It is found free in tissues and as the prosthetic group in many hemeproteins.Oxidation-Reduction: A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).Anemia, Sickle Cell: A disease characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia, episodic painful crises, and pathologic involvement of many organs. It is the clinical expression of homozygosity for hemoglobin S.Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy: A technique applicable to the wide variety of substances which exhibit paramagnetism because of the magnetic moments of unpaired electrons. The spectra are useful for detection and identification, for determination of electron structure, for study of interactions between molecules, and for measurement of nuclear spins and moments. (From McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science and Technology, 7th edition) Electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy is a variant of the technique which can give enhanced resolution. Electron spin resonance analysis can now be used in vivo, including imaging applications such as MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Body Fluids: Liquid components of living organisms.Psoralens: Linear furanocoumarins which are found in many PLANTS, especially UMBELLIFERAE and RUTACEAE, as well as PSORALEA from which they were originally discovered. They can intercalate DNA and, in an UV-initiated reaction of the furan portion, alkylate PYRIMIDINES, resulting in PHOTOSENSITIVITY DISORDERS.Ficusin: A naturally occurring furocoumarin, found in PSORALEA. After photoactivation with UV radiation, it binds DNA via single and double-stranded cross-linking.Tax Exemption: Status not subject to taxation; as the income of a philanthropic organization. Tax-exempt organizations may also qualify to receive tax-deductible donations if they are considered to be nonprofit corporations under Section 501(c)3 of the United States Internal Revenue Code.Income Tax: Tax on the net income of an individual, organization, or business.Patient Credit and Collection: Accounting procedures for determining credit status and methods of obtaining payment.PUVA Therapy: Photochemotherapy using PSORALENS as the photosensitizing agent and ultraviolet light type A (UVA).Chlorine Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain chlorine as an integral part of the molecule.Chlorine: A greenish-yellow, diatomic gas that is a member of the halogen family of elements. It has the atomic symbol Cl, atomic number 17, and atomic weight 70.906. It is a powerful irritant that can cause fatal pulmonary edema. Chlorine is used in manufacturing, as a reagent in synthetic chemistry, for water purification, and in the production of chlorinated lime, which is used in fabric bleaching.Chlorates: Inorganic salts of chloric acid that contain the ClO3- ion.Oxides: Binary compounds of oxygen containing the anion O(2-). The anion combines with metals to form alkaline oxides and non-metals to form acidic oxides.Gastrointestinal Contents: The contents included in all or any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Chlorides: Inorganic compounds derived from hydrochloric acid that contain the Cl- ion.Disinfectants: Substances used on inanimate objects that destroy harmful microorganisms or inhibit their activity. Disinfectants are classed as complete, destroying SPORES as well as vegetative forms of microorganisms, or incomplete, destroying only vegetative forms of the organisms. They are distinguished from ANTISEPTICS, which are local anti-infective agents used on humans and other animals. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)Infrared Rays: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum usually sensed as heat. Infrared wavelengths are longer than those of visible light, extending into the microwave frequencies. They are used therapeutically as heat, and also to warm food in restaurants.Citrus sinensis: A plant species of the genus CITRUS, family RUTACEAE that provides the familiar orange fruit which is also a source of orange oil.Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Antiphospholipid Syndrome: The presence of antibodies directed against phospholipids (ANTIBODIES, ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID). The condition is associated with a variety of diseases, notably systemic lupus erythematosus and other connective tissue diseases, thrombopenia, and arterial or venous thromboses. In pregnancy it can cause abortion. Of the phospholipids, the cardiolipins show markedly elevated levels of anticardiolipin antibodies (ANTIBODIES, ANTICARDIOLIPIN). Present also are high levels of lupus anticoagulant (LUPUS COAGULATION INHIBITOR).Nitric Oxide Synthase: An NADPH-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-ARGININE and OXYGEN to produce CITRULLINE and NITRIC OXIDE.Antibodies, Antiphospholipid: Autoantibodies directed against phospholipids. These antibodies are characteristically found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, SYSTEMIC;), ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME; related autoimmune diseases, some non-autoimmune diseases, and also in healthy individuals.Venous Thrombosis: The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.Current Procedural Terminology: Descriptive terms and identifying codes for reporting medical services and procedures performed by PHYSICIANS. It is produced by the AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION and used in insurance claim reporting for MEDICARE; MEDICAID; and private health insurance programs (From CPT 2002).Spirometry: Measurement of volume of air inhaled or exhaled by the lung.Blood Volume Determination: Method for determining the circulating blood volume by introducing a known quantity of foreign substance into the blood and determining its concentration some minutes later when thorough mixing has occurred. From these two values the blood volume can be calculated by dividing the quantity of injected material by its concentration in the blood at the time of uniform mixing. Generally expressed as cubic centimeters or liters per kilogram of body weight.Total Lung Capacity: The volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration. It is the equivalent to each of the following sums: VITAL CAPACITY plus RESIDUAL VOLUME; INSPIRATORY CAPACITY plus FUNCTIONAL RESIDUAL CAPACITY; TIDAL VOLUME plus INSPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus functional residual capacity; or tidal volume plus inspiratory reserve volume plus EXPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus residual volume.Carmine: Coloring matter from the insect Coccus cacti L. It is used in foods, pharmaceuticals, toiletries, etc., as a dye, and also has use as a microscopic stain and biological marker.Carbon Monoxide: Carbon monoxide (CO). A poisonous colorless, odorless, tasteless gas. It combines with hemoglobin to form carboxyhemoglobin, which has no oxygen carrying capacity. The resultant oxygen deprivation causes headache, dizziness, decreased pulse and respiratory rates, unconsciousness, and death. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Clinical Coding: Process of substituting a symbol or code for a term such as a diagnosis or procedure. (from Slee's Health Care Terms, 3d ed.)Persistent Fetal Circulation Syndrome: A syndrome of persistent PULMONARY HYPERTENSION in the newborn infant (INFANT, NEWBORN) without demonstrable HEART DISEASES. This neonatal condition can be caused by severe pulmonary vasoconstriction (reactive type), hypertrophy of pulmonary arterial muscle (hypertrophic type), or abnormally developed pulmonary arterioles (hypoplastic type). The newborn patient exhibits CYANOSIS and ACIDOSIS due to the persistence of fetal circulatory pattern of right-to-left shunting of blood through a patent ductus arteriosus (DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS, PATENT) and at times a patent foramen ovale (FORAMEN OVALE, PATENT).Hypertension, Pulmonary: Increased VASCULAR RESISTANCE in the PULMONARY CIRCULATION, usually secondary to HEART DISEASES or LUNG DISEASES.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.
1-2% Normal Less than 10% metHb - No symptoms 10-20% metHb - Skin discoloration only (most notably on mucous membranes) 20-30% ... metHb - Coma, seizures, arrhythmias, acidosis Greater than 70% metHb - Death Increased levels of methemoglobin are found in ... metHb - Anxiety, headache, dyspnea on exertion 30-50% metHb - Fatigue, confusion, dizziness, tachypnea, palpitations 50-70% ... Methemoglobin saturation is expressed as the percentage of hemoglobin in the methemoglobin state; That is MetHb as a proportion ...
... met-Hb) and ending up in hemichrome (HC). For forensic purposes, the fractions of HbO2, met-Hb and HC in a bloodstain can be ... A hemichrome (FeIII) is a form of low-spin methemoglobin (metHb). Hemichromes, which precede the denaturation processes of ...
HbO2 can auto-oxidize into met-Hb, which contains iron in the Fe3+ state. Met-Hb is incapable of binding oxygen. When met-Hb is ... met-Hb) and hemichrome (HC). The fractions of HbO2, met-Hb and HC in a bloodstain can be used for age determination of ...
Hemoglobin can take the forms of oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO), and methemoglobin (met-Hb); similarly, ...
Indicaxanthin is able to reduce the perferryl-Hb, a reactive intermediate, back to met-Hb. The overall effect of this step is ... Hb undergoes the following oxidation reaction during normal controlled breakdown of RBCs: Hb → Oxy-Hb → Met-Hb → [Perferryl-Hb ...
Hereditary met-Hb is caused by a recessive gene. If only one parent has this gene, offspring will have normal-hued skin, but if ... Instead of being red in color, the arterial blood of met-Hb patients is brown. This results in the skin of Caucasian patients ... Due to a deficiency of the enzyme diaphorase I (NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase), methemoglobin levels rise and the blood of met-Hb ...
MetHb). The use of 'CO' rather than 'Co' or 'co' is more appropriate since this designation represents a device that measures ... metHb, other hemoglobin moieties and 'background' light-absorbing species. When a patient presents with carbon monoxide ...
... metHb, i.e., ferric [Fe3+] rather than ferrous [Fe2+] haemoglobin) in the blood. Methemoglobinemia prevents the binding of ...
Heme released during oxidation of Hb to met-Hb or from heme saturated hepatocytes is bound by albumin and rapidly transferred ...
... that indicaxanthin can reduce perferryl-Hb generated in solution from met-Hb and hydrogen peroxide, more effectively than ...
This device is capable of reporting pH, pCO2, pO2, SatO2, Na+, K+, Cl−, Ca2+, Hemoglobin (total and derivatives: O2Hb, MetHb, ...
... met-Hb). ...
In both groups, MetHb increased in T1 after preoxygenation. In T2 there were differences regarding MetHb in both groups, in ... Increased fractions of COHb and MetHb are dangerous for two reasons: COHb and MetHb inhibit O2 transport by blocking heme iron- ... Furthermore, the finding of a lower than normal MetHb level in asthmatics was unexpected. A higher than normal MetHb level was ... Levels of COHb and MetHb were determined from arterial blood sample. COHb, MetHb, total Hb, fractional oxyhemoglobin (FO2Hb) ...
Dr. Moretti is a highly productive scientist. In addition to holding two patents, she has over 100 peer-reviewed scientific publications. Dr. Rojas is an internationally recognized scientist in both the medical sciences and biotechnology industry. He has about 200 peer-reviewed scientific publications and received FDA approval for a number of in vitro diagnostic test products.. ...
... such as MetHb content, revealed a higher initial MetHb percentage during the first 3 weeks of storage under hyperoxia, though ... However, hyperoxic and normoxic RBCs were comparable at day 21 and 42 (Figure 5E), when SO2 percentage, MetHb levels, and ... SO2 measurements and MetHb concentration. Preparation of controlled ,95% (hyperoxic) or 5% (hypoxic) SO2 of day 0 CP2D-AS-3 ... MetHb increases were comparable in both groups after storage day 21 (Figure 5C). Hypoxia significantly decreased MetHb ...
metHb. ⋅. μ. a. ,. metHb. +. 0.75. ⋅. μ. a. ,. W. .. In Eq. 3, f. Hb. +. Mb. is the Hb. +. Mb. tissue fraction, S. Hb. +. Mb. ... metHb. to be equal to zero.. Eq. 3. μ. a. ,. heart. (. λ. ). =. f. Hb. +. Mb. ⋅. [. S. Hb. +. Mb. ⋅. μ. a. ,. Hb. O. 2. +. (. 1 ... metHb. is the metHb tissue fraction. It should be noted that absorption data is often provided in terms of the specific ... metHb. , α. , and β. ) were determined by minimizing the expressions T. cal. ,. I. ∕. M. heart. norm. −. 1. and T. cal. ,. II. ...
Formation of MetHb and 15NO-Hb. Further metabolism of 15NO2− was also reflected by MetHb, 15NO-Hb, plasma RS-NO, and 15NO2-cLA ... A, After oral 15NO3−, no significant increase in MetHb occurs. B, After oral 15NO2−, a significant rise in MetHb occurs through ... Nitrite reacts with oxyHb to form NO3− and MetHb and with deoxyhemoglobin to ultimately form NO-Hb16. On NO2− protonation to ... cLA supplementation did not impact MetHb levels (not shown). The metabolism of 15NO2− to 15NO was measured by the formation of ...
MetHb) is a blood disorder in which an abnormal amount of methemoglobin is produced. Hemoglobin is the protein in red blood ... People with type 1 MetHb and hemoglobin M disease often do well. Type 2 MetHb is more serious. It often causes death within the ... Acquired MetHb is more common than the inherited forms. It occurs in some people after they are exposed to certain chemicals ... People with acquired MetHb often do very well once the medicine, food, or chemical that caused the problem is identified and ...
Met Hb. 0.3. ± 0.5. 0 0 3.2. ± 1.9. 0 2.36. ± 2.33. % Hemi.. 0 0.7. ± 0.6. 3.72. ± 0.9. 0.5. ± 0.9. 1.0. ± 0.8. 4.6. ± 1.1. D.I ... Met Hb. 0.5. ± 0.5. 2.9. ± 1.5. 0 ± 0. 1.7. ± 1.7. 0 ± 0. 1.4. ± 1.2. % Hemochrome. 0.3. ± 0.4. 1.9. ± 1.5. 0.6. ± 0.9. 0.6. ± ... Oxidation damage can form a semi-stable methemoglobin species (metHb), which can normally be reduced back to oxyhemoglobin by a ...
G6PD, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase; Hb, hemoglobin; metHb, methemoglobin; SARS-CoV-2, severe acute respiratory syndrome ... Hb and metHb concentration during admission. Each arrow indicates a 3-unit erythrocyte transfusion. ...
Time course of MetHb concentration following liposuction employing tumescent anesthesia.. 133. Female. 18 Years and older ( ...
pH , pCO2 , pO2 , sO2 , ctHb , FO2Hb , FCOHb , FMetHb , FHHb , FHbF , cK+ , cNa+ , cCa2+ , cCl- , cGlu , cLac , cCrea , ctBil. ...
sO2 , ctHb , FO2Hb , FCOHb , FMetHb , FHHb ...
Test restults show hgb 14.1; cohb 3.7; 02hb 89.9; methb 1.0; o2 17.9. I have trouble takingq a good deep breath. What could ...
Impaired reduction of MetHb: *At birth, NADH-dependent methemoglobin reductase (also called cytochrome-b5 reductase), the ... Arterial blood gases (ABGs) with co-oximetry (to determine MetHb level, oxygen saturation, presence of other dyshemoglobins, ... Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is more readily oxidized to MetHb by nitrites than is adult hemoglobin. ...
This binding eliminates the MetHb light absorption wavelengths in direct proportion to the MetHb concentration. MetHb is given ... Co-Oximetry and MetHb Levels. MetHb percentages can only be used to estimate oxygen-carrying capacity when interpreted with the ... This test can both quantify MetHb level and distinguish between sulfhemoglobin and MetHb. Cyanide binds to the positively ... A tube of MetHb-containing blood will not turn red when shaken in air or when oxygen is bubbled through it, whereas blood that ...
Met-Hb en gatos. Mantenimiento sin infusión continua. 0.5 - 2 mg kg IV. Propofol ...
MetHb) and total serum T3 and T4 concentrations were evaluated.. Postmortem examinations (parental animals):. HISTOPATHOLOGY: ...
Em 1 MetHb)+F}]/{square root over ( )}[(Eo 2 O2Hb+Er 2 RHb+Em 2 MetHb){(Eo 2 O2Hb+Er 2 RHb+Em 2 MetHb)+F}] (4). ... Em 1 MetHb+F}]/{square root over ( )}[( Eo 3 O2Hb+Er 3 RHb+Em 3 MetHb){(Eo 3 O2Hb+Er 3 Hb+Em 3 MetHb)+F}] (4′). ... In COHb/MetHb select Switch circuit 27 shown in FIG. 1, by selectively activating MetHb determination button 36 or COHb ... Φ12=ΔA 1/ΔA 2={square root over ( )}[(Eo 1 O2Hb+Er 1 RHb+Em 1 MetHb){(Eo 1 O2Hb+Er 1 RHb+ ...
MetHb (%) 0.22 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.2 0.2 20 ppm NO Hb (mg/dl) 14.3 0.85 12.7 0.7 2 1 Group B Platelet Count 292 25 269 22 253 16 (n ... MetHb (%) 0.2 0.1 0.4 0.1 0.3 0.1 200 ppm NO Hb (mg/dl) 12.9 0.6 12.2 1.0 12.9 0.9 Group D Platelet Count 237 35 232 44 244 40 ... 6) ( 10.sup.3 /mm.sup.3) MetHb (%) 0.1 0.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 0.02 80 ppm NO Hb (mg/dl) 14.0 0.8 11.9 0.3 11.1 0.6 Group C Platelet ... MetHb (%) 0.25 0.17 0.10 0.06 0.18 0.09 0.26 0.09______________________________________. In Table 1: "Number of tPA boluses" ...
Carboxyhemoglobin (CoHb) and methemoglobin (metHb) absorb light at the same wavelength as deoxyhemoglobin, causing a very ... Elevated levels of dysfunctional hemoglobins (CoHb, metHb) can cause significant overestimation of the actual SaO2. ... elevated metHb, anemia, and motion artifact if the actual SaO2 is less than 85%. ... typically without consideration for CoHb or metHb (see below). One pulse oximetry manufacturer now offers options that allow ...
The resulting MetHb is unable to carry oxygen. The function of MetHb reductase is to restore oxygen-binding ability of Hb by ... Similarly, we later showed that MetHb but not Hb induces oxidative modification of LDL [42]. This effect of MetHb was inhibited ... is released and is prone to autoxidation producing MetHb. Inorganic and organic peroxides may convert Hb and MetHb to higher ... whereas the reaction of MetHb with H2O2 yields ferrylHb radical in which the unpaired electron is associated with the globin or ...
Study 8/4- Red Cell Physiology flashcards from Kathryn Kudlaty
Tx for metHb reductase deficiency. High dose of vitamin C. mitochondrial role in apoptosis. cyt C binds Apaf-1 and procaspase 9 ...
The Tmax of metHb ranged from 1 to 4 hours. Normally, ,1 % of the total hemoglobin is in the form of metHb. [See OVERDOSAGE (10 ... Normally, metHb levels are ,1%, and cyanosis may not be evident until a level of at least 10% is present. The development of ... The individual maximum level of metHb in blood ranged from 0.8% to 1.7% following administration of the maximum dose of 8.5g ... Individual maximum blood concentrations of metHb increased from 0 to 1.1% up to 0.8 to 1.7% following administration of the ...
  • Gently blowing supplemental oxygen onto the filter paper hastens the reaction with deoxyhemoglobin, but does not affect MetHb [Wright et al. (cdc.gov)
  • A tube of MetHb-containing blood will not turn red when shaken in air or when oxygen is bubbled through it, whereas blood that is dark because of normal deoxyhemoglobin will turn red [Henretig et al. (cdc.gov)
  • Under circumstances of Hb oxidation, Hp can prevent heme release from MetHb, but unfortunately the Hp-mediated removal of Hb is severely compromised when Hb is structurally altered such as in ferrylHb allowing deleterious downstream reactions to occur even in the presence of Hp. (hindawi.com)
  • 1-2% Normal Less than 10% metHb - No symptoms 10-20% metHb - Skin discoloration only (most notably on mucous membranes) 20-30% metHb - Anxiety, headache, dyspnea on exertion 30-50% metHb - Fatigue, confusion, dizziness, tachypnea, palpitations 50-70% metHb - Coma, seizures, arrhythmias, acidosis Greater than 70% metHb - Death Increased levels of methemoglobin are found in blood stains. (wikipedia.org)
  • The toxicity of inhaled hydrogen cyanide (HCN) at the cellular level was evaluated considering the impact of methemoglobin (MetHb) produced by fire gases. (bvsalud.org)
  • Potassium cyanide then combines with metHb to form hemoglobincyanide (HiCN) which is a stable pigment read photometrically at a wavelength of 540 nm. (iqmh.org)
  • Although recent studies showed that immune cells recognize redox-active cytotoxic extracellular Hb (metHb) bound to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), currently available information is limited to experiments performed in defined conditions using single cell lines. (stemcell.com)
  • METHODS We investigated how human white blood cells, including neutrophils, respond to metHb and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS), signalling mediators (ERK and p38), NF-κB, cytokines, elastase secretion and cell activation markers. (stemcell.com)
  • The individual maximum level of metHb in blood ranged from 0.8% to 1.7% following administration of the maximum dose of 8.5g Oraqix. (drugs.com)
  • Therefore, a systemic approach targeting primary whole blood cells is required to better understand the cellular immune defence against metHb and PAMPs, when under a haemolytic infection. (stemcell.com)
  • The activation of neutrophils by metHb + LTA was subdued by the presence of other types of white blood cells. (stemcell.com)
  • During a haemolytic infection, white blood cells in the vicinity crosstalk to modulate neutrophil TLR-signalling induced by metHb and LTA. (stemcell.com)
  • Potassium ferricyanide oxidizes Hb in the whole blood to form methemoglobin (metHb). (iqmh.org)
  • MetHb is known to darken the blood. (facmedicine.com)
  • The Usefulness of Noninvasive MetHb Monitoring at HBOT Department (Pulse CO-Oximetry Masimo Rainbow SET RAD-57). (masimo.com)
  • Inorganic and organic peroxides may convert Hb and MetHb to higher oxidation states such as ferrylHb. (hindawi.com)
  • In most cases of mild acquired MetHb, no treatment is needed. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Treatment of isolated neutrophils with metHb increased production of ROS and expressions of IL-8, TNFα, and CD11b, which were further enhanced by metHb + LTA complex. (stemcell.com)
  • Regarding the ability of MetHb-formation the cat was identified as the species most similar to human. (europa.eu)
  • 2001). MADDS-NOH has been shown to be a more potent methemoglobin (metHb) former than DDS-NOH in human erythrocytes in vitro (Coleman, Holden, 2004), whilst both metabolites present the same potency in rats and humans (Vage et al . (scielo.br)
  • METHODS: Reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), methemoglobin (metHb) and 2,3-diphosphoglyceric acid (2,3-DPG) were measured in 31 patients suffering from CFS and 41 healthy control subjects. (ei-resource.org)