Organized services to provide mental health care.
The state wherein the person is well adjusted.
Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.
Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.
Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.
The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.
The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.
Facilities which administer the delivery of psychologic and psychiatric services to people living in a neighborhood or community.
Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.
Organized services to provide health care for children.
An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to substance abuse and mental health. It is commonly referred to by the acronym SAMHSA. On 1 October 1992, the United States Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration (ADAMHA) became SAMHSA.
The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.
Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.
Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.
Insurance providing benefits to cover part or all of the psychiatric care.
Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)
Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.
Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.
Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.
Persons with psychiatric illnesses or diseases, particularly psychotic and severe mood disorders.
Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.
Special hospitals which provide care to the mentally ill patient.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.
The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.
The practice of caring for individuals in the community, rather than in an institutional environment with resultant effects on the individual, the individual's family, the community, and the health care system.
A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.
A component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with research, overall planning, promoting, and administering mental health programs and research. It was established in 1949.
A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)
Organized services to provide immediate psychiatric care to patients with acute psychological disturbances.
Brief therapeutic approach which is ameliorative rather than curative of acute psychiatric emergencies. Used in contexts such as emergency rooms of psychiatric or general hospitals, or in the home or place of crisis occurrence, this treatment approach focuses on interpersonal and intrapsychic factors and environmental modification. (APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 7th ed)
Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.
Use of all social work processes in the treatment of patients in a psychiatric or mental health setting.
Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.
Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.
Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.
Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.
Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)
The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.
Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.
Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.
Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.
Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.
Management of public health organizations or agencies.
A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.
The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.
Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.
Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.
The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.
Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.
Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.
A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.
Disorders related to substance abuse.
Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.
Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)
Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.
Health care programs or services designed to assist individuals in the planning of family size. Various methods of CONTRACEPTION can be used to control the number and timing of childbirths.
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
Legal process required for the institutionalization of a patient with severe mental problems.
Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
An organized procedure carried out through committees to review admissions, duration of stay, professional services furnished, and to evaluate the medical necessity of those services and promote their most efficient use.
Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).
The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.
Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.
Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.
A specialty concerned with the application of psychiatric principles in caring for the mentally ill. It also includes the nursing care provided the mentally ill patient.
A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.
Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.
Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.
An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.
Calamities producing great damage, loss of life, and distress. They include results of natural phenomena and man-made phenomena. Normal conditions of existence are disrupted and the level of impact exceeds the capacity of the hazard-affected community.
Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.
The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.
The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.
State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.
Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.
Families who care for neglected children or patients unable to care for themselves.
Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.
Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.
Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.
The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.
Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.
The use of community resources, individual case work, or group work to promote the adaptive capacities of individuals in relation to their social and economic environments. It includes social service agencies.
A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.
The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.
The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.
The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)
A loosely defined grouping of drugs that have effects on psychological function. Here the psychotropic agents include the antidepressive agents, hallucinogens, and tranquilizing agents (including the antipsychotics and anti-anxiety agents).
A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.
Transfer from pediatric to adult care.
Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.
Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.
A division of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that is responsible for the public health and the provision of medical services to NATIVE AMERICANS in the United States, primarily those residing on reservation lands.
The act of killing oneself.
Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.
Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.
The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.
A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.
The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.
A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to VETERANS. It was established March 15, 1989 as a Cabinet-level position.
The controlling of access to health services, usually by primary care providers; often used in managed care settings to reduce utilization of expensive services and reduce referrals. (From BIOETHICS Thesaurus, 1999)
Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.
Former members of the armed services.
The status of health in rural populations.
The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.
Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.
Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.
A generic term for the treatment of mental illness or emotional disturbances primarily by verbal or nonverbal communication.
Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.
Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.
Psychiatry in its legal aspects. This includes criminology, penology, commitment of mentally ill, the psychiatrist's role in compensation cases, the problems of releasing information to the court, and of expert testimony.
The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).
Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.
Maladaptive reactions to identifiable psychosocial stressors occurring within a short time after onset of the stressor. They are manifested by either impairment in social or occupational functioning or by symptoms (depression, anxiety, etc.) that are in excess of a normal and expected reaction to the stressor.
A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)
A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.
Hospital department responsible for the organization and administration of psychiatric services.
The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.
The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.
The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.
Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)
All organized methods of funding.
The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.
Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.
Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.
Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.
Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.
Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.
Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.
An oversimplified perception or conception especially of persons, social groups, etc.
The status of health in urban populations.
Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent.
A child or adolescent who is deserted by parents or parent substitutes without regard for its future care.
A perceived attribute that is deeply discrediting and is considered to be a violation of social norms.
Hostile conflict between organized groups of people.
Outside services provided to an institution under a formal financial agreement.
Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.
Non-frontal low-pressure systems over tropical or sub-tropical waters with organized convection and definite pattern of surface wind circulation.
Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.
The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.
Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.
A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.
The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.
Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.
Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.
Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)
The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.
A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.
People who leave their place of residence in one country and settle in a different country.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
Persons who have no permanent residence. The concept excludes nomadic peoples.
Interactions between health personnel and patients.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.
A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.
Health services for college and university students usually provided by the educational institution.
Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)
Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.
The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.
Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.
A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.
Health facilities providing therapy and/or rehabilitation for substance-dependent individuals. Methadone distribution centers are included.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.
Persons including soldiers involved with the armed forces.
A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.
Groups of persons whose range of options is severely limited, who are frequently subjected to COERCION in their DECISION MAKING, or who may be compromised in their ability to give INFORMED CONSENT.
Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.
Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.
Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.
A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.
Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.
The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.
A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.
Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.
Multinational coalition military operation initiated in October 2001 to counter terrorism and bring security to AFGHANISTAN in collaboration with Afghan forces.
Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.
An armed intervention involving multi-national forces in the country of IRAQ.
Health care provided to individuals.
Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.
The confinement of a patient in a hospital.
Female parents, human or animal.
Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.

Dilemmas of medical ethics in the Canadian Penitentiary Service. (1/1841)

There is a unique hospital in Canada-and perhaps in the world-because it is built outside prison walls and it exists specifically for the psychiatric treatment of prisoners. It is on the one hand a hospital and on the other a prison. Moreover it has to provide the same quality and standard of care which is expected of a hospital associated with a university. From the time the hospital was established moral dilemmas appeared which were concerned with conflicts between the medical and custodial treatment of prisoners, and also with the attitudes of those having the status of prisoner-patient. Dr Roy describes these dilemmas and attitudes, and in particular a special conference which was convened to discuss them. Not only doctors and prison officials took part in this meeting but also general practitioners, theologians, philosophers, ex-prisoners, judges, lawyers, Members of Parliament and Senators. This must have been a unique occasion and Dr Roy's description may provide the impetus to examine these prison problems in other settings.  (+info)

Behavioral health benefits in employer-sponsored health plans, 1997. (2/1841)

Data for 1997 show that three-quarters or more of employer-sponsored health plans continue to place greater restrictions on behavioral health coverage than on general medical coverage. The nature of these restrictions varies by plan type. Some improvement in the treatment of mental health/substance abuse (MH/SA) benefits in employer plans may be occurring, however. Comparisons with data from 1996 show that the proportion of plans with benefits for "alternative" types of MH/SA services, such as nonhospital residential care, has increased. Further, the proportion with special limitations on these benefits shows a modest decrease.  (+info)

Mental health/medical care cost offsets: opportunities for managed care. (3/1841)

Health services researchers have long observed that outpatient mental health treatment sometimes leads to a reduction in unnecessary or excessive general medical care expenditures. Such reductions, or cost offsets, have been found following mental health treatment of distressed elderly medical inpatients, some patients as they develop major medical illnesses, primary care outpatients with multiple unexplained somatic complaints, and nonelderly adults with alcoholism. In this paper we argue that managed care has an opportunity to capture these medical care cost savings by training utilization managers to make mental health services more accessible to patients whose excessive use of medical care is related to psychological factors. For financial reasons, such policies are most likely to develop within health care plans that integrate the financing and management of mental health and medical/surgical benefits.  (+info)

Mental health care in the primary health care setting: a collaborative study in six countries of Central America. (4/1841)

The results of a naturalistic epidemiological study conducted in 6 Central American countries in collaboration with the WHO/PAHO Regional Office are reported, aimed at describing the patients with mental distress presenting to the primary health care setting, the interventions enacted and the evolution of the patients over the 6 months following recruitment. A total of 812 patients were recruited by the personnel of 11 primary health care centres. A high degree of heterogeneity was observed with respect to the patients' characteristics and the patterns of care provided. The factors potentially contributing to the heterogeneity, identified through multivariate analyses, are discussed in detail against the specific background differences between countries and between areas within each country. Interestingly albeit expectedly, besides the differences in health care provision and availability, social needs appear to influence both interventions and outcomes.  (+info)

Looking beyond the formulary budget in cost-benefit analysis. (5/1841)

With the introduction of newer, more expensive psychotropic medications, healthcare providers and managed care administrators must consider whether these drugs offer "value for the money." A true picture of the benefits of these drugs emerges only when all the costs of treatment are considered. Focusing exclusively on the acquisition cost of the drug can result in a misleading impression of the drug's worth. Although the medication costs associated with treating a patient with a newer drug increase, use of these agents may actually result in an overall decrease in healthcare costs, through reductions in hospitalization and length of stay, use of mental health services, and prescriptions for adjunctive drugs. In one study of the newer antipsychotic agent risperidone, the overall annual costs of treating a patient with schizophrenia were reduced by nearly $8,000 (Canadian dollars), even though medication costs increased by approximately $1,200 (Canadian dollars). Retrospective and prospective pharmacoeconomic studies can provide valuable data on the cost effectiveness of treatment with newer psychotropic medications.  (+info)

Behavioral health services: carved out and managed. (6/1841)

This article highlights the financial pressures that led to an examination of how mental healthcare was provided and paid for, and discusses the rise, characteristics, and functioning of carved-out behavioral healthcare. The typical characteristics of managed behavioral health carve outs (MBHCOs), including contracts, payment arrangements, provider networks, and data collection are discussed and illustrated using the example of United Behavioral Health. The article details the function of the MBHCO on cost and utilization, access, quality, and the relationship of behavioral health services to general medical care and other human services, but cautions that further research is needed to evaluate the qualitative aspects of care.  (+info)

Mental disorders in the primary care sector: a potential role for managed care. (7/1841)

This activity is designed for leaders and managers of managed care organizations and for primary care physicians involved in evaluating, treating, and caring for patients with mental disorders. GOAL: To provide a better understanding of primary care patients' needs for mental health services and how managed care companies might best address these needs. OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe problems in detection of mental disorders 2. Discuss the specific ways in which treatments can be improved for mental disorders under managed care systems.  (+info)

A conflict of strategies: Medicaid managed care and Medicaid maximization. (8/1841)

OBJECTIVE: To examine the influence of state strategies aimed at increasing federal Medicaid matching dollars on the design of states' Medicaid managed care programs. STUDY DESIGN: Data obtained from the 1996-1997 case studies of 13 states to examine how states have adapted the design of their Medicaid managed care programs in part because of maximization strategies, to accommodate the many roles and responsibilities that Medicaid has assumed over the years. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our study showed that as states made the shift to managed care, some found that the responsibilities undertaken in part through maximization strategies proved to be in conflict with their Medicaid managed care initiatives. Among other things, the study revealed that most states included provisions that preserved the health care safety net, such as adapting the managed care benefit package and promoting the participation of safety net providers in managed care programs. In addition, most of the study states continued to pay special subsidies to safety net providers, including hospitals and clinics. CONCLUSIONS: States have made real progress in moving a large number of Medicaid beneficiaries into managed care. At the same time, many states have specially crafted their managed care programs to accommodate safety net providers and existing funding mechanisms. By making these adaptations states, in the long run, may compromise the central goals of managed care: controlling costs and improving Medicaid beneficiaries' access to and quality of care.  (+info)

Some common types of mental disorders include:

1. Anxiety disorders: These conditions cause excessive worry, fear, or anxiety that interferes with daily life. Examples include generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder.
2. Mood disorders: These conditions affect a person's mood, causing feelings of sadness, hopelessness, or anger that persist for weeks or months. Examples include depression, bipolar disorder, and seasonal affective disorder.
3. Personality disorders: These conditions involve patterns of thought and behavior that deviate from the norm of the average person. Examples include borderline personality disorder, narcissistic personality disorder, and antisocial personality disorder.
4. Psychotic disorders: These conditions cause a person to lose touch with reality, resulting in delusions, hallucinations, or disorganized thinking. Examples include schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and brief psychotic disorder.
5. Trauma and stressor-related disorders: These conditions develop after a person experiences a traumatic event, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
6. Dissociative disorders: These conditions involve a disconnection or separation from one's body, thoughts, or emotions. Examples include dissociative identity disorder (formerly known as multiple personality disorder) and depersonalization disorder.
7. Neurodevelopmental disorders: These conditions affect the development of the brain and nervous system, leading to symptoms such as difficulty with social interaction, communication, and repetitive behaviors. Examples include autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and Rett syndrome.

Mental disorders can be diagnosed by a mental health professional using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), which provides criteria for each condition. Treatment typically involves a combination of medication and therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy or psychodynamic therapy, depending on the specific disorder and individual needs.

The symptoms of PTSD can vary widely and may include:

1. Flashbacks or intrusive memories of the traumatic event
2. Nightmares or disturbed sleep
3. Avoidance of people, places, or activities that remind them of the event
4. Hypervigilance or an exaggerated startle response
5. Difficulty concentrating or memory problems
6. Irritability, anger, or other mood changes
7. Physical symptoms such as headaches, stomachaches, or muscle tension

The exact cause of PTSD is not fully understood, but it is thought to involve changes in the brain's response to stress and the release of chemical messengers (neurotransmitters) that help regulate emotions and memory.

PTSD can be diagnosed by a mental health professional using a combination of psychological evaluation and medical history. Treatment for PTSD typically involves therapy, medication, or a combination of both. Therapy may include exposure therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), or other forms of talk therapy. Medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and antidepressants may be used to help manage symptoms.

Prevention is an important aspect of managing PTSD, and this includes seeking support from friends, family, or mental health professionals soon after the traumatic event. Self-care practices such as exercise, meditation, or relaxation techniques can also be helpful in reducing stress and promoting emotional well-being.

Types of Substance-Related Disorders:

1. Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD): A chronic disease characterized by the excessive consumption of alcohol, leading to impaired control over drinking, social or personal problems, and increased risk of health issues.
2. Opioid Use Disorder (OUD): A chronic disease characterized by the excessive use of opioids, such as prescription painkillers or heroin, leading to withdrawal symptoms when the substance is not available.
3. Stimulant Use Disorder: A chronic disease characterized by the excessive use of stimulants, such as cocaine or amphetamines, leading to impaired control over use and increased risk of adverse effects.
4. Cannabis Use Disorder: A chronic disease characterized by the excessive use of cannabis, leading to impaired control over use and increased risk of adverse effects.
5. Hallucinogen Use Disorder: A chronic disease characterized by the excessive use of hallucinogens, such as LSD or psilocybin mushrooms, leading to impaired control over use and increased risk of adverse effects.

Causes and Risk Factors:

1. Genetics: Individuals with a family history of substance-related disorders are more likely to develop these conditions.
2. Mental health: Individuals with mental health conditions, such as depression or anxiety, may be more likely to use substances as a form of self-medication.
3. Environmental factors: Exposure to substances at an early age, peer pressure, and social environment can increase the risk of developing a substance-related disorder.
4. Brain chemistry: Substance use can alter brain chemistry, leading to dependence and addiction.

Symptoms:

1. Increased tolerance: The need to use more of the substance to achieve the desired effect.
2. Withdrawal: Experiencing symptoms such as anxiety, irritability, or nausea when the substance is not present.
3. Loss of control: Using more substance than intended or for longer than intended.
4. Neglecting responsibilities: Neglecting responsibilities at home, work, or school due to substance use.
5. Continued use despite negative consequences: Continuing to use the substance despite physical, emotional, or financial consequences.

Diagnosis:

1. Physical examination: A doctor may perform a physical examination to look for signs of substance use, such as track marks or changes in heart rate and blood pressure.
2. Laboratory tests: Blood or urine tests can confirm the presence of substances in the body.
3. Psychological evaluation: A mental health professional may conduct a psychological evaluation to assess symptoms of substance-related disorders and determine the presence of co-occurring conditions.

Treatment:

1. Detoxification: A medically-supervised detox program can help manage withdrawal symptoms and reduce the risk of complications.
2. Medications: Medications such as methadone or buprenorphine may be prescribed to manage withdrawal symptoms and reduce cravings.
3. Behavioral therapy: Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and contingency management are effective behavioral therapies for treating substance use disorders.
4. Support groups: Joining a support group such as Narcotics Anonymous can provide a sense of community and support for individuals in recovery.
5. Lifestyle changes: Making healthy lifestyle changes such as regular exercise, healthy eating, and getting enough sleep can help manage withdrawal symptoms and reduce cravings.

It's important to note that diagnosis and treatment of substance-related disorders is a complex process and should be individualized based on the specific needs and circumstances of each patient.

The exact cause of depressive disorder is not fully understood, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and psychological factors. Some common risk factors for developing depressive disorder include:

* Family history of depression
* Traumatic events, such as abuse or loss
* Chronic stress
* Substance abuse
* Chronic illness or chronic pain

There are several different types of depressive disorders, including:

* Major depressive disorder (MDD): This is the most common type of depression, characterized by one or more major depressive episodes in a person's lifetime.
* Persistent depressive disorder (PDD): This type of depression is characterized by persistent, low-grade symptoms that last for two years or more.
* Bipolar disorder: This is a mood disorder that involves periods of both depression and mania or hypomania.
* Postpartum depression (PPD): This is a type of depression that occurs in women after childbirth.
* Severe depression: This is a severe and debilitating form of depression that can interfere with daily life and relationships.

Treatment for depressive disorder typically involves a combination of medication and therapy, such as antidepressant medications and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Other forms of therapy, such as psychodynamic therapy or interpersonal therapy, may also be effective. Lifestyle changes, such as regular exercise, healthy eating, and getting enough sleep, can also help manage symptoms.

It's important to seek professional help if you or someone you know is experiencing symptoms of depressive disorder. With proper treatment, many people are able to recover from depression and lead fulfilling lives.

* Emotional distress, such as anxiety, sadness, or irritability
* Difficulty sleeping or concentrating
* Changes in appetite or eating habits
* Social withdrawal or avoidance of social situations
* Physical symptoms, such as headaches or muscle tension

Adjustment disorder can be diagnosed by a mental health professional based on the presence of these symptoms and their duration. Treatment for adjustment disorder may involve therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or medication, such as antidepressants.

It is important to note that adjustment disorder is not a sign of weakness, and it is not something that a person can simply "snap out of." It is a real condition that requires professional treatment in order to recover fully. With appropriate treatment and support, individuals with adjustment disorder can learn to cope with the stresses in their life and regain their emotional balance.

There are several types of adjustment disorders, including:

* Adjustment disorder with anxiety: This type of adjustment disorder is characterized by excessive worry or fear about the future, and may include physical symptoms such as rapid heartbeat or shortness of breath.
* Adjustment disorder with depressed mood: This type of adjustment disorder is characterized by persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness, and may include changes in appetite or sleep patterns.
* Adjustment disorder with mixed anxiety and depressed mood: This type of adjustment disorder is characterized by both anxious and depressed symptoms, such as worrying about the future while also feeling sad or hopeless.

It is important to seek professional help if you are experiencing any of the symptoms of adjustment disorder, especially if they are interfering with your daily life or causing significant distress. With appropriate treatment, individuals with adjustment disorder can learn to cope with stress and regain their emotional balance.

It's important to note that while adjustment disorder is a real condition, it is not the same as depression or anxiety disorders. However, these conditions can often occur at the same time as adjustment disorder, and may need to be treated separately.

Treatment for adjustment disorder typically involves a combination of psychotherapy and medication, such as antidepressants or anti-anxiety drugs. Psychotherapy can help individuals with adjustment disorder learn new coping skills and strategies for managing stress, while medication can help reduce the symptoms of anxiety or depression.

In addition to professional treatment, there are several things that individuals with adjustment disorder can do at home to help manage their symptoms, such as:

* Practicing relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing or yoga
* Engaging in regular exercise, which can help reduce stress and improve mood
* Getting enough sleep and maintaining a healthy diet
* Avoiding alcohol and drugs, which can worsen symptoms of adjustment disorder
* Seeking support from friends, family, or support groups.

It's important to seek professional help if you are experiencing symptoms of adjustment disorder, as early treatment can help improve the chances of a successful recovery.

Some common types of anxiety disorders include:

1. Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD): Excessive and persistent worry about everyday things, even when there is no apparent reason to be concerned.
2. Panic Disorder: Recurring panic attacks, which are sudden feelings of intense fear or anxiety that can occur at any time, even when there is no obvious trigger.
3. Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD): Excessive and persistent fear of social or performance situations in which the individual is exposed to possible scrutiny by others.
4. Specific Phobias: Persistent and excessive fear of a specific object, situation, or activity that is out of proportion to the actual danger posed.
5. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD): Recurring, intrusive thoughts (obsessions) and repetitive behaviors (compulsions) that are distressing and disruptive to daily life.
6. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): Persistent symptoms of anxiety, fear, and avoidance after experiencing a traumatic event.

Anxiety disorders can be treated with a combination of psychotherapy, medication, or both, depending on the specific diagnosis and severity of symptoms. With appropriate treatment, many people with anxiety disorders are able to manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

1. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): A neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity.
2. Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD): A disorder marked by a pattern of negative, hostile, and defiant behavior toward authority figures.
3. Conduct Disorder (CD): A disorder characterized by a repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the child violates the rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms and rules.
4. Anxiety Disorders: A group of disorders that cause excessive fear, worry, or anxiety that interferes with daily life.
5. Mood Disorders: A group of disorders that affect a child's mood, causing them to feel sad, hopeless, or angry for extended periods of time.
6. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by difficulties with social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication, and repetitive behaviors.
7. Tourette Syndrome: A neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor tics and at least one vocal tic, often involving involuntary sounds or words.
8. Selective Mutism: A disorder characterized by a persistent and excessive fear of speaking in certain situations, such as school or social events.
9. Separation Anxiety Disorder: A disorder characterized by excessive and persistent anxiety related to separation from home or loved ones.
10. Disruptive Behavior Disorders: A group of disorders that include ODD, CD, and conduct disorder, which are characterized by a pattern of behavior that violates the rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms and rules.

These disorders can be challenging to diagnose and treat, but early identification and intervention can make a significant difference in a child's outcome. It is important for parents and caregivers to seek professional help if they notice any signs of these disorders in their child.

There are several types of mood disorders, including:

1. Major Depressive Disorder (MDD): This is a condition characterized by persistent feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and a loss of interest in activities that were once enjoyed. It can also involve changes in appetite, sleep patterns, and energy levels.
2. Bipolar Disorder: This is a condition that involves periods of mania or hypomania (elevated mood) alternating with episodes of depression.
3. Persistent Depressive Disorder (PDD): This is a condition characterized by persistent low mood, lasting for two years or more. It can also involve changes in appetite, sleep patterns, and energy levels.
4. Postpartum Depression (PPD): This is a condition that occurs in some women after childbirth, characterized by feelings of sadness, anxiety, and a lack of interest in activities.
5. Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD): This is a condition that occurs during the winter months, when there is less sunlight. It is characterized by feelings of sadness, lethargy, and a lack of energy.
6. Anxious Distress: This is a condition characterized by excessive worry, fear, and anxiety that interferes with daily life.
7. Adjustment Disorder: This is a condition that occurs when an individual experiences a significant change or stressor in their life, such as the loss of a loved one or a job change. It is characterized by feelings of sadness, anxiety, and a lack of interest in activities.
8. Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD): This is a condition that occurs in some women during the premenstrual phase of their menstrual cycle, characterized by feelings of sadness, anxiety, and a lack of energy.

Mood disorders can be treated with a combination of medication and therapy. Antidepressant medications, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), are commonly used to treat mood disorders. These medications can help relieve symptoms of depression and anxiety by altering the levels of neurotransmitters in the brain.

Therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal therapy (IPT), can also be effective in treating mood disorders. CBT helps individuals identify and change negative thought patterns and behaviors that contribute to their depression, while IPT focuses on improving communication skills and relationships with others.

In addition to medication and therapy, lifestyle changes such as regular exercise, healthy eating, and getting enough sleep can also be helpful in managing mood disorders. Support from family and friends, as well as self-care activities such as meditation and relaxation techniques, can also be beneficial.

It is important to seek professional help if symptoms of depression or anxiety persist or worsen over time. With appropriate treatment, individuals with mood disorders can experience significant improvement in their symptoms and overall quality of life.

Some common types of psychotic disorders include:

1. Schizophrenia: A chronic and severe mental disorder that affects how a person thinks, feels, and behaves. It can cause hallucinations, delusions, and disorganized thinking.
2. Bipolar Disorder: A mood disorder that causes extreme changes in mood, energy, and behavior. It can lead to manic or hypomanic episodes, as well as depression.
3. Schizoaffective Disorder: A mental disorder that combines symptoms of schizophrenia and a mood disorder. It can cause hallucinations, delusions, and mood swings.
4. Brief Psychotic Disorder: A short-term episode of psychosis that can be triggered by a stressful event. It can cause hallucinations, delusions, and a break from reality.
5. Postpartum Psychosis: A rare condition that occurs in some new mothers after childbirth. It can cause hallucinations, delusions, and a break from reality.
6. Drug-Induced Psychosis: A psychotic episode caused by taking certain medications or drugs. It can cause hallucinations, delusions, and a break from reality.
7. Alcohol-Related Psychosis: A psychotic episode caused by alcohol use disorder. It can cause hallucinations, delusions, and a break from reality.
8. Trauma-Related Psychosis: A psychotic episode caused by a traumatic event. It can cause hallucinations, delusions, and a break from reality.
9. Psychotic Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (NOS): A catch-all diagnosis for psychotic episodes that do not meet the criteria for any other specific psychotic disorder.

Symptoms of psychotic disorders can vary depending on the individual and the specific disorder. Common symptoms include:

1. Hallucinations: Seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there.
2. Delusions: False beliefs that are not based in reality.
3. Disorganized thinking and speech: Difficulty organizing thoughts and expressing them in a clear and logical manner.
4. Disorganized behavior: Incoherent or bizarre behavior, such as dressing inappropriately for the weather or neglecting personal hygiene.
5. Catatonia: A state of immobility or abnormal movement, such as rigidity or agitation.
6. Negative symptoms: A decrease in emotional expression or motivation, such as a flat affect or a lack of interest in activities.
7. Cognitive impairment: Difficulty with attention, memory, and other cognitive functions.
8. Social withdrawal: Avoidance of social interactions and relationships.
9. Lack of self-care: Neglecting personal hygiene, nutrition, and other basic needs.
10. Suicidal or homicidal ideation: Thoughts of harming oneself or others.

It's important to note that not everyone with schizophrenia will experience all of these symptoms, and some people may experience additional symptoms not listed here. Additionally, the severity and frequency of symptoms can vary widely from person to person. With proper treatment and support, many people with schizophrenia are able to manage their symptoms and lead fulfilling lives.

The burden of chronic diseases is significant, with over 70% of deaths worldwide attributed to them, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). In addition to the physical and emotional toll they take on individuals and their families, chronic diseases also pose a significant economic burden, accounting for a large proportion of healthcare expenditure.

In this article, we will explore the definition and impact of chronic diseases, as well as strategies for managing and living with them. We will also discuss the importance of early detection and prevention, as well as the role of healthcare providers in addressing the needs of individuals with chronic diseases.

What is a Chronic Disease?

A chronic disease is a condition that lasts for an extended period of time, often affecting daily life and activities. Unlike acute diseases, which have a specific beginning and end, chronic diseases are long-term and persistent. Examples of chronic diseases include:

1. Diabetes
2. Heart disease
3. Arthritis
4. Asthma
5. Cancer
6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
7. Chronic kidney disease (CKD)
8. Hypertension
9. Osteoporosis
10. Stroke

Impact of Chronic Diseases

The burden of chronic diseases is significant, with over 70% of deaths worldwide attributed to them, according to the WHO. In addition to the physical and emotional toll they take on individuals and their families, chronic diseases also pose a significant economic burden, accounting for a large proportion of healthcare expenditure.

Chronic diseases can also have a significant impact on an individual's quality of life, limiting their ability to participate in activities they enjoy and affecting their relationships with family and friends. Moreover, the financial burden of chronic diseases can lead to poverty and reduce economic productivity, thus having a broader societal impact.

Addressing Chronic Diseases

Given the significant burden of chronic diseases, it is essential that we address them effectively. This requires a multi-faceted approach that includes:

1. Lifestyle modifications: Encouraging healthy behaviors such as regular physical activity, a balanced diet, and smoking cessation can help prevent and manage chronic diseases.
2. Early detection and diagnosis: Identifying risk factors and detecting diseases early can help prevent or delay their progression.
3. Medication management: Effective medication management is crucial for controlling symptoms and slowing disease progression.
4. Multi-disciplinary care: Collaboration between healthcare providers, patients, and families is essential for managing chronic diseases.
5. Health promotion and disease prevention: Educating individuals about the risks of chronic diseases and promoting healthy behaviors can help prevent their onset.
6. Addressing social determinants of health: Social determinants such as poverty, education, and employment can have a significant impact on health outcomes. Addressing these factors is essential for reducing health disparities and improving overall health.
7. Investing in healthcare infrastructure: Investing in healthcare infrastructure, technology, and research is necessary to improve disease detection, diagnosis, and treatment.
8. Encouraging policy change: Policy changes can help create supportive environments for healthy behaviors and reduce the burden of chronic diseases.
9. Increasing public awareness: Raising public awareness about the risks and consequences of chronic diseases can help individuals make informed decisions about their health.
10. Providing support for caregivers: Chronic diseases can have a significant impact on family members and caregivers, so providing them with support is essential for improving overall health outcomes.

Conclusion

Chronic diseases are a major public health burden that affect millions of people worldwide. Addressing these diseases requires a multi-faceted approach that includes lifestyle changes, addressing social determinants of health, investing in healthcare infrastructure, encouraging policy change, increasing public awareness, and providing support for caregivers. By taking a comprehensive approach to chronic disease prevention and management, we can improve the health and well-being of individuals and communities worldwide.

The term "schizophrenia" was first used by the Swiss psychiatrist Eugen Bleuler in 1908 to describe the splitting of mental functions, which he believed was a key feature of the disorder. The word is derived from the Greek words "schizein," meaning "to split," and "phrenos," meaning "mind."

There are several subtypes of schizophrenia, including:

1. Paranoid Schizophrenia: Characterized by delusions of persecution and suspicion, and a tendency to be hostile and defensive.
2. Hallucinatory Schizophrenia: Characterized by hearing voices or seeing things that are not there.
3. Disorganized Schizophrenia: Characterized by disorganized thinking and behavior, and a lack of motivation or interest in activities.
4. Catatonic Schizophrenia: Characterized by immobility, mutism, and other unusual movements or postures.
5. Undifferentiated Schizophrenia: Characterized by a combination of symptoms from the above subtypes.

The exact cause of schizophrenia is still not fully understood, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and neurochemical factors. It is important to note that schizophrenia is not caused by poor parenting or a person's upbringing.

There are several risk factors for developing schizophrenia, including:

1. Genetics: A person with a family history of schizophrenia is more likely to develop the disorder.
2. Brain chemistry: Imbalances in neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin have been linked to schizophrenia.
3. Prenatal factors: Factors such as maternal malnutrition or exposure to certain viruses during pregnancy may increase the risk of schizophrenia in offspring.
4. Childhood trauma: Traumatic events during childhood, such as abuse or neglect, have been linked to an increased risk of developing schizophrenia.
5. Substance use: Substance use has been linked to an increased risk of developing schizophrenia, particularly cannabis and other psychotic substances.

There is no cure for schizophrenia, but treatment can help manage symptoms and improve quality of life. Treatment options include:

1. Medications: Antipsychotic medications are the primary treatment for schizophrenia. They can help reduce positive symptoms such as hallucinations and delusions, and negative symptoms such as a lack of motivation or interest in activities.
2. Therapy: Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and other forms of talk therapy can help individuals with schizophrenia manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.
3. Social support: Support from family, friends, and support groups can be an important part of the treatment plan for individuals with schizophrenia.
4. Self-care: Engaging in activities that bring pleasure and fulfillment, such as hobbies or exercise, can help individuals with schizophrenia improve their overall well-being.

It is important to note that schizophrenia is a complex condition, and treatment should be tailored to the individual's specific needs and circumstances. With appropriate treatment and support, many people with schizophrenia are able to lead fulfilling lives and achieve their goals.

HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection is a condition in which the body is infected with HIV, a type of retrovirus that attacks the body's immune system. HIV infection can lead to AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), a condition in which the immune system is severely damaged and the body is unable to fight off infections and diseases.

There are several ways that HIV can be transmitted, including:

1. Sexual contact with an infected person
2. Sharing of needles or other drug paraphernalia with an infected person
3. Mother-to-child transmission during pregnancy, childbirth, or breastfeeding
4. Blood transfusions ( although this is rare in developed countries due to screening processes)
5. Organ transplantation (again, rare)

The symptoms of HIV infection can be mild at first and may not appear until several years after infection. These symptoms can include:

1. Fever
2. Fatigue
3. Swollen glands in the neck, armpits, and groin
4. Rash
5. Muscle aches and joint pain
6. Night sweats
7. Diarrhea
8. Weight loss

If left untreated, HIV infection can progress to AIDS, which is a life-threatening condition that can cause a wide range of symptoms, including:

1. Opportunistic infections (such as pneumocystis pneumonia)
2. Cancer (such as Kaposi's sarcoma)
3. Wasting syndrome
4. Neurological problems (such as dementia and seizures)

HIV infection is diagnosed through a combination of blood tests and physical examination. Treatment typically involves antiretroviral therapy (ART), which is a combination of medications that work together to suppress the virus and slow the progression of the disease.

Prevention methods for HIV infection include:

1. Safe sex practices, such as using condoms and dental dams
2. Avoiding sharing needles or other drug-injecting equipment
3. Avoiding mother-to-child transmission during pregnancy, childbirth, or breastfeeding
4. Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), which is a short-term treatment that can prevent infection after potential exposure to the virus
5. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), which is a daily medication that can prevent infection in people who are at high risk of being exposed to the virus.

It's important to note that HIV infection is manageable with proper treatment and care, and that people living with HIV can lead long and healthy lives. However, it's important to be aware of the risks and take steps to prevent transmission.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5) defines alcohol use disorder as a maladaptive pattern of alcohol use that leads to clinically significant impairment or distress in at least three of the following areas:

1. Drinking more or for longer than intended.
2. Desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control drinking.
3. Spending a lot of time drinking or recovering from its effects.
4. Craving or strong desire to drink.
5. Drinking interferes with work, school, or home responsibilities.
6. Continuing to drink despite social or personal problems caused by alcohol use.
7. Giving up important activities in order to drink.
8. Drinking in hazardous situations (e.g., while driving).
9. Continued drinking despite physical or psychological problems caused or worsened by alcohol use.
10. Developing tolerance (i.e., needing to drink more to achieve the desired effect).
11. Experiencing withdrawal symptoms when alcohol use is stopped or reduced.

The severity of alcoholism is categorized into three subtypes based on the number of criteria met: mild, moderate, and severe. Treatment for alcoholism typically involves a combination of behavioral interventions (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing) and medications (e.g., disulfiram, naltrexone, acamprosate) to manage withdrawal symptoms and cravings.

In conclusion, alcoholism is a chronic and often progressive disease characterized by excessive and compulsive consumption of alcohol despite negative consequences to physical and mental health, relationships, and social functioning. The diagnostic criteria for alcoholism include a combination of physiological, behavioral, and subjective symptoms, and treatment typically involves a combination of behavioral interventions and medications to manage withdrawal symptoms and cravings.

Some examples of central auditory diseases include:

1. Central auditory processing disorder (CAPD): A condition where the brain has difficulty processing sounds, leading to difficulties with speech and language development, reading, and social interactions.
2. Auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD): A condition that affects the transmission of sound from the inner ear to the brain, leading to difficulties with hearing and understanding speech.
3. Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM): A condition that causes chronic inflammation and infection of the middle ear, which can lead to hearing loss and difficulty processing sound.
4. Meniere's disease: A condition that affects the inner ear and causes vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss.
5. Acoustic neuroma: A benign tumor that grows on the nerve that connects the inner ear to the brain, leading to hearing loss, tinnitus, and balance difficulties.
6. Stroke or traumatic brain injury: These conditions can damage the auditory system and cause hearing loss or difficulty understanding speech.
7. Cochlear implant complications: Complications related to the surgical implantation of a cochlear implant, such as infection or device malfunction, can affect the central auditory system.
8. Chronic tinnitus: A condition characterized by persistent ringing or other sounds in the ears that can lead to hearing loss and difficulty understanding speech.
9. Ototoxicity: Exposure to certain medications or chemicals can damage the inner ear and cause hearing loss or tinnitus.
10. Meningitis or encephalitis: Infections of the brain and its membranes can affect the auditory system and cause hearing loss, tinnitus, and balance difficulties.

These are just a few examples of central auditory diseases. The diagnosis and treatment of these conditions typically involve a team of healthcare professionals, including otolaryngologists (ENT specialists), neurologists, audiologists, and speech-language pathologists.

Acute wounds and injuries are those that occur suddenly and heal within a relatively short period of time, usually within a few days or weeks. Examples of acute wounds include cuts, scrapes, and burns. Chronic wounds and injuries, on the other hand, are those that persist over a longer period of time and may not heal properly, leading to long-term complications. Examples of chronic wounds include diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, and chronic back pain.

Wounds and injuries can be caused by a variety of factors, including accidents, sports injuries, violence, and medical conditions such as diabetes or circulatory problems. Treatment for wounds and injuries depends on the severity of the injury and may include cleaning and dressing the wound, applying antibiotics, immobilizing broken bones, and providing pain management. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to repair damaged tissues or restore function.

Preventive measures for wounds and injuries include wearing appropriate protective gear during activities such as sports or work, following safety protocols to avoid accidents, maintaining proper hygiene and nutrition to prevent infection, and seeking medical attention promptly if an injury occurs.

Overall, wounds and injuries can have a significant impact on an individual's quality of life, and it is important to seek medical attention promptly if symptoms persist or worsen over time. Proper treatment and management of wounds and injuries can help to promote healing, reduce the risk of complications, and improve long-term outcomes.

The exact cause of MDD is not known, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and psychological factors. Some risk factors for developing MDD include:

* Family history of depression or other mental health conditions
* History of trauma or stressful life events
* Chronic illness or chronic pain
* Substance abuse or addiction
* Personality traits such as low self-esteem or perfectionism

Symptoms of MDD can vary from person to person, but typically include:

* Persistent feelings of sadness, emptiness, or hopelessness
* Loss of interest in activities that were once enjoyed
* Changes in appetite or sleep patterns
* Fatigue or loss of energy
* Difficulty concentrating or making decisions
* Thoughts of death or suicide

MDD can be diagnosed by a mental health professional, such as a psychiatrist or psychologist, based on the symptoms and their duration. Treatment typically involves a combination of medication and therapy, and may include:

* Antidepressant medications to relieve symptoms of depression
* Psychotherapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), to help identify and change negative thought patterns and behaviors
* Interpersonal therapy (IPT) to improve communication skills and relationships with others
* Other forms of therapy, such as mindfulness-based therapies or relaxation techniques

It is important to seek professional help if symptoms of depression are severe or persistent, as MDD can have a significant impact on daily life and can increase the risk of suicide. With appropriate treatment, however, many people with MDD are able to manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

Bipolar Disorder Types:

There are several types of bipolar disorder, including:

1. Bipolar I Disorder: One or more manic episodes with or without depressive episodes.
2. Bipolar II Disorder: At least one major depressive episode and one hypomanic episode (a less severe form of mania).
3. Cyclothymic Disorder: Periods of hypomania and depression that last at least 2 years.
4. Other Specified Bipolar and Related Disorders: Symptoms that do not meet the criteria for any of the above types.
5. Unspecified Bipolar and Related Disorders: Symptoms that do not meet the criteria for any of the above types, but there is still a noticeable impact on daily life.

Bipolar Disorder Causes:

The exact cause of bipolar disorder is unknown, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and neurobiological factors. Some potential causes include:

1. Genetics: Individuals with a family history of bipolar disorder are more likely to develop the condition.
2. Brain structure and function: Imbalances in neurotransmitters and abnormalities in brain structure have been found in individuals with bipolar disorder.
3. Hormonal imbalances: Imbalances in hormones such as serotonin, dopamine, and cortisol have been linked to bipolar disorder.
4. Life events: Traumatic events or significant changes in life circumstances can trigger episodes of mania or depression.
5. Medical conditions: Certain medical conditions, such as multiple sclerosis or stroke, can increase the risk of developing bipolar disorder.

Bipolar Disorder Symptoms:

The symptoms of bipolar disorder can vary depending on the individual and the specific type of episode they are experiencing. Some common symptoms include:

1. Manic episodes: Increased energy, reduced need for sleep, impulsivity, and grandiosity.
2. Depressive episodes: Feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and loss of interest in activities.
3. Mixed episodes: A combination of manic and depressive symptoms.
4. Hypomanic episodes: Less severe than full-blown mania, but still disrupt daily life.
5. Rapid cycling: Experiencing four or more episodes within a year.
6. Melancholic features: Feeling sad, hopeless, and worthless.
7. Atypical features: Experiencing mania without elevated mood or grandiosity.
8. Mood instability: Rapid changes in mood throughout the day.
9. Anxiety symptoms: Restlessness, feeling on edge, and difficulty concentrating.
10. Sleep disturbances: Difficulty falling or staying asleep, or oversleeping.
11. Substance abuse: Using drugs or alcohol to cope with symptoms.
12. Suicidal thoughts or behaviors: Having thoughts of harming oneself or taking actions that could lead to death.

It's important to note that not everyone with bipolar disorder will experience all of these symptoms, and some people may experience additional symptoms not listed here. Additionally, the severity and frequency of symptoms can vary widely between individuals.

Neoplasm refers to an abnormal growth of cells that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Neoplasms can occur in any part of the body and can affect various organs and tissues. The term "neoplasm" is often used interchangeably with "tumor," but while all tumors are neoplasms, not all neoplasms are tumors.

Types of Neoplasms

There are many different types of neoplasms, including:

1. Carcinomas: These are malignant tumors that arise in the epithelial cells lining organs and glands. Examples include breast cancer, lung cancer, and colon cancer.
2. Sarcomas: These are malignant tumors that arise in connective tissue, such as bone, cartilage, and fat. Examples include osteosarcoma (bone cancer) and soft tissue sarcoma.
3. Lymphomas: These are cancers of the immune system, specifically affecting the lymph nodes and other lymphoid tissues. Examples include Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
4. Leukemias: These are cancers of the blood and bone marrow that affect the white blood cells. Examples include acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).
5. Melanomas: These are malignant tumors that arise in the pigment-producing cells called melanocytes. Examples include skin melanoma and eye melanoma.

Causes and Risk Factors of Neoplasms

The exact causes of neoplasms are not fully understood, but there are several known risk factors that can increase the likelihood of developing a neoplasm. These include:

1. Genetic predisposition: Some people may be born with genetic mutations that increase their risk of developing certain types of neoplasms.
2. Environmental factors: Exposure to certain environmental toxins, such as radiation and certain chemicals, can increase the risk of developing a neoplasm.
3. Infection: Some neoplasms are caused by viruses or bacteria. For example, human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common cause of cervical cancer.
4. Lifestyle factors: Factors such as smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, and a poor diet can increase the risk of developing certain types of neoplasms.
5. Family history: A person's risk of developing a neoplasm may be higher if they have a family history of the condition.

Signs and Symptoms of Neoplasms

The signs and symptoms of neoplasms can vary depending on the type of cancer and where it is located in the body. Some common signs and symptoms include:

1. Unusual lumps or swelling
2. Pain
3. Fatigue
4. Weight loss
5. Change in bowel or bladder habits
6. Unexplained bleeding
7. Coughing up blood
8. Hoarseness or a persistent cough
9. Changes in appetite or digestion
10. Skin changes, such as a new mole or a change in the size or color of an existing mole.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Neoplasms

The diagnosis of a neoplasm usually involves a combination of physical examination, imaging tests (such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans), and biopsy. A biopsy involves removing a small sample of tissue from the suspected tumor and examining it under a microscope for cancer cells.

The treatment of neoplasms depends on the type, size, location, and stage of the cancer, as well as the patient's overall health. Some common treatments include:

1. Surgery: Removing the tumor and surrounding tissue can be an effective way to treat many types of cancer.
2. Chemotherapy: Using drugs to kill cancer cells can be effective for some types of cancer, especially if the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.
3. Radiation therapy: Using high-energy radiation to kill cancer cells can be effective for some types of cancer, especially if the cancer is located in a specific area of the body.
4. Immunotherapy: Boosting the body's immune system to fight cancer can be an effective treatment for some types of cancer.
5. Targeted therapy: Using drugs or other substances to target specific molecules on cancer cells can be an effective treatment for some types of cancer.

Prevention of Neoplasms

While it is not always possible to prevent neoplasms, there are several steps that can reduce the risk of developing cancer. These include:

1. Avoiding exposure to known carcinogens (such as tobacco smoke and radiation)
2. Maintaining a healthy diet and lifestyle
3. Getting regular exercise
4. Not smoking or using tobacco products
5. Limiting alcohol consumption
6. Getting vaccinated against certain viruses that are associated with cancer (such as human papillomavirus, or HPV)
7. Participating in screening programs for early detection of cancer (such as mammograms for breast cancer and colonoscopies for colon cancer)
8. Avoiding excessive exposure to sunlight and using protective measures such as sunscreen and hats to prevent skin cancer.

It's important to note that not all cancers can be prevented, and some may be caused by factors that are not yet understood or cannot be controlled. However, by taking these steps, individuals can reduce their risk of developing cancer and improve their overall health and well-being.

1. Asbestosis: a lung disease caused by inhaling asbestos fibers.
2. Carpal tunnel syndrome: a nerve disorder caused by repetitive motion and pressure on the wrist.
3. Mesothelioma: a type of cancer caused by exposure to asbestos.
4. Pneumoconiosis: a lung disease caused by inhaling dust from mining or other heavy industries.
5. Repetitive strain injuries: injuries caused by repetitive motions, such as typing or using vibrating tools.
6. Skin conditions: such as skin irritation and dermatitis caused by exposure to chemicals or other substances in the workplace.
7. Hearing loss: caused by loud noises in the workplace.
8. Back injuries: caused by lifting, bending, or twisting.
9. Respiratory problems: such as asthma and other breathing difficulties caused by exposure to chemicals or dust in the workplace.
10. Cancer: caused by exposure to carcinogens such as radiation, certain chemicals, or heavy metals in the workplace.

Occupational diseases can be difficult to diagnose and treat, as they often develop gradually over time and may not be immediately attributed to the work environment. In some cases, these diseases may not appear until years after exposure has ended. It is important for workers to be aware of the potential health risks associated with their job and take steps to protect themselves, such as wearing protective gear, following safety protocols, and seeking regular medical check-ups. Employers also have a responsibility to provide a safe work environment and follow strict regulations to prevent the spread of occupational diseases.

Postpartum depression is estimated to affect up to 15% of new mothers, although the actual number may be higher due to underreporting. It usually develops within the first few months after delivery, but can sometimes last longer.

The exact cause of postpartum depression is not known, but it is believed to be related to changes in hormone levels and other physical and emotional factors associated with childbirth. Risk factors include a history of depression or anxiety, lack of support, and stressful life events.

Symptoms of postpartum depression can vary from mild to severe and may include:

* Persistent feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and helplessness
* Loss of interest in activities that were once enjoyed
* Changes in appetite and sleep patterns
* Difficulty concentrating or making decisions
* Thoughts of harming oneself or the baby

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, it is important to seek medical help as soon as possible. Postpartum depression can be treated with therapy, medication, or a combination of both. With proper treatment, most women with postpartum depression can recover and go on to lead healthy and fulfilling lives.

STDs can cause a range of symptoms, including genital itching, burning during urination, unusual discharge, and painful sex. Some STDs can also lead to long-term health problems, such as infertility, chronic pain, and an increased risk of certain types of cancer.

STDs are usually diagnosed through a physical exam, blood tests, or other diagnostic tests. Treatment for STDs varies depending on the specific infection and can include antibiotics, antiviral medication, or other therapies. It's important to practice safe sex, such as using condoms, to reduce the risk of getting an STD.

Some of the most common STDs include:

* Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that can cause genital itching, burning during urination, and unusual discharge.
* Gonorrhea: A bacterial infection that can cause similar symptoms to chlamydia.
* Syphilis: A bacterial infection that can cause a painless sore on the genitals, followed by a rash and other symptoms.
* Herpes: A viral infection that can cause genital itching, burning during urination, and painful sex.
* HPV: A viral infection that can cause genital warts and increase the risk of cervical cancer.
* HIV/AIDS: A viral infection that can cause a range of symptoms, including fever, fatigue, and weight loss, and can lead to AIDS if left untreated.

It's important to note that some STDs can be spread through non-sexual contact, such as sharing needles or mother-to-child transmission during childbirth. It's also important to know that many STDs can be asymptomatic, meaning you may not have any symptoms even if you are infected.

If you think you may have been exposed to an STD, it's important to get tested as soon as possible. Many STDs can be easily treated with antibiotics or other medications, but if left untreated, they can lead to serious complications and long-term health problems.

It's also important to practice safe sex to reduce the risk of getting an STD. This includes using condoms, as well as getting vaccinated against HPV and Hepatitis B, which are both common causes of STDs.

In addition to getting tested and practicing safe sex, it's important to be aware of your sexual health and the risks associated with sex. This includes being aware of any symptoms you may experience, as well as being aware of your partner's sexual history and any STDs they may have. By being informed and proactive about your sexual health, you can help reduce the risk of getting an STD and maintain good sexual health.

Combat disorders refer to a range of mental health conditions that can develop as a result of exposure to traumatic events during military service. These disorders can include post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety disorders, depression, substance abuse, and other conditions that can impact an individual's ability to function in daily life.

Combat disorders can be caused by a variety of factors, including the experience of combat itself, exposure to violence and trauma, and the stress of military service. These disorders can have a significant impact on an individual's quality of life, as well as their relationships and ability to perform their duties.

Treatment for combat disorders often involves a combination of psychotherapy and medication, and may also involve other forms of therapy such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). It is important for individuals with combat disorders to seek medical attention if they are experiencing symptoms, as early treatment can help to improve outcomes and reduce the risk of long-term complications.

Examples of Combat Disorders

Some examples of combat disorders include:

1. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): This condition can develop after an individual experiences a traumatic event, such as combat or sexual assault. Symptoms may include flashbacks, nightmares, anxiety, and avoidance of triggers that remind the individual of the traumatic event.
2. Anxiety disorders: These conditions can cause excessive worry, fear, or anxiety that interferes with daily life. Examples include generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder.
3. Depression: This condition can cause feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and a loss of interest in activities that were once enjoyed. It can also lead to changes in appetite, sleep patterns, and energy levels.
4. Substance abuse: This can include the misuse of alcohol or drugs as a way to cope with stress or trauma. Substance abuse can have serious consequences for an individual's physical and mental health, relationships, and career.
5. Traumatic brain injury (TBI): This occurs when the brain is injured as a result of a blow or jolt to the head, such as from an explosion or a fall. Symptoms may include memory problems, difficulty with concentration, and changes in mood or behavior.

Effects of Combat Disorders on Individuals and Families

Combat disorders can have a significant impact on individuals and their families. Some of the effects may include:

1. Emotional distress: Combat disorders can cause significant emotional distress, including anxiety, depression, and anger. This can affect not only the individual but also their family members and loved ones.
2. Relationship problems: The symptoms of combat disorders can strain relationships with family and friends, leading to feelings of isolation and loneliness.
3. Career difficulties: Combat disorders can make it difficult for individuals to maintain a career or job, leading to financial stress and instability.
4. Social challenges: The symptoms of combat disorders can make social interactions difficult, leading to feelings of embarrassment and stigma.
5. Health problems: Combat disorders can increase the risk of physical health problems, such as chronic pain, sleep disturbances, and gastrointestinal issues.
6. Financial stress: The cost of treatment and lost income due to career difficulties can lead to financial stress and instability for individuals and their families.
7. Legal issues: Some combat disorders, such as PTSD, may be accompanied by legal issues related to criminal behavior or other forms of self-destructive behavior.
8. Stigma: Combat disorders can carry a stigma, leading to feelings of shame and guilt for individuals and their families.
9. Lack of support: Some combat disorders may not receive sufficient support from society or the medical community, leading to feelings of isolation and neglect.

Treatment Options for Combat Disorders

There are a variety of treatment options available for combat disorders, including:

1. Medications: Medications such as antidepressants and anti-anxiety drugs may be prescribed to help manage the symptoms of combat disorders.
2. Psychotherapy: Talk therapies such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic therapy can be effective in treating combat disorders.
3. Group therapy: Group therapy can provide a sense of community and support for individuals with combat disorders.
4. Family therapy: Family therapy can help family members understand the combat disorder and learn how to support their loved one.
5. Alternative therapies: Alternative therapies such as acupuncture, yoga, and meditation may be helpful in managing the symptoms of combat disorders.
6. Residential treatment: In severe cases, residential treatment may be necessary to provide a structured and supportive environment for individuals with combat disorders.
7. Support groups: Joining a support group can provide a sense of community and understanding for individuals with combat disorders.

Conclusion

Combat disorders are a serious issue that can have long-lasting effects on the physical, emotional, and financial well-being of those who serve in the military. It is important to recognize the signs and symptoms of combat disorders and seek treatment as soon as possible. With proper treatment and support, individuals with combat disorders can lead fulfilling lives and achieve their goals.

1. Predominantly Inattentive Type: This type is characterized by symptoms of inattention, such as difficulty paying attention to details or making careless mistakes. Individuals with this type may have trouble sustaining their focus during tasks and may appear daydreamy or easily distracted.
2. Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive Type: This type is characterized by symptoms of hyperactivity, such as fidgeting, restlessness, and an inability to sit still. Individuals with this type may also exhibit impulsivity, such as interrupting others or speaking out of turn.
3. Combined Type: This type is characterized by both symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity.

The symptoms of ADHD can vary from person to person and may change over time. Some common symptoms include:

* Difficulty sustaining attention during tasks
* Easily distracted or interrupted
* Difficulty completing tasks
* Forgetfulness
* Fidgeting or restlessness
* Difficulty sitting still or remaining quiet
* Interrupting others or speaking out of turn
* Impulsivity, such as acting without thinking

The exact cause of ADHD is not fully understood, but research suggests that it may be related to differences in brain structure and function, as well as genetic factors. There is no cure for ADHD, but medication and behavioral therapy can help manage symptoms and improve functioning.

ADHD can have significant impacts on daily life, including academic and social difficulties. However, with proper treatment and support, many individuals with ADHD are able to lead successful and fulfilling lives.

Conduct disorder is a mental health condition that is characterized by a pattern of behavior in children and adolescents that violates the rights of others, as well as age-appropriate societal norms and rules. This condition can involve behaviors such as aggression to people or animals, destruction of property, deceitfulness, theft, and serious violations of rules.

Conduct disorder is also characterized by a lack of empathy, guilt, or remorse for one's actions, as well as a tendency towards impulsivity.

Symptoms of conduct disorder can include:

* Aggression to people or animals
* Destruction of property
* Deceitfulness
* Theft
* Serious violations of rules
* Disrespect for authority figures
* Lack of empathy, guilt, or remorse for one's actions
* Impulsivity
* Difficulty with self-control
* Antisocial behavior

Conduct disorder is diagnosed based on a combination of the child's symptoms and behavior, as well as an evaluation of their social and family history. Treatment for conduct disorder typically involves a combination of psychotherapy and medication.

Psychotherapy may involve:

* Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to help the child identify and change negative thought patterns and behaviors
* Family therapy to address any family dynamics that may be contributing to the child's behavior
* Social skills training to help the child learn appropriate social interactions and communication skills.

Medications that may be used to treat conduct disorder include:

* Stimulants, such as Ritalin (methylphenidate), to help with impulse control and attention
* Antipsychotics, such as Risperdal (risperidone), to help with aggression and irritability
* Antidepressants, such as Prozac (fluoxetine), to help with mood regulation.

It's important to note that conduct disorder is a mental health condition that can have serious consequences if left untreated. Children with conduct disorder are at an increased risk of developing other mental health conditions, such as depression and anxiety, as well as engaging in risky behaviors, such as substance abuse and delinquency. With appropriate treatment and support, however, it is possible for children with conduct disorder to learn healthy coping mechanisms, improve their social skills, and lead successful lives as adults.

The three main types of stress disorders, traumatic are:

1. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) - This is a condition that can develop after a person experiences a traumatic event. Symptoms may include flashbacks, nightmares, anxiety, avoidance of triggers that remind the person of the event, and changes in emotional reactivity and arousal.
2. Acute stress disorder (ASD) - This is a condition that can develop within one month of a traumatic event. Symptoms are similar to those of PTSD, but they are more severe and last for longer than two days.
3. Adjustment disorder (AD) - This is a condition that can develop after a person experiences a stressful event, such as the loss of a loved one or a job. Symptoms may include anxiety, sadness, and changes in behavior and mood.

Traumatic stress disorders can be treated with psychotherapy, medication, or a combination of both. The goal of treatment is to help the person manage their symptoms and improve their ability to function in daily life.

There are several types of diabetes mellitus, including:

1. Type 1 DM: This is an autoimmune condition in which the body's immune system attacks and destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, resulting in a complete deficiency of insulin production. It typically develops in childhood or adolescence, and patients with this condition require lifelong insulin therapy.
2. Type 2 DM: This is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for around 90% of all cases. It is caused by a combination of insulin resistance (where the body's cells do not respond properly to insulin) and impaired insulin secretion. It is often associated with obesity, physical inactivity, and a diet high in sugar and unhealthy fats.
3. Gestational DM: This type of diabetes develops during pregnancy, usually in the second or third trimester. Hormonal changes and insulin resistance can cause blood sugar levels to rise, putting both the mother and baby at risk.
4. LADA (Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults): This is a form of type 1 DM that develops in adults, typically after the age of 30. It shares features with both type 1 and type 2 DM.
5. MODY (Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young): This is a rare form of diabetes caused by genetic mutations that affect insulin production. It typically develops in young adulthood and can be managed with lifestyle changes and/or medication.

The symptoms of diabetes mellitus can vary depending on the severity of the condition, but may include:

1. Increased thirst and urination
2. Fatigue
3. Blurred vision
4. Cuts or bruises that are slow to heal
5. Tingling or numbness in hands and feet
6. Recurring skin, gum, or bladder infections
7. Flu-like symptoms such as weakness, dizziness, and stomach pain
8. Dark, velvety skin patches (acanthosis nigricans)
9. Yellowish color of the skin and eyes (jaundice)
10. Delayed healing of cuts and wounds

If left untreated, diabetes mellitus can lead to a range of complications, including:

1. Heart disease and stroke
2. Kidney damage and failure
3. Nerve damage (neuropathy)
4. Eye damage (retinopathy)
5. Foot damage (neuropathic ulcers)
6. Cognitive impairment and dementia
7. Increased risk of infections and other diseases, such as pneumonia, gum disease, and urinary tract infections.

It is important to note that not all individuals with diabetes will experience these complications, and that proper management of the condition can greatly reduce the risk of developing these complications.

In the medical field, emergencies are situations that require immediate medical attention to prevent serious harm or death. These situations may include:

1. Life-threatening injuries, such as gunshot wounds, stab wounds, or severe head trauma.
2. Severe illnesses, such as heart attacks, strokes, or respiratory distress.
3. Acute and severe pain, such as from a broken bone or severe burns.
4. Mental health emergencies, such as suicidal thoughts or behaviors, or psychosis.
5. Obstetric emergencies, such as preterm labor or placental abruption.
6. Pediatric emergencies, such as respiratory distress or dehydration in infants and children.
7. Trauma, such as from a car accident or fall.
8. Natural disasters, such as earthquakes, hurricanes, or floods.
9. Environmental emergencies, such as carbon monoxide poisoning or exposure to toxic substances.
10. Mass casualty incidents, such as a terrorist attack or plane crash.

In all of these situations, prompt and appropriate medical care is essential to prevent further harm and save lives. Emergency responders, including paramedics, emergency medical technicians (EMTs), and other healthcare providers, are trained to quickly assess the situation, provide immediate care, and transport patients to a hospital if necessary.

The term "somatoform" refers to the fact that these disorders involve somatic (physical) symptoms, rather than psychotic or mood-related symptoms. Somatoform disorders can include conditions such as:

* Somatization disorder: characterized by multiple physical symptoms that are not easily explained by a medical condition, and which cause significant distress or impairment in daily life.
* Hypochondriasis: excessive preoccupation with the fear of having or acquiring a serious illness, despite medical reassurance that no such illness exists.
* Conversion disorder: characterized by physical symptoms that are thought to be related to an unconscious psychological conflict or stress.
* Factitious disorder: characterized by intentionally producing or feigning physical symptoms in order to gain attention, sympathy, or other benefits.

Somatoform disorders can be challenging to diagnose and treat, as they often involve complex interplay between psychological and physical factors. Treatment may involve a combination of psychotherapy and medication, and may require a multidisciplinary approach involving mental health professionals and medical specialists.

1. Somatic symptom disorder: This condition is characterized by persistent and excessive thoughts or concerns about physical symptoms, such as pain or gastrointestinal issues, despite medical evaluation and reassurance that no underlying medical condition exists.
2. Illness anxiety disorder: Formerly known as hypochondriasis, this disorder is characterized by an excessive preoccupation with the fear of having or acquiring a serious illness, despite evidence to the contrary.
3. Conversion disorder: This condition is characterized by symptoms that are not readily explainable by a medical or neurological condition, such as paralysis, blindness, or difficulty speaking. The symptoms are thought to be a manifestation of psychological conflicts or stressors.
4. Factitious disorder: Also known as Munchausen syndrome, this condition is characterized by the deliberate production or feigning of symptoms in order to gain attention, sympathy, or other forms of support.
5. Hypochondriasis: This condition is characterized by an excessive preoccupation with the fear of having or acquiring a serious illness, despite evidence to the contrary.
6. Health anxiety disorder: This condition is characterized by an excessive preoccupation with the fear of having or acquiring a serious illness, despite evidence to the contrary.
7. Medical phobia: This condition is characterized by an excessive fear of medical procedures or healthcare settings, which can lead to avoidance of necessary medical care and potential harm as a result.
8. Pain disorder: This condition is characterized by persistent and excessive pain that cannot be fully explained by a medical condition or injury. The pain can have a significant impact on an individual's daily life and functioning.
9. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: These are seizures that are not caused by a medical or neurological condition, but rather by psychological factors such as stress, anxiety, or other forms of emotional distress.
10. Somatic symptom disorder: This condition is characterized by persistent and excessive preoccupation with physical symptoms, such as pain, fatigue, or gastrointestinal issues, despite medical evidence that the symptoms are not caused by a medical condition or injury.

It's important to note that while these conditions are distinct from one another, they can sometimes overlap or co-occur, and it may be necessary to rule out other potential causes of the patient's symptoms before making a diagnosis. Additionally, individuals with mental health conditions may be at higher risk for developing somatoform disorders due to the emotional distress and maladaptive coping strategies that can accompany these conditions.

1. Preeclampsia: A condition characterized by high blood pressure during pregnancy, which can lead to complications such as stroke or premature birth.
2. Gestational diabetes: A type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy, which can cause complications for both the mother and the baby if left untreated.
3. Placenta previa: A condition in which the placenta is located low in the uterus, covering the cervix, which can cause bleeding and other complications.
4. Premature labor: Labor that occurs before 37 weeks of gestation, which can increase the risk of health problems for the baby.
5. Fetal distress: A condition in which the fetus is not getting enough oxygen, which can lead to serious health problems or even death.
6. Postpartum hemorrhage: Excessive bleeding after delivery, which can be life-threatening if left untreated.
7. Cesarean section (C-section) complications: Complications that may arise during a C-section, such as infection or bleeding.
8. Maternal infections: Infections that the mother may contract during pregnancy or childbirth, such as group B strep or urinary tract infections.
9. Preterm birth: Birth that occurs before 37 weeks of gestation, which can increase the risk of health problems for the baby.
10. Chromosomal abnormalities: Genetic disorders that may affect the baby's growth and development, such as Down syndrome or Turner syndrome.

It is important for pregnant women to receive regular prenatal care to monitor for any potential complications and ensure a healthy pregnancy outcome. In some cases, pregnancy complications may require medical interventions, such as hospitalization or surgery, to ensure the safety of both the mother and the baby.

... (s) may refer to: Community mental health service Psychiatric hospital Psychiatric and mental health ... Department of Health and Human Services California Mental Health Services Act Services for mental disorders This disambiguation ... NHS-provided services in the United Kingdom Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), a branch of the ... page lists articles associated with the title Mental health service. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change ...
... improving mental health coverage of community mental health services, adding rehabilitative services, and expanding clinical ... Center for Mental Health Services [1] (CMHS), also known as community mental health teams (CMHT) in the United Kingdom, support ... community mental health centers, and self-help groups for mental health. The services may be provided by government ... the number of patients diagnosed with a mental health or substance abuse disorder receiving services at community mental health ...
"St Patrick's Mental Health Services launches first mental health EHR in Ireland". Digital Health. 23 November 2017. Retrieved 2 ... Patrick's Mental Health Services is a mental health organisation in Ireland, with over 700 staff members delivering 12% of the ... "Our services". St Patrick's Mental Health Services. Retrieved 6 May 2018. "Getting peace of mind". Irish Times. 7 October 2008 ... "St Patrick's Mental Health Services launches Patient Portal". 7 July 2020. Official Site (Articles with ISNI identifiers, ...
Mental Health Services Act (MHSA): Home Page', California Department of Mental Health www.mhsoac.ca.gov - 'Mental Health ... "Mental Health Services Act" (PDF). California Department of Mental Health. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 January 2012 ... These include the State Department of Mental Health (DMH) and the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability ... a mental health program specialist at San Mateo County Mental Health Services. Karen Henry (Republican), 61, of Granite Bay, a ...
"Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services - Our Mission". "Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services - Faith and Mental ... Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services Grand Rapids, MI. Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services Pine Rest CPE site Pine ... Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services is a psychiatric hospital and behavioral health provider, with the main treatment ... Services at the Redwood Unit are dedicated to the treatment and care of patients with co-occurring disorders (mental health ...
Child Guidance Mental health in the United Kingdom Mental health trust "A guide to mental health services in England". NHS ... Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) is the name for NHS-provided services in the United Kingdom for children, ... "Improving mental health services for young people". Department of Health. 17 March 2015. Archived from the original on 3 April ... mental health services, says Committee". Health Select Committee. UK Parliament. 5 November 2014. Archived from the original on ...
... and Mental Health Services Administration at Wikimedia Commons Official website Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services ... Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; United States Department of Health and Human Services". SAMHSA. 30 ... or mental disorders. The Children's Mental Health Initiative is the largest Federal commitment to children's mental health to ... Department of Health and Human Services. This U.S. government agency describes its role as: The Center for Mental Health ...
Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services is a monthly peer-reviewed nursing journal for psychosocial and mental health ... "Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services". MIAR: Information Matrix for the Analysis of Journals. University ... "Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services". 2017 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Science/Social ... "Source details: Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services". Scopus preview. Elsevier. Retrieved 2019-01-03. " ...
State operated facilities include: Carl Albert Community Mental Health Center Central Oklahoma Community Mental Health Center ... The Department is governed by the Board of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, composed of eleven members appointed by ... The state is geographically divided into 17 service areas each served by a community mental health center (some centers serve ... The Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) is an agency of the Government of Oklahoma ...
It replaced four earlier grant programs legislated by the Community Mental Health Centers Act, Mental Health Systems Act, ... Drug Abuse and Mental Health Services Block Grant". Federal Programs for Persons with Disabilities. U.S. Department of Health ... and National Institute of Mental Health, the ADMS grants were administered by the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health ... The Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Services Block Grant (ADMS block grant) was created in August 1981 with passage the ...
Treatment of mental disorders, Mental health in the United States, Adolescence in North America, Race and health in the United ... with mental health care were obstacles to African American children and adolescents looking for mental health services. When ... "Increasing Access to Child Mental Health Services for Urban Children and Their Caregivers". Health & Social Work. 23 (1): 9-15 ... and care providers reported they did not think their child had any mental health problems or they believed the mental health ...
The Puerto Rico Mental Health and Anti-Addiction Services Administration -Spanish: Administración de Servicios de Salud Mental ... with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration of the United States Department of Health and Human Services ... Department of Health of Puerto Rico, All stub articles, Puerto Rico stubs, Mental health stubs, United States health ... "Administration of Mental Health and Anti-Addiction Services Act". Act No. 67 of August 7, 1993 (in Spanish). Retrieved December ...
Usual Care". Mental Health Services Research. 2 (3): 155-164. doi:10.1023/A:1010141826867. ISSN 1573-6636. PMID 11256724. S2CID ... Serious mental illness or severe mental illness (SMI) is characterized as any mental health condition that seriously impairs ... In 2017, 66.7% of the 4.5% diagnosed adults sought out mental health care services. Many people living with SMI experience ... People with SMI seek medical services for a variety of non-mental health conditions, including diabetes, coronary artery ...
It provides mental health services. Mississippi State Hospital East Mississippi State Hospital North Mississippi State Hospital ... Medical and health organizations based in Mississippi, All stub articles, Mississippi stubs, Mental health stubs). ... Mississippi Department of Mental Health. Retrieved on August 10, 2010. Mississippi portal Mississippi Department of Mental ... The Mississippi Department of Mental Health (DMH) is a state agency of Mississippi, headquartered in Suite 1101 of the Robert E ...
... mental health service providers that provide school-based mental health services to students in local educational agencies ( ... mental health initiatives that promote mental health and prevention for those at risk was recommended by the Mental Health ... "Attitudes toward mental health services: age-group differences in Korean American adults". Aging & Mental Health. 13 (1): 127- ... However, this does not mean no mental health services exist in the world or in the educational setting. The World Health ...
The Mental Health Services 2018 Report released by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare produced a wide spectrum of ... "Mental Health Direct". Mental health disorders. Retrieved 20 April 2019. "Mental Health Commission Home". Mental Health ... In 2015, mental health accounted for 5.2% of the overall yearly health budgeting, although mental health equated to 12% of the ... Mental health Health care in Australia Suicide in Australia "National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing: Summary of Results ...
The institute also provides training in mental health. There is a system to provide low cost medical services. "Director". NIMH ... It is the only government mental hospital and mental health institution in Dhaka. It was established in 1981 as a mental health ... S M Yasir Arafat (12 October 2019). "An update on mental health services". The Financial Express. Archived from the original on ... The 50-bed organization was called the Institute of Mental Health and Research. In 1993, the address of the institute was ...
... use of mental health services. Hiya plays a negative role in Filipinos' ability to seek help from mental health professionals. ... Mental health outcomes Mental health of Asian Americans Tuliao AP (2014-07-03). "Mental health help seeking among Filipinos: a ... "Mental Health Care for Asian Americans and Pacific. In Mental Health: Culture, Race, and Ethnicity-A Supplement to Mental ... Center for Mental Health Services (US).; National Institute of Mental Health (US). 2001. pp. 107-126. de Castro AB, Gee GC, ...
... such as implementing early mental health training, or mental health assessments to help service members understand their mental ... Chinese Society of Psychiatry Geriatric depression in China Global mental health Mental health in the Middle East Mental health ... us), Office of the Surgeon General; (us), Center for Mental Health Services; (us), National Institute of Mental Health (August ... The Influence of Culture and Society on Mental Health. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (US). Good, ...
... is an NHS mental health trust providing adult mental health and related services in Wiltshire and the former county of Avon, an ... rated mental health services run by the trust as weak overall, along with ten other mental health trusts nationally. A 2012 CQC ... "Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership services rated 'weak' by health watchdog". Bristol Evening Post. 24 July 2008. ... The Bath Mental Health Care National Health Service Trust (Establishment) Amendment Order 1999, UK Statutory Instruments 1999, ...
"Hazelwood House, Secure mental health services" (PDF). Priory Group. Priory Group. p. 4. Retrieved 12 June 2019. "Cygnet ... "An insight into neuropsychiatric services at the country's largest mental health facility". NR Times. St Andrew's Healthcare. ... Over 20,000 professionals working in Mental Health and related areas are trained in the RAID approach, mainly in the UK and ... and another v Birmingham & Solihull Mental Health NHS Trust". NIPC Law. NIPC Law. Retrieved 12 June 2019. Howes Percival, " ...
Early Mental Health Screening, Assessment, and Referral to Services Are Common Practice. Promote the mental health of young ... Address mental health with the same urgency as physical health. Mental Health Care Is Consumer and Family Driven. Develop an ... Protect and enhance the rights of people with mental illnesses. Disparities in Mental Health Services Are Eliminated. Improve ... New Freedom Commission on Mental Health (July 22, 2003). Achieving the Promise: Transforming Mental Health Care in America ( ...
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Retrieved 2022-10-24. Nishi, Koko. "Mental Health Among Asian- ... Health status of Asian Americans Race and health in the United States Mental health of Filipino Americans Health care in the ... Mental Health and Health Consequences", Handbook of Asian American Health, New York, NY: Springer New York, pp. 155-172, doi: ... Mental health outcomes Kim, Sophia Bohun; Lee, Yeonjung Jane (2021-06-01). "Factors Associated with Mental Health Help-Seeking ...
Internet: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2016. pp. DSM-5 Changes: Implications for Child Serious ... covering overall health as well as mental health; chapter 5 of the ICD specifically covers mental and behavioral disorders. ... In 1917, together with the National Commission on Mental Hygiene (now Mental Health America), the American Medico-Psychological ... "Three Approaches to Understanding and Classifying Mental Disorder: ICD-11, DSM-5, and the National Institute of Mental Health's ...
"Mental Health Services". 2016-12-06. "NCDHHS: Deaf and Hard of Hearing Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Services". www. ... and Alabama have specialized Deaf mental health services. The Alabama Department of Mental Health has established an office of ... It term also covers research, training, and services in ways that improve mental health for deaf people. These services ... Department of Mental Health's Office of Deaf Services directed by Steve Hamerdinger established the Alabama's Mental Health ...
... and other associated mental illness. Delivering mental health services through telehealth became common. Telehealth visits ... Lockdowns closed most mental health centers. Patients who already had mental health disorders may have worsened symptoms. South ... When patients read their clinical notes from mental health care, they report an increased understanding of their mental health ... mental health symptoms, withdrawal symptoms, and psychological trauma. The known causes of mental health issues during the ...
"Mental Health Problems, Use of Mental Health Services, and Attrition From Military Service After Returning From Deployment to ... and beliefs that those with mental health problems cannot be relied upon. These beliefs about mental health and mental health ... Canadian Alliance on Mental Illness and Mental Health, "Mental health literacy", 2007 Angermeyer, M.C.; Matschinger, H. (2005 ... Mental health literacy has also found its uses in the realm of sports. Sports social workers are promoting mental health ...
"Rural Migrant Health Overview - Rural Health Information Hub". U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2018. ... Rural response to Farmer Mental Health and Suicide Prevention provides a variety of rural health and farmer mental health ... Mental health, or mental well-being, is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "a state of well-being in which an ... A 1978 Rural Task Force on Mental Health report to President Jimmy Carter noted a lack of understanding of the mental health ...
... a Canadian policy paper on mental health issues concerning children and youth. Evidence-based mental health services for youth ... as well as show how the mental health care system responds to mental illness. Canadian Mental Health Association Mental Health ... The Commission is not responsible to undertake service-delivery or advocacy for mental health services. The aim is provide ... "Informing the Future: Mental Health Indicators for Canada". Mental Health Commission of Canada. Archived from the original on ...
Roh, Sungwon (2016). "Mental health services and R&D in South Korea". International Journal of Mental Health Systems. 10 (45): ... The Mental Health Act expanded the number of national mental hospitals and community mental health centers with the goal of ... doi:10.1787/health_glance-2013-graph13-en. Retrieved 2022-04-25. (Mental health by country, Health in South Korea). ... Min, Sung-kil; Yeo, In-sok (2017). Mental Health in Korea: Past and Present. Mental Health in Asia and the Pacific. ...
"Mental health nurse Deborah Bone, MBE, who inspired Pulp's 'Disco 2000' dies aged 51". Independent.co.uk. Archived from the ... Tory MEP Philip Bradbourn dies aged 63 Memorial service for 'Junkanoo pioneer' Maureen Duvalier on Friday Arthur Gardner dies ... Deborah Bone, 51, English mental health nurse, inspired Disco 2000, multiple myeloma. Antonio Brack Egg, 74, Peruvian ecologist ... Public Service and Scandal Diocese of Cleveland Bishop passes away at 89 Telugu actor, dubbing artiste P J Sarma no more Rohit ...
... health support and social systems, home care nursing theory, maternity, mental health, nursing integration, psychiatric nursing ... They include the Japan Visiting Nursing Foundation, which was founded in 1994 to create and improve home care services for the ... Family Health Nursing, Gerontological Nursing, Home Care Nursing, Infection Control Nursing, Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing ... Public health nursing is designed to help the public and is also driven by the public's needs. The goals of public health ...
After another mental health crisis in 1999 precipitated in part by what he describes as the school's stigma towards psychiatric ... and in 2012 presented to the American Psychiatric Association's Institute on Psychiatric Services. Hall hosts the FM radio ... He spent a year in the public mental health system, including restraints, solitary confinement in a padded cell, and more than ... In 2001, he began speaking publicly about his mental health experiences, and with Oryx Cohen co-founded and did peer counseling ...
James Infirmary Health Day" in San Francisco. In addition, the St. James Infirmary was awarded the 2009 Community Service Award ... Peer and Mental Health Counseling, Support Groups, Food and Clothing, Syringe Access & Disposal, Condoms & Lube, Information & ... Pertaining to health, safety and services, the report stated that, "programs should include occupational and educational ... Since SJI is a multi-service clinic, it challenges centuries of beliefs pertaining to the perceived health needs of the sex ...
... of mental health services was transferred from the Provincial Secretary to the newly formed Department of Health Services. The ... BC Mental Health Society (August 30, 2004). History of BCMHS/RVH. Victoria, BC: BC Mental Health Society. BC Mental Health ... "Housing". Coast Mental Health. "Red Fish Healing Centre for Mental Health & Addiction". "Riverview Hospital to reopen with new ... The new centre for mental health and addiction has been named Red Fish Healing Centre for Mental Health and Addiction. It will ...
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. 2016. Retrieved September 8, 2017. "New Yorkers are living longer, ... Express train service between Great Kills and the St. George Ferry Terminal is maintained during the morning and evening ... NYC Health. 2018. Retrieved March 2, 2019. "2016-2018 Community Health Assessment and Community Health Improvement Plan: Take ... had 159,132 inhabitants as of NYC Health's 2018 Community Health Profile, with an average life expectancy of 81.3 years at ...
Parvaiz, Athar (2020-05-20). "Kashmir internet blackouts hinder health services, contact tracing". Reuters. Retrieved 2021-05- ... catalog of prohibited AI practices that distort the behavior of the individual in a manner that can lead to physical or mental ... This means, even if the service is not directly aimed at children, the parties that offer those services must comply with The ... The Digital Services Act, a legislative proposal aimed at harmonizing rules regarding digital intermediary services, most ...
O'Neill, Jen (15 March 2019). "'Kicking Through Mental Health' with Rachel Rowe (Wales & Reading FC Women)". She Kicks. ... She made her international debut despite still working within the prison service. As of match played 24 November 2022 ... initially combining her playing career with a job in the prison service. She turned professional later the same year after ... round trip from her home in Swansea to training three times every week while remaining in her job with the prison service. In ...
2003 US Department of Health and Human Services - Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, National Mental ... US Department of Health and Human Services - Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: School Violence ... 19, 2007 See also US Department of Health and Human Services - Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, ... mental health clinics, community health clinics and nursing, drug and alcohol rehabilitation programs, services for the ...
Detainees who cannot afford to pay for legal services are to have legal aid provided for free. All detainees are to be treated ... Except in a few limited circumstances related to national security, public safety or health, people are guaranteed freedom of ... All forms of physical, mental, and emotional torture are prohibited, as are "cruel, inhumane, degrading or disproportionately ...
Other relevant amendments to ERISA include the Newborns' and Mothers' Health Protection Act, the Mental Health Parity Act, and ... Defined benefit plans provide retirees with a certain level of benefits based on years of service, salary and other factors. ... It also bars health benefit plans from certain types of discrimination on the basis of health status, genetic information, or ... The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) prohibits a health benefit plan from refusing to cover ...
Kaloinen 1986, p. [page needed]. "History of CMHA-". Canadian Mental Health Association. Retrieved 22 December 2017. Maurer, ... The Military Service Bill, which included conscription in Ireland, became law. A conference of nationalist parties, Sinn Féin ... later renamed the Canadian Mental Health Association). Born: Fanny Blankers-Koen, Dutch runner, four-time gold medalist at the ... Maurer, Maurer (1969). "U.S. Air Service Victory Credits World War I" (PDF). U.S.A.F. Historical Studies No. 133. Maxwell AFB: ...
Sarah Sawyer as Jessica Adelstein, Jake's sister who sends him audio letters on tapes and has been in mental health treatment. ... HBO Max and its sibling service HBO Go hold streaming rights to the series in countries where either service is available ... receiving an eight-episode order from WarnerMedia to be streamed on its streaming service HBO Max. Ansel Elgort was to be ... with all episodes available for six months on the BBC's iPlayer service. The review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes reported ...
The tribunal is established under the Mental Health & Related Services Act (NT). The act gives the tribunal a wide range of ... The Mental Health Review Tribunal is a specialist tribunal established in the Northern Territory of Australia, a territory of ... Annual Report 2005 p5 Annual Report 2005, p5 Mental Health and Services Act (NT) - http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/nt/consol ... It has exclusive jurisdiction in terms of most mental health issues, although it may share jurisdiction on some issue with ...
... stands for Veterans Service Organization or Veterans Service Officer. Note that the General Rating Formula for Mental Disorders ... LHI); Veterans Evaluation Services (VES); Vet Fed; and QTC (QTC in turn contracts with Magellan Health to manage their network ... Mental health professionals document the results of Initial and Review PTSD C&P exams on a Disability Benefits Questionnaire ( ... These benefits not only include tax-free cash payments but can also include free or low-cost mental health treatment and other ...
... and have good social skills and general mental health. Within the business domain, physically attractive individuals have been ... For example, one panelist may ask technical questions, another may ask management questions, another may ask customer service- ... The mental ability of interviewers may play a role in how good they are as interviewers. Higher mental ability is important ... Have you ever been treated for mental health problems? What prescription drugs are you currently taking? Applicants with ...
Committee on Veterans Committee on Aging Committee on Civil Service and Labor Committee on Education Committee on Mental Health ... "Committee on Mental Health, Disabilities, and Addictions". New York City Council. Retrieved 2021-05-06. "Committee on Oversight ... "Committee on Civil Service and Labor". New York City Council. Retrieved 2021-05-06. "Committee on Education". New York City ...
Breslin Michael J., Alan Lewis Christopher (2008). "Theoretical Models of the Nature of Prayer and Health: A Review". Mental ... religious beliefs are increasingly being considered in psychotherapy with the goal of improving service and effectiveness of ... Psychologists consider that there are various ways in which religion may benefit both physical and mental health, including ... Schumaker, J. F. (1992). Religion and Mental Health. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-506985-3. Retrieved 25 ...
Because of Garroway's dedication to the cause of mental health, his third wife, Sarah, helped establish the Dave Garroway ... "Funeral services held for Garroway". Gettysburg Times. July 29, 1982. p. 18. Retrieved January 31, 2013. NBC News Today rundown ... Nobody wants old Dave anymore." His family held a private graveside service for him in Philadelphia on July 28. Garroway is ...
Mental Health Clinic Archived July 30, 2020, at the Wayback Machine, American Red Cross, Naval Hospital Barracks 31A Area ( ... The base was established in 1942 to train U.S. Marines for service in World War II. By October 1944, Camp Pendleton was ... Camp Pendleton (official site) Camp Pendleton (GlobalSecurity.org) Marine Corps Community Services at Camp Pendleton Historical ... Emergency Services Battalion, Marine Corps Police Department 16 Area: 1st Radio Battalion; 1st Intelligence Battalion; 1st EOD ...
The Health Training Hub is where their health, social care, nursing and mental health courses are delivered. The Life Rooms is ... housing and community services. Thornton College is a partnership between Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council, Sefton special ... Their Healthcare Campus opened in 2019, housing the college's Health Training Hub and Mersey Care NHS Foundation Trust's Life ... Healthcare Campus houses the college's Health Training Hub and Mersey Care NHS Foundation Trust's Life Rooms Bootle. ...
"The Mental Health Impact of Mass Shootings" (PDF). Brady: United Against Gun Violence. Brady defines a mass shooting as a ... In 2004, the U.S. Secret Service and the U.S. Department of Education issued a report analyzing 41 school shootings in the ... In comparison to the general population, mass shooters were more likely to have a history of mental health issues, to have ... 44 (5).{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link) "Statement of APA CEO on Gun Violence and Mental Health ...
Disabled people cannot afford to wait." Charities that represent mental health and learning disability groups claim the changes ... Phil Reynolds of the consortium said, "Across the DBC we have had our helpline and advice services inundated by calls about PIP ... partly due to a rise in mental health issues and learning disabilities. New rules were introduced in 2017 and many charities ... distress could not be considered in deciding if a person could walk discriminated against people with mental health problems. ...
After poor health forced his withdrawal from the University of Virginia, he continued to study law on his own while living with ... "African-American Postal Workers in the 20th Century - Who We Are - USPS". United States Postal Service. Retrieved February 10, ... but Garfield retained greater control of his mental faculties and faced relatively few pressing issues. When the war ended the ... Due to his health, Wilson was unable to attend the inauguration. On December 10, 1920, Wilson was awarded the 1919 Nobel Peace ...
The defendant is the health care provider. Although a 'health care provider' usually refers to a physician, the term includes ... mental suffering, emotional distress, loss of society and companionship, loss of consortium, injury to reputation and ... report using data from a private actuarial firm and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) found that malpractice ... Recent research has shown that while both health consumers and health producers are concerned about some of the adverse ...
Child Services, Adolescent Services, The center, and The School. Each of these programs target specific age and mental health ... Superior Court provides immediate mental health assessments and treatment to defendants with mental health needs, as identified ... As evident from the units' names, PIW serves not only adults seeking mental health support, it also has the capacity to treat ... "Rankings". health.usnews.com. Retrieved 2019-05-20. "Psychiatric Institute of Washington - Inpatient Services". Archived from ...
... mental health conditions). Aspects of the individual's environment also are assessed, including cultural, community, home, ... Specific services may include: To enhance the rehabilitation process, one must not only identify barriers to recovery, but also ... mental status, neurocognitive function); physical function (fatigue, health behavior, pain, sleep); psychological function ( ... and overall health among individuals with disabilities and chronic health conditions. This model holds that thoughts and coping ...
The north-south line is still in service, but as of 2008, the east-west line is no longer in service. By the 1880s, Hartford ... Annual report of the Indiana State Board of Health. 1915. State Board of Health. 1917. p. 12. "Blackford County" by Indiana ... Blackford High School player Brian Lanham was the recipient of the L. V. Phillips Mental Attitude Award for the 1977-78 season ... Indiana State Board of Health (1907). Annual Report. State Board of Health. p. 96. Annual Report. The Department. 1896. p. 405 ...
Ng, Beng Yeong (2001). Till the Break of Day: A History of Mental Health Services in Singapore, 1841-1993. NUS Press. p. 261. ... including the 2001 President's Social Service Award from the National Council of Social Service and the 2010 Singapore Health ... Other MINDS services, including counselling, behaviour therapy and rehabilitation, are concentrated at their integrated service ... National Council of Social Service. "Gold Awards Recipients 2010[permanent dead link]", Health Promotion Board. Member ...
Condon J (February 2010). "Women's mental health: a "wish-list" for the DSM V". Archives of Women's Mental Health. 13 (1): 5-10 ... the World Health Organization (WHO) has urged midwife training to strengthen maternal and newborn health services. To support ... How health reform can improve the health of women and babies in America" (PDF). Washington, D.C.: Trust for America's Health. ... Studies in Health Services Organisation and Policy. Vol. 17. Antwerp: ITG Press. pp. 7-33. ISBN 978-90-76070-19-3. Where ...
... of areas with a mental health professional shortage are rural or partially rural. ... According to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), 61% ... which can include primary care and mental health clinicians. Services can range from wellness exams to mental health services.[ ... SBHCs provide primary health care and may also provide mental health care, social services, dentistry, and health education. ...
Services in our area for people with mental health or psychiatric problems ... Mental Health Services in Dublin West. It is estimated that one in four of us will experience some mental health problems in ... For questions about health services, your entitlements, or how to access HSE health or social services in your area? ... Ballyfermot Mental Health Centre, Primary Care Centre, Ballyfermot Road, Dublin 10 (07669) 56100 ...
Mental health services for people with learning disabilities BMJ 2001; 322 :301 doi:10.1136/bmj.322.7281.301/a ... Mental health services for people with learning disabilities. BMJ 2001; 322 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.322.7281.301/a ( ... EDITOR-Hassiotis et al highlight many difficulties in providing services for people with mild learning disability and mental ... Glastonbury Health Centre: Salaried GP (Up to 6 sessions) - Glastonbury Health Centre ...
What is Mental Health? * How to Talk About Mental Health *For People with Mental Health Problems ... What is Mental Health?*How to Talk About Mental Health*For People with Mental Health Problems ... 988 & Behavioral Health Crisis Coordinating Office (BHCCO). Office of Recovery (OR). Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS). ... SAMHSAs mission is to lead public health and service delivery efforts that promote mental health, prevent substance misuse, ...
If you are experiencing bullying or harassment by your flatmates, you can receive support from a member of the Mental Wellbeing ... the Student Advice and Support Service Team can talk you through the process and implications of this. ...
Mental, Heart Health Could Be Directly Connected. Its mental health awareness month and mental well-being is connected to a ... Prioritizing Mental Health During Womens Health Week. To wrap up Womens Health Week, doctors are urging women to take stock ... Nevada mental health professionals want to remind everyone it is OK to not be OK. According to Mental Health America, in 2022 ... Survey: Parents Worried About Student Mental Health. A recent survey from the National PTA found student mental health is a top ...
Mental Health First Aid has trained more than 780,000 individuals to connect youth and adults in need to mental health and ... National Council for Behavioral Health is the unifying voice of Americas community mental health and addictions treatment ... I am being asked much more than ever about the thinking behind various provisions of the Mental Health Services Act when we are ... A new memo was drafted recently and presented to Karen Baylor, Deputy Director for Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders ...
A Blog of the National Center for Health Statistics - mental health services - Featured Topics from the National Center for ... Use of Selected Nonmedication Mental Health Services by Adolescent Boys and Girls With Serious Emotional or Behavioral ... Mental health is a key component of a childs overall wellbeing. Previous research using data from the National Health ... Two recent reports from the National Center for Health Read More ,. Posted on August 27, 2014. by NCHS. Categories ...
HomeAddiction and Mental HealthGet Loud - Mental Health Awareness Week Get Loud - Mental Health Awareness Week. Wednesday, May ... Mental Health in Alberta Health Services and believes mental health care should be just as easy to access as physical health ... Nicholas Mitchell is the Senior Medical Director with the Alberta Health Services Addiction and Mental Health Strategic ... Laura Calhoun, AHS Provincial Medical Director, Addiction and Mental Health, talks about overcoming the stigma of mental ...
... and constitutes a mandate for integrating mental health services into HIV primary care. The Whole Life project-a collaboration ... The high rate of mental health problems in HIV-infected women jeopardizes the health of this vulnerable population, ... Integrating mental health services into primary HIV care for women: the Whole Life project Public Health Rep. 2004 Jan-Feb;119( ... The high rate of mental health problems in HIV-infected women jeopardizes the health of this vulnerable population, and ...
... 0-9. A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N. O. P. Q. R. S. T. U. V. W. X ... Ministerial round tables: mental health  World Health Assembly, 54 (‎World Health Organization, 2001)‎ ...
Providing mental health, wellbeing, and alcohol and other drug supports to the Barwon community. ... McKellar Mental Health and Wellbeing Centre opening Geelong and Barwon region residents now have better access to mental health ... Local partnership to close mental health gaps A NEW mental health consortium will bring local agencies together to bridge gaps ... Young people in the Colac area have increased access to a range of specialist mental health supports and services with the ...
... NHS England and NHS Improvement is building ... Response to mental health from the Ambulance service. In recognition of the significant role the ambulance service plays in ... Reform of the Mental Health Act. The Independent Review of the Mental Health Act (2018) was completed in response to concerns ... Mental Health, Learning Disability and Autism Inpatient Quality Transformation Programme. *Working for the NHS in mental health ...
Warwick Brunton, Mental health services - Community care, 1990s onwards, Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, http://www ... Otago nurse Bernadette Forde-Paus became one of New Zealands first mental health nurse practitioners in 2002. This ... govt.nz/mi/photograph/29426/mental-health-nurse-practitioner (accessed 8 June 2023) ... Health Board employed her to work with adults who had received a dual diagnosis of intellectual disability and major mental ...
Mariposa Mental Health Services Act Three-Year-Plan 2020-2023 (PDF). Mental Health Services Act Annual Plan Update 2022-2023. ... 2022-2023 Mental Health Services Act Annual Update (PDF). Mental Health Services Act Annual plan Update 2021-2022. 2021-2022 ... Mental health services 2019-2020 annual Plan update 2019-2020 Mental Health Services Act 2019-2020 Annual Plan Update (PDF) ... Mental Health Services Annual Plan Update (PDF). Mental Health Services Act annual plan Update 2021-2022 Amendment: Workforce, ...
9.5 million proposal would outlaw locking people in jail when they are picked up on mental health holds and bolster the state ... to intervene on mental health-related police calls and de-escalate situations more appropriate for mental health treatment than ... Colorado would outlaw using jails for mental health holds, increase services under $9.5 million proposal Two-person teams would ... according to a 2015 survey by the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Yet the state ranks in the ...
Louis County Childrens Service Fund (CSF) is pleased to announce its 2023-2026 Core Funding Opportunity recipients. The award ... Louis County Childrens Service Fund Invests $150 Million in 72 Local Mental Health Organizations * Bridget Christner ... CSF also encourages those searching for mental and behavioral health services and partners to take advantage of its interactive ... As its largest funding allocation, CSFs Core Funding Opportunity was created to support mental and behavioral health services ...
Rosecrance Health Network will take over inpatient and outpatient behavioral health services at SwedishAmerican Hospital this ...
Mental health is important at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence through adulthood. ... Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also ... Psychiatric Services. Chestnuts psychiatrists provide expert evaluation and medical management of mental health and substance ... A therapist, registered nurse, and case manager work together to provide mental health services in the privacy of the persons ...
... with only 17 psychiatrists and 900 mental health nurses available to serve the whole country.,/p, ... p,Zimbabwe faces a critical shortage of mental health professionals, ... Zimbabwe faces a critical shortage of mental health professionals, with only 17 psychiatrists and 900 mental health nurses ... Zimbabwe faces a critical shortage of mental health professionals, with only 17 psychiatrists and 900 mental health nurses ...
As the lead health authority within the United Nations (UN) system, we help ensure the safety of the air we breathe, the food ... Health lays the foundation for vibrant and productive communities, stronger economies, safer nations and a better world. Our ... The World Health Organization (WHO) is building a better future for people everywhere. ... Health topics Improving access to mental health services in Ghana health topics ...
In 2006, CARMHA was asked by the BC Ministry of Health Services - Health Authorities Division to replicate and extend needs ... This information was combined with epidemiological estimates of cases to determine overall service volumes and resource ... with information provided by the members of expert working groups to create service pathways that demonstrated service ...
King County provides publicly-funded mental health services to low-income people in need. ... Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Mental Health ... Services are provided through licensed community mental health centers. Mental health services are available based on needs ... Even if you do not qualify for our mental health services, you can find out about other low-cost mental health service ...
Directory of Stress Services, Help and Support for Montreal, QC ... Friends for Mental Health Friends for Mental Health is a non- ... General Community Mental Health Services Publicly Funded / Free Services Affordable Therapy Network - Canada (ATN) ... Canadian Mental Health Association, National Office (CMHA) National, charitable organization that promotes the mental health of ... Publicly Funded / Free Services Douglas Mental Health University Institute The Douglas Institute provides specialized and ...
Your behavioral health is just as important to your overall well-being as your physical health. Mental conditions are real and ... For more than 50 years, Lehigh Valley Health Network has been caring for people who need behavioral health treatment, whether ... 2023 Lehigh Valley Health Network. Image content is used for illustrative purposes only. ...
For Mercy Housing residents, having access to service-enriched, stable, affordable housing leads to living a healthier life, ... May is Mental Health Awareness Month and the conversation around mental health continues to grow. ... of youth experience a mental health disorder? May is Mental Health Awareness Month and the conversation around mental health ... Stats: National Alliance on Mental Illness. You may also like:. *Teaming up to Address Mental Health A new mental health ...
... or other mental health issues. Poor mental health can increase the risk for many types of physical health problems, ... Symptoms of mental health conditions in older adults are often mistaken for symptoms of aging, which can leave mental health ... mental health struggles may impact health, relationships, and daily life. Financial strain, stress, substance abuse and other ... Video: Service Members and Mental Health. DVIDS video Mental Health for Active Duty Service Members, Older Adults, and Families ...
Supervise Mental Health Access Specialist, Mental Health Promotion Specialist and 1-2 mental health interns per semester. ... Coordinate mental health intakes and follow up for all refugees referred to mental health treatment from the health screening. ... the Mental Health Program Coordinator is responsible for addressing mental health focused service provision for newly arrived ... addressing severe mental health and community mental and emotional wellbeing needs, facilitating staffing meetings with mental ...
Mental Health Service Learning Sub-Project Project Management Micro-leader. This is an ongoing virtual opportunity. ... Medicinal Foods, Mental Health Service Learning Sub-Project Project Management Micro-leader Save to Favorites ... Please get in touch if you would be interested in supporting us through the role of: Medicinal Foods, Mental Health Service ... This role is for the Medicinal Foods, Mental Health Service Learning Sub-Project Project Management.. ...
Mental Health Awareness Month Media Kiticfs-web2022-09-07T02:48:05+00:00 Download these pictures by clicking and holding each ...
  • EDITOR-Hassiotis et al highlight many difficulties in providing services for people with mild learning disability and mental illness. (bmj.com)
  • Dr. Laura Calhoun, AHS Provincial Medical Director, Addiction and Mental Health, talks about overcoming the stigma of mental illness. (albertahealthservices.ca)
  • Specialist support in the comfort of home is changing the way people are treated with acute mental illness, thanks to a Victoria-first Hospital in the Home (HITH) program at Barwon Health. (barwonhealth.org.au)
  • In 2009 the Otago District Health Board employed her to work with adults who had received a dual diagnosis of intellectual disability and major mental illness. (teara.govt.nz)
  • The legislation, combined with state human services department requests for marijuana tax funds totaling $9.5 million, describes a multilayered plan to provide better treatment for people with mental illness. (denverpost.com)
  • The proposals also call for expansion of prebooking criminal justice diversion programs to treat mental illness, as well as additional training for law enforcement and other first responders. (denverpost.com)
  • FIRST.IL is comprehensive, team-based treatment aimed at improving mental health and quality of life for individuals who have experienced a first episode of a psychotic illness. (chestnut.org)
  • Ireland, north and south, still has no mother and baby inpatient unit for new mothers who suffer severe mental illness, this has to change without further delay. (sinnfein.ie)
  • Adolescence is a key period for the development of mental health challenges and mental illness, with some 70% of mental disorders manifesting before adulthood. (bmj.com)
  • If you have an AUD and a mental illness, it is important to get treatment for both. (medlineplus.gov)
  • with most of the long-stay offender mental illness with poor symptom control, substance inmates remaining in these facilities till date.6 Another major dependence, homelessness and abandonment by the patients' source of long-stay patients is from the population of vagrant, relatives.3,4 Furthermore, in developing countries such as psychotic individuals in the country. (who.int)
  • This is not good enough as shortcomings in our maternity and mental health services have directly led to heartrending incidents involving mothers and children, including the tragic deaths of some. (sinnfein.ie)
  • Young people in the Colac area have increased access to a range of specialist mental health supports and services with the opening of the community's new headspace centre in October. (barwonhealth.org.au)
  • Geelong and Barwon region residents now have better access to mental health support with the completion of Barwon Health's McKellar Mental Health and Wellbeing Centre. (barwonhealth.org.au)
  • St. Louis County Children's Service Fund (CSF) is pleased to announce its 2023-2026 Core Funding Opportunity recipients. (stltoday.com)
  • While telemental health has been used more with adults than children, pediatric use is increasing. (cdc.gov)
  • Together with 2,800 member organizations, it serves more than 10 million adults and children living with mental illnesses and addictions. (constantcontact.com)
  • Mental Health First Aid has trained more than 780,000 individuals to connect youth and adults in need to mental health and addictions care in their communities. (constantcontact.com)
  • Poor mental health can increase the risk for many types of physical health problems, particularly in older adults. (health.mil)
  • Symptoms of mental health conditions in older adults are often mistaken for symptoms of aging, which can leave mental health conditions untreated. (health.mil)
  • The impact of depression on health in older adults can be severe because it's associated with worse physical health (health disease, diabetes, stroke). (health.mil)
  • Title : Trend in rural-urban disparities in access to outpatient mental health services among US adults aged 18-64 with employer-sponsored insurance: 2005-2018 Personal Author(s) : Chen, Zhuo;Roy, Kakoli;Khushalani, Jaya Shankar;Puddy, Richard W. (cdc.gov)
  • The Community Guide to Preventive Services. (cdc.gov)
  • 5 ] This shortage combined with the unique socioeconomic and cultural factors associated with rural residence, including higher poverty rates and geographic isolation, make it more challenging for rural children to access behavioral health services. (cdc.gov)
  • It will distribute $150 million among 72 organizations that provide mental and behavioral health services to children and families in St. Louis County. (stltoday.com)
  • As its largest funding allocation, CSF's Core Funding Opportunity was created to support mental and behavioral health services like substance use treatment, transitional housing, therapeutic counseling and more. (stltoday.com)
  • Millions of Americans have mental and substance use disorders. (samhsa.gov)
  • success in improving the lives of people living with mental illnesses and substance use disorders. (constantcontact.com)
  • Across the country, people with mental health issues may struggle to get care due to a shortage of providers, and this problem is magnified in rural areas. (cdc.gov)
  • 6,7 ] Transportation is also a barrier in accessing mental health care and is often cited "as one of the major concerns reported by rural residents in discussing limitations to their access to health care or their participation in health programs. (cdc.gov)
  • A new report spotlighted some of the challenges to accessing behavioral health care for the one in seven Americans who live in rural areas. (publicnewsservice.org)
  • sharing their stories and insights about what's happening at AHS to improve Albertans' confidence and satisfaction in their health care system. (albertahealthservices.ca)
  • Terri Fortunaso is Seniors Health Director for Continuing Care, Palliative Care and Geriatric Assessment and Rehab, in AHS South Zone. (albertahealthservices.ca)
  • Laura Calhoun is provincial medical director for Addiction and Mental Health in Alberta Health Services and believes mental health care should be just as easy to access as physical health care. (albertahealthservices.ca)
  • The high rate of mental health problems in HIV-infected women jeopardizes the health of this vulnerable population, and constitutes a mandate for integrating mental health services into HIV primary care. (nih.gov)
  • The Whole Life project-a collaboration of the departments of Psychiatry and Obstetrics/Gynecology at the University of Miami School of Medicine-successfully integrated mental health services into primary HIV care for women. (nih.gov)
  • Chestnut Health Systems™ Crisis Stabilization Unit (CSU) provides 24-hour short-term supervised care for persons 18 years of age and older experiencing an acute psychiatric crisis that do not require hospitalization. (chestnut.org)
  • Moyo also took the time to open the UZ Friendship Bench, which is meant to offer counselling services to students and improve access to mental health care and to help reduce suicide cases. (co.zw)
  • The Friendship has trained a number of community health workers to recognise and help manage distressing mental health problems like depression and anxiety in our communities, thus helping to improve awareness and access to care," he said. (co.zw)
  • In the Africa region, WHO works with countries to integrate mental health services under primary care at community level. (co.zw)
  • There are only 39 psychiatrists (0.13 per 100 000 people) for the entire population of whom an estimated 2.3 million people have mental health conditions and need care. (who.int)
  • This means scant access to care for people like Mariama, who live with mental health conditions in rural areas where only 2% receive psychiatric treatment and support. (who.int)
  • In line with this policy, WHO, with funding from the United Kingdom Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (UK-FCDO), launched a three-year QualityRights Initiative in 2019 to improve quality of care and promote the human rights of people living with mental health conditions. (who.int)
  • We need mental health care services that are not only accessible, but also respect human rights in addressing the needs of patients," says Dr Joana Ansong, Technical Officer, Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factors at World Health Organization (WHO) Ghana. (who.int)
  • The problem with many of us is that we think we must use all means necessary to treat mental health patients and that's why on daily basis we see aggression and coercion of service users in our facilities, pushing them to stay away from seeking care," he says. (who.int)
  • Depending on circumstances and funding, the KCMHP also has limited funding to provide mental health care for people who do not have Medicaid. (kingcounty.gov)
  • TRICARE Select is a fee-for-service option in the United States that allows you to get care from any TRICARE-authorized provider. (health.mil)
  • Integrating mental health in primary health care: part 1. (who.int)
  • This scoping review will provide an enhanced understanding of the definition, characteristics and expected impacts of youth friendliness in mental/behavioural health and addiction care settings. (bmj.com)
  • The camp will provide essential health care services to affected people, and includes a reception area, an outpatient services department, a vaccination area, a small laboratory, a nutritional care service and maternal and child health areas as well as a mental health unit. (who.int)
  • Facing the immense devastation brought about by the disaster and the burden of taking care of remaining family members also increases the risk of mental health issues for women. (who.int)
  • Association of Integrated Mental Health Services with Physical Health Quality Among VA Primary Care Patients. (bvsalud.org)
  • Integrated care for comorbid depression and chronic medical disease improved physical and mental health outcomes in randomized controlled trials. (bvsalud.org)
  • The Veterans Health Administration (VA) implemented Primary Care - Mental Health Integration (PC-MHI) across all primary care clinics nationally to increase access to mental/behavioral health treatment , alongside physical health management . (bvsalud.org)
  • This retrospective cohort study included 828,050 primary care patients with at least one quality metric among 396 VA clinics providing PC-MHI services between October 2013 and September 2016. (bvsalud.org)
  • The explanatory variable was the proportion of primary care patients seen by integrated mental health specialists in each clinic annually. (bvsalud.org)
  • CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Primary care clinics where integrated mental health care reached a greater proportion of patients achieved modest albeit statistically significant gains in key chronic care quality metrics , providing optimism about the expected effects of large-scale PC-MHI implementation on physical health . (bvsalud.org)
  • Facilitating coordination of medical, mental health, and chemical dependency care can avoid duplication of services and, hopefully, assist the patient in adhering to the treatment regimen. (medscape.com)
  • In addition, even small amounts of alcohol can interact with medications specifically prescribed for travel, creating adverse reactions leading to unwanted visits to unfamiliar health care providers. (cdc.gov)
  • Your health care provider can help you figure out if one of these medicines is right for you. (medlineplus.gov)
  • It involves working with a health care professional to identify and help change the behaviors that lead to your heavy drinking. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The data obtained: socio-demographic profiles and clinical few years have shown a new era of mental health care i.e. re- details including the BPRS scores were entered into a SPSS institutionalization.2 Various factors are responsible for this. (who.int)
  • BHRD provides community mental health treatment, also known as outpatient services , to people who qualify for Medicaid . (kingcounty.gov)
  • Dr. Nicholas Mitchell is the Senior Medical Director with the Alberta Health Services Addiction and Mental Health Strategic Clinical Network. (albertahealthservices.ca)
  • Introduction To better reach youth in need of mental health and addiction (MHA) services, there is increasing emphasis on making MHA services 'youth friendly. (bmj.com)
  • HHS, through SAMHSA, awarded $6M to states, tribes and college campuses for youth suicide prevention programs, part of the Biden-Harris commitment to addressing the mental health crisis. (samhsa.gov)
  • HHS, through SAMHSA, announced more than $200 million in new funding for states, territories, and tribes to build local capacity for the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline and related crisis services. (samhsa.gov)
  • Health insurers of San Francisco's workers and retirees say they have significantly reduced addictive painkiller prescriptions in response to the opioid crisis gripping the nation. (constantcontact.com)
  • A $9.5 million proposal would outlaw locking people in jail when they are picked up on mental health holds and bolster the state's network of crisis-response teams, walk-in treatment centers and transportation from rural Colorado. (denverpost.com)
  • It only makes a person's mental health far, far worse to be not only in a state of crisis but now in jail. (denverpost.com)
  • The funds would support two-person mobile crisis teams, including a law officer and a behavioral health specialist, to intervene on mental health-related police calls and de-escalate situations more appropriate for mental health treatment than arrest. (denverpost.com)
  • In 2013, Gov. John Hickenlooper ramped up mental health treatment statewide with a $25 million initiative that created a crisis hotline and walk-in mental health crisis centers throughout the state. (denverpost.com)
  • The latest proposals come after recommendations from the governor's task force on mental health holds, which said in January that the state should outlaw using jails to house those who are in mental health crisis, as well as recommendations from the Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice. (denverpost.com)
  • From January 2015 to April 2016, a single county in Colorado held 117 people in mental health crisis in jail because there were no available beds at treatment centers or no available transportation to those centers, according to state Department of Human Services documents provided to lawmakers. (denverpost.com)
  • From Grand Junction, which has just 11 contracted mental health beds, the nearest crisis stabilization unit is 248 miles in Littleton, a four-hour drive one way. (denverpost.com)
  • Under the proposals, mobile crisis units would transport people in mental health crisis to the closest treatment option. (denverpost.com)
  • Persons may refer themselves for crisis residential/stabilization services or may be referred by a hospital, police department, mental health agency, social service agency, or family member. (chestnut.org)
  • If you or a loved one is actively experiencing a behavioral health crisis, King County still recommends that you call the King County Regional Crisis Line at Crisis Connections at 206-461-3222 or 1-866-427-4747 , or visit www.CrisisConnections.org . (kingcounty.gov)
  • Crisis Connections is the best way to connect to local crisis response services. (kingcounty.gov)
  • World Health Organization. (who.int)
  • The data presented here was collected by the Child and Adolescent Health Programme at the Division of Noncommunicable Diseases and Promoting Health through the Life course, World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. (who.int)
  • 9 ] Telemental health is the "use of telemedicine to provide mental health assessment and treatment at a distance. (cdc.gov)
  • 11,16 ] Twenty-three states and the District of Columbia require that payments for telemental health services be equivalent to those received for in-office treatment. (cdc.gov)
  • A new report underscores the challenges of getting mental health treatment when living in rural areas, like much of Montana. (publicnewsservice.org)
  • National Council for Behavioral Health is the unifying voice of America's community mental health and addictions treatment organizations. (constantcontact.com)
  • Both medication and nonmedication services have been found to be effective for treatment. (cdc.gov)
  • Within a day, the person must go to a health facility for evaluation and treatment, but in rural areas, the nearest mental health center is often hours away. (denverpost.com)
  • There have been reports of human rights violations against people with mental health conditions, with some service users suffering coercion and forced treatment. (who.int)
  • The initiative is helping to address the issue of rights and access to dignified treatment for mental health conditions by making available the e-training programme with online coaching on mental health, human rights and recovery whilst ensuring the provision of holistic services that comply with recovery principles and international human rights standards. (who.int)
  • We also offer supportive services that enhance the effectiveness of mental health treatment. (kingcounty.gov)
  • For more than 50 years, Lehigh Valley Health Network has been caring for people who need behavioral health treatment, whether it's for counseling during a stressful time in your life or for a lifelong condition that requires medication, and anything in between. (lvhn.org)
  • It has important policy implications in improving treatment access to this sizeable but understudied subgroup affected by the attack, which has a history of being the lowest mental health service users compared to other races. (cdc.gov)
  • For service providers like Dr Ramata Seidu, a Resident in Psychiatry, the QualityRights Initiative is improving their service provision. (who.int)
  • Many psychiatric symptoms and mental status changes may occur in alcohol and drug intoxication and withdrawal states. (medscape.com)
  • Drinking less alcohol is better for health than drinking more, and individuals who do not drink should not start. (cdc.gov)
  • There is also a gap between the demand for services from child psychiatrists and psychologists and the supply of providers. (cdc.gov)
  • Chestnut's psychiatrists provide expert evaluation and medical management of mental health and substance use issues. (chestnut.org)
  • Zimbabwe faces a critical shortage of mental health professionals, with only 17 psychiatrists and 900 mental health nurses available to serve the whole country. (co.zw)
  • Individuals unknown to a psychiatric service at the point of a first psychotic episode are, in the climate of closure of hospitals for people with learning disability, increasingly likely to be admitted to a general adult psychiatric ward. (bmj.com)
  • The Friendship Bench is a community-based mental health programme that is helping to improve access to mental healthcare through a cost-effective intervention. (co.zw)
  • The WHO QualityRights Initiative is a truly innovative programme for transforming lives of people with mental health conditions," notes Susan Adwoa Mensah, Social Development Adviser for FCDO. (who.int)
  • It is estimated that one in four of us will experience some mental health problems in our lifetime, from a low period, to more serious depression, to a small number who will experience severe mental health problems. (hse.ie)
  • This indicator represents the response to the survey question 3.14 Do you offer community services for early intervention and continuing support to young people with a first episode of a severe mental health problem? (who.int)
  • Our trained Masters-level and licensed clinicians are available to assess your needs and provide therapy services for individuals of all ages and for their families. (chestnut.org)
  • By offering this broad array of services, we help individuals achieve their full potential and improve their overall quality of life. (kingcounty.gov)
  • Individuals can choose from a variety of different services and work with different service providers to set personal goals and achieve their full potential. (kingcounty.gov)
  • These individuals may have undergone many poorly coordinated episodes of prior medical, mental health, and chemical dependency treatments by several different providers. (medscape.com)
  • Lessons learned from the RDF 3 experience include the need for both clinical and public health capacity, the value of having special mental health resources, the benefits of collaboration with other federal medical responders, and recognition of the large burden of chronic disease management issues following natural disasters. (cdc.gov)
  • SAMHSA celebrates Pride Month and remains committed to supporting the health and well-being of the LGBTQI+ community. (samhsa.gov)
  • A NEW mental health consortium will bring local agencies together to bridge gaps that have impacted access to timely support in the Geelong community. (barwonhealth.org.au)
  • The e-training is now a semester course in Human Rights and Mental Health for Community Mental Health and Rehabilitation specialists of the Ghana College of Nurses and Midwives. (who.int)
  • David Naboare, President of the Ghana National Association of Community Mental Health Officers, concurs. (who.int)
  • Services are provided through licensed community mental health centers. (kingcounty.gov)
  • Specialist community perinatal services will go along way but there needs to be access to inpatient services and beds, accessible across the island. (sinnfein.ie)
  • The scoping review results will be strengthened by consultations with youth, family members and community service providers on the definition, characteristics and expected impacts of youth friendliness. (bmj.com)
  • Community health assessment and health improvement planning. (cdc.gov)
  • The QualityRights Initiative, rolled out on a national scale, involves face-to-face and e-training of mental health service providers, caregivers, teachers, police service personnel, social welfare officials, the judicial service and persons with lived experiences. (who.int)
  • With a focus on launching a new initiative across seven Kings County communities, the grant helps to address mental and behavioral health through programming and training focused on improving the mental health of residents and staff. (mercyhousing.org)
  • Paul Dockerty, Senior Health and Wellbeing Officer at Cafcass, talks about his role and our upcoming mental health initiative. (cafcass.gov.uk)
  • Alabama must redraw its Congressional maps, CNN reports a former official told the feds Trump knew the process for declassifying documents, and Canadian wildfires affect the health of humans and wildlife. (publicnewsservice.org)
  • Colorado's mental health facilities need nurses. (denverpost.com)
  • The unit is staffed with nurses and behavioral health technicians and is not a hospital. (chestnut.org)
  • Published Date : 9 2022 Source : J Rural Health. (cdc.gov)
  • King County provides publicly-funded mental health services to low-income people in need. (kingcounty.gov)
  • such use could be associated with negative health consequences and other risky behaviors. (cdc.gov)
  • Most people are treated by the GP alone, unless more support, for example, therapy services, is required, in which case you may be referred to some of the following day and hospital services. (hse.ie)
  • HHS, through SAMHSA, published the National Model Standards for Peer Support Certification for substance use, mental health and family peer workers. (samhsa.gov)
  • If the conflict has progressed to a point where you feel like you need to move accommodation or wish to terminate your lease agreement early, the Student Advice and Support Service Team can talk you through the process and implications of this. (lboro.ac.uk)
  • If you are experiencing bullying or harassment by your flatmates, you can receive support from a member of the Mental Wellbeing Team. (lboro.ac.uk)
  • Our Core Funding Opportunity is just one of the many ways we're able to support essential services for local children and families," said Emily Koenig, executive director of CSF. (stltoday.com)
  • Support Mercy Housing in our mission to create stable, vibrant and healthy communities by providing affordable, service-enriched housing. (mercyhousing.org)
  • Cafcass is excited to be working in partnership with Mental Health First Aid England over the next few months to help raise awareness and support improved mental health in the workplace," Paul explains. (cafcass.gov.uk)
  • Telemental health could increase access for all rural Americans by maximizing the ability of the existing mental health workforce to reach people who may not have access to in-person services. (cdc.gov)
  • We, Barwon Health, acknowledge the Traditional Owners of the land, the Wadawurrung people of the Kulin Nation. (barwonhealth.org.au)
  • Colorado is one of only six states that allows putting people who are suicidal or having mental health episodes behind bars. (denverpost.com)
  • People can be held for up to 72 hours, though an evaluation can result in a longer commitment in a mental health facility. (denverpost.com)
  • It has now been modified for young people and today, we launch the Friendship Bench here at the University of Zimbabwe to provide a tailored mental health intervention for college and university students to help young people get that access to mental healthcare. (co.zw)
  • He encouraged people to visit health centres for assistance and make use of services such as the Friendship Bench. (co.zw)
  • This scoping review explores (1) how youth friendliness in mental health services is defined in the literature, (2) what characteristics make MHA services youth friendly and (3) how youth friendliness is expected to impact service use by young people. (bmj.com)
  • CDC policy briefs provide a summary of evidence-based best practices or policy options for a public health issue. (cdc.gov)
  • We lead public health efforts to advance the behavioral health of the nation. (samhsa.gov)
  • SAMHSA's mission is to lead public health and service delivery efforts that promote mental health, prevent substance misuse, and provide treatments and supports to foster recovery while ensuring equitable access and better outcomes. (samhsa.gov)
  • Public Health Rep . 2004 Jan-Feb;119(1):48-59. (nih.gov)
  • World Health Organisation (WHO) acting country representative Alex Gasasira said in Africa, the data on suicide was scarce and stigma was significant around suicide, though this was a serious public health problem. (co.zw)
  • An emergency health camp has also been set up by the Ministry of Public Health, WHO and their partners. (who.int)
  • Villagers are receiving mental health first aid from counselling teams and the Ministry of Public Health is currently conducting additional training for field teams on post-disaster mental health needs assessment. (who.int)
  • Public health officials can assist in disseminating the following resources to the audiences who need them. (cdc.gov)
  • The effects of a disaster, terrorist attack, or other public health emergency can be long-lasting, and the resulting trauma can affect those not directly impacted by the disaster. (cdc.gov)
  • The reduction in mother-to-infant transmission of HIV is regarded as one of the most effective US public health initiatives. (medscape.com)
  • Public health emergency response lessons learned by Rapid Deployment Force 3, 2006-2016. (cdc.gov)
  • Following Hurricane Katrina, the uniformed US Public Health Service created an updated system through which its officers participated in emergency responses. (cdc.gov)
  • The Rapid Deployment Force (RDF) concept, begun in 2006, involved five teams of officers with diverse clinical and public health skill sets organized into an incident command system led by a team commander. (cdc.gov)
  • Between 2006 and 2016, the RDF 3 team deployed multiple times in response to natural disasters and public health emergencies. (cdc.gov)
  • CDC's "Mass Casualty Event Preparedness and Response" website, available at http://emergency.cdc.gov/masscasualties/index.asp, is the primary location for resources for the general public and for health professionals. (cdc.gov)
  • In the south, a preferred site has been chosen for a specialist perinatal mental health service in St Vincent's Hospital in Dublin, but there are no meetings scheduled to discuss this until at least September this year. (sinnfein.ie)
  • In the face of recently introduced government health reform and the dwindling number of available beds for acutely ill patients, a cross sectional study was carried out on long-stay patients at the 100 years old psychiatric hospital Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria with a view to discharging most of them. (who.int)
  • According to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), 61% of areas with a mental health professional shortage are rural or partially rural. (cdc.gov)
  • This means that if you're enrolled in TRICARE Prime, you can make an appointment with a TRICARE-authorized network provider for mental health services like individual or family counseling or therapy. (health.mil)
  • 10 ] This brief will use the term telemedicine to refer to the general use of technology to provide health services. (cdc.gov)
  • There is some evidence that when telemedicine is not reimbursed, or is reimbursed at a lower level than in-person services, doctors may not have sufficient financial incentives to provide telemedicine services. (cdc.gov)
  • WHO has provided emergency medical kits, essential medicines, diarrhoea kits, and tents to provide health services at the site of the emergency. (who.int)
  • Financial strain, stress, substance abuse and other life issues can lead to depression, anxiety, or other mental health issues. (health.mil)
  • Untreated mental health conditions like anxiety, depression, substance use disorder, and PTSD can lead to more suffering, self-medication, and financial and relationship challenges, regardless of age. (health.mil)
  • Regulation varies considerably because each state defines telemedicine services differently, and these definitions determine the services that qualify for reimbursement under Medicaid and private insurance. (cdc.gov)
  • The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) encourages states to use the flexibility built into Medicaid to create innovative payment methodologies for services that incorporate telemedicine technology. (cdc.gov)
  • 13 ] Thirty-nine states have some form of Medicaid coverage and reimbursement for telemental health services. (cdc.gov)
  • Sinn Féin spokespersons north and south, Mark Ward TD and Órlaithí Flynn MLA, have called for a specialist perinatal mental health service on the island of Ireland. (sinnfein.ie)
  • Managers across Cafcass, as well as a network of Mental Health First Aiders, will receive specialist training on understanding mental health and its different forms. (cafcass.gov.uk)
  • One of the Prime Minister's first announcements in 2017 was around a package to tackle mental health in Britain. (cafcass.gov.uk)
  • In 2017, Cafcass will also focus on this area, helping its practitioners understand more about mental health in the workplace. (cafcass.gov.uk)
  • interpreter services (through the Washington State Healthcare Authority's contract with Universal Language Service . (kingcounty.gov)
  • In general, though positive aspects have been found, most of the references indicate stigma, prejudice and neglect from institutions and professionals regarding mental health users' sexuality. (bvsalud.org)
  • Boston health officials are dealing with the immediate aftermath of two bombs that exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on the afternoon of April 15, 2013. (cdc.gov)
  • Post-traumatic mental health problems are a key concern in the area as many families have lost their loved ones as well as property and all means of income. (who.int)
  • SAMHSA is sponsoring a Behavioral Health Equity Challenge to learn more about outreach and engagement strategies that foster behavioral health equity throughout the country. (samhsa.gov)
  • There are many definitions of telemedicine, but the American Telemedicine Association defines it as the "use of medical information exchanged from one site to another via electronic communications to improve patients' health status. (cdc.gov)
  • On the private payer side, thirty-two states and the District of Columbia have private payer policies in place for telehealth, but these policies differ considerably in what services are covered and how much providers are reimbursed. (cdc.gov)
  • Funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) as a Special Program of National Significance (SPNS), Whole Life efforts have been sustained beyond the demonstration funding period as a result of the changes brought about in organizational structures, service delivery, and the providers' conceptualization of health for HIV-infected women. (nih.gov)
  • Even if you do not qualify for our mental health services, you can find out about other low-cost mental health service providers . (kingcounty.gov)
  • This information was combined with epidemiological estimates of cases to determine overall service volumes and resource requirements. (sfu.ca)
  • Previous research using data from the National Health Interview Survey found that about 6% of adolescents have serious emotional or behavioral difficulties. (cdc.gov)
  • Moyo said it was vital to raise awareness about the issues of mental health and suicide so as to prevent unnecessary loss of life. (co.zw)