A relatively common neoplasm of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and SPINAL CANAL. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)
Benign and malignant neoplastic processes that arise from or secondarily involve the meningeal coverings of the brain and spinal cord.
A delicate membrane enveloping the brain and spinal cord. It lies between the PIA MATER and the DURA MATER. It is separated from the pia mater by the subarachnoid cavity which is filled with CEREBROSPINAL FLUID.
Neoplasms of the bony part of the skull.
Increase in the mass of bone per unit volume.
Neoplasms of the base of the skull specifically, differentiated from neoplasms of unspecified sites or bones of the skull (SKULL NEOPLASMS).
Junction between the cerebellum and the pons.
Neoplasms of the intracranial components of the central nervous system, including the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. Brain neoplasms are subdivided into primary (originating from brain tissue) and secondary (i.e., metastatic) forms. Primary neoplasms are subdivided into benign and malignant forms. In general, brain tumors may also be classified by age of onset, histologic type, or presenting location in the brain.
The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.
Tumor suppressor genes located on the long arm of human chromosome 22. Mutation or loss of these genes causes NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
A benign SCHWANNOMA of the eighth cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE), mostly arising from the vestibular branch (VESTIBULAR NERVE) during the fifth or sixth decade of life. Clinical manifestations include HEARING LOSS; HEADACHE; VERTIGO; TINNITUS; and FACIAL PAIN. Bilateral acoustic neuromas are associated with NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p673)
Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from the optic nerve or its sheath. OPTIC NERVE GLIOMA is the most common histologic type. Optic nerve neoplasms tend to cause unilateral visual loss and an afferent pupillary defect and may spread via neural pathways to the brain.
A tumor composed of spindle cells with a rich vascular network, which apparently arises from pericytes, cells of smooth muscle origin that lie around small vessels. Benign and malignant hemangiopericytomas exist, and the rarity of these lesions has led to considerable confusion in distinguishing between benign and malignant variants. (From Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1364)
Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.
Tumors or cancer of any part of the hearing and equilibrium system of the body (the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR).
An autosomal dominant disorder characterized by a high incidence of bilateral acoustic neuromas as well as schwannomas (NEURILEMMOMA) of other cranial and peripheral nerves, and other benign intracranial tumors including meningiomas, ependymomas, spinal neurofibromas, and gliomas. The disease has been linked to mutations of the NF2 gene (GENES, NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2) on chromosome 22 (22q12) and usually presents clinically in the first or second decade of life.
Any operation on the cranium or incision into the cranium. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Neoplasms located in the brain ventricles, including the two lateral, the third, and the fourth ventricle. Ventricular tumors may be primary (e.g., CHOROID PLEXUS NEOPLASMS and GLIOMA, SUBEPENDYMAL), metastasize from distant organs, or occur as extensions of locally invasive tumors from adjacent brain structures.
A neoplasm that arises from SCHWANN CELLS of the cranial, peripheral, and autonomic nerves. Clinically, these tumors may present as a cranial neuropathy, abdominal or soft tissue mass, intracranial lesion, or with spinal cord compression. Histologically, these tumors are encapsulated, highly vascular, and composed of a homogenous pattern of biphasic fusiform-shaped cells that may have a palisaded appearance. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp964-5)
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
The three membranes that cover the BRAIN and the SPINAL CORD. They are the dura mater, the arachnoid, and the pia mater.
The large hole at the base of the skull through which the SPINAL CORD passes.
A specific pair of GROUP G CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
A membrane protein homologous to the ERM (Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin) family of cytoskeleton-associated proteins which regulate physical properties of membranes. Alterations in neurofibromin 2 are the cause of NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
A extremely rare bone tumor characterized by abundant collagen formation and a fibrous stroma, without evidence of mitosis or pleomorphism. It appears on x-rays as an osteolytic lesion with well-defined margins and must be differentiated from primary fibrosarcoma of bone. (DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1441)
A neoplasm derived from blood vessels, characterized by numerous prominent endothelial cells that occur singly, in aggregates, and as the lining of congeries of vascular tubes or channels. Hemangioendotheliomas are relatively rare and are of intermediate malignancy (between benign hemangiomas and conventional angiosarcomas). They affect men and women about equally and rarely develop in childhood. (From Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1866)

SPARC: a potential diagnostic marker of invasive meningiomas. (1/1193)

SPARC, a secreted, extracellular matrix-associated protein implicated in the modulation of cell adhesion and migration, was evaluated as a marker for invasive meningiomas. Although the majority of meningiomas are clinically and morphologically benign, approximately 10% progress into atypical and malignant tumors, according to the standard criteria. However, a subset of meningiomas presents as histomorphologically benign tumors (WHO grade I), but they are clinically invasive. It has been suggested that these tumors should be classified as malignant, and that the patients may require adjuvant therapy and closer follow up. Unfortunately, a significant number of these tumors may not be recognized because the surgical specimen used to assess the grade of a tumor lacks the infiltrative interface with the brain, which is currently necessary to determine its invasive character. Therefore, a marker of heightened invasiveness would greatly facilitate the identification of this subset of patients. In this study, the immunohistochemical expression of SPARC in benign, noninvasive primary meningiomas was compared with its expression in invasive, aggressive, primary and recurrent meningiomas. SPARC was not expressed in the 9 benign, noninvasive tumors, but was highly expressed in the 20 invasive tumors, regardless of the grade. The findings suggest that SPARC is a potential diagnostic marker of invasive meningiomas and is capable of distinguishing the histomorphologically benign noninvasive from the histomorphologically benign but invasive meningiomas, in the absence of the infiltrative interface.  (+info)

Hemangioblastoma mimicking tentorial meningioma: preoperative embolization of the meningeal arterial blood supply--case report. (2/1193)

A 72-year-old male presented with a primary hemangioblastoma of the posterior fossa with unusual dural attachment and meningeal arterial blood supply from the external carotid artery and marginal tentorial artery. Preoperative embolization facilitated complete resection of the tumor with no resultant neurological deficit. Hemangioblastoma must be included in the differential diagnosis of tumors with dural involvement. Preoperative embolization is very useful in such tumors.  (+info)

Cerebral veins: comparative study of CT venography with intraarterial digital subtraction angiography. (3/1193)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Our objective was to compare the reliability of CT venography with intraarterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in imaging cerebral venous anatomy and pathology. METHODS: In 25 consecutive patients, 426 venous structures were determined as present, partially present, or absent by three observers evaluating CT multiplanar reformatted (MPR) and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images. These results were compared with the results from intraarterial DSA and, in a second step, with the results of an intraobserver consensus. In addition, pathologic conditions were described. RESULTS: Using DSA as the standard of reference, MPR images had an overall sensitivity of 95% (specificity, 19%) and MIP images a sensitivity of 80% (specificity, 44%) in depicting the cerebral venous anatomy. On the basis of an intraobserver consensus including DSA, MPR, and MIP images (415 vessels present), the sensitivity/specificity was 95%/91% for MPR, 90%/100% for DSA, and 79%/91% for MIP images. MPR images were superior to DSA images in showing the cavernous sinus, the inferior sagittal sinus, and the basal vein of Rosenthal. Venous occlusive diseases were correctly recognized on both MPR and MIP images. Only DSA images provided reliable information of invasion of a sinus by an adjacent meningioma. CONCLUSION: CT venography proved to be a reliable method to depict the cerebral venous structures. MPR images were superior to MIP images.  (+info)

A new technique of surface anatomy MR scanning of the brain: its application to scalp incision planning. (4/1193)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Surface anatomy scanning (SAS) is an established technique for demonstrating the brain's surface. We describe our experience in applying SAS with superposition of MR venograms to preoperative scalp incision planning. METHODS: In 16 patients, scalp incision planning was done by placing a water-filled plastic tube at the intended incision site when we performed SAS using half-Fourier single-shot fast spin-echo sequences. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MR angiograms were obtained to demonstrate the cortical veins and then superimposed upon the SAS images. The added images were compared with surgical findings using a four-point grading scale (0 to 3, poor to excellent). RESULTS: In each case, neurosurgeons could easily reach the lesion. Surgical findings correlated well with MR angiogram-added SAS images, with an average score of 2.56. CONCLUSION: Our simple technique is a useful means of preoperatively determining brain surface anatomy and can be used to plan a scalp incision site.  (+info)

In vivo hydrogen-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of human intracranial tumors. (5/1193)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the metabolic changes, pathological state and histological types of intracranial tumors with hydrogen-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-1 MRS). METHODS: Thirteen patients with intracranial tumors were studied with localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-1MRS), in vivo. All spectra were obtained with a 2.0 T whole body MR imaging system. RESULTS: All the spectra of these tumors exhibited high ratios of choline (Cho)/creatine (Cr) and Cho/N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), and histologically different tumors showed obvious variations in the metabolite ratios. Significant differences of Cho/Cr ratio were found between meningiomas and astrocytomas by statistical evaluation. The spectra obtained after operation were remarkably different from those before operation. CONCLUSION: H-1 MRS can serve as a non-invasive clinical test for therapeutic and prognostic uses for intracranial tumors.  (+info)

NF2 gene mutations and allelic status of 1p, 14q and 22q in sporadic meningiomas. (6/1193)

Formation of meningiomas and their progression to malignancy may be a multi-step process, implying accumulation of genetic mutations at specific loci. To determine the relationship between early NF2 gene inactivation and the molecular mechanisms that may contribute to meningioma tumor progression, we have performed deletion mapping analysis at chromosomes 1, 14 and 22 in a series of 81 sporadic meningiomas (54 grade I (typical), 25 grade II (atypical) and two grade III (anaplastic)), which were also studied for NF2 gene mutations. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis was used to identify 11 mutations in five of the eight exons of the NF2 gene studied. All 11 tumors displayed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for chromosome 22 markers; this anomaly was also detected in 33 additional tumors. Twenty-nine and 23 cases were characterized by LOH at 1p and 14q, respectively, mostly corresponding to aggressive tumors that also generally displayed LOH 22. All three alterations were detected in association in seven grade II and two grade III meningiomas, corroborating the hypothesis that the formation of aggressive meningiomas follows a multi-step tumor progression model.  (+info)

Clinical features and outcomes in patients with non-acoustic cerebellopontine angle tumours. (7/1193)

OBJECTIVES: Non-acoustic tumours of the cerebellopontine angle differ from vestibular schwannomas in their prevalence, clinical features, operative management, and surgical outcome. These features were studied in patients presenting to the regional neuro-otological unit. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of clinical notes identified 42 patients with non-acoustic tumours of the cerebellopontine angle. Data were extracted regarding presenting clinical features, histopathological data after surgical resection, surgical morbidity and mortality, and clinical outcome (mean 32 months follow up). RESULTS: The study group comprised 25 meningiomas (60%), 12 epidermoid cysts/cholesteatomata (28%), and five other tumours. In patients with meningiomas, symptoms differed considerably from patients presenting with vestibular schwannomas. Cerebellar signs were present in 52% and hearing loss in only 68%. Twenty per cent of patients had hydrocephalus at the time of diagnosis. After surgical resection, normal facial nerve function was preserved in 75% of cases. In the epidermoid group, fifth, seventh, and eighth nerve deficits were present in 42%, 33%, and 66% respectively. There were no new postoperative facial palsies. There were two recurrences (17%) requiring reoperation. Overall, there were two perioperative deaths from pneumonia and meningitis. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with non-acoustic lesions of the cerebellopontine angle often present with different symptoms and signs from those found in patients with schwannomas. Hearing loss is less prevalent and cerebellar signs and facial paresis are more common as presenting features. Hydrocephalus is often present in patients presenting with cerebellopontine angle meningiomas. Non-acoustic tumours can usually be resected with facial nerve preservation.  (+info)

Role of p53 gene mutation in tumor aggressiveness of intracranial meningiomas. (8/1193)

The mutations that occur in the p53 tumor suppressor gene have been studied in various human malignant tumors. However, little is known about this gene in meningiomas. To investigate the relationship and frequency of p53 gene mutations, the p53 polymerase chain reaction-single stranded conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and immunohistochemical study were performed on the 41 intracranial meningiomas (21 benign, 11 atypical, and 9 malignant). The higher the p53 protein expression rate, the poorer the histologic grade (9.5%, 72.7%, and 88.9% in benign, atypical and malignant meningioma, respectively) (p=0.000). The p53 protein expression rate was higher in recurrent meningioma (71.4%) than in nonrecurrent meningioma (10.5%) (p=0.002). PCR-SSCP method was performed in positive p53 protein immunoreactivity cases. p53 gene mutation rate was higher in the atypical (62.5%) and malignant (25%) meningiomas than in the benign meningioma (0%) (p=0.232). Also, the rate was higher in recurrent menigioma (20%) than in nonrecurrent meningioma (0%) (o=0.495). Among five to eight exons of the p53 gene, the mutation was observed on exon 7 more frequently. In conclusion, p53 immunoreactivity and p53 gene mutation are closely correlated with histologic grade and histologic atypia of intracranial meningiomas. p53 gene mutation would be considered as a useful marker to detect the progression of intracranial meningiomas.  (+info)

A meningioma is a type of slow-growing tumor that forms on the membranes (meninges) surrounding the brain and spinal cord. It's usually benign, meaning it doesn't spread to other parts of the body, but it can still cause serious problems if it grows and presses on nearby tissues.

Meningiomas most commonly occur in adults, and are more common in women than men. They can cause various symptoms depending on their location and size, including headaches, seizures, vision or hearing problems, memory loss, and changes in personality or behavior. In some cases, they may not cause any symptoms at all and are discovered only during imaging tests for other conditions.

Treatment options for meningiomas include monitoring with regular imaging scans, surgery to remove the tumor, and radiation therapy to shrink or kill the tumor cells. The best treatment approach depends on factors such as the size and location of the tumor, the patient's age and overall health, and their personal preferences.

Meningeal neoplasms, also known as malignant meningitis or leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, refer to cancerous tumors that originate in the meninges, which are the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. These tumors can arise primarily from the meningeal cells themselves, although they more commonly result from the spread (metastasis) of cancer cells from other parts of the body, such as breast, lung, or melanoma.

Meningeal neoplasms can cause a variety of symptoms, including headaches, nausea and vomiting, mental status changes, seizures, and focal neurological deficits. Diagnosis typically involves imaging studies (such as MRI) and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid obtained through a spinal tap. Treatment options may include radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or surgery, depending on the type and extent of the tumor. The prognosis for patients with meningeal neoplasms is generally poor, with a median survival time of several months to a year.

The arachnoid is one of the three membranes that cover the brain and the spinal cord, known as the meninges. It is located between the dura mater (the outermost layer) and the pia mater (the innermost layer). The arachnoid is a thin, delicate membrane that is filled with cerebrospinal fluid, which provides protection and nutrition to the central nervous system.

The arachnoid has a spider-web like appearance, hence its name, and it is composed of several layers of collagen fibers and elastic tissue. It is highly vascularized, meaning that it contains many blood vessels, and it plays an important role in regulating the flow of cerebrospinal fluid around the brain and spinal cord.

In some cases, the arachnoid can become inflamed or irritated, leading to a condition called arachnoiditis. This can cause a range of symptoms, including pain, muscle weakness, and sensory changes, and it may require medical treatment to manage.

Skull neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop within the skull. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They can originate from various types of cells, such as bone cells, nerve cells, or soft tissues. Skull neoplasms can cause various symptoms depending on their size and location, including headaches, seizures, vision problems, hearing loss, and neurological deficits. Treatment options include surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. It is important to note that a neoplasm in the skull can also refer to metastatic cancer, which has spread from another part of the body to the skull.

Hyperostosis is a medical term that refers to an excessive growth or abnormal thickening of bone tissue. It can occur as a result of various conditions, such as inflammation, injury, or genetic disorders. The extra bone growth can cause pain, stiffness, and limited mobility in the affected area. In some cases, hyperostosis can also lead to deformities and other complications.

There are several types of hyperostosis, including:

1. Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH): This is a condition that affects the spine, causing calcification and stiffening of the ligaments and bone spurs to form along the edges of the vertebrae. It is often asymptomatic but can cause pain and stiffness in some cases.
2. Flat bone hyperostosis: This type of hyperostosis affects the flat bones of the body, such as the skull, ribs, and pelvis. It can be caused by various conditions, including Paget's disease, fibrous dysplasia, and certain types of cancer.
3. Focal hyperostosis: This refers to localized areas of bone overgrowth that can occur in response to injury, infection, or inflammation. Examples include heterotopic ossification (the formation of bone in soft tissues) and Freiberg's infarction (a condition that affects the joint surface of the metatarsal bones in the foot).
4. Hyperostosis frontalis interna: This is a benign condition that causes thickening of the inner table of the frontal bone in the skull. It is more common in women and often asymptomatic but can cause headaches and other symptoms in some cases.

Treatment for hyperostosis depends on the underlying cause and severity of the condition. In some cases, no treatment may be necessary. However, if the condition causes pain or limits mobility, various treatments may be recommended, such as medication, physical therapy, or surgery.

Skull base neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors located in the skull base, which is the region where the skull meets the spine and where the brain connects with the blood vessels and nerves that supply the head and neck. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous), and they can arise from various types of cells in this area, including bone, nerve, glandular, and vascular tissue.

Skull base neoplasms can cause a range of symptoms depending on their size, location, and growth rate. Some common symptoms include headaches, vision changes, hearing loss, facial numbness or weakness, difficulty swallowing, and balance problems. Treatment options for skull base neoplasms may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches. The specific treatment plan will depend on the type, size, location, and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health and medical history.

The cerebellopontine angle (CPA) is a narrow space located at the junction of the brainstem and the cerebellum, where the pons and cerebellum meet. This region is filled with several important nerves, blood vessels, and membranous coverings called meninges. The CPA is a common site for various neurological disorders because it contains critical structures such as:

1. Cerebellum: A part of the brain responsible for coordinating muscle movements, maintaining balance, and fine-tuning motor skills.
2. Pons: A portion of the brainstem that plays a role in several vital functions, including facial movements, taste sensation, sleep regulation, and respiration.
3. Cranial nerves: The CPA is home to the following cranial nerves:
* Vestibulocochlear nerve (CN VIII): This nerve has two components - cochlear and vestibular. The cochlear part is responsible for hearing, while the vestibular part contributes to balance and eye movement.
* Facial nerve (CN VII): This nerve controls facial expressions, taste sensation in the anterior two-thirds of the tongue, salivary gland function, and lacrimation (tear production).
4. Blood vessels: The CPA contains critical blood vessels like the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), which supplies blood to various parts of the brainstem, cerebellum, and cranial nerves.
5. Meninges: These are protective membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. In the CPA, the meninges include the dura mater, arachnoid mater, and pia mater.

Disorders that can affect the structures in the cerebellopontine angle include acoustic neuromas (vestibular schwannomas), meningiomas, epidermoids, and arteriovenous malformations. These conditions may cause symptoms such as hearing loss, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), vertigo (dizziness), facial weakness or numbness, difficulty swallowing, and imbalance.

Brain neoplasms, also known as brain tumors, are abnormal growths of cells within the brain. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign brain tumors typically grow slowly and do not spread to other parts of the body. However, they can still cause serious problems if they press on sensitive areas of the brain. Malignant brain tumors, on the other hand, are cancerous and can grow quickly, invading surrounding brain tissue and spreading to other parts of the brain or spinal cord.

Brain neoplasms can arise from various types of cells within the brain, including glial cells (which provide support and insulation for nerve cells), neurons (nerve cells that transmit signals in the brain), and meninges (the membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord). They can also result from the spread of cancer cells from other parts of the body, known as metastatic brain tumors.

Symptoms of brain neoplasms may vary depending on their size, location, and growth rate. Common symptoms include headaches, seizures, weakness or paralysis in the limbs, difficulty with balance and coordination, changes in speech or vision, confusion, memory loss, and changes in behavior or personality.

Treatment for brain neoplasms depends on several factors, including the type, size, location, and grade of the tumor, as well as the patient's age and overall health. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or a combination of these approaches. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence and manage any long-term effects of treatment.

Dura Mater is the thickest and outermost of the three membranes (meninges) that cover the brain and spinal cord. It provides protection and support to these delicate structures. The other two layers are called the Arachnoid Mater and the Pia Mater, which are thinner and more delicate than the Dura Mater. Together, these three layers form a protective barrier around the central nervous system.

Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) is a genetic disorder characterized by the development of non-cancerous tumors in the nervous system. It is caused by mutations in the NF2 gene, which provides instructions for making a protein called merlin or schwannomin. This protein helps regulate cell growth and plays a role in suppressing tumor formation.

In NF2, the lack of functional merlin protein leads to an increased risk of developing tumors on the nerves related to hearing and balance (vestibular schwannomas or acoustic neuromas), on the spine (schwannomas), and on the brain (meningiomas). These tumors can cause various symptoms, such as hearing loss, ringing in the ears, balance problems, numbness or weakness in the limbs, and visual changes.

NF2 is an autosomal dominant disorder, meaning that a person has a 50% chance of inheriting the mutated gene from an affected parent and developing the condition. However, about half of all NF2 cases result from new mutations in the NF2 gene, with no family history of the disorder.

Medical Definition:

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic imaging technique that uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed cross-sectional or three-dimensional images of the internal structures of the body. The patient lies within a large, cylindrical magnet, and the scanner detects changes in the direction of the magnetic field caused by protons in the body. These changes are then converted into detailed images that help medical professionals to diagnose and monitor various medical conditions, such as tumors, injuries, or diseases affecting the brain, spinal cord, heart, blood vessels, joints, and other internal organs. MRI does not use radiation like computed tomography (CT) scans.

An acoustic neuroma, also known as vestibular schwannoma, is not actually a neuroma but rather a benign (noncancerous) tumor that develops on the vestibular nerve. This nerve is one of the two nerves that transmit sound and balance information from the inner ear to the brain. The tumor arises from an overproduction of Schwann cells, which normally provide a protective covering for the nerve fibers. As the tumor grows, it can press against the hearing and balance nerves, causing symptoms such as hearing loss, ringing in the ear (tinnitus), unsteadiness, and disequilibrium. In some cases, acoustic neuromas can become quite large and cause additional symptoms by pressing on nearby cranial nerves. Treatment options include observation, radiation therapy, or surgical removal of the tumor.

Optic nerve neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop within or near the optic nerve. These tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign optic nerve neoplasms include optic nerve meningiomas and schwannomas, which originate from the sheaths surrounding the optic nerve. They usually grow slowly and may not cause significant vision loss, but they can lead to compression of the optic nerve, resulting in visual field defects or optic disc swelling (papilledema).

Malignant optic nerve neoplasms are rare but more aggressive. The most common type is optic nerve glioma, which arises from the glial cells within the optic nerve. These tumors can quickly damage the optic nerve and cause severe vision loss.

It's important to note that any optic nerve neoplasm requires prompt medical evaluation and treatment, as they can potentially lead to significant visual impairment or even blindness if left untreated.

Hemangiopericytoma is a rare type of soft tissue sarcoma, which is a cancer that develops from the cells that surround blood vessels. It specifically arises from the pericytes, which are cells that help regulate blood flow in capillaries. Hemangiopericytomas typically form in the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord (meninges), but they can also occur in other parts of the body such as the lungs, abdomen, or extremities.

These tumors usually grow slowly, but they can become aggressive and spread to other parts of the body (metastasize). Symptoms depend on the location of the tumor, but may include headaches, seizures, weakness, or numbness in the arms or legs. Diagnosis typically involves imaging tests like MRI or CT scans, followed by a biopsy to confirm the presence of cancer cells. Treatment usually consists of surgical removal of the tumor, often accompanied by radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy to help prevent recurrence or spread of the disease.

Neurosurgical procedures are operations that are performed on the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. These procedures are typically carried out by neurosurgeons, who are medical doctors with specialized training in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the nervous system. Neurosurgical procedures can be used to treat a wide range of conditions, including traumatic injuries, tumors, aneurysms, vascular malformations, infections, degenerative diseases, and congenital abnormalities.

Some common types of neurosurgical procedures include:

* Craniotomy: A procedure in which a bone flap is temporarily removed from the skull to gain access to the brain. This type of procedure may be performed to remove a tumor, repair a blood vessel, or relieve pressure on the brain.
* Spinal fusion: A procedure in which two or more vertebrae in the spine are fused together using bone grafts and metal hardware. This is often done to stabilize the spine and alleviate pain caused by degenerative conditions or spinal deformities.
* Microvascular decompression: A procedure in which a blood vessel that is causing pressure on a nerve is repositioned or removed. This type of procedure is often used to treat trigeminal neuralgia, a condition that causes severe facial pain.
* Deep brain stimulation: A procedure in which electrodes are implanted in specific areas of the brain and connected to a battery-operated device called a neurostimulator. The neurostimulator sends electrical impulses to the brain to help alleviate symptoms of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease or dystonia.
* Stereotactic radiosurgery: A non-invasive procedure that uses focused beams of radiation to treat tumors, vascular malformations, and other abnormalities in the brain or spine. This type of procedure is often used for patients who are not good candidates for traditional surgery due to age, health status, or location of the lesion.

Neurosurgical procedures can be complex and require a high degree of skill and expertise. Patients considering neurosurgical treatment should consult with a qualified neurosurgeon to discuss their options and determine the best course of action for their individual situation.

Ear neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that occur in the ear. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous) and can affect any part of the ear, including the outer ear, middle ear, inner ear, and the ear canal.

Benign ear neoplasms are typically slow-growing and do not spread to other parts of the body. Examples include exostoses, osteomas, and ceruminous adenomas. These types of growths are usually removed surgically for cosmetic reasons or if they cause discomfort or hearing problems.

Malignant ear neoplasms, on the other hand, can be aggressive and may spread to other parts of the body. Examples include squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and adenoid cystic carcinoma. These types of tumors often require more extensive treatment, such as surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

It is important to note that any new growth or change in the ear should be evaluated by a healthcare professional to determine the nature of the growth and develop an appropriate treatment plan.

Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) is a genetic disorder characterized by the development of non-cancerous tumors in the nervous system, particularly on the nerves related to hearing and balance. It's also known as central neurofibromatosis or bilateral acoustic neuroma syndrome.

The primary feature of NF2 is the growth of schwannomas, which are tumors that develop from the cells surrounding nerve fibers. These typically grow on the vestibular nerve, leading to hearing loss, ringing in the ears (tinnitus), and balance problems. Bilateral acoustic neuromas (schwannomas affecting both vestibular nerves) are a hallmark of this condition.

Other common features include:

1. Meningiomas: These are tumors that grow in the meninges, the protective layers surrounding the brain and spinal cord.
2. Ependymomas: These are tumors that develop from the ependymal cells lining the ventricles (fluid-filled spaces) in the brain or the spinal cord canal.
3. Neurofibromas: Unlike in Neurofibromatosis type 1, these are less common and typically don't become cancerous.
4. Skin changes: While not as prevalent as in NF1, some people with NF2 may have skin freckles, café-au-lait spots, or skin tumors.
5. Eye problems: Some individuals may experience cataracts, retinal abnormalities, or optic nerve tumors (optic gliomas).
6. Other potential symptoms: Headaches, facial weakness or numbness, and difficulty swallowing or speaking.

NF2 is an autosomal dominant disorder, meaning that a person has a 50% chance of inheriting the condition if one of their parents has it. However, about half of all NF2 cases result from spontaneous genetic mutations with no family history of the disorder.

A craniotomy is a surgical procedure where a bone flap is temporarily removed from the skull to access the brain. This procedure is typically performed to treat various neurological conditions, such as brain tumors, aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, or traumatic brain injuries. After the underlying brain condition is addressed, the bone flap is usually replaced and secured back in place with plates and screws. The purpose of a craniotomy is to provide access to the brain for diagnostic or therapeutic interventions while minimizing potential damage to surrounding tissues.

Cerebral ventricle neoplasms refer to tumors that develop within the cerebral ventricles, which are fluid-filled spaces in the brain. These tumors can arise from various types of cells within the ventricular system, including the ependymal cells that line the ventricles, choroid plexus cells that produce cerebrospinal fluid, or other surrounding tissues.

Cerebral ventricle neoplasms can cause a variety of symptoms depending on their size and location, such as headaches, nausea, vomiting, vision changes, imbalance, weakness, or difficulty with mental tasks. The treatment options for these tumors may include surgical resection, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, depending on the type and extent of the tumor. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence and manage any long-term effects of treatment.

A neurilemmoma, also known as schwannoma or peripheral nerve sheath tumor, is a benign, slow-growing tumor that arises from the Schwann cells, which produce the myelin sheath that surrounds and insulates peripheral nerves. These tumors can occur anywhere along the course of a peripheral nerve, but they most commonly affect the acoustic nerve (vestibulocochlear nerve), leading to a type of tumor called vestibular schwannoma or acoustic neuroma. Neurilemmomas are typically encapsulated and do not invade the surrounding tissue, although larger ones may cause pressure-related symptoms due to compression of nearby structures. Rarely, these tumors can undergo malignant transformation, leading to a condition called malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor or neurofibrosarcoma.

X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging method that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional (tomographic) images (virtual "slices") of the body. These cross-sectional images can then be used to display detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body.

The term "computed tomography" is used instead of "CT scan" or "CAT scan" because the machines take a series of X-ray measurements from different angles around the body and then use a computer to process these data to create detailed images of internal structures within the body.

CT scanning is a noninvasive, painless medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. CT imaging provides detailed information about many types of tissue including lung, bone, soft tissue and blood vessels. CT examinations can be performed on every part of the body for a variety of reasons including diagnosis, surgical planning, and monitoring of therapeutic responses.

In computed tomography (CT), an X-ray source and detector rotate around the patient, measuring the X-ray attenuation at many different angles. A computer uses this data to construct a cross-sectional image by the process of reconstruction. This technique is called "tomography". The term "computed" refers to the use of a computer to reconstruct the images.

CT has become an important tool in medical imaging and diagnosis, allowing radiologists and other physicians to view detailed internal images of the body. It can help identify many different medical conditions including cancer, heart disease, lung nodules, liver tumors, and internal injuries from trauma. CT is also commonly used for guiding biopsies and other minimally invasive procedures.

In summary, X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging technique that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional images of the body. It provides detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body, allowing physicians to diagnose and treat medical conditions.

The meninges are the protective membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord. They consist of three layers: the dura mater (the outermost, toughest layer), the arachnoid mater (middle layer), and the pia mater (the innermost, delicate layer). These membranes provide protection and support to the central nervous system, and contain blood vessels that supply nutrients and remove waste products. Inflammation or infection of the meninges is called meningitis, which can be a serious medical condition requiring prompt treatment.

The foramen magnum is the largest opening in the human skull, located at the base of the skull, through which the spinal cord connects to the brain. It is a crucial structure for the transmission of nerve impulses between the brain and the rest of the body. The foramen magnum also provides passage for blood vessels that supply the brainstem and upper spinal cord.

Human chromosome pair 22 consists of two rod-shaped structures present in the nucleus of each cell in the human body. Each chromosome is made up of DNA tightly coiled around histone proteins, forming a complex structure called a chromatin.

Chromosome pair 22 is one of the 22 autosomal pairs of human chromosomes, meaning they are not sex chromosomes (X or Y). Chromosome 22 is the second smallest human chromosome, with each arm of the chromosome designated as p and q. The short arm is labeled "p," and the long arm is labeled "q."

Chromosome 22 contains several genes that are associated with various genetic disorders, including DiGeorge syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome, and cat-eye syndrome, which result from deletions or duplications of specific regions on the chromosome. Additionally, chromosome 22 is the location of the NRXN1 gene, which has been associated with an increased risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia when deleted or disrupted.

Understanding the genetic makeup of human chromosome pair 22 can provide valuable insights into human genetics, evolution, and disease susceptibility, as well as inform medical diagnoses, treatments, and research.

Neurofibromin 2 is not a medical term itself, but Neurofibromin 1 and Neurofibromin 2 are related to a genetic disorder called Neurofibromatosis. Neurofibromin 1 is the correct term, which is a protein encoded by the NF1 gene in humans.

Neurofibromin 1 is a tumor suppressor protein that plays a crucial role in regulating cell growth and differentiation. Mutations in the NF1 gene can lead to Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a genetic disorder characterized by the development of benign tumors on the nerves, skin, and other parts of the body.

Neurofibromin 2, on the other hand, is not a recognized term in medical literature. It is possible that there is some confusion with Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), which is a separate genetic disorder caused by mutations in the NF2 gene. The NF2 gene encodes a protein called Merlin, which also functions as a tumor suppressor and helps regulate cell growth and division.

Therefore, it is essential to clarify whether you are asking about Neurofibromin 1 or Neurofibromatosis type 2 when using the term "Neurofibromin 2."

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

Desmoplastic fibroma is a very rare benign (non-cancerous) tumor of the connective tissue. It typically develops in the bones, but can also occur in soft tissues. The tumor is characterized by the overgrowth of collagen-producing cells (fibroblasts), leading to the formation of a firm, fibrous mass. Desmoplastic fibromas are slow-growing and typically do not spread to other parts of the body (metastasize). However, they can cause significant damage to the affected bone or tissue as they grow, potentially leading to fractures or deformities. Treatment usually involves surgical removal of the tumor.

Hemangioendothelioma is a rare type of vascular tumor, which means it arises from the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels. It can occur in various parts of the body, but it most commonly involves the soft tissues and bones. Hemangioendotheliomas are often classified as borderline malignant tumors because they can behave either indolently (like a benign tumor) or aggressively (like a malignant tumor), depending on their specific type and location.

There are several subtypes of hemangioendothelioma, including:

1. Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma: This subtype typically affects young adults and can involve various organs, such as the liver, lungs, or soft tissues. It tends to have a more indolent course but can metastasize in some cases.
2. Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma: This is an aggressive subtype that usually occurs in infants and children. It often involves the skin and soft tissues, causing local invasion and consumptive coagulopathy (Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon).
3. Retiform hemangioendothelioma: A rare and low-grade malignant tumor that typically affects the skin and subcutaneous tissue of adults. It has a favorable prognosis with a low risk of metastasis.
4. Papillary intralymphatic angioendothelioma (PILA): This is a rare, slow-growing tumor that usually occurs in the head and neck region of children and young adults. It has an excellent prognosis with no reported cases of metastasis or recurrence after complete surgical resection.

Treatment for hemangioendotheliomas typically involves surgical excision when possible. Other treatment options, such as radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or targeted therapies, may be considered depending on the tumor's location, size, and behavior. Regular follow-up is essential to monitor for potential recurrence or metastasis.

Malignant anaplastic meningioma is aggressive. Although anaplastic meningioma has higher chances of distant metastasis than the ... MR/CT scans of meningioma from MedPix MR/CT scans of pneumosinus dilatans from MedPix Cancer.Net: Meningioma (Webarchive ... Starr CJ, Cha S (September 2017). "Meningioma mimics: five key imaging features to differentiate them from meningiomas". ... atypical and anaplastic meningiomas identifies novel genes associated with meningioma progression". International Journal of ...
... is a rare, fast-growing tumor that forms in one of the inner layers of the meninges (thin layers of tissue ... Malignant meningioma entry in the public domain NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms This article incorporates public domain material ... The World Health Organization classification system defines both grade II and grade III meningiomas as malignant. Historically ... Benign or low grade meningiomas (WHO grade I) include meningothelial, fibrous, transitional, psammomatous, angiomatous, ...
... (also known as "Heterotopic meningeal tissue," and "Rudimentary meningocele") is a developmental defect, ...
A sphenoid wing meningioma is a benign brain tumor near the sphenoid bone. A meningioma is a benign brain tumor. It originates ... Meningiomas are much more common in females, and are more common after 50 years of age. Of all cranial meningiomas, about 20% ... Meningiomas. New York: Raven Press, 1991. Bonnal J, A Thibaut, J Brotchi, and J Born. Invading Meningiomas of the Sphenoid ... Treatment of meningioma. UpToDate, online, April 7, 2006. Schmidek, H. Meningiomas and Their Surgical Management. Philadelphia ...
About 1-2% of all meningiomas are optic nerve sheath meningiomas. Meningiomas have an incidence of ~4.18/100,000 persons each ... Thus, ~10,000 meningiomas are diagnosed in the US each year; corresponding to ~100 cases of ONSM each year in the US. The ... Optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) are rare benign tumors of the optic nerve. 60-70% of cases occur in middle age females, ... Wright JE, Call NB, Liaricos S (1980). "Primary optic nerve meningioma". Br J Ophthalmol. 64 (8): 553-558. doi:10.1136/bjo.64.8 ...
HF1 Meningioma; 607174; MN1 Meningioma, NF2-related, somatic; 607174; NF2 Menkes disease; 309400; ATP7A Mental retardation and ...
Many meningiomas, with the exception of some tumors located at the skull base, can be successfully removed surgically. Most ... Tumors of the meninges are meningiomas and are often benign. Though not technically a tumor of brain tissue, they are often ... Since they are usually slow-growing tumors, meningiomas can be quite large by the time symptoms appear. The brains of humans ... "Meningioma Brain Tumor". neurosurgery.ucla.edu. Retrieved 29 July 2019. "Neurons & Glial Cells , SEER Training". training.seer. ...
... or a chordoid meningioma. In particular, meningiomas are known to produce musical auditory hallucinations such as Schumann ... Scott, M (1979). "Musical hallucinations from meningioma". JAMA. 241 (16): 1683. doi:10.1001/jama.1979.03290420011006. PMID ...
... showed that the owner of the skull suffered from a meningioma, which is an arachnoid tumor. Meningiomas are a diverse set of ... Meningiomas are very rare with roughly 2 out of 100,000 causing symptoms, so finding evidence of one in such ancient remains is ... It is the earliest evidence of a meningioma tumor on record. List of fossil sites (with link directory) List of hominina ( ... It is also possible that no neurological deficiencies were suffered, due to the slow growing nature of meningiomas. Whether the ...
In the differential diagnosis, schwannoma and meningioma with pigmentation are to be considered as well. Melanocytomas have ... Limas C, Tio FO (1972). "Meningeal melanocytoma ("melanotic meningioma"). Its melanocytic origin as revealed by electron ...
Rao SB, Dinakar I, Rao KS (December 1971). "Giant intracranial epidural meningioma". Journal of Neurosurgery. 35 (6): 748-50. ...
They have a grade 2 or 3 biological behavior, and need to be distinguished from benign meningiomas because of their high rate ... When inside the nervous system, although not strictly a meningioma tumor, it is a meningeal tumor with a special aggressive ... Berlin: Springer-Verlag (2nd ed.) (30). Sherman W, Raizer J. Dropcho EJ (ed.). "Meningiomas". Medmerits: 2. Archived from the ... Maier H, Ofner D, Hittmair A, Kitz K, Budka H (October 1992). "Classic, atypical, and anaplastic meningioma: three ...
Seker, Askin; Martins, Carolina; Rhoton Jr., Albert L. (2010). "2 - Meningeal Anatomy". Meningiomas. Saunders. pp. 11-51. doi: ...
A tumor growing from the meninges is referred to as a meningioma. Most meningiomas grow from the arachnoid mater inward ... While meningiomas make up 20% of primary brain tumors and 12% of spinal cord tumors, 90% of these tumors are benign. ... Meningiomas tend to grow slowly and therefore symptoms may arise years after initial tumor formation. The symptoms often ... "Meningiomas". Mayfield Clinic. Retrieved 23 March 2011. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Pia mater. Martini, F. Timmons, ...
ISBN 978-0-8089-2306-0. Kawase, Takeshi (2010). "38 - Petroclival Meningiomas: Middle Fossa Anterior Transpetrosal Approach". ... Meningiomas. Saunders. pp. 495-501. doi:10.1016/B978-1-4160-5654-6.00038-6. ISBN 978-1-4160-5654-6. Anatomy photo:22:os-0902 at ...
Zada, Gabriel; Jensen, Randy L. (2016). Meningiomas. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ISBN 978-0323443890.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: ...
Meningiomas. Saunders. pp. 11-51. doi:10.1016/B978-1-4160-5654-6.00002-7. ISBN 978-1-4160-5654-6.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: ...
Seker, Askin; Martins, Carolina; Rhoton Jr., Albert L. (2010). "2 - Meningeal Anatomy". Meningiomas. Saunders. pp. 11-51. doi: ...
Lahmeyer HW (June 1982). "Frontal lobe meningioma and depression". The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 43 (6): 254-5. PMID ...
Initially, the dural tail sign was thought to be pathognomonic of meningioma, a slow-growing tumor that arises from the ... Guermazi, A.; Lafitte, F.; Miaux, Y.; Adem, C.; Bonneville, J.-F.; Chiras, J. (2005). "The dural tail sign-beyond meningioma". ... volumes for meningioma treatment did not seem to impact recurrence. Sotoudeh, Houman (2010). "A review on dural tail sign". ... "Radiation of meningioma dural tail may not improve tumor control rates". Frontiers in Surgery. Frontiers Media SA. 9: 908745. ...
Meningiomas, Part II. Elsevier. 170: 291-302. doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-822198-3.00048-3. ISBN 9780128221983. PMC 6169485. PMID ... Chukwueke UN, Wen PY (2020). McDermott MW (ed.). "Medical management of meningiomas". Handbook of Clinical Neurology. ...
Gil M, Oliva B, Timoner J, Maciá MA, Bryant V, de Abajo FJ (December 2011). "Risk of meningioma among users of high doses of ... A hemangioblastoma mimicking a meningioma has been reported in a man treated with CPA. The combination of low-dose (2 mg) CPA ... Raj R, Korja M, Koroknay-Pál P, Niemelä M (2018). "Multiple meningiomas in two male-to-female transsexual patients with hormone ... Ter Wengel PV, Martin E, Gooren L, Den Heijer M, Peerdeman SM (December 2016). "Meningiomas in three male-to-female transgender ...
This gene is a candidate meningioma gene. Two transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been found for this gene, ... a candidate meningioma gene". Hum Mol Genet. 3 (8): 1393-9. doi:10.1093/hmg/3.8.1393. PMID 7987321. Peyrard M, Pan HQ, Kedra D ...
Cerrón Rojas, Vladimir Roy (2001). "Meningioma in the pediatric age: rare case". Neurol Journal 5 (33): 495-497. Cerrón Rojas, ...
ISBN 9781598848311 Chan, Amanda, "What's a meningioma? The science of Mary Tyler Moore's brain tumor" NBCNews.com (May 12, 2011 ...
"Co-existing fibrous dysplasia and meningothelial meningioma". Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria. 67 (3): 699-700. doi:10.1590/S0004 ...
In 2011, she had surgery to remove a meningioma, a benign brain tumor. In 2014, friends reported that Moore had heart and ... ISBN 9781598848311 Chan, Amanda, "What's a meningioma? The science of Mary Tyler Moore's brain tumor" NBCNews.com (May 12, 2011 ... Goldmann, Russell (May 12, 2011). "Mary Tyler Moore Has Brain Surgery for Meningioma Tumor". ABC News. Retrieved July 6, 2019. ...
Mutations in this gene are associated with meningioma. Reciprocal translocations between chromosomes 22 and 17, at sites where ...
Wood was diagnosed in 1910 with a benign meningioma, which was successfully resected by Harvey Cushing. He made a full recovery ... Lee, Joung H. (2009). Meningiomas: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcome. Springer. p. 8. ISBN 978-1-84882-910-7. Lane 2009, p. 19 ...
Adjuvant radiotherapy for atypical meningiomas (2017) Couldwell, WT; Bagshaw, HP; Burt, LM; Suneja, G; Jensen, RL; Palmer, CA ( ... A description of familial clustering of meningiomas in the Utah population (2017) Couldwell, WT; CannonAlbright, LA (2017). "A ... Clinical Outcomes with Transcranial Resection of the Tuberculum Sellae Meningioma (2017) Couldwell, WT; CannonAlbright, LA ( ... 2017). "Clinical Outcomes with Transcranial Resection of the Tuberculum Sellae Meningioma". World Neurosurgery. 108: 748-755. ...
Malignant anaplastic meningioma is aggressive. Although anaplastic meningioma has higher chances of distant metastasis than the ... MR/CT scans of meningioma from MedPix MR/CT scans of pneumosinus dilatans from MedPix Cancer.Net: Meningioma (Webarchive ... Starr CJ, Cha S (September 2017). "Meningioma mimics: five key imaging features to differentiate them from meningiomas". ... atypical and anaplastic meningiomas identifies novel genes associated with meningioma progression". International Journal of ...
Felix Plater first described meningiomas at an autopsy. In 1938, Harvey Cushing introduced them as a separate category of ... encoded search term (Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma) and Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma What to Read Next on Medscape ... Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma. Updated: May 11, 2021 * Author: Mitchell V Gossman, MD; Chief Editor: Edsel B Ing, MD, PhD, MBA ... Meningiomas rarely occur in children [4] and differ from those in adults and other childhood tumors. Incidence in children is ...
Meningioma, the term coined by Harvey Cushing, refers to a set of tumors that arise contiguously to the meninges. . ... Psammomatous meningioma (arrow indicates psammoma body). C, Meningothelial meningioma, tumor in case 4. E, Meningioma with ... Meningioma refers to a set of tumors that arise contiguously to the meninges (see the image below). Meningiomas may occur ... Meningiomas are more prevalent in Africa than in North America or Europe. In Los Angeles County, meningioma is reported more ...
Meningiomas - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the MSD Manuals - Medical Professional ... Symptoms and Signs of Meningiomas Symptoms of meningiomas depend on which part of the brain is compressed and thus on the ... Meningiomas, particularly those , 2 cm in diameter, are among the most common intracranial tumors. Meningiomas are the only ... Treatment of Meningiomas *. For symptomatic or enlarging meningiomas, surgical excision or radiation therapy ...
Extra-axial mass arising from petrous apex. Lesion extends anteriorly under right temporal lobe and posteriorly along the edge of the tentorium. Homogeneous enhancement noted following contrast administration. MRI Positive for CSF cleft and dural tail signs.
Surgical complications of petroclival meningiomas have reduced in last decades due to advancement in surgical techniques, ... Surgical complications of petroclival meningiomas have reduced in last decades due to advancement in surgical techniques, ...
Meningioma of the paranasal sinuses. A report of two cases. Am J Surg Pathol. 1990 Jan; 14(1):82-6. ...
Meningioma, the term coined by Harvey Cushing, refers to a set of tumors that arise contiguously to the meninges. . ... Psammomatous meningioma (arrow indicates psammoma body). C, Meningothelial meningioma, tumor in case 4. E, Meningioma with ... Case 3: Tentorial meningioma. A, Contrast-enhanced CT scan shows the enhancing meningioma. Transverse T1-weighted MRIs shows ... Case 7: Parasagittal meningioma invading the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). A, Sagittal T1-weighted MRI shows a meningioma ( ...
Meningioma, the term coined by Harvey Cushing, refers to a set of tumors that arise contiguously to the meninges. . ... Psammomatous meningioma (arrow indicates psammoma body). C, Meningothelial meningioma, tumor in case 4. E, Meningioma with ... Meningiomas are more prevalent in Africa than in North America or Europe. In Los Angeles County, meningioma is reported more ... In rare cases, meningiomas occur in an intraventricular or intraosseous location. The problem of classifying meningioma is that ...
Identification of Meningioma Patients at High Risk of Tumor Recurrence Using MicroRNA Profiling. Neurosurgery. 2020, 87(5), ... Identification of Meningioma Patients at High Risk of Tumor Recurrence Using MicroRNA Profiling ... Identification of Meningioma Patients At High Risk of Tumor Recurrence Using MicroRNA Profiling ...
Involvement of the optic canal in meningiomas is frequent, and often the initial presentation is visual disturbance due to ... Object. Juxtasellar meningiomas frequently extend into the optic canal. Removing these meningiomas from the optic canal is ... Only 1 patient harboring a left cavernous sinus meningioma had tumor recurrence and underwent repeat resection. Meningiomas ... It occurs in a wide variety of anterior skull base meningiomas and it can be bilateral. It is a prominent factor that affects ...
Benign Meningioma with Pulmonary Metastasis: A Rare Presentation. Adeel Sattar Chaudhry, Indiana University School of Medicine ...
Meningiomas * View other providers who treat Meningiomas Merkel Cell Carcinoma * View other providers who treat Merkel Cell ...
Meningioma. C70.0-70.1, 70.9. 9530-9539. Thyroid. C73.9. 8000-9049, 9056-9139, 9141-9589. ...
Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging of meningioma and other intracranial tumors. J Neurooncol. 2018 Jan; 136 (2):373-378 ... Adapting a pet imaging agent for correlative microscopy of meningiomas and other intracranial tumors Microscopy and ...
meningioma. *mesenchymal, non-meningothelial tumors *soft tissue tumors*fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors * solitary ...
2009) Navigated resection of giant intracranial meningiomas based on intraoperative 3D ultrasound. Acta Neurochirurgica ... 2009) Navigated resection of giant intracranial meningiomas based on intraoperative 3D ultrasound. Acta Neurochirurgica ...
Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) and meningioma microsurgical resection. *Cranial and spinal radiosurgery ...
Meningioma. 3. sCJD. 2001 Jan. 1989 Apr. Subarachinoid hemorrhage. dCJD. 1995 Jul. 1980 Jul. Aneurysm. ...
Neoplasias Meníngeas; Meningioma; Acidente Vascular Cerebral; Humanos; Feminino; Pessoa de Meia-Idade; Meningioma/diagnóstico; ... Meningiomas are rarely reported as a cause of a stroke. A detailed evaluation can provide a high degree of confidence in ... Meningioma as a rare cause of underlying clinical stroke. Alfonso, Leslie Guadalupe Gozá; Antulov, Ronald; Toncheva, Nataliya ... In this case report a 54-year-old woman had an anterior clinoid process meningioma. She was initially diagnosed as having a ...
Spinal meningiomas: evaluation of 41 patients. J Neurosurg Sci; 49 (1): 7-11 (2005) Peker S, Çerçi A, Özgen S, Işık N, ...
Inhibition of BMP signaling pathway induced senescence and calcification in anaplastic meningioma. ConclusionsThe GREM2-BMPR1A- ... Peptide radionuclide radiation therapy with Lutathera in multirecurrent nonanaplastic meningiomas: antitumoral activity study ... ConclusionIn nonanaplastic meningiomas, Lutathera ®s antitumoral activity appeared delayed and more likely observed at six ... tryptophan metabolic pathway in meningiomas is a potential new therapeutic target. (Source: Journal of Neuro-Oncology). Source ...
Meningioma see Brain Tumors * Meningitis * Meningococcal Disease * Meningococcal Infections see Meningococcal Disease ...
A small meningioma arising from the right sphenoid ridge was discovered. The meningioma enlarged over time [. Figures 1a -. c ... Case Description: The meningioma enlarged as her hemichorea worsened, and after meningioma resection, the hemichorea gradually ... and to the best of our knowledge, there has only been one case of chorea with a meningioma reported to date.[. 10 ] Herein, we ... The meningioma in our patient may have had a similar remote effect, which would explain our aforementioned 123I-IMP SPECT ...
... of vascular endothelial growth factor messenger RNA expression with peritumoral vasogenic cerebral edema in meningiomas. J ...
RESULTS: The MRI revealed a large occipital lobe meningioma, which was surgically resected. Removal of the meningioma had ... Those who evaluate patients with MCS are reminded that meningiomas and other intracranial mass lesions can affect olfaction, ... BACKGROUND: The concurrent diagnosis of meningioma with increased intracranial pressure has not been reported previously in a ... meningioma; neoplasms; environmental illness; occupational medicine; illness behavior; smell ...
Microsurgical resection of foramen magnum meningioma thru a transcondylar approach: 3D operative vid ...
Endoscope-Assisted Microsurgical Removal of an Optic Foramen Meningioma through a Frontolateral Minicraniotomy. J Neurol Surg B ... Approach Distinguishes Low-grade from High-grade Meningiomas, Can Reflect the Respective Proliferative Potential and ... MRI Gives Valuable Insights into Tumor Biology and Enables Prediction of Growth Kinetics and Prognosis in Meningiomas.. Transl ...
  • The frequency of meningiomas has been the topic of relatively few reports. (medscape.com)
  • The frequency of meningiomas in Africa is nearly 30% of all primary intracranial tumors. (medscape.com)
  • Only 1 patient harboring a left cavernous sinus meningioma had tumor recurrence and underwent repeat resection. (medscape.com)
  • Optic nerve and cavernous sinus meningiomas are uncommon pathologies, and so far there have not been previously reported to occur in the same patient. (bvsalud.org)
  • Another rare group of meningiomas consists of tumors that arise from ectopic arachnoid cells within the orbital cavity, either in the muscle cone or in the walls of the orbit. (medscape.com)
  • Meningioma refers to a set of tumors that arise contiguously to the meninges (see the image below). (medscape.com)
  • 18F-FDG PET in the assessment of tumor grade and prediction of tumor recurrence in intracranial meningioma. (medscape.com)
  • The current trend is to separate unequivocal meningiomas from other less well-defined neoplasms. (medscape.com)
  • Meningiomas account for approximately 20% of all primary intracranial neoplasms. (medscape.com)
  • Ibebuike K, Ouma J, Gopal R. Meningiomas among intracranial neoplasms in Johannesburg, South Africa: prevalence, clinical observations and review of the literature. (medscape.com)
  • Coke CC, Corn BW, Werner-Wasik M, Xie Y, Curran WJ Jr. Atypical and malignant meningiomas: an outcome report of seventeen cases. (medscape.com)
  • Malignant meningioma in Gorlin's syndrome: cytogenetic and p53 gene analysis. (medscape.com)
  • Long-term experience with World Health Organization grade III (malignant) meningiomas at a single institution. (medscape.com)
  • The term optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) does not indicate a definite site of origin. (medscape.com)
  • Secondary ONSMs are much more common than primary ONSMs, but the unqualified term "optic nerve sheath meningioma" ordinarily refers to primary ONSM. (medscape.com)
  • These ectopic, extradural meningiomas do not appear to have a connection to the optic nerve sheath or the optic canal and do not appear to originate intracranially. (medscape.com)
  • Juxtasellar meningiomas frequently extend into the optic canal. (medscape.com)
  • Removing these meningiomas from the optic canal is crucial for favorable visual outcome. (medscape.com)
  • Methods The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 45 patients with anterior and middle fossa meningiomas with involvement of the optic pathway in whom surgery was performed by the senior author (O.A.M.) during the period from 1993 to 2007. (medscape.com)
  • Involvement of the optic canal in meningiomas is frequent. (medscape.com)
  • Visual disturbance due to optic nerve compression is the initial presentation for many patients with anterior and middle fossa meningiomas. (medscape.com)
  • In this study we review 45 patients with meningiomas extending into the optic canal, and we discuss the pattern of involvement of the canal and implications for method of decompression as well as the outcome. (medscape.com)
  • Cite this: Meningiomas Involving the Optic Canal - Medscape - May 01, 2011. (medscape.com)
  • In general, the ideal treatment of a benign meningioma is surgical resection if possible. (medscape.com)
  • The meningioma enlarged as her hemichorea worsened, and after meningioma resection, the hemichorea gradually subsided. (surgicalneurologyint.com)
  • Case 1: Bone-window CT reveals calcification of the meningioma. (medscape.com)
  • Meningiomas produce their symptoms by several mechanisms. (medscape.com)
  • A systematic review of the literature regarding the clinical behavior of small, untreated meningiomas suggests that most meningiomas 2.5 cm or less in diameter do not proceed to cause symptoms in the 5 years following their discovery. (medscape.com)
  • Symptoms of Meningiomas by. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The meningioma enlarged over time [ Figures 1a - c ], alongside worsening symptoms [ Video 1 ]. (surgicalneurologyint.com)
  • Removal of the meningioma had little effect on the patient's symptoms. (cdc.gov)
  • Meningiomas commonly are found at the surface of the brain, either over the convexity or at the skull base. (medscape.com)
  • Abdel Kerim A, Bonneville F, Jean B, Cornu P, LeJean L, Chiras J. Balloon-assisted embolization of skull base meningioma with liquid embolic agent. (medscape.com)
  • It occurs in a wide variety of anterior skull base meningiomas and it can be bilateral. (medscape.com)
  • Meningioma, also known as meningeal tumor, is typically a slow-growing tumor that forms from the meninges, the membranous layers surrounding the brain and spinal cord. (wikipedia.org)
  • Meningiomas are tumors of the meninges that can compress adjacent brain tissue. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Meningiomas are tumors of the meninges that are usually but not always benign. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The annual incidence of symptomatic meningiomas is approximately 2 cases per 100,000 individuals. (medscape.com)
  • Symptomatic or enlarging meningiomas should be excised if possible. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Meningiomas are more prevalent in Africa than in North America or Europe. (medscape.com)
  • Body mass index, physical activity, and risk of adult meningioma and glioma: A meta-analysis. (medscape.com)
  • 2012. Occupational exposure to chlorinated solvents and risks of glioma and meningioma in adults. (cdc.gov)
  • 26 (4) : 263-267 Applying DDX3X Biomarker to Discriminate Atypical from Benign Meningiomas in Tissue Microarray. (genetex.com)
  • Stereotactic radiosurgery is used for surgically inaccessible meningiomas and electively for other meningiomas. (msdmanuals.com)
  • RESULTS: The MRI revealed a large occipital lobe meningioma, which was surgically resected. (cdc.gov)
  • citation needed] Histologically, meningioma cells are relatively uniform, with a tendency to encircle one another, forming whorls and psammoma bodies (laminated calcific concretions). (wikipedia.org)
  • In rare cases, meningiomas occur in an intraventricular or intraosseous location. (medscape.com)
  • Intraventricular chordoid meningioma presenting with Castleman disease due to overproduction of interleukin-6. (medscape.com)
  • Meningiomata arise from arachnoidal cap cells, most of which are near the vicinity of the venous sinuses, and this is the site of greatest prevalence for meningioma formation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Variability has been shown in the prevalence of meningiomas among Caucasians, Africans, African Americans, and Asians. (medscape.com)
  • Although intracranial tumors as a whole show a higher prevalence in males than in females, meningiomas have a 2:1 female-to-male ratio in Caucasians. (medscape.com)
  • However, the true prevalence is likely higher than this because autopsy studies reveal that 2.3% of individuals have undiagnosed asymptomatic meningiomas. (medscape.com)
  • Papillary meningioma: clinical and histopathological observations. (medscape.com)
  • Meningioma as a rare cause of underlying clinical stroke. (bvsalud.org)
  • Majchrzak K, Tymowski M. Surgical treatment of the tentorial and falco-tentorial junction meningiomas. (medscape.com)
  • Meningiomas are multiple in 5-40% of cases, particularly when they associated with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). (medscape.com)
  • Meningiomas, which are usually benign, can develop wherever there is dura, most commonly over the convexities near the venous sinuses, along the base of the skull, and in the posterior fossa and rarely within ventricles. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The incidence of meningiomas increases with age, 2-7 cases per 100,000 in women and 1-5 cases per 100,000 in men. (medscape.com)
  • In Los Angeles County, meningioma is reported more commonly in African Americans than in others. (medscape.com)
  • Diagnosis of meningiomas is similar to that of other brain tumors, usually by MRI with a paramagnetic contrast agent. (msdmanuals.com)
  • BACKGROUND: The concurrent diagnosis of meningioma with increased intracranial pressure has not been reported previously in a patient who meets diagnostic criteria for multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS). (cdc.gov)
  • In patients with gliomas and meningiomas, faster exchange was tentatively associated with higher tumor grade. (lu.se)
  • [ 1 ] Meningiomas are believed to arise from arachnoid cap cells, and they usually are attached to the dura. (medscape.com)
  • If stereotactic radiosurgery is impossible or if a meningioma recurs, radiation therapy may be useful. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Meningiomas rarely occur in infants. (medscape.com)
  • Meningiomas may occur intracranially or within the spinal canal. (medscape.com)
  • In this case report a 54-year-old woman had an anterior clinoid process meningioma . (bvsalud.org)
  • Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 22q and 17p correlates with aggressiveness of meningiomas. (medscape.com)
  • Meningiomas are rarely reported as a cause of a stroke . (bvsalud.org)
  • Such locations for meningiomas are rare in adults. (medscape.com)
  • For asymptomatic small meningiomas, particularly in older adults, monitoring with serial neuroimaging is sufficient. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Dental X-rays are correlated with an increased risk of meningioma, in particular for people who had frequent dental X-rays in the past, when the X-ray dose of a dental X-ray was higher than in the present. (wikipedia.org)
  • In one series of 517 patients with meningiomas at Brigham and Women's Hospital, the female-to-male ratio was 24:1. (medscape.com)
  • In one retrospective series at the King Faisal Hospital from 1980-1993 that included a total of 318 patients with meningiomas, only 2.8% of patients were children aged 16 years or younger. (medscape.com)
  • Therefore, some patients die with meningioma and not from it. (medscape.com)
  • Those who evaluate patients with MCS are reminded that meningiomas and other intracranial mass lesions can affect olfaction, and that patients with MCS can have treatable intracranial abnormalities. (cdc.gov)
  • Case 1: MRI of a meningioma on plaque. (medscape.com)
  • See Brain Lesions: 9 Cases to Test Your Management Skills , a Critical Images slideshow, to review cases including meningiomas, glioblastomas and craniopharyngiomas, and to determine the best treatment options based on the case history and the associated images. (medscape.com)
  • 3 ] Brain tumors presenting with chorea are rare,[ 2 ] and to the best of our knowledge, there has only been one case of chorea with a meningioma reported to date. (surgicalneurologyint.com)
  • The dura is opened, and the meningioma can be seen extending en plaque over the surface of the brain. (medscape.com)
  • Meningiomas are the only brain tumor more common among women. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Meningiomas compress but do not invade brain parenchyma. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Treatment decision making based on the published natural history and growth rate of small meningiomas. (medscape.com)
  • A small meningioma arising from the right sphenoid ridge was discovered. (surgicalneurologyint.com)
  • Multiple meningiomas may develop. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Multiple meningiomas in a patient with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. (medscape.com)
  • Occipital lobe meningioma in a patient with multiple chemical sensitivities. (cdc.gov)
  • Meningiomas account for approximately 13-19% of all intracranial tumors. (medscape.com)
  • A 2012 review found that mobile telephone use was unrelated to meningioma. (wikipedia.org)
  • The problem of classifying meningioma is that arachnoidal cells may express both mesenchymal and epithelial characteristics. (medscape.com)
  • Familial meningiomas are rare unless associated with NF2. (medscape.com)
  • ConclusionIn nonanaplastic meningiomas, Lutathera ®'s antitumoral activity appeared delayed and more likely observed at six months, while no major response was observed under treatment. (medworm.com)
  • Inflammatory response and meningioma tumorigenesis and the effect of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors. (medscape.com)
  • We propose that the enlarging sphenoid ridge meningioma had a remote effect on regional CBF and the thalamocortical motor center and that complex changes in the basal ganglia output may have caused the hemichorea. (surgicalneurologyint.com)
  • Meningiomas afflict women more often than men. (medscape.com)