Pterygium: An abnormal triangular fold of membrane in the interpalpebral fissure, extending from the conjunctiva to the cornea, being immovably united to the cornea at its apex, firmly attached to the sclera throughout its middle portion, and merged with the conjunctiva at its base. (Dorland, 27th ed)Conjunctiva: The mucous membrane that covers the posterior surface of the eyelids and the anterior pericorneal surface of the eyeball.Membranes: Thin layers of tissue which cover parts of the body, separate adjacent cavities, or connect adjacent structures.Membrane Lipids: Lipids, predominantly phospholipids, cholesterol and small amounts of glycolipids found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. These lipids may be arranged in bilayers in the membranes with integral proteins between the layers and peripheral proteins attached to the outside. Membrane lipids are required for active transport, several enzymatic activities and membrane formation.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Intracellular Membranes: Thin structures that encapsulate subcellular structures or ORGANELLES in EUKARYOTIC CELLS. They include a variety of membranes associated with the CELL NUCLEUS; the MITOCHONDRIA; the GOLGI APPARATUS; the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM; LYSOSOMES; PLASTIDS; and VACUOLES.Membrane Potentials: The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).Membranes, Artificial: Artificially produced membranes, such as semipermeable membranes used in artificial kidney dialysis (RENAL DIALYSIS), monomolecular and bimolecular membranes used as models to simulate biological CELL MEMBRANES. These membranes are also used in the process of GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION.Erythrocyte Membrane: The semi-permeable outer structure of a red blood cell. It is known as a red cell 'ghost' after HEMOLYSIS.Membrane Fluidity: The motion of phospholipid molecules within the lipid bilayer, dependent on the classes of phospholipids present, their fatty acid composition and degree of unsaturation of the acyl chains, the cholesterol concentration, and temperature.Lower Extremity Deformities, Congenital: Congenital structural abnormalities of the LOWER EXTREMITY.Cell Membrane Permeability: A quality of cell membranes which permits the passage of solvents and solutes into and out of cells.Basement Membrane: A darkly stained mat-like EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX (ECM) that separates cell layers, such as EPITHELIUM from ENDOTHELIUM or a layer of CONNECTIVE TISSUE. The ECM layer that supports an overlying EPITHELIUM or ENDOTHELIUM is called basal lamina. Basement membrane (BM) can be formed by the fusion of either two adjacent basal laminae or a basal lamina with an adjacent reticular lamina of connective tissue. BM, composed mainly of TYPE IV COLLAGEN; glycoprotein LAMININ; and PROTEOGLYCAN, provides barriers as well as channels between interacting cell layers.Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.Conjunctival DiseasesScleritis: Refers to any inflammation of the sclera including episcleritis, a benign condition affecting only the episclera, which is generally short-lived and easily treated. Classic scleritis, on the other hand, affects deeper tissue and is characterized by higher rates of visual acuity loss and even mortality, particularly in necrotizing form. Its characteristic symptom is severe and general head pain. Scleritis has also been associated with systemic collagen disease. Etiology is unknown but is thought to involve a local immune response. Treatment is difficult and includes administration of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents such as corticosteroids. Inflammation of the sclera may also be secondary to inflammation of adjacent tissues, such as the conjunctiva.Mitomycin: An antineoplastic antibiotic produced by Streptomyces caespitosus. It is one of the bi- or tri-functional ALKYLATING AGENTS causing cross-linking of DNA and inhibition of DNA synthesis.Autografts: Transplant comprised of an individual's own tissue, transferred from one part of the body to another.Membrane Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of molecules across a biological membrane. Included in this broad category are proteins involved in active transport (BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT, ACTIVE), facilitated transport and ION CHANNELS.Limbus Corneae: An annular transitional zone, approximately 1 mm wide, between the cornea and the bulbar conjunctiva and sclera. It is highly vascular and is involved in the metabolism of the cornea. It is ophthalmologically significant in that it appears on the outer surface of the eyeball as a slight furrow, marking the line between the clear cornea and the sclera. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)Membrane Glycoproteins: Glycoproteins found on the membrane or surface of cells.Lipid Bilayers: Layers of lipid molecules which are two molecules thick. Bilayer systems are frequently studied as models of biological membranes.Fibrin Tissue Adhesive: An autologous or commercial tissue adhesive containing FIBRINOGEN and THROMBIN. The commercial product is a two component system from human plasma that contains more than fibrinogen and thrombin. The first component contains highly concentrated fibrinogen, FACTOR VIII, fibronectin, and traces of other plasma proteins. The second component contains thrombin, calcium chloride, and antifibrinolytic agents such as APROTININ. Mixing of the two components promotes BLOOD CLOTTING and the formation and cross-linking of fibrin. The tissue adhesive is used for tissue sealing, HEMOSTASIS, and WOUND HEALING.Amnion: The innermost membranous sac that surrounds and protects the developing embryo which is bathed in the AMNIOTIC FLUID. Amnion cells are secretory EPITHELIAL CELLS and contribute to the amniotic fluid.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Commodification: The social process by which something or someone comes to be regarded and treated as an article of trade or commerce.Sister Mary Joseph's Nodule: Metastatic lesion of the UMBILICUS associated with intra-abdominal neoplasms especially of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT or OVARY.Umbilicus: The pit in the center of the ABDOMINAL WALL marking the point where the UMBILICAL CORD entered in the FETUS.Azores: A group of nine islands and several islets belonging to Portugal in the north Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Portugal. The islands are named after the acores, the Portuguese for goshawks, living there in abundance. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p102 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p42)Pinnipedia: The suborder of aquatic CARNIVORA comprising the WALRUSES; FUR SEALS; SEA LIONS; and EARLESS SEALS. They have fusiform bodies with very short tails and are found on all sea coasts. The offspring are born on land.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Consumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Corneal Stroma: The lamellated connective tissue constituting the thickest layer of the cornea between the Bowman and Descemet membranes.Blood Volume: Volume of circulating BLOOD. It is the sum of the PLASMA VOLUME and ERYTHROCYTE VOLUME.RestaurantsCommerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Corneal Topography: The measurement of curvature and shape of the anterior surface of the cornea using techniques such as keratometry, keratoscopy, photokeratoscopy, profile photography, computer-assisted image processing and videokeratography. This measurement is often applied in the fitting of contact lenses and in diagnosing corneal diseases or corneal changes including keratoconus, which occur after keratotomy and keratoplasty.Ophthalmic Solutions: Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.Ointments: Semisolid preparations used topically for protective emollient effects or as a vehicle for local administration of medications. Ointment bases are various mixtures of fats, waxes, animal and plant oils and solid and liquid hydrocarbons.Tears: The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.Blepharitis: Inflammation of the eyelids.Surgical Equipment: Nonexpendable apparatus used during surgical procedures. They are differentiated from SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, usually hand-held and used in the immediate operative field.Protestantism: The name given to all Christian denominations, sects, or groups rising out of the Reformation. Protestant churches generally agree that the principle of authority should be the Scriptures rather than the institutional church or the pope. (from W.L. Reese, Dictionary of Philosophy and Religion, 1999)Ophthalmology: A surgical specialty concerned with the structure and function of the eye and the medical and surgical treatment of its defects and diseases.Hospitals, Religious: Private hospitals that are owned or sponsored by religious organizations.Eye Diseases: Diseases affecting the eye.Dry Eye Syndromes: Corneal and conjunctival dryness due to deficient tear production, predominantly in menopausal and post-menopausal women. Filamentary keratitis or erosion of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium may be caused by these disorders. Sensation of the presence of a foreign body in the eye and burning of the eyes may occur.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Burns: Injuries to tissues caused by contact with heat, steam, chemicals (BURNS, CHEMICAL), electricity (BURNS, ELECTRIC), or the like.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Medicare Part C: The Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 establishes a Medicare+Choice program under part C of Title XVIII, Section 4001, of the Social Security Act. Under this program, an eligible individual may elect to receive Medicare benefits through enrollment in a Medicare+Choice plan. Beneficiaries may choose to use private pay options, establish medical savings accounts, use managed care plans, or join provider-sponsored plans.Vatican CityCenters for Medicare and Medicaid Services (U.S.): A component of the Department of Health and Human Services to oversee and direct the Medicare and Medicaid programs and related Federal medical care quality control staffs. Name was changed effective June 14, 2001.
It is also employed in "no sutures" corneal transplantation, pterygium excision with amniotic membrane or conjunctival ...
Amniotic membrane transplantation is an effective and safe procedure for pterygium removal. Amniotic membrane transplantation ... In addition, pterygia are twice as likely to occur in men than women. Pterygium in the conjunctiva is characterized by ... 1997 Jun;104(6):974-85.Comparison of conjunctival autografts, amniotic membrane grafts, and primary closure for pterygium ... It has an advancing portion called the head of the pterygium, which is connected to the main body of the pterygium by the neck ...
The differential for OSSN includes pterygium, pingueculum, papilloma, solar keratosis, lipoma, lymphoma, chronic ... and it is diagnosed when the tumor has not yet penetrated the basement membrane or other delimiting structure to invade ...
Other disorders of tympanic membrane (384.21) Perforation, central, tympanic membrane (385) Other disorders of middle ear and ... 372.4) Pterygium (372.5) Conjunctival degenerations and deposits (372.6) Conjunctival scars (372.7) Conjunctival vascular ... Changes of corneal membranes (371.4) Corneal degenerations (371.5) Hereditary corneal dystrophies (371.50) Hereditary corneal ...
Changes in corneal membranes (H18.4) Corneal degeneration Arcus senilis Band keratopathy (H18.5) corneal dystrophies Fuchs' ... Pterygium (H11.1) Conjunctival degenerations and deposits (H11.2) Conjunctival scars Symblepharon (H11.3) Conjunctival ... Pupillary membranes (H21.5) Other adhesions and disruptions of iris and ciliary body Goniosynechiae Iridodialysis Synechiae ( ...
The enzyme metalloproteinase degrades the cornea's basement membrane and extracellular matrix, while proteolytic enzymes allow ... Degenerative diseases such as pterygiums, and terrien's marginal degeneration may be responsible. Traumas frequently seen with ... from previously injected photosensitive dye inducing apoptosis and necrosis of the endothelium and basement membrane. Diathermy ...
Pars plana vitrectomy (PPV), or trans pars plana vitrectomy (TPPV), is a procedure to remove vitreous opacities and membranes ... Penetrating keratoplasty (PK) Keratoprosthesis(KPro) Phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK) Pterygium excision Corneal tattooing ...
Membrane biology Membrane channel Membrane contact site Membrane curvature Membrane fluidity Membrane lipids Membrane nanotube ... Prediction Protein targeting Protein-lipid interaction Protomer Protoplast Pseudopeptidoglycan Pseudopodia Pterygium Q-type ... Membrane potential Membrane protein Membrane topology Membrane transport Membranome Mesaxon Mesosome Metachronal rhythm ... IgSF CAM Inner membrane Inner mitochondrial membrane Insect wing Integral membrane protein Interbilayer forces in membrane ...
2001). "BAG-1 is a novel cytoplasmic binding partner of the membrane form of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor: a unique ... "Proliferative effects of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor on pterygium epithelial cells and ... 1991). "An antibody that inhibits the binding of diphtheria toxin to cells revealed the association of a 27-kDa membrane ... HB-EGF-like growth factor is synthesized as a membrane-anchored mitogenic and chemotactic glycoprotein. An epidermal growth ...
Vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling versus vitrectomy with no peeling for idiopathic full-thickness ... Done Fibrin glue versus sutures for conjunctival autografting in primary pterygium surgery PMID 27911983 https://doi.org/ ... Amniotic membrane transplantation for acute ocular burns PMID 22972141 https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD009379.pub2 ... Interventions for mucous membrane pemphigoid and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita PMID 12535507 https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858 ...
... (LP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin, mucous membranes and nails. Lichen planus lesions are so ... pterygium formation, shedding of the nail plate with atrophy of the nail bed, subungual keratosis, longitudinal erthronychia ( ... Other oral vesiculo-ulcerative conditions such as Pemphigus vulgaris and Benign mucous membrane pemphigoid Lupus erythematosus ...
Secretory carrier-associated membrane protein 3 SDHC (1q23) SELE (1q24) SHC1 (1q21) SLC39A1 (1q21) SLC50A1: Solute carrier ... deafness Oligodendroglioma Parkinson disease Pheochromocytoma porphyria porphyria cutanea tarda popliteal pterygium syndrome ... Membrane metallo-endopeptidase-like 1 MTFR1L: mitochondrial fission regulator 1 like MTHFR (1p36): 5,10- ...
... epiretinal membrane MeSH C11.768.400 --- retinal artery occlusion MeSH C11.768.585 --- retinal degeneration MeSH C11.768. ... pterygium MeSH C11.187.810 --- xerophthalmia MeSH C11.204.236 --- corneal dystrophies, hereditary MeSH C11.204.236.438 --- ...
Psoriatic nails Pterygium inversum unguis (pterygium inversus unguis, ventral pterygium) Pterygium unguis (dorsal pterygium) ... Therefore, most current textbooks present a classification based on location (for example, conditions of the mucous membrane), ... mucous membranes, nails, and hair. Annular lichen planus Atrophic lichen planus Bullous lichen planus (vesiculobullous lichen ... between which the two layers interact through the basement membrane zone. Structural components of the dermis are collagen, ...
... , membrane: Solute carrier disorders. 1-10. *SLC1A3 *Episodic ataxia 6 ...
In this situation, when the air in the middle ear is absorbed by the mucous membrane, the negative pressure is not compensated ... Malpuech facial clefting syndrome Hearing loss with craniofacial syndromes Popliteal pterygium syndrome Treacher Collins ... which results in the secretion of fluid into the middle ear space from the mucous membrane. Children with this problem ...
The average thickness of the bulbar conjuntival membrane is 33 microns.[1] ...
They are due to copper deposition in part of the cornea (Descemet's membrane) as a result of particular liver diseases.[1] They ... The rings, which consist of copper deposits where the cornea meets the sclera, in Descemet's membrane, first appear as a ... Copper deposition in peripheral Descemet membrane (Kayser-Fleischer ring) and anterior capsule of crystalline lens ( Sunflower ...
... is a chronic inflammatory and immune mediated disease that affects the skin, nails, hair, and mucous membranes.[1 ... pterygium formation, shedding of the nail plate with atrophy of the nail bed, subungual keratosis, longitudinal erthronychia ( ... Mucous membrane pemphigoid and other autoimmune blistering diseases may present with oral erosions and desquamative gingivitis ... upregulation of matrix metalloproteinases that disrupt the epithelial basement membrane zone and allow entry of immune cells ...
MMEL1: Membrane metallo-endopeptidase-like 1. *MTFR1L: mitochondrial fission regulator 1 like ...
Treatment requires careful consideration of angiographic findings when a choroidal neovascular membrane is suspected which is a ...
Epiretinal membrane (Macular pucker). *Vitelliform macular dystrophy. *Leber's congenital amaurosis. *Birdshot ...
C. diphtheriae causes membrane formation in conjunctiva of unimmunized children.[7] Chemical[edit]. Chemical eye injury may ... Cases of bacterial conjunctivitis that involve the production of membranes or pseudomembranes are associated with Neisseria ... Bacterial conjunctivitis may cause the production of membranes or pseudomembranes that cover the conjunctiva. Pseudomembranes ... consist of a combination of inflammatory cells and exudates and adhere loosely to the conjunctiva, while true membranes are ...
Epiretinal membrane (Macular pucker). *Vitelliform macular dystrophy. *Leber's congenital amaurosis. *Birdshot ...
Epiretinal membrane (Macular pucker). *Vitelliform macular dystrophy. *Leber's congenital amaurosis. *Birdshot ...
Pterygium inversum unguis. *Pterygium unguis. *Purpura of the nail bed. *Racquet nail ... membrane. *Aphthous stomatitis. *oral candidiasis. *lichen planus. *leukoplakia. *pemphigus vulgaris. *mucous membrane ...
... a conjunctival/limbal autograft and/or amniotic membrane may be used. This generally requires extra technical skills and ... He has had five previous pterygium excisions, with the last surgery involving conjunctival autografting and subconjunctival ... MMC injection followed by bare sclera pterygium excision was found to be effective in this patient with a recurrent pterygium. ... Treatment of recurrent pterygium associated with symblepharon usually involves the use of tissue grafting and/or the ...
To demonstrate the long-term outcome of pterygium surgery with adjunctive amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) and ... Adjunctive use of AMT and short exposure of MMC can reduce recurrence after pterygium surgery. The procedure is less tedious ... Medical records were retrieved for this noncomparative retrospective study of all patients who had pterygium excision with ... 13 years who had pterygium excision (527 primary and 29 recurrent). For an average follow-up period of 17.3 ± 0.8 months (range ...
... shows a pterygium surgery with amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT). Such surgery allows patients to experience rapid post- ... Pterygium Surgery with Amniotic Membrane (AMT) Matthew Rauen, MD. Channels: Cornea Matthew Rauen, MD, shows a pterygium surgery ... Alex W. Cohen, MD, PhD, shows a technique for performing pterygium surgery using mitomycin C and an amniotic membrane graft. ... Matthew Rauen, MD, shows a pterygium surgery with amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT). Such surgery allows patients to ...
Amniotic membrane. Conjunctival autograft. Recurrent pterygia. compare amniotic membrane associated with conjunctival autograft ... Amniotic Membrane Associated With Conjunctival Autograft Versus Conjunctival Autograft for Recurrent Pterygia. The safety and ... Recurrent Pterygia Procedure: Conjunctival autograft versus conjunctival autograft treatment for recurrent pterygia Phase 1 ... Patients with recurrent pterygia without symblepharon were randomly assigned to undertake pterygium excision followed by ...
Amniotic Membrane Graft and Cryotherapy for the Treatment of Primary Pterygium You will receive an email whenever this article ... Purpose: To study the recurrence rate of pterygium using amniotic membrane graft (AMG) with or without cryotherapy for the ... Results: A total of 12 patient underwent pterygium excision with amniotic membrane graft and application of cryotherapy to date ... James Thomas Murphy; Amniotic Membrane Graft and Cryotherapy for the Treatment of Primary Pterygium. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. ...
Keywords: Amniotic membrane graft, pterygium, recurrence Abstract. Objective: The objective of this study is to present the 3 ... Short term results of pterygium surgery with adjunctive amniotic membrane graft * O Okoye ... Conclusion: Short term results suggests that adjunctive amniotic membrane transplant with pterygium excision is effective and ... The data collected were sex, age, occupation, type of pterygium (primary or recurrent), extent of pterygium, post‑operative ...
Arun Gulani demonstrates his use of Ambio2 amniotic membrane, while performing pterygium removal using his "Iceberg" technique ...
Amniotic membrane transplantation is another safe and effective procedure to remove a pterygium. Donor tissue from an inner ... The pterygium may grow on the cornea, which covers the iris, the colored part of the eye. A pterygium usually begins at the ... Causes of Pterygium. While the causes of pterygium are not entirely known, it is believed to be caused mainly by exposure to UV ... Surgical Treatment of Pterygium. In most mild cases of pterygium, artificial tears can be used to reduce dryness and irritation ...
Helping you find trustworthy answers on Pterygium , Latest evidence made easy ... Find all the evidence you need on Pterygium via the Trip Database. ... Comparison of free conjunctival autograft versus amniotic membrane transplantation for pterygium surgery (PubMed). Comparison ... 3. Pterygium Pterygium Pterygium submit The College submit Youre here: Pterygium Pterygium The CMGs are guidelines on the ...
Cursiefen cyst cystic defect degeneration diabetic disease dystrophy edema endothelial cells entropion epiretinal membranes ...
Fluorescein Staining of Cryopreserved Amniotic Membrane Grafts to Improve Visualization During and After Pterygium Surgery: A ... New Pterygium Surgical Techniques Require Standardization of Outcome Measures. Hirst, Lawrence W. ... Retroprosthetic Membrane Formation in Boston Keratoprosthesis: A Case-Control-Matched Comparison of Titanium Versus PMMA ... Techniques for Learning Descemet Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty for Eyes of Asian Patients With Shallow Anterior Chamber. ...
Re: Amniotic Membrane Grafts to Reduce Pterygium Recurrence. Kalamkar, Charudutt; Singh Popli, Jaideep; Mukherjee, Amrita ... Outcomes of Hemi-Descemet Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty for Fuchs Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy. Birbal, Rénuka S.; Hsien, ... Use of Donor Corneas From Pseudophakic Eyes for Descemet Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty. Lapp, Thabo; Heinzelmann, Sonja; ... New Surgical Modality for Management of Corneal Perforation Using Bowman Membrane. Choudhary, Dharamveer Singh; Agrawal, Nikhil ...
DMEK or Descemets Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty. DMEK or Descemets Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty is the latest ... The density of the fibres is higher towards the Bowmans membrane. Below the stroma is again a fibrous layer. This is termed as ... The donor cornea graft devoid of the inner layer is placed on the bare descemets membrane and sutured with interrupted and/or ... Although appearing to be one clear membrane, the cornea is really composed of five distinct layers of tissue, each with its own ...
... pterygium) at the joints and a lack of muscle movement (akinesia) before birth. Explore symptoms, inheritance, genetics of this ... Multiple pterygium syndrome is a condition that is evident before birth with webbing of the skin ( ... The AChR protein is found in the membrane of skeletal muscle. cells and is critical for signaling between nerve and muscle ... Multiple pterygium syndrome is a condition that is evident before birth with webbing of the skin (pterygium) at the joints and ...
Because early pterygia are usually asymptomatic, there has been little research on their natural history and treatment, and ... Amniotic membrane grafting has also been used to prevent pterygium recurrence. Although the exact mechanism by which the ... Amniotic membrane is typically placed over the bare sclera, with the basement membrane facing up and the stroma facing down. ... There has been no consensus on the appropriate management of pterygia. Morphology. A pterygium consists of three distinct parts ...
Pterygia can vary from small, atrophic quiescent lesions to large, aggressive, rapidly growing fibrovascular lesions that can ... A pterygium is an elevated, superficial, external ocular mass that usually forms over the perilimbal conjunctiva and extends ... Oguz H. Amniotic membrane grafting versus conjunctival autografting in pterygium surgery. Clin Experiment Ophthalmol. 2005 Aug ... Jain AK, Bansal R, Sukhija J. Human amniotic membrane transplantation with fibrin glue in management of primary pterygia: a new ...
Juan F. Batlle Presents "Pterygium Surgery with Amniotic Membrane" at the SUNY 40th Annual Alumni Meeting, June 7, 2012. ... John Hovanesians book, Pterygium Techniques and Technologies for Surgical Success, regarding the history of amniotic membrane ... Battle presentation topic was "Pterygium Surgery with Amniotic Membrane". His presentation covered the use of adjuvants to ... Batlle also discussed the history of amniotic membrane and the events that led to the current technology, a dry, preserved and ...
The use of dry amniotic membrane in pterygium surgery Noureddin GS, Yeung SN ... Epiretinal membrane: optical coherence tomography-based diagnosis and classification Stevenson W, Prospero Ponce CM, Agarwal DR ... A mathematical approach to human pterygium shape Pajic B, Vastardis I, Rajkovic P, Pajic-Eggspuehler B, Aebersold DM, Cvejic Z ... The new Bruchs membrane opening - minimum rim width classification improves optical coherence tomography specificity in tilted ...
... Ophthalmology. 1982 Sep;89(9):1072- ... The use of free conjunctival grafts provides significant advantage over the use of buccal mucous membrane grafts. The ... Grafts of normal conjunctiva provided intact basement membrane, goblet cells, and epithelium that help restore normal ocular ...
... pterygium, and other corneal and external diseases. These ophthalmologists also specialize in treatments such as corneal ...
There are several different types of surgery for pterygium, including those that involve leaving the eye bare where the growth ... Another type of surgery involves gluing a protective membrane over the surgery site. ... Pterygium often does not encroach on the cornea, making it harmless, but in some cases surgery for pterygium removal is ... A pterygium is a growth on the outside of the eye that can expand over the cornea, obstructing vision and light transmission to ...
This was significantly longer than those in six cases in which amniotic membrane transplantation failed (13.1 mm, P = 0.007) ... The authors found that the grading system they used was clinically useful for primary pterygia but not suitable for recurrent ... The study included 30 patients (32 eyes) with pterygia managed at the Ocular Surface Center in Miami from 2002 through 2010. ... Amniotic membrane transplantation alone was successful in 23 eyes with residual conjunctiva of a mean of 27.8 mm. ...
Corneal edema after descemet membrane stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty with the use of gentian violet staining. Ray ...
Complications of fibrin glue in pterygium surgery with amniotic membrane transplant.. Nguyen LP, Wang Z, Molina J, Tellez A, ...
A pterygium is an abnormal, non-cancerous growth of the conjunctiva. The conjunctiva is a thin membrane lining the inside of ... If a pterygium continues to grow, it may spread onto the cornea. A pterygium that grows large enough may eventually distort the ... The symptoms of pterygia vary from person-to-person. In some people, pterygia remain small and do not affect vision. These ... In other people, pterygia grow quickly and cause severely blurred vision. Pterygia do not cause pain. ...
  • A 7 mm long and 2 mm width PRECLUDE® Pericardial Membrane was implanted beneath the scleral flap with a fine forceps left 1 bis 2 mm of the patch left over both sides without sutering the membrane to the sclera. (springer.com)
  • A leading theory proposes that the increased prevalence of pterygium among people in equatorial regions is due to the damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation, specifically UV-B radiation. (aao.org)
  • Tano T, Ono K, Hiratsuka Y et al (2013) Prevalence of pterygium in a population in Northern Japan: the locomotive syndrome and health outcome in Aizu Cohort Study. (springer.com)
  • 1 The prevalence of pterygium is reported to be 3% in Australians, 23% in blacks in United States, 15% in Tibetans in China, 18% in Mongolians in China, 30% in Japanese and 7% in Singaporean Chinese and Indians. (cehjournal.org)
  • In a population-based study from rural central India, prevalence of pterygium increased from 6.7±0.8% in the age group from 30-39 years to 25.3±2.1% in the age group of 70-79 years. (cehjournal.org)
  • In fact, the prevalence of pterygium seems to be associated with geographical latitude, with higher prevalences in areas located within 40 above and below the equator, suggesting that prolonged exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation may promote its development. (scribd.com)
  • Ocular mucous membrane pemphigoid is an autoimmune disorder (a malfunction of the body's immune system that causes the body to attack its own tissues). (merckmanuals.com)
  • In people with ocular mucous membrane pemphigoid, both eyes are affected, becoming red at first. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Doctors usually suspect the diagnosis of ocular mucous membrane pemphigoid based on the person's symptoms and the results of an eye examination, including an examination with a slit lamp (an instrument that enables a doctor to examine the eye under high magnification). (merckmanuals.com)
  • People with ocular mucous membrane pemphigoid can use artificial tears and doctors can remove inwardly turned lashes (for example, by pulling, freezing, or burning with electricity) to help relieve symptoms and prevent some complications. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Background: Various surgical specialties have made use of the amniotic membranes in wound care with good success. (ispub.com)
  • Objectives: The present study was designed to assess the willingness or otherwise of pregnant women in Osogbo, South Western Nigeria to allow amniotic membranes to be harvested from the placenta after they deliver their babies. (ispub.com)
  • Only 26(9.3%) were willing to donate placenta for medical use of the amniotic membranes. (ispub.com)
  • The beliefs as well as the culture on placenta use, appear to be the important factors in knowing who may consent to harvesting of amniotic membranes for medical use. (ispub.com)
  • Conclusion: There are sociocultural impediments in this part of the world to the use of amniotic membranes. (ispub.com)
  • Education of the women as well as their husbands (who have great influence on them) on the uses to which placenta may be made, is likely to make more women consent to harvest of amniotic membranes from the placenta for therapeutic uses. (ispub.com)
  • Others have demonstrated the use of amniotic membranes as a biological dressing for open wounds including burns and chronic ulceration of the legs. (ispub.com)
  • Amniotic membranes have been successfully used in cases of eye surgery to prevent adhesion and in reconstruction in gynaecological, neurological, urological and vascular diseases. (ispub.com)
  • We decided to commence processing of amniotic membranes for surgical use in our centre. (ispub.com)
  • We however wanted to find out whether the pregnant women who are the potential donors of the placenta would be willing to consent to harvesting amniotic membranes from the placenta after they deliver. (ispub.com)
  • The questions were to assess their willingness to allow amniotic membranes to be harvested from the placenta after delivery. (ispub.com)
  • Amniotic membranes have been used as a dressing to promote healing of chronic ulcers of the leg and as a biological dressing for burned skin and skin wounds. (bmj.com)
  • In particular, reconstituted and recombinant amniotic membranes are provided for sustained delivery of therapeutic molecules, proteins or metabolites, to a site of a host in need thereof. (google.com)
  • For those patients with severe cases of pterygium and whose vision has been affected, different types of surgery are available. (cincinnatieye.com)
  • These findings suggest that in severe cases of pterygium histopathologically exists precancerosis. (srce.hr)
  • Three population based studies have described the incidence of pterygium. (cehjournal.org)
  • Barbados eye study has described the 9 year incidence of pterygium to be 11.6% (95% CI,10.1- 13.1), the Beijing Eye Study described the 10 year incidence of pterygium in the adult Chinese population to be 4.9%, and the 5 year cumulative incidence in Bai Chinese population in a rural community was 6.8% (95% CI, 5.2-8.4). (cehjournal.org)