Meglumine: 1-Deoxy-1-(methylamino)-D-glucitol. A derivative of sorbitol in which the hydroxyl group in position 1 is replaced by a methylamino group. Often used in conjunction with iodinated organic compounds as contrast medium.Clonixin: Anti-inflammatory analgesic.Iothalamate Meglumine: A radiopaque medium used for urography, angiography, venography, and myelography. It is highly viscous and binds to plasma proteins.Antiprotozoal Agents: Substances that are destructive to protozoans.Organometallic Compounds: A class of compounds of the type R-M, where a C atom is joined directly to any other element except H, C, N, O, F, Cl, Br, I, or At. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Antimony: A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Sb, atomic number 51, and atomic weight 121.75. It is used as a metal alloy and as medicinal and poisonous salts. It is toxic and an irritant to the skin and the mucous membranes.Leishmaniasis, Cutaneous: An endemic disease that is characterized by the development of single or multiple localized lesions on exposed areas of skin that typically ulcerate. The disease has been divided into Old and New World forms. Old World leishmaniasis is separated into three distinct types according to epidemiology and clinical manifestations and is caused by species of the L. tropica and L. aethiopica complexes as well as by species of the L. major genus. New World leishmaniasis, also called American leishmaniasis, occurs in South and Central America and is caused by species of the L. mexicana or L. braziliensis complexes.Leishmania infantum: A parasitic hemoflagellate of the subgenus Leishmania leishmania that infects man and animals and causes visceral leishmaniasis (LEISHMANIASIS, VISCERAL). Human infections are confined almost entirely to children. This parasite is commonly seen in dogs, other Canidae, and porcupines with humans considered only an accidental host. Transmission is by Phlebotomus sandflies.Leishmania guyanensis: A parasitic hemoflagellate of the subgenus Leishmania viannia that infects man and animals and causes mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (LEISHMANIASIS, MUCOCUTANEOUS). Transmission is by Lutzomyia sandflies.Leishmania braziliensis: A parasitic hemoflagellate of the subgenus Leishmania viannia that infects man and animals. It causes cutaneous (LEISHMANIASIS, CUTANEOUS), diffuse cutaneous (LEISHMANIASIS, DIFFUSE CUTANEOUS), and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (LEISHMANIASIS, MUCOCUTANEOUS) depending on the subspecies of this organism. The sandfly, Lutzomyia, is the vector. The Leishmania braziliensis complex includes the subspecies braziliensis and peruviana. Uta, a form of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the New World, is caused by the subspecies peruviana.Leishmania mexicana: A parasitic hemoflagellate of the subgenus Leishmania leishmania that infects man and animals including rodents. The Leishmania mexicana complex causes both cutaneous (LEISHMANIASIS, CUTANEOUS) and diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (LEISHMANIASIS, DIFFUSE CUTANEOUS) and includes the subspecies amazonensis, garnhami, mexicana, pifanoi, and venezuelensis. L. m. mexicana causes chiclero ulcer, a form of cutaneous leishmaniasis (LEISHMANIASIS, CUTANEOUS) in the New World. The sandfly, Lutzomyia, appears to be the vector.Leishmaniasis, Visceral: A chronic disease caused by LEISHMANIA DONOVANI and transmitted by the bite of several sandflies of the genera Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia. It is commonly characterized by fever, chills, vomiting, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, leukopenia, hypergammaglobulinemia, emaciation, and an earth-gray color of the skin. The disease is classified into three main types according to geographic distribution: Indian, Mediterranean (or infantile), and African.Pentamidine: Antiprotozoal agent effective in trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, and some fungal infections; used in treatment of PNEUMOCYSTIS pneumonia in HIV-infected patients. It may cause diabetes mellitus, central nervous system damage, and other toxic effects.Benzethonium: Bactericidal cationic quaternary ammonium surfactant used as a topical anti-infective agent. It is an ingredient in medicaments, deodorants, mouthwashes, etc., and is used to disinfect apparatus, etc., in the food processing and pharmaceutical industries, in surgery, and also as a preservative. The compound is toxic orally as a result of neuromuscular blockade.Diatrizoate: A commonly used x-ray contrast medium. As DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE and as Diatrizoate sodium, it is used for gastrointestinal studies, angiography, and urography.Paromomycin: An oligosaccharide antibiotic produced by various STREPTOMYCES.ThiazinesParasitic Sensitivity Tests: Tests that demonstrate the relative effectiveness of chemotherapeutic agents against specific parasites.Iothalamic Acid: A contrast medium in diagnostic radiology with properties similar to those of diatrizoic acid. It is used primarily as its sodium and meglumine (IOTHALAMATE MEGLUMINE) salts.Parasite Load: Measure of the number of the PARASITES present in a host organism.Leishmaniasis: A disease caused by any of a number of species of protozoa in the genus LEISHMANIA. There are four major clinical types of this infection: cutaneous (Old and New World) (LEISHMANIASIS, CUTANEOUS), diffuse cutaneous (LEISHMANIASIS, DIFFUSE CUTANEOUS), mucocutaneous (LEISHMANIASIS, MUCOCUTANEOUS), and visceral (LEISHMANIASIS, VISCERAL).Diatrizoate Meglumine: A versatile contrast medium used for DIAGNOSTIC X-RAY RADIOLOGY.Cerebral Ventriculography: Radiography of the ventricular system of the brain after injection of air or other contrast medium directly into the cerebral ventricles. It is used also for x-ray computed tomography of the cerebral ventricles.Antimony Sodium Gluconate: Antimony complex where the metal may exist in either the pentavalent or trivalent states. The pentavalent gluconate is used in leishmaniasis. The trivalent gluconate is most frequently used in schistosomiasis.Platelet Factor 3: A phospholipid from the platelet membrane that contributes to the blood clotting cascade by forming a phospholipid-protein complex (THROMBOPLASTIN) which serves as a cofactor with FACTOR VIIA to activate FACTOR X in the extrinsic pathway of BLOOD COAGULATION.Leishmania: A genus of flagellate protozoa comprising several species that are pathogenic for humans. Organisms of this genus have an amastigote and a promastigote stage in their life cycles. As a result of enzymatic studies this single genus has been divided into two subgenera: Leishmania leishmania and Leishmania viannia. Species within the Leishmania leishmania subgenus include: L. aethiopica, L. arabica, L. donovani, L. enrietti, L. gerbilli, L. hertigi, L. infantum, L. major, L. mexicana, and L. tropica. The following species are those that compose the Leishmania viannia subgenus: L. braziliensis, L. guyanensis, L. lainsoni, L. naiffi, and L. shawi.Aminoquinolines: Quinolines substituted in any position by one or more amino groups.Leishmaniasis, Mucocutaneous: A disease characterized by the chronic, progressive spread of lesions from New World cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by species of the L. braziliensis complex to the nasal, pharyngeal, and buccal mucosa some time after the appearance of the initial cutaneous lesion. Nasal obstruction and epistaxis are frequent presenting symptoms.Leishmania tropica: A parasitic hemoflagellate of the subgenus Leishmania leishmania that infects man and rodents. This taxonomic complex includes species which cause a disease called Oriental sore which is a form of cutaneous leishmaniasis (LEISHMANIASIS, CUTANEOUS) of the Old World.Nicotinic Acids: 2-, 3-, or 4-Pyridinecarboxylic acids. Pyridine derivatives substituted with a carboxy group at the 2-, 3-, or 4-position. The 3-carboxy derivative (NIACIN) is active as a vitamin.ColombiaPhosphorylcholine: Calcium and magnesium salts used therapeutically in hepatobiliary dysfunction.Injections, Intramuscular: Forceful administration into a muscle of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the muscle and any tissue covering it.Horse Diseases: Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.Amphotericin B: Macrolide antifungal antibiotic produced by Streptomyces nodosus obtained from soil of the Orinoco river region of Venezuela.Contrast Media: Substances used to allow enhanced visualization of tissues.Societies, Pharmaceutical: Societies whose membership is limited to pharmacists.Internship, Nonmedical: Advanced programs of training to meet certain professional requirements in fields other than medicine or dentistry, e.g., pharmacology, nutrition, nursing, etc.Reference Books, Medical: Books in the field of medicine intended primarily for consultation.Pharmacists: Those persons legally qualified by education and training to engage in the practice of pharmacy.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Hospitals, AnimalAnti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal: Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.Musculoskeletal Diseases: Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.Drug Information Services: Services providing pharmaceutic and therapeutic drug information and consultation.Gadolinium: Gadolinium. An element of the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Gd, atomic number 64, and atomic weight 157.25. Its oxide is used in the control rods of some nuclear reactors.Biological Availability: The extent to which the active ingredient of a drug dosage form becomes available at the site of drug action or in a biological medium believed to reflect accessibility to a site of action.Gadolinium DTPA: A complex of gadolinium with a chelating agent, diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA see PENTETIC ACID), that is given to enhance the image in cranial and spinal MRIs. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p706)Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Polymers: Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).South CarolinaAlabamaBerlinMexicoMarylandRadiology: A specialty concerned with the use of x-ray and other forms of radiant energy in the diagnosis and treatment of disease.

Low resting potential and postnatal upregulation of NMDA receptors may cause Cajal-Retzius cell death. (1/478)

Using in situ patch-clamp techniques in rat telencephalic slices, we have followed resting potential (RP) properties and the functional expression of NMDA receptors in neocortical Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells from embryonic day 18 to postnatal day 13, the time around which these cells normally disappear. We find that throughout their lives CR cells have a relatively depolarized RP (approximately -50 mV), which can be made more hyperpolarized (approximately -70 mV) by stimulation of the Na/K pump with intracellular ATP. The NMDA receptors of CR cells are subjected to intense postnatal upregulation, but their similar properties (EC50, Hill number, sensitivity to antagonists, conductance, and kinetics) throughout development suggest that their subunit composition remains relatively homogeneous. The low RP of CR cells is within a range that allows for the relief of NMDA channels from Mg2+ blockade. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that CR cells may degenerate and die subsequent to uncontrolled overload of intracellular Ca2+ via NMDA receptor activation by ambient glutamate. In support of this hypothesis we have obtained evidence showing the protection of CR cells via in vivo blockade of NMDA receptors with dizocilpine.  (+info)

Overexpression of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP1) in human heavy metal-selected tumor cells. (2/478)

Cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the resistance to cytotoxic heavy metals remain largely to be characterized in mammalian cells. To this end, we have analyzed a metal-resistant variant of the human lung cancer GLC4 cell line that we have selected by a step-wise procedure in potassium antimony tartrate. Antimony-selected cells, termed GLC4/Sb30 cells, poorly accumulated antimony through an enhanced cellular efflux of metal, thus suggesting up-regulation of a membrane export system in these cells. Indeed, GLC4/Sb30 cells were found to display a functional overexpression of the multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP1, a drug export pump, as demonstrated by Western blotting, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and calcein accumulation assays. Moreover, MK571, a potent inhibitor of MRP1 activity, was found to markedly down-modulate resistance of GLC4/Sb30 cells to antimony and to decrease cellular export of the metal. Taken together, our data support the conclusion that overexpression of functional MRP1 likely represents one major mechanism by which human cells can escape the cytotoxic effects of heavy metals.  (+info)

Value of Western blotting in the clinical follow-up of canine leishmaniasis. (3/478)

Specific serum antibody levels in Leishmania infantum-infected dogs treated with a combination of glucantime and allopurinol were estimated by indirect immunofluorescence and Western blotting. The sensitivity of Western blot was greater than that obtained with immunofluorescence titration. In general, both diagnostic methods concurred with the post-treatment clinical status of the animals. Clinical improvement of successfully treated dogs was related to lower immunofluorescence titers and simpler and/or less reactive immunodetection patterns in Western blotting. The recognition, by infected dogs, of certain low molecular weight antigens, particularly one of approximately 26 kDa, was restricted to pretreatment samples and a single animal in relapse thus apparently constituting an active infection marker.  (+info)

Supraspinal neurotensin-induced antianalgesia in mice is mediated by spinal cholecystokinin. (4/478)

Intracerebral injection of neurotensin into specific brain loci in rats produces hyperalgesia due to the release of cholecystokinin (CCK) in the spinal cord. The present purpose was to show in another species that neurotensin can antagonize the antinociceptive action of morphine through the spinal CCK mechanism in mice. Neurotensin given intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) at doses higher than 100 ng produced antinociception in the tail flick test. However, at lower doses between 1 pg to 25 ng, neurotensin antagonized the antinociceptive action of morphine given intrathecally (i.t.), thus demonstrating the antianalgesic activity of neurotensin. The rightward shift in the morphine dose-response curve produced by i.c.v. neurotensin was eliminated by an i.t. pretreatment with CCK8 antibody (5 microl of antiserum solution diluted 1:1000). I.t. administration of lorglumide, a CCK(A)-receptor antagonist (10-1000 ng), and PD135,158, a CCK(B)-receptor antagonist (250-500 ng), also eliminated the antianalgesic action of neurotensin. Thus, the mechanism of the antianalgesic action of neurotensin given i.c.v. involved spinal CCK. This mode of action is similar to that for the antianalgesic action of supraspinal pentobarbital which also involves spinal CCK.  (+info)

Analysis of the behaviour of selected CCKB/gastrin receptor antagonists in radioligand binding assays performed in mouse and rat cerebral cortex. (5/478)

1. The previously described complex behaviour of the CCKB/gastrin receptor antagonist, L-365,260, in radioligand binding assays could be explained by a variable population of two binding sites. We have investigated whether other CCKB/gastrin receptor ligands (PD134,308, PD140,376, YM022 and JB93182) can distinguish between these sites. 2. In the mouse cortex assay, Hill slopes were not different from unity and the ligand pKI values did not differ when either [125I]-BH-CCK-8S or [3H]-PD140,376 was used as label as expected for a single site (G2). 3. In the rat cortex, where previous analysis of replicate (n=48) L-365,260 data indicated the presence of two CCKB/gastrin sites (G1 and G2), the competition data for PD134,308, PD140,376, YM022 and JB93182 could be explained by a homogeneous population of CCKB/gastrin sites because the Hill slope estimates were not significantly different from unity. However, the estimated affinity values for JB93182 and YM022 were significantly higher and that for PD134,308 was significantly lower than those obtained in the mouse cortex when the same radioligand was used. In view of our previous data obtained with L-365,260, the rat cortex data were also interpreted using a two-site model. In this analysis, SR27897 expressed approximately 9 fold, PD134,308 approximately 13 fold and PD140,376 approximately 11 fold selectivity for the G2 site. In contrast, JB93182 expressed approximately 23 fold and YM022 approximately 4 fold selectivity for the G1 site. If the two-site interpretation of the data is valid then, because of its reverse selectivity to L-365,260, JB93182 has been identified as a compound which if radiolabelled could provide a test of this receptor subdivision.  (+info)

Characterization of the binding of a novel radioligand to CCKB/gastrin receptors in membranes from rat cerebral cortex. (6/478)

1. We have investigated the binding of a novel radiolabelled CCKB/gastrin receptor ligand, [3H]-JB93182 (5[[[(1S)-[[(3,5-dicarboxyphenyl)amino]carbonyl]-2-phenylethyla mino]-carbonyl]-6-[[(1-adamantylmethyl) amino]carbonyl]-indole), to sites in rat cortex membranes. 2. The [3H]-JB93182 was 97% radiochemically pure as assessed by reverse-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) and was not degraded by incubation (150 min) with rat cortex membranes. 3. Saturation analysis indicated that [3H]-JB93182 labelled a homogeneous population of receptors in rat cortex membranes (pKD=9.48+/-0.08, Bmax=3.61+/-0.65 pmol g(-1) tissue, nH=0.97+/-0.02, n=5). The pKD was not significantly different when estimated by association-dissociation analysis (pKD=9.73+/-0.11; n=10). 4. In competition studies, the low affinity of the CCKA receptor antagonists, L-364,718; SR27897 and 2-NAP, suggest that, under the assay conditions employed, [3H]-JB93182 (0.3 nM) does not label CCKA receptors in the rat cortex. 5. The affinity estimates obtained for reference CCKB/gastrin receptor antagonists were indistinguishable from one of the affinity values obtained when a two site model was used to interpret [125I]-BH-CCK8S competition curves obtained in the same tissue (Harper et al., 1999). 6. This study provides further evidence for the existence of two CCKB/gastrin sites in rat cortex. [3H]-JB93182 appears to label selectively sites previously designated as gastrin-G1 and therefore it may be a useful compound for the further discrimination and characterization of these putative receptor subtypes.  (+info)

Differential effects of intrathecally administered morphine and its interaction with cholecystokinin-B antagonist on thermal hyperalgesia following two models of experimental mononeuropathy in the rat. (7/478)

BACKGROUND: Cholecystokinin-B receptor activation has been reported to reduce morphine analgesia. Neuropathic pain is thought to be relatively refractory to opioids. One possible mechanisms for a reduced effect of morphine on neuropathic pain is the induction of cholecystokinin in the spinal cord by nerve injury. The authors evaluated the role of the spinal cholecystokinin-B receptor on morphine analgesia in two rat neuropathic pain models: chronic constriction injury and partial sciatic nerve injury. METHODS: A chronic constriction injury is created by placing four loosely tied ligatures around the right sciatic nerve. A partial sciatic nerve injury was created by tight ligation of one third to one half of the right sciatic nerve. All drugs were injected intrathecally 7 and 11 days after the nerve injury. The effect of the drugs was reflected in the degree of paw withdrawal latency to thermal nociceptive stimulation. The paw withdrawal latencies of injured and uninjured paws were measured 5, 15, 30, and 60 min after the drugs were injected. RESULTS: In the chronic constriction injury model, intrathecal morphine increased the paw withdrawal latencies of injured and uninjured paws. PD135158, a cholecystokinin-B receptor antagonist, potentiated the analgesic effect of morphine on injured and uninjured paws. In the partial sciatic nerve injury model, the effect of morphine on the injured paw was less potent than that on the uninjured paw, and PD135158 potentiated the morphine analgesia in the uninjured paw and had only a minor effect on the morphine analgesia in the injured paw. CONCLUSIONS: The effectiveness of morphine for thermal hyperalgesia after nerve injury depends on the type of nerve injury. The role of the cholecystokinin-B receptor in morphine analgesia in thermal hyperalgesia after nerve injury also depends on the type of nerve injury.  (+info)

Glycine-extended gastrin exerts growth-promoting effects on human colon cancer cells. (8/478)

BACKGROUND: Since human colon cancers often contain significant quantities of progastrin-processing intermediates, we sought to explore the possibility that the biosynthetic precursor of fully processed amidated gastrin, glycine-extended gastrin, may exert trophic effects on human colonic cancer cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Binding of radiolabeled glycine-extended and amidated gastrins was assessed on five human cancer cell lines: LoVo, HT 29, HCT 116, Colo 320DM, and T 84. Trophic actions of the peptides were assessed by increases in [3H]thymidine incorporation and cell number. Gastrin expression was determined by northern blot and radioimmunoassay. RESULTS: Amidated gastrin did not bind to or stimulate the growth of any of the five cell lines. In contrast, saturable binding of radiolabeled glycine-extended gastrin was seen on LoVo and HT 29 cells that was not inhibited by amidated gastrin (10(-6) M) nor by a gastrin/CCKB receptor antagonist (PD 134308). Glycine-extended gastrin induced a dose-dependent increase in [3H]thymidine uptake in LoVo (143 +/- 8% versus control at 10(-10) M) and HT 29 (151 +/- 11% versus control at 10(-10) M) cells that was not inhibited by PD 134308 or by a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) or ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor (PD 98509). Glycine-extended gastrin did stimulate jun-kinase activity in LoVo and HT 29 cells. The two cell lines expressed the gastrin gene at low levels and secreted small amounts of amidated gastrin and glycine-extended gastrin into the media. CONCLUSIONS: Glycine-extended gastrin receptors are present on human colon cancer cells that mediate glycine-extended gastrin's trophic effects via a MEK-independent mechanism. This suggests that glycine-extended gastrin and its novel receptors may play a role in colon cancer cell growth.  (+info)

  • The facility, validated by the FDA, is the only location in Europe that manufactures meglumine, an amino sugar derived from glucose. (emdgroup.com)
  • Billerica, Massachusetts, January 17, 2017 - MilliporeSigma, a leading science and technology company, today announced the opening of a facility in Mollet des Vallès, Spain dedicated to the manufacture of meglumine, an FDA-approved excipient for pharmaceuticals and a component of medical imaging contrast media. (emdgroup.com)
  • The facility in Spain is solely dedicated to the production of meglumine, thereby ensuring continuity of supply to customers as well as meeting increasing demand for the excipient. (emdgroup.com)
  • As an excipient, meglumine interacts directly with active pharmaceutical ingredients to increase solubility. (emdgroup.com)
  • The study's objectives were to prospectively investigate the safety of gadoterate meglumine (Dotarem® or Magnescope®, Guerbet, Roissy-Charles de Gaulle, France) in observational conditions and to assess the overall incidence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in patients with renal impairment. (appliedradiology.com)
  • It contains not less than 95.0 percent and not more than 105.0 percent of the labeled amounts of ioxaglate meglumine (C 24 H 21 I 6 N 5 O 8 ·C 7 H 17 NO 5 ) and iodine (I). It may contain small amounts of Edetate Calcium Disodium as a stabilizer. (drugfuture.com)
  • Principal investigator Professor Philippe Soyer, MD, PhD, head of the Department of Body and Interventional Imaging and chairman of the radiology department at Hôpital Lariboisière in Paris, and co-authors reported that there was no statistically significant difference between patients with and without adverse drug reactions according to gender, age, body mass index (BMI), mean volume, or mean dose of gadoterate meglumine injected. (appliedradiology.com)
  • In their study, six mature swine (121-168kg) were administered an IV, IM or PO dose of flunixin meglumine at a target dose of 2.2mg per kg in a cross-over design with a 10-day wash-out period between treatments. (thepigsite.com)
  • Flunixin meglumine was administered at an actual mean dose of 2.21mg per kg (range: 2.05-2.48mg per kg) IV, IM and PO. (thepigsite.com)
  • After a single oral dose of tafamidis meglumine 20 mg, approximately 59% of the dose was recovered in feces (mostly as the unchanged drug) and approximately 22% of the dose was recovered in urine (mostly as the glucuronide metabolite). (com.sv)
  • Six mature swine (121-168 kg) were administered an IV, IM, or PO dose of flunixin meglumine at a target dose of 2.2 mg/kg in a cross-over design with a 10 day washout period between treatments. (beds.ac.uk)
  • Flunixin meglumine was administered at an actual mean dose of 2.21 mg/kg (range: 2.05-2.48 mg/kg) IV, IM and PO. (beds.ac.uk)
  • Tafamidis meglumine (Fx-1006A) is a potent and selective transthyretin (TTR) stabilizer, shows comparable potency and efficacy to the mutumant homotetramers V30M-TTR, V122I-TTR and wild type WT-TTR, with EC 50 s of 2.7-3.2 μM. (medchemexpress.com)
  • Long-term, the clinical and laboratory findings of the G1 dogs were more stable than those of the G2 dogs, thus indicating that meglumine antimoniate had better clinical efficacy than miltefosine. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Oral Tablets: 450 mg delafloxacin (equivalent to 649 mg delafloxacin meglumine). (drugs.com)
  • Eighteen dogs with leishmaniosis were divided into the following two groups: G1 (n = 9) was treated subcutaneously with meglumine antimoniate (100 mg/kg/day/30 days) plus allopurinol (10 mg/kg/per day/30 days), while G2 (n = 9) was treated orally with miltefosine (2 mg/Kg/day/30 days) plus allopurinol (10 mg/kg/day/30 days). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Clinical relapses were observed in four dogs from G2 (miltefosine/allopurinol), and just one dog from G1 (meglumine antimoniate/allopurinol). (biomedcentral.com)
GE Healthcare's Clariscan™ (gadoterate meglumine) Becomes Only FDA-Approved MRI Contrast Agent Available in Polymer Bottle |...
GE Healthcare's Clariscan™ (gadoterate meglumine) Becomes Only FDA-Approved MRI Contrast Agent Available in Polymer Bottle |... (businesswire.com)
Dotarem: A safe(r) gadolinium-based contrast imaging agent | FierceBiotech
Dotarem: A safe(r) gadolinium-based contrast imaging agent | FierceBiotech (fiercebiotech.com)
Plus it
Plus it (ajnr.org)
DailyMed - MULTIHANCE- gadobenate dimeglumine injection, solution
DailyMed - MULTIHANCE- gadobenate dimeglumine injection, solution (dailymed.nlm.nih.gov)
GMP grade Meglumine / CAS 6284-40-8/N-Methyl-D-glucamine, View Meglumine, N&R Product Details from N&R Bio Industries Inc. (Xi...
GMP grade Meglumine / CAS 6284-40-8/N-Methyl-D-glucamine, View Meglumine, N&R Product Details from N&R Bio Industries Inc. (Xi... (nutraii.en.alibaba.com)
FDA Approves First Macrocyclic and Ionic Gadolinium-Contrast Agent for MRI | DAIC
FDA Approves First Macrocyclic and Ionic Gadolinium-Contrast Agent for MRI | DAIC (dicardiology.com)
Diatrizoate Meglumine | Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Diatrizoate Meglumine | Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (mskcc.org)
A-Z Drug Index for Prescription and OTC Medications - Alphabet G
A-Z Drug Index for Prescription and OTC Medications - Alphabet G (medindia.net)
Meglumine Antimoniate (Intravenous Route, Injection Route) Before Using - Mayo Clinic
Meglumine Antimoniate (Intravenous Route, Injection Route) Before Using - Mayo Clinic (mayoclinic.org)
Meglumine lodipamide (Cholografin®) Hepatotoxicity | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians
Meglumine lodipamide (Cholografin®) Hepatotoxicity | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians (annals.org)
Flunixin Meglumine Doses: More or Less? (AAEP 2012) - BloodHorse
Flunixin Meglumine Doses: More or Less? (AAEP 2012) - BloodHorse (bloodhorse.com)
Liquid Injection, Liquid Injection Suppliers and Manufacturers at Alibaba.com
Liquid Injection, Liquid Injection Suppliers and Manufacturers at Alibaba.com (alibaba.com)
Flunixin Meglumine | VCA Animal Hospital
Flunixin Meglumine | VCA Animal Hospital (vcahospitals.com)
Pharmaceutical Bulk Chemicals | Bulk Fine Chemicals | Spectrum Chemical
Pharmaceutical Bulk Chemicals | Bulk Fine Chemicals | Spectrum Chemical (spectrumchemical.com)
Gadoterate meglumine - WellSpan Health Library
Gadoterate meglumine - WellSpan Health Library (wellspan.org)
Search | American Veterinary Medical Association
Search | American Veterinary Medical Association (avma.org)
Leishmaniasis: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia
Leishmaniasis: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia (medlineplus.gov)
Acta Parasitologica
Acta Parasitologica (degruyter.com)
Bioniche Animal Health Inflammation & Pain | Pharmacy
Bioniche Animal Health Inflammation & Pain | Pharmacy (valleyvet.com)
ICU Medical (formerly Hospira) Colic | Pharmacy
ICU Medical (formerly Hospira) Colic | Pharmacy (valleyvet.com)
Excede for Cattle Horses Zoetis Animal Health - Safe.Pharmacy|Antibiotics (Rx) | Equine Pharmacy (Rx
Excede for Cattle Horses Zoetis Animal Health - Safe.Pharmacy|Antibiotics (Rx) | Equine Pharmacy (Rx (valleyvet.com)
Flu-Nix Flunixin Meglumine AgriLabs - Safe.Pharmacy|Inflammation Pain (Rx) | Equine Pharmacy (Rx)
Flu-Nix Flunixin Meglumine AgriLabs - Safe.Pharmacy|Inflammation Pain (Rx) | Equine Pharmacy (Rx) (valleyvet.com)
Covidien Inflammation and Pain | Pharmacy
Covidien Inflammation and Pain | Pharmacy (valleyvet.com)
Oxytocin for Horses, Cows, Sows Ewes Brand May Vary - Safe.Pharmacy|Reproductive (Rx) | Equine Pharm
Oxytocin for Horses, Cows, Sows Ewes Brand May Vary - Safe.Pharmacy|Reproductive (Rx) | Equine Pharm (valleyvet.com)
SMZ TMP for Dogs, Cats Horses Generic (brand may vary) - Safe.Pharmacy|Antibiotics (Rx) | Equine Pha
SMZ TMP for Dogs, Cats Horses Generic (brand may vary) - Safe.Pharmacy|Antibiotics (Rx) | Equine Pha (valleyvet.com)
Bimeda Inflammation and Pain | Pharmacy
Bimeda Inflammation and Pain | Pharmacy (valleyvet.com)
SSD Silver Sulfadiazine Cream for Animal Use Generic (brand may vary) - Safe.Pharmacy|Ear, Eye Skin
SSD Silver Sulfadiazine Cream for Animal Use Generic (brand may vary) - Safe.Pharmacy|Ear, Eye Skin (valleyvet.com)
Ceftiflex for Multiple Species of Animals Generic (brand may vary) - Safe.Pharmacy|Antibiotics (Rx)
Ceftiflex for Multiple Species of Animals Generic (brand may vary) - Safe.Pharmacy|Antibiotics (Rx) (valleyvet.com)
Phenylbutazone 20% for Horses Generic (brand may vary) - Safe.Pharmacy|Inflammation Pain (Rx) | Equi
Phenylbutazone 20% for Horses Generic (brand may vary) - Safe.Pharmacy|Inflammation Pain (Rx) | Equi (valleyvet.com)