MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Abstracting and Indexing as Topic: Activities performed to identify concepts and aspects of published information and research reports.MEDLARS: A computerized biomedical bibliographic storage and retrieval system operated by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLARS stands for Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, which was first introduced in 1964 and evolved into an online system in 1971 called MEDLINE (MEDLARS Online). As other online databases were developed, MEDLARS became the name of the entire NLM information system while MEDLINE became the name of the premier database. MEDLARS was used to produce the former printed Cumulated Index Medicus, and the printed monthly Index Medicus, until that publication ceased in December 2004.Medical Subject Headings: Controlled vocabulary thesaurus produced by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. It consists of sets of terms naming descriptors in a hierarchical structure that permits searching at various levels of specificity.Subject Headings: Terms or expressions which provide the major means of access by subject to the bibliographic unit.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)United StatesDatabase Management Systems: Software designed to store, manipulate, manage, and control data for specific uses.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Databases, Genetic: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.Databases, Nucleic Acid: Databases containing information about NUCLEIC ACIDS such as BASE SEQUENCE; SNPS; NUCLEIC ACID CONFORMATION; and other properties. Information about the DNA fragments kept in a GENE LIBRARY or GENOMIC LIBRARY is often maintained in DNA databases.Databases, Protein: Databases containing information about PROTEINS such as AMINO ACID SEQUENCE; PROTEIN CONFORMATION; and other properties.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Databases, Bibliographic: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of references and citations to books, articles, publications, etc., generally on a single subject or specialized subject area. Databases can operate through automated files, libraries, or computer disks. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, FACTUAL which is used for collections of data and facts apart from bibliographic references to them.Databases as Topic: Organized collections of computer records, standardized in format and content, that are stored in any of a variety of computer-readable modes. They are the basic sets of data from which computer-readable files are created. (from ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.CD-ROM: An optical disk storage system for computers on which data can be read or from which data can be retrieved but not entered or modified. A CD-ROM unit is almost identical to the compact disk playback device for home use.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Search Engine: Software used to locate data or information stored in machine-readable form locally or at a distance such as an INTERNET site.National Library of Medicine (U.S.): An agency of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to advancement of medical and related sciences. Major activities of this institute include the collection, dissemination, and exchange of information important to the progress of medicine and health, research in medical informatics and support for medical library development.Natural Language Processing: Computer processing of a language with rules that reflect and describe current usage rather than prescribed usage.Online Systems: Systems where the input data enter the computer directly from the point of origin (usually a terminal or workstation) and/or in which output data are transmitted directly to that terminal point of origin. (Sippl, Computer Dictionary, 4th ed)Genomics: The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.Systems Integration: The procedures involved in combining separately developed modules, components, or subsystems so that they work together as a complete system. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Computer Communication Networks: A system containing any combination of computers, computer terminals, printers, audio or visual display devices, or telephones interconnected by telecommunications equipment or cables: used to transmit or receive information. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Sequence Analysis, Protein: A process that includes the determination of AMINO ACID SEQUENCE of a protein (or peptide, oligopeptide or peptide fragment) and the information analysis of the sequence.Computer Graphics: The process of pictorial communication, between human and computers, in which the computer input and output have the form of charts, drawings, or other appropriate pictorial representation.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Abbreviations as Topic: Shortened forms of written words or phrases used for brevity.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Data Mining: Use of sophisticated analysis tools to sort through, organize, examine, and combine large sets of information.Molecular Sequence Annotation: The addition of descriptive information about the function or structure of a molecular sequence to its MOLECULAR SEQUENCE DATA record.Vocabulary, Controlled: A specified list of terms with a fixed and unalterable meaning, and from which a selection is made when CATALOGING; ABSTRACTING AND INDEXING; or searching BOOKS; JOURNALS AS TOPIC; and other documents. The control is intended to avoid the scattering of related subjects under different headings (SUBJECT HEADINGS). The list may be altered or extended only by the publisher or issuing agency. (From Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed, p163)Databases, Chemical: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific chemicals.Information Systems: Integrated set of files, procedures, and equipment for the storage, manipulation, and retrieval of information.Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Review Literature as Topic: Published materials which provide an examination of recent or current literature. Review articles can cover a wide range of subject matter at various levels of completeness and comprehensiveness based on analyses of literature that may include research findings. The review may reflect the state of the art. It also includes reviews as a literary form.Grateful Med: A microcomputer-based software package providing a user-friendly interface to the MEDLARS system of the National Library of Medicine.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Dictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.
  • The database contains about 12 million citations dating back to the mid-1960s. (nih.gov)
  • Out-of-scope citations are primarily from general science and chemistry journals that contain life sciences articles indexed for MEDLINE, e.g., the plate tectonics or astrophysics articles from Science magazine. (nih.gov)
  • Publishers can also submit citations with publication dates that precede the journal's selection for MEDLINE indexing, usually because they want to create links to older content. (nih.gov)
  • PMC citations are taken from life sciences journals (MEDLINE or non-MEDLINE) that submit full-text articles to PMC. (nih.gov)
  • In addition to the incorporation of PubMed-only citations, PubMed has been enhanced recently by the incorporation of citations from the following unique databases: HealthSTAR, AIDSLINE, HISTLINE, SPACELINE, BIOETHICSLINE, and POPLINE. (nih.gov)
  • Created by the National Library of Medicine, MEDLINE uses MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) indexing with tree, tree hierarchy, subheadings and explosion capabilities to search citations from over 4,800 current biomedical journals. (salford.ac.uk)
  • The huge database of citations to articles in approximately 5,000 biomedical journals, created by the National Library of Medicine. (castleton.edu)
  • These citations are from MEDLINE and additional life science journals. (emory.edu)
  • Methods: In this work, bibliometric analysis and knowledge visualization technology were applied to evaluate global scientific production and developing trend of artemisinin research through Science Citation Index (SCI) papers and Medline papers with online version published as following aspects: publication outputs, subject categories, journals, countries, international collaboration, citations, authorship and co-authorship, author key words and co-words analysis. (who.int)
  • The fundamental components of the ACM Portal are an enhanced version of the ACM Digital Library plus an extended bibliographic database, consisting initially of more than a quarter-million citations of core works in computing. (bilkent.edu.tr)
  • The database contains over 16 million citations and dates back to 1950. (llrx.com)
  • PubMed also contains in-process citations of articles not yet indexed or assigned subject headings and citations for some articles or journals not selected for regular Medline indexing. (llrx.com)
  • MEDLINE citations may carry the databank names listed in the two tables shown below. (nih.gov)
  • This Medline System runs a regular PubMed search (By NCBI's API), and it will retrieve a list of citations, which can be seen on-screen and which can be printed out - typically, a sensitive search is around 5.000 hits these times. (kidney.de)
  • The database is freely accessible on the Internet via the PubMed interface and new citations are added Tuesday through Saturday. (wikipedia.org)
  • Further research into these methods is needed before they can be implemented in the retrieval systems of MEDLINE. (biomedcentral.com)
  • While scientometric studies have estimated ASEBD sizes before, the methods employed were able to compare only a few databases. (springer.com)
  • A wide range of different evaluation methods and outcomes were used to assess the impact of SMS varying from existing databases (eg, attendance rate based on medical records), questionnaires, and physiological measures. (jmir.org)
  • We have developed a novel method, the BInary Characteristics Extractor and biomedical Properties Predictor (BICEPP), to classify properties (characteristics) of drugs (scientific entities) and subsequently validated this approach on data collected from traditional analytical methods derived from the knowledge of field experts (a therapeutic drug reference and a drug interaction database). (biomedcentral.com)
  • The Fact Sheet on Journal Selection for Index Medicus ® /MEDLINE ® describes the journal selection policy, criteria, and procedures for data submission. (nih.gov)
  • The ACS Symposium Series Online database provides full-text access to e-books in agriculture, food chemistry, organic and polymer chemistry, chemical education, materials science, and related subjects from 1950 to present, published by American Chemical Society. (bilkent.edu.tr)
  • We searched Medline from 1950 to July 2009 and the Cochrane Library through the third quarter of 2009, reviewed reference lists, and consulted experts. (aappublications.org)
  • The database contains more than 26 million records from 5,639 selected publications covering biomedicine and health from 1950 to the present. (wikipedia.org)
  • Originally the database covered articles starting from 1965, but this has been enhanced, and records as far back as 1950/51 are now available within the main index. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common topic in the database is Cancer with around 12% of all records between 1950-2016, which have risen from 6% in 1950 to 16% in 2016. (wikipedia.org)
  • From 1971 to 1997, MEDLINE online access to the MEDLARS Online computerized database primarily had been through institutional facilities, such as university libraries . (wikipedia.org)
  • This system, called PubMed, was offered to the general online user in June, 1997, when MEDLINE searches via the Web were demonstrated, in a public ceremony, by Vice President Al Gore. (wikipedia.org)
  • MEDLINE added a "publication type" term for "randomized controlled trial" in 1991 and a MESH subset "systematic review" in 2001. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most systematic review articles published presently build on extensive searches of MEDLINE to identify articles that might be useful in the review. (wikipedia.org)
  • MEDLINE (PubMed), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Cqvip Database (VIP), and Wanfang Database were researched for the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of SZC for PIC. (hindawi.com)
  • We also searched five trials registry databases, and checked reference lists of included studies and reviews for further references to relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs). (bvs.br)
  • Links to Medline can also be found on other sites, such as those of medical libraries. (llrx.com)
  • In late 1971, an online version called MEDLINE ("MEDLARS Online") became available as a way to do online searching of MEDLARS from remote medical libraries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Now, the collection and the index are available together for the first time in an online, searchable database. (bilkent.edu.tr)
  • A searchable database to improve access to UK library holdings for researchers working in all subject areas of the humanities and social sciences relating to Asia, the Middle East and North Africa. (dur.ac.uk)
  • PubMed, first released in January 1996, ushered in the era of private, free, home- and office-based MEDLINE searching. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1996, soon after most home computers began automatically bundling efficient web browsers, a free public version of MEDLINE was instigated. (wikipedia.org)
  • The dietary intake of 316 women previously treated for postmenopausal breast cancer informed the identification of potential food and beverage sources of PE and the bespoke dietary analysis database was created to, ultimately, quantify their PE intake. (biomedsearch.com)
  • In conclusion, these results indicate that the combination of data contained in different databases allows the generation of gene and protein name dictionaries that contain significantly more used names than dictionaries obtained from individual data sources. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Development of a food compositional database for the estimation of dietary intake of phyto-oestrogens in a group of postmenopausal women previously treated for breast cancer and validation with urinary excretion. (biomedsearch.com)