Tibet: An autonomous region located in central Asia, within China.Medicine, Tibetan Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Tibetan culture.Altitude: A vertical distance measured from a known level on the surface of a planet or other celestial body.Medicine, Chinese Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Chinese culture.History of MedicineIndividualized Medicine: Therapeutic approach tailoring therapy for genetically defined subgroups of patients.Antelopes: Any of various ruminant mammals of the order Bovidae. They include numerous species in Africa and the American pronghorn.Internal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Buddhism: The teaching ascribed to Gautama Buddha (ca. 483 B.C.) holding that suffering is inherent in life and that one can escape it into nirvana by mental and moral self-purification. (Webster, 3d ed)Nuclear Medicine: A specialty field of radiology concerned with diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative use of radioactive compounds in a pharmaceutical form.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Medicine, Kampo: System of herbal medicine practiced in Japan by both herbalists and practitioners of modern medicine. Kampo originated in China and is based on Chinese herbal medicine (MEDICINE, CHINESE TRADITIONAL).Freshwater Biology: The study of life and ECOLOGIC SYSTEMS in bodies of FRESHWATER.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Juniperus: A plant genus of the family CUPRESSACEAE. The species are slow growing coniferous evergreen trees or shrubs.Kashin-Beck Disease: Disabling osteochondrodysplasia with OSTEOSCLEROSIS, cone-shaped METAPHYSIS, and shortening of the DIAPHYSIS. It is endemic in parts of Siberia and northern China. Mineral deficiencies (e.g., selenium, iodine), fungal cereal contamination, and water contamination may be contributing factors in its etiology.Echinococcus multilocularis: A north temperate species of tapeworm (CESTODA) whose adult form infects FOXES and wild RODENTS. The larval form can infect humans producing HEPATIC HYDATID CYSTS.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Altitude Sickness: Multiple symptoms associated with reduced oxygen at high ALTITUDE.Lagomorpha: An order of small mammals comprising two families, Ochotonidae (pikas) and Leporidae (RABBITS and HARES). Head and body length ranges from about 125 mm to 750 mm. Hares and rabbits have a short tail, and the pikas lack a tail. Rabbits are born furless and with both eyes and ears closed. HARES are born fully haired with eyes and ears open. All are vegetarians. (From Nowak, Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p539-41)Clinical Medicine: The study and practice of medicine by direct examination of the patient.Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-Proline Dioxygenases: Dioxygenase enzymes that specifically hydroxylate a PROLINE residue on the HYPOXIA-INDUCIBLE FACTOR 1, ALPHA SUBUNIT. They are OXYGEN-dependent enzymes that play an important role in mediating cellular adaptive responses to HYPOXIA.Drugs, Chinese Herbal: Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.Regenerative Medicine: A field of medicine concerned with developing and using strategies aimed at repair or replacement of damaged, diseased, or metabolically deficient organs, tissues, and cells via TISSUE ENGINEERING; CELL TRANSPLANTATION; and ARTIFICIAL ORGANS and BIOARTIFICIAL ORGANS and tissues.Emergency Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Naphazoline: An adrenergic vasoconstrictor agent used as a decongestant.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Medicine, Ayurvedic: The traditional Hindu system of medicine which is based on customs, beliefs, and practices of the Hindu culture. Ayurveda means "the science of Life": veda - science, ayur - life.Complementary Therapies: Therapeutic practices which are not currently considered an integral part of conventional allopathic medical practice. They may lack biomedical explanations but as they become better researched some (PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES; DIET; ACUPUNCTURE) become widely accepted whereas others (humors, radium therapy) quietly fade away, yet are important historical footnotes. Therapies are termed as Complementary when used in addition to conventional treatments and as Alternative when used instead of conventional treatment.Snow: Frozen water crystals that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Echinococcus granulosus: A species of hydatid tapeworm (class CESTODA) in the family Taeniidae, whose adult form infects the DIGESTIVE TRACT of DOGS, other canines, and CATS. The larval form infects SHEEP; PIGS; HORSES; and may infect humans, where it migrates to various organs and forms permanent HYDATID CYSTS.Meteorology: The science of studying the characteristics of the atmosphere such as its temperature, density, winds, clouds, precipitation, and other atmospheric phenomena and aiming to account for the weather in terms of external influences and the basic laws of physics. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Integrative Medicine: The discipline concerned with using the combination of conventional ALLOPATHIC MEDICINE and ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE to address the biological, psychological, social, and spiritual aspects of health and illness.Osteopathic Medicine: A medical discipline that is based on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy, developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, recognizes the concept of "wellness" and the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Special attention is placed on the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.Torture: The intentional infliction of physical or mental suffering upon an individual or individuals, including the torture of animals.Phylogeography: A field of study concerned with the principles and processes governing the geographic distributions of genealogical lineages, especially those within and among closely related species. (Avise, J.C., Phylogeography: The History and Formation of Species. Harvard University Press, 2000)Locusta migratoria: A species of migratory Old World locusts, in the family ACRIDIDAE, that are important pests in Africa and Asia.Medicine, East Asian Traditional: Medical practice or discipline that is based on the knowledge, cultures, and beliefs of the people in EAST ASIA.Erigeron: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE that is similar to CONYZA. Members contain SESQUITERPENES.Ethnobotany: The study of plant lore and agricultural customs of a people. In the fields of ETHNOMEDICINE and ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, the emphasis is on traditional medicine and the existence and medicinal uses of PLANTS and PLANT EXTRACTS and their constituents, both historically and in modern times.Sports Medicine: The field of medicine concerned with physical fitness and the diagnosis and treatment of injuries sustained in exercise and sports activities.Thioredoxin Reductase 2: A subtype of thioredoxin reductase found primarily in MITOCHONDRIA.Theft: Unlawful act of taking property.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Medicine, African Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the African peoples. It includes treatment by medicinal plants and other materia medica as well as by the ministrations of diviners, medicine men, witch doctors, and sorcerers.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Echinococcosis, Hepatic: Liver disease caused by infections with parasitic tapeworms of the genus ECHINOCOCCUS, such as Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multilocularis. Ingested Echinococcus ova burrow into the intestinal mucosa. The larval migration to the liver via the PORTAL VEIN leads to watery vesicles (HYDATID CYST).Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the use of physical agents, mechanical apparatus, and manipulation in rehabilitating physically diseased or injured patients.Asian Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the southeastern and eastern areas of the Asian continent.Occupational Medicine: Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Echinococcosis: An infection caused by the infestation of the larval form of tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus. The liver, lungs, and kidney are the most common areas of infestation.Acclimatization: Adaptation to a new environment or to a change in the old.Hematologic Agents: Drugs that act on blood and blood-forming organs and those that affect the hemostatic system.Veterinary Medicine: The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.Aster Plant: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. This plant should not be confused with microtubule asters (MICROTUBULES) nor with aster yellows phytoplasma (mycoplasma-like organisms).Salinity: Degree of saltiness, which is largely the OSMOLAR CONCENTRATION of SODIUM CHLORIDE plus any other SALTS present. It is an ecological factor of considerable importance, influencing the types of organisms that live in an ENVIRONMENT.History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.National Library of Medicine (U.S.): An agency of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to advancement of medical and related sciences. Major activities of this institute include the collection, dissemination, and exchange of information important to the progress of medicine and health, research in medical informatics and support for medical library development.Chlamydiaceae Infections: Infections with bacteria of the family CHLAMYDIACEAE.Inula: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Members contain INULIN, alantol, helenin, alantic acid, and acrid resin.NepalPlant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Echinococcosis, Pulmonary: Helminth infection of the lung caused by Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multilocularis.Hordeum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The EDIBLE GRAIN, barley, is widely used as food.Gentianaceae: A plant family of the order Gentianales, subclass Asteridae, class Magnoliopsida.Drugs, Essential: Drugs considered essential to meet the health needs of a population as well as to control drug costs.Environmental Medicine: Medical specialty concerned with environmental factors that may impinge upon human disease, and development of methods for the detection, prevention, and control of environmentally related disease.Medicine, Korean Traditional: Medical practice or discipline that is based on the knowledge, cultures, and beliefs of the people of KOREA.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Community Medicine: A branch of medicine concerned with the total health of the individual within the home environment and in the community, and with the application of comprehensive care to the prevention and treatment of illness in the entire community.Procollagen-Proline Dioxygenase: A mixed-function oxygenase that catalyzes the hydroxylation of a prolyl-glycyl containing peptide, usually in PROTOCOLLAGEN, to a hydroxyprolylglycyl-containing-peptide. The enzyme utilizes molecular OXYGEN with a concomitant oxidative decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate to SUCCINATE. The enzyme occurs as a tetramer of two alpha and two beta subunits. The beta subunit of procollagen-proline dioxygenase is identical to the enzyme PROTEIN DISULFIDE-ISOMERASES.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Tropical Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with diseases, mainly of parasitic origin, common in tropical and subtropical regions.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Sesquiterpenes, Eudesmane: SESQUITERPENES cyclized into two adjoining cyclohexane rings but with a different configuration from the ARTEMISININS.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Climate Change: Any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). It may result from natural factors such as changes in the sun's intensity, natural processes within the climate system such as changes in ocean circulation, or human activities.Social Medicine: A branch of medicine concerned with the role of socio-environmental factors in the occurrence, prevention and treatment of disease.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Religion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.Anoxia: Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Sleep Medicine Specialty: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of SLEEP WAKE DISORDERS and their causes.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Plankton: Community of tiny aquatic PLANTS and ANIMALS, and photosynthetic BACTERIA, that are either free-floating or suspended in the water, with little or no power of locomotion. They are divided into PHYTOPLANKTON and ZOOPLANKTON.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Chloroflexi: Phylum of green nonsulfur bacteria including the family Chloroflexaceae, among others.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Preventive Medicine: A medical specialty primarily concerned with prevention of disease (PRIMARY PREVENTION) and the promotion and preservation of health in the individual.Defensive Medicine: The alterations of modes of medical practice, induced by the threat of liability, for the principal purposes of forestalling lawsuits by patients as well as providing good legal defense in the event that such lawsuits are instituted.Philosophy, MedicalBiodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Oral Medicine: A branch of dentistry dealing with diseases of the oral and paraoral structures and the oral management of systemic diseases. (Hall, What is Oral Medicine, Anyway? Clinical Update: National Naval Dental Center, March 1991, p7-8)Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Disaster Medicine: Branch of medicine involved with management and organization of public health response to disasters and major events including the special health and medical needs of a community in a disaster.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.United StatesHaplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.POU Domain Factors: A family of transcription factors characterized by the presence of a bipartite DNA-binding domain known as the POU domain. The POU domain contains two subdomains, a POU-specific domain and a POU-homeodomain. The POU domain was originally identified as a region of approximately 150 amino acids shared between the Pit-1, Oct-1, Oct-2, and Unc-86 transcription factors.Postpartum Hemorrhage: Excess blood loss from uterine bleeding associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR or CHILDBIRTH. It is defined as blood loss greater than 500 ml or of the amount that adversely affects the maternal physiology, such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEMATOCRIT. Postpartum hemorrhage is divided into two categories, immediate (within first 24 hours after birth) or delayed (after 24 hours postpartum).DNA, Mitochondrial: Double-stranded DNA of MITOCHONDRIA. In eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GENOME is circular and codes for ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and about 10 proteins.Plant Preparations: Material prepared from plants.
As of the 2014 Census, there are about 6 million Tibetans living in the Tibet Autonomous Region and the 10 Tibetan Autonomous Prefectures in Gansu, Qinghai, Yunnan and Sichuan, China.[15][16] The SIL Ethnologue in 2009 documents an additional 189,000 Tibetic speakers living in India, 5,280 in Nepal, and 4,800 in Bhutan.[17] The Central Tibetan Administration's (CTA) Green Book (of the Tibetan Government in Exile) counts 145,150 Tibetans outside Tibet: a little over 100,000 in India; over 16,000 in Nepal; over 1,800 in Bhutan, and over 25,000 in other parts of the world. There are Tibetan communities in the United States,[18] Australia, Brazil, Canada, Costa Rica, France, Mexico, Norway, Mongolia, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. In the Baltistan region of northern Pakistan, the Balti people are a Muslim ethnicity of Tibetan descent numbering around 300,000.[19] There is some dispute over ...
The Lhasa Apso (/ˈlɑːsə ˈæpsoʊ/ LAH-sə AP-soh) is a non-sporting dog breed originating in Tibet. It was bred as an interior sentinel in the Buddhist monasteries, to alert the monks to any intruders who entered. Lhasa is the capital city of Tibet, and apso is a word in the Tibetan language meaning "bearded", so, Lhasa Apso simply means "long-haired Lhasa dog". There are, however, some who claim that the word "apso" is a form of the Tibetan word "rapso", meaning "goat-like", which would make the equivalent translation "wooly Lhasa dog". Male Lhasa Apsos should ideally be 10.75 inches (27.3 cm) at the withers and weigh about 14 to 18 pounds (6.4 to 8.2 kg). The females are slightly smaller, and weigh between 12 to 14 pounds (5.4 to 6.4 kg). The breed standard requires dark brown eyes and a black nose, although liver-colored Lhasas have a brown nose. The texture of the coat is heavy, straight, hard, neither woolly nor silky, and very dense. They come in a wide variety of colors ...
... (KBD) is a chronic, endemic type of osteochondropathy (disease of the bone) that is mainly distributed from northeastern to southwestern China, involving 15 provinces. Tibet currently has the highest incidence rate of KBD in China. Southeast Siberia and North Korea are other affected areas. KBD usually involves children ages 5-15. To date, more than a million individuals have suffered from KBD. The symptoms of KBD include joint pain, morning stiffness in the joints, disturbances of flexion and extension in the elbows, enlarged inter-phalangeal joints and limited motion in many joints of the body. Death of cartilage cells in the growth plate and articular surface is the basic pathologic feature; this can result in growth retardation and secondary osteoarthrosis. Histological diagnosis of KBD is particularly difficult; clinical and radiological examinations have proved to be the best means for identifying KBD. Little is known about the early stages of KBD before the visible ...
Està catalogat com vulnerable dins la Llista Vermella de la UICN de la Unió Internacional per a la Conservació de la Natura. Es veu amenaçat principalment per la desforestació i pèrdua d'hàbitat. Els óssos són morts pels grangers a causa de l'amenaça que suposen pel bestiar, i també són impopulars, pel seu hàbit d'extreure l'escorça d'arbres de fusta valuosa. L'ós tibetà també es veu amenaçat per la caça, especialment per obtenir la bilis de la seva vesícula biliar, que s'utilitza en la medicina tradicional xinesa. Des que la Xina va prohibir la caça furtiva d'óssos autòctons en el decenni dels 80, la bilis d'ós s'ha subministrat als consumidors xinesos a través de granges especials, on els óssos es mantenen constantment en gàbies i subjectes, mentre els catèters inserits en les seves vesícules biliars permeten recollir per degoteig la bilis en un contenidor. Els partidaris d'aquesta pràctica sostenen que, sense aquestes explotacions, la demanda de bilis d'ós seria ...
In 2006, Qinghai-Tibet Railway, the first railway in Tibet, was completed. The same year, then chairman of Tibet Autonomous Region Qiangba Puncog told current Prime Minister of Nepal Khadga Prasad Oli, then Deputy Prime Minister, that the railway would be extended to Shigatse and eventually to China-Nepal border. In 2016, during Oli's visit to China, the two countries signed a treaty on trade and transit, including a plan to build a high speed railway from Kathmandu to the Chinese border.[5] In June 2018, Nepal and China agreed on construction of the railway as a component of a series of cooperation projects approved by the two sides.[4][6] A mutual agreement over the pre-feasibility study was reached in August 2018.[7] First extension of the Tibetan Railway, the Lhasa-Shigatse railway, opened in 2014. Construction of the railway from Shigatse to Gyirong is expected to be complete by 2022.[8] ...
... connects Beijing with Lhasa. It runs westwards of Beijing via Datong, Yinchuan and Xining to Golmud before turning southwest to Lhasa. The portion of the highway from Xining to Lhasa is known as the Qinghai-Tibet Highway.[1] The total distance of the highway is 3,901 km. Fushi Road or Jinglan Road forms the stretch of G109 in Beijing, as it begins from Fuchengmen and traverses through Shijingshan. The majority of the Beijing section is in Mentougou District. The section of the highway within western Qinghai and Tibet, from Golmud to Lhasa, is paralleled by the Qinghai-Tibet Railway., ...
Tarixi olaraq, vəhşi yaklar Tibet dövrünə aid insanlar üçün təhlükəli olan böyük pislərdən biri sayılır. Tibetdə, yabanı yak, ev yakından fərqli olaraq, dronq adlanır. Vəhşi yaklar insanlar tərəfindən idarə olunan yerlərə dözməzlər və buna görə də sürətlə öləcəklər - indi yalnız Tibet dağlıq ərazilərində, dəniz səviyyəsindən 4300-4600 metr yüksəkliklərdə yaşayırlar. qışda və dəniz səviyyəsindən 6100 m-ə qədərdir. yayda. Yak yüksək dağ şəraitinə uyğunlaşdırılmışdır. Ovçuluq ərazilərində buğa ilə müqayisədə daha böyük ağciyər və ürək vardır[8]. Yağ qanının ömrü boyunca fetal hemoglobinin əhəmiyyətli bir hissəsinin olması səbəbiylə daha çox oksigen daşıya bilir[9]. Saldırı aşağı temperaturda zəif tolerantlıq və 15 ° C-dən yuxarı olan temperaturda aşınma olur[10]. Aşağı temperaturda olan digər adaptasiya yağın subkutan təbəqəsi və ter bezlərinin demək olar ki, ...
Although the origin of the Five Rites before the publication of The Eye of Revelation is disputed between practitioners and skeptics, a comparison of illustrations of the postures shows a remarkable similarity between the Rites and authentic Tibetan 'phrul 'khor exercises from a system rendered into English as Vajra Body Magical Wheel Sun and Moon Union (Tibetan: .mw-parser-output .uchen{font-family:"Qomolangma-Dunhuang","Qomolangma-Uchen Sarchen","Qomolangma-Uchen Sarchung","Qomolangma-Uchen Suring","Qomolangma-Uchen Sutung","Qomolangma-Title","Qomolangma-Subtitle","Qomolangma-Woodblock","DDC Uchen","DDC Rinzin",Kailash,"BabelStone Tibetan",Jomolhari,"TCRC Youtso Unicode","Tibetan Machine Uni",Wangdi29,"Noto Sans Tibetan","Microsoft Himalaya"}.mw-parser-output ...
The Zaniskari or Zanskari is a breed of small mountain horse or pony from Ladakh, in Jammu and Kashmir state in northern India. It is named for the Zanskar valley or region in Kargil district. It is similar to the Spiti breed of Himachal Pradesh, but is better adapted to work at high altitude. Like the Spiti, it shows similarities to the Tibetan breeds of neighbouring Tibet.:197 It is of medium size, and is often grey in colour. The breed is considered endangered, as there are only a few hundred alive today, and a conservation programme has been started in India. In 1977 the population of Zaniskari horses was estimated at 15,000-20,000. The breed was listed as "not at risk" by the FAO in 2007.:61 However, it has been endangered by indiscriminate cross-breeding with other horses and it is thought that only a few hundred pure-bred animals now remain, mainly in the valleys of Ladakh, including the Zanskar Gorge from which the breed takes its name. The Animal Husbandry Department of Jammu and ...
According to Sam van Schaik, who studies early Dzogchen manuscripts from the Dunhuang caves, the Dzogchen texts are influenced by earlier Mahayana sources such as the Laṅkāvatāra Sūtra and Indian Buddhist Tantras with their teaching of emptiness and luminosity, which in Dzogchen texts are presented as 'ever-purity' (ka-dag) and 'spontaneous presence' (lhun-grub).[19] Sam van Schaik also notes that there is a discrepancy between the histories as presented by the traditions, and the picture that emerges from those manuscripts.[17][web 1] There is no record of Dzogchen as a separate tradition or vehicle prior to the 10th century,[8] although the terms atiyoga (as a higher practice than Tantra) and dzogchen do appear in 8th and 9th century Indian tantric texts.[11] There is also no independent attestation of the existence of any separate traditions or lineages under the name of Dzogchen outside of Tibet,[11] and it may be a unique Tibetan teaching,[8][3] drawing on multiple influences, ...
Ruit was born on September 4, 1954 to rural, illiterate parents in the remote mountainous village Olangchunggola in the border with Tibet in Taplejung district of northeast Nepal. His village was a tiny cluster of 200 people, located 11,000 feet above the sea level, on the lap of the world's third highest peak Mt. Kanchenjunga. It is one of the remotest regions of Nepal with no electricity, no school, no health facility, or modern means of communication, and lies blanketed under snow for six to nine months a year. Ruit's family made a subsistence living from small agriculture, petty trading and livestock farming.[10] Ruit was the second of his parents' six children. But he lost his three siblings - elder brother to diarrhea at age three[11] and younger sister Chundak to fever at age eight. In many interviews, Ruit has mentioned that for him, the most painful was his younger sister Yangla's death. Yangla was his childhood companion, and he was to develop a special bond with her over the ...
Three Bon scriptures-mdo 'dus, gzer mig, and gzi brjid-relate the mythos of Tonpa Shenrab Miwoche. The Bonpos regard the first two as gter ma rediscovered around the tenth and eleventh centuries and the last as nyan brgyud (oral transmission) dictated by Loden Nyingpo, who lived in the fourteenth century.[7] In the fourteenth century, Loden Nyingpo revealed a terma known as The Brilliance (Wylie: gzi brjid), which contained the story of Tonpa Shenrab. He was not the first Bonpo tertön, but his terma became one of the definitive scriptures of Bon religion.[5] It states that Shenrab established the Bon religion while searching for a horse stolen by a demon. Tradition also tells that he was born in the land of Tagzig Olmo Lung Ring (considered[by whom?] an axis mundi) which is traditionally identified as Mount Yung-drung Gu-tzeg ("Edifice of Nine Sauwastikas"), possibly Mount Kailash, in western Tibet. Due to the sacredness of Tagzig Olmo Lungting and Mount Kailash, the Bonpo regard both the ...
... (Capra sibirica) er en geiteart. Bukkene blir 65-105 cm høye og geitene 65-70 cm. De er ensfarget brune. Begge kjønn har hakeskjegg og horn, men geitenes horn er mindre enn bukkenes. Begge kjønn har en stor analkjertel.[2] Den er utbredt i sentrale og nordøstlige Afghanistan, Kina (nordvestlige Gansu, vestlige Indre Mongolia, Xinjiang, kanskje Tibet), nordlige India (Himalaya i Jammu og Kashmir og Himachal Pradesh), østlige Kasakhstan, Kirgisistan, Mongolia (Altaj, Khangajfjellene og Sajanfjellene), nordøstlige Usbekistan, nordlige Pakistan, Russland (Sør-Sibir, sørlige Tuva og Altajfjellene) og Tadsjikistan.[1] Morfologisk står den nær alpesteinbukk (Capra ibex) og er ofte blitt regnet som en underart av den. Molekylærgenetiske studier viser derimot at sibirsteinbukken tilhører en egen utviklingslinje. Mitokondrielt DNA antyder at sibirsteinbukk er mer i slekt med himalyatahr (Hemitragus jemlahicus) enn med resten av slekta Capra.[3][4] ...
... or main disciplines of Traditional Tibetan Medicine. It is said that the Founder of Tibetan Medicine, Yuthok Yonten Gonpo, ... Nashalla G. Nyinda. *Prevention of Disease in Sowa Rigpa, Douglas deBecker. *Lifestyle According to your Typology ... Rejuvenation in Tibetan Medicine - Chulen - Interview with Dr. Nida Chenagtsang. *Expanding the Concepts of Tibetan Medicine:. ... According to Tibetan Medicine, long life and good health result from a balance of bodily energies and constituents. It is ...
BOULDER TIBETAN MEDICINE. Traditional Tibetan Medicine གསོ་བ་རིགཔ་ From East to West ... April 9th, 2017 Posted in Articles, Tibetan Medicine Info. By Nashalla G. Nyinda, Menpa © 2017 ... what traditional Tibetan Medicine healing methods can benefit this affliction?. Tibetan Medicine has four methods of treatment ... April 13th, 2017 Posted in Articles, Tibetan Medicine Info. Written for The 4th Annual Symposium on Western & Tibetan Medicine ...
Nyinda Menpa © 2017 Meditation and mindfulness are increasingly popular and studied in systematic western approaches. The focus ... BOULDER TIBETAN MEDICINE. Traditional Tibetan Medicine གསོ་བ་རིགཔ་ From East to West ... Nashalla G. Nyinda Menpa © 2017. Meditation and mindfulness are increasingly popular and studied in systematic western ... Home Articles Subtle and Gross Winds in Tibetan Medicine. Subtle and Gross Winds in Tibetan Medicine. December 27th, 2017 ...
Nashalla Nyinda, Naropa University. Adapting Traditional Tibetan Medicine Treatment of Mental Health into Western Systems ...
Nashalla Nyinda. Nashalla Gwyn Nyinda TMD, LMT began the study of Tibetan Medicine in 1999 and started treating with permission ... Kalsang Dawa grew up in Lhasa where he has painted traditional Tibetan art since the age of 14. He later moved to Dharamsala ... David R. Shlim, MD, is the co-author, with Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche, of Medicine and Compassion: A Tibetan Lamas Guidance for ... Marc Olmsted took refuge with Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche in 1978 and completed a traditional Tibetan Buddhist three-year retreat ...
... comparing the measurement of the pulse using modern digital instruments to the methodology used in Traditional Tibetan Medicine ... THE ART OF DIAGNOSIS: A PRACTICE IN PERCEPTION AND COMPASSION - Nashalla G. Nyinda ... CHU TAG THE TIBETAN ART OF URINE ANALYSIS - Patrice Richard. TRADITIONAL TIBETAN PULSE READING IN THE DIGITAL ERA - Patrick ... DIAGNOSIS IN TIBETAN VETERINARY MEDICINE - Alice Leorin. CHAPTER 24 OF THE FOUR MEDICAL TANTRAS : DIAGNOSTIC PRINCIPLES - Root ...
  • Some Tibetan physicians may describe wind as a neutral agent, mixing with hot or cold in consequence. (holistic-health.org)
  • This level of understanding what elements do on a physiological level, as well as how to alter and affect the elements for leaning towards homeostasis, have been the backbone of the healthcare management model for Tibetan physicians for centuries. (holistic-health.org)