Isaacs Syndrome: A rare neuromuscular disorder with onset usually in late childhood or early adulthood, characterized by intermittent or continuous widespread involuntary muscle contractions; FASCICULATION; hyporeflexia; MUSCLE CRAMP; MUSCLE WEAKNESS; HYPERHIDROSIS; TACHYCARDIA; and MYOKYMIA. Involvement of pharyngeal or laryngeal muscles may interfere with speech and breathing. The continuous motor activity persists during sleep and general anesthesia (distinguishing this condition from STIFF-PERSON SYNDROME). Familial and acquired (primarily autoimmune) forms have been reported. (From Ann NY Acad Sci 1998 May 13;841:482-496; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1491)Eczema: A pruritic papulovesicular dermatitis occurring as a reaction to many endogenous and exogenous agents (Dorland, 27th ed).Respiratory Sounds: Noises, normal and abnormal, heard on auscultation over any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Dermatitis, Atopic: A chronic inflammatory genetically determined disease of the skin marked by increased ability to form reagin (IgE), with increased susceptibility to allergic rhinitis and asthma, and hereditary disposition to a lowered threshold for pruritus. It is manifested by lichenification, excoriation, and crusting, mainly on the flexural surfaces of the elbow and knee. In infants it is known as infantile eczema.Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal: Allergic rhinitis that occurs at the same time every year. It is characterized by acute CONJUNCTIVITIS with lacrimation and ITCHING, and regarded as an allergic condition triggered by specific ALLERGENS.Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial: Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the nose similar to that found in hay fever except that symptoms persist throughout the year. The causes are usually air-borne allergens, particularly dusts, feathers, molds, animal fur, etc.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.ConjunctivitisMedicine, Chinese Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Chinese culture.Hypersensitivity: Altered reactivity to an antigen, which can result in pathologic reactions upon subsequent exposure to that particular antigen.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Individualized Medicine: Therapeutic approach tailoring therapy for genetically defined subgroups of patients.Dermatology: A medical specialty concerned with the skin, its structure, functions, diseases, and treatment.Internal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Nuclear Medicine: A specialty field of radiology concerned with diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative use of radioactive compounds in a pharmaceutical form.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Medicine, Kampo: System of herbal medicine practiced in Japan by both herbalists and practitioners of modern medicine. Kampo originated in China and is based on Chinese herbal medicine (MEDICINE, CHINESE TRADITIONAL).Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Hypersensitivity, Immediate: Hypersensitivity reactions which occur within minutes of exposure to challenging antigen due to the release of histamine which follows the antigen-antibody reaction and causes smooth muscle contraction and increased vascular permeability.BrazilHistory of MedicineClinical Medicine: The study and practice of medicine by direct examination of the patient.Drugs, Chinese Herbal: Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.Regenerative Medicine: A field of medicine concerned with developing and using strategies aimed at repair or replacement of damaged, diseased, or metabolically deficient organs, tissues, and cells via TISSUE ENGINEERING; CELL TRANSPLANTATION; and ARTIFICIAL ORGANS and BIOARTIFICIAL ORGANS and tissues.Emergency Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Medicine, Ayurvedic: The traditional Hindu system of medicine which is based on customs, beliefs, and practices of the Hindu culture. Ayurveda means "the science of Life": veda - science, ayur - life.Complementary Therapies: Therapeutic practices which are not currently considered an integral part of conventional allopathic medical practice. They may lack biomedical explanations but as they become better researched some (PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES; DIET; ACUPUNCTURE) become widely accepted whereas others (humors, radium therapy) quietly fade away, yet are important historical footnotes. Therapies are termed as Complementary when used in addition to conventional treatments and as Alternative when used instead of conventional treatment.Bronchial Hyperreactivity: Tendency of the smooth muscle of the tracheobronchial tree to contract more intensely in response to a given stimulus than it does in the response seen in normal individuals. This condition is present in virtually all symptomatic patients with asthma. The most prominent manifestation of this smooth muscle contraction is a decrease in airway caliber that can be readily measured in the pulmonary function laboratory.Integrative Medicine: The discipline concerned with using the combination of conventional ALLOPATHIC MEDICINE and ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE to address the biological, psychological, social, and spiritual aspects of health and illness.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Osteopathic Medicine: A medical discipline that is based on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy, developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, recognizes the concept of "wellness" and the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Special attention is placed on the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Sports Medicine: The field of medicine concerned with physical fitness and the diagnosis and treatment of injuries sustained in exercise and sports activities.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Medicine, African Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the African peoples. It includes treatment by medicinal plants and other materia medica as well as by the ministrations of diviners, medicine men, witch doctors, and sorcerers.Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the use of physical agents, mechanical apparatus, and manipulation in rehabilitating physically diseased or injured patients.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Occupational Medicine: Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Veterinary Medicine: The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.National Library of Medicine (U.S.): An agency of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to advancement of medical and related sciences. Major activities of this institute include the collection, dissemination, and exchange of information important to the progress of medicine and health, research in medical informatics and support for medical library development.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Drugs, Essential: Drugs considered essential to meet the health needs of a population as well as to control drug costs.Environmental Medicine: Medical specialty concerned with environmental factors that may impinge upon human disease, and development of methods for the detection, prevention, and control of environmentally related disease.Medicine, Korean Traditional: Medical practice or discipline that is based on the knowledge, cultures, and beliefs of the people of KOREA.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Community Medicine: A branch of medicine concerned with the total health of the individual within the home environment and in the community, and with the application of comprehensive care to the prevention and treatment of illness in the entire community.Tropical Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with diseases, mainly of parasitic origin, common in tropical and subtropical regions.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Social Medicine: A branch of medicine concerned with the role of socio-environmental factors in the occurrence, prevention and treatment of disease.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Religion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Sleep Medicine Specialty: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of SLEEP WAKE DISORDERS and their causes.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Preventive Medicine: A medical specialty primarily concerned with prevention of disease (PRIMARY PREVENTION) and the promotion and preservation of health in the individual.Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Defensive Medicine: The alterations of modes of medical practice, induced by the threat of liability, for the principal purposes of forestalling lawsuits by patients as well as providing good legal defense in the event that such lawsuits are instituted.Philosophy, MedicalOral Medicine: A branch of dentistry dealing with diseases of the oral and paraoral structures and the oral management of systemic diseases. (Hall, What is Oral Medicine, Anyway? Clinical Update: National Naval Dental Center, March 1991, p7-8)Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Disaster Medicine: Branch of medicine involved with management and organization of public health response to disasters and major events including the special health and medical needs of a community in a disaster.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.United StatesPlant Preparations: Material prepared from plants.Reproductive Medicine: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with the morphology, physiology, biochemistry, and pathology of reproduction in man and other animals, and on the biological, medical, and veterinary problems of fertility and lactation. It includes ovulation induction, diagnosis of infertility and recurrent pregnancy loss, and assisted reproductive technologies such as embryo transfer, in vitro fertilization, and intrafallopian transfer of zygotes. (From Infertility and Reproductive Medicine Clinics of North America, Foreword 1990; Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, Notice to Contributors, Jan 1979)Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and management of nuclear medicine services.Holistic Health: Health as viewed from the perspective that humans and other organisms function as complete, integrated units rather than as aggregates of separate parts.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Homeopathy: A system of therapeutics founded by Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843), based on the Law of Similars where "like cures like". Diseases are treated by highly diluted substances that cause, in healthy persons, symptoms like those of the disease to be treated.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Medicine in ArtSpecialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.Behavioral Medicine: The interdisciplinary field concerned with the development and integration of behavioral and biomedical science, knowledge, and techniques relevant to health and illness and the application of this knowledge and these techniques to prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation.Pharmaceutical Preparations: Drugs intended for human or veterinary use, presented in their finished dosage form. Included here are materials used in the preparation and/or formulation of the finished dosage form.Nonprescription Drugs: Medicines that can be sold legally without a DRUG PRESCRIPTION.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Materia Medica: Materials or substances used in the composition of traditional medical remedies. The use of this term in MeSH was formerly restricted to historical articles or those concerned with traditional medicine, but it can also refer to homeopathic remedies. Nosodes are specific types of homeopathic remedies prepared from causal agents or disease products.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Pulmonary Medicine: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM. It is especially concerned with diagnosis and treatment of diseases and defects of the lungs and bronchial tree.Clinical Clerkship: Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.Self Medication: The self administration of medication not prescribed by a physician or in a manner not directed by a physician.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Medicine, Arabic: Traditional Arabic methods used in medicine in the ARAB WORLD.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Military Medicine: The practice of medicine as applied to special circumstances associated with military operations.History, Medieval: The period of history from the year 500 through 1450 of the common era.Legislation, Drug: Laws concerned with manufacturing, dispensing, and marketing of drugs.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Herb-Drug Interactions: The effect of herbs, other PLANTS, or PLANT EXTRACTS on the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of drugs.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Venereology: A branch of medicine which deals with sexually transmitted disease.Naturopathy: A drugless system of therapy, making use of physical forces such as air, light, water, heat, massage. Treatments are often diet- and nutrition-oriented with attention given to the patient's personal history and lifestyle. (From Cassileth, Alternative Medicine Handbook, 1998, p329)Molecular Medicine: The field of medicine concerned with understanding the biochemical basis of health and disease and involved in developing diagnostic and therapeutic methods that utilize MOLECULAR BIOLOGY techniques.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Nobel PrizeHistory, 15th Century: Time period from 1401 through 1500 of the common era.Physicians, Women: Women licensed to practice medicine.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Spiritual Therapies: Mystical, religious, or spiritual practices performed for health benefit.Qi: The vital life force in the body, supposedly able to be regulated by acupuncture. It corresponds roughly to the Greek pneuma, the Latin spiritus, and the ancient Indian prana. The concept of life-breath or vital energy was formulated as an indication of the awareness of man, originally directed externally toward nature or society but later turned inward to the self or life within. (From Comparison between Concepts of Life-Breath in East and West, 15th International Symposium on the Comparative History of Medicine - East and West, August 26-September 3, 1990, Shizuoka, Japan, pp. ix-x)Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.History, 16th Century: Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.Forensic Medicine: The application of medical knowledge to questions of law.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Geriatrics: The branch of medicine concerned with the physiological and pathological aspects of the aged, including the clinical problems of senescence and senility.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Pharmacies: Facilities for the preparation and dispensing of drugs.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Acupuncture Therapy: Treatment of disease by inserting needles along specific pathways or meridians. The placement varies with the disease being treated. It is sometimes used in conjunction with heat, moxibustion, acupressure, or electric stimulation.Drug Therapy: The use of DRUGS to treat a DISEASE or its symptoms. One example is the use of ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS to treat CANCER.Croatia: Created 7 April 1992 as a result of the division of Yugoslavia.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.Technology, Radiologic: The application of scientific knowledge or technology to the field of radiology. The applications center mostly around x-ray or radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes but the technological applications of any radiation or radiologic procedure is within the scope of radiologic technology.Ethnobotany: The study of plant lore and agricultural customs of a people. In the fields of ETHNOMEDICINE and ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, the emphasis is on traditional medicine and the existence and medicinal uses of PLANTS and PLANT EXTRACTS and their constituents, both historically and in modern times.Fellowships and Scholarships: Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Drug Information Services: Services providing pharmaceutic and therapeutic drug information and consultation.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Acupuncture: The occupational discipline of the traditional Chinese methods of ACUPUNCTURE THERAPY for treating disease by inserting needles along specific pathways or meridians.Great BritainPharmacogenetics: A branch of genetics which deals with the genetic variability in individual responses to drugs and drug metabolism (BIOTRANSFORMATION).Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Rehabilitation: Restoration of human functions to the maximum degree possible in a person or persons suffering from disease or injury.Translational Medical Research: The application of discoveries generated by laboratory research and preclinical studies to the development of clinical trials and studies in humans. A second area of translational research concerns enhancing the adoption of best practices.Naval Medicine: The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Medicine, Tibetan Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Tibetan culture.Yin-Yang: In Chinese philosophy and religion, two principles, one negative, dark, and feminine (yin) and one positive, bright, and masculine (yang), from whose interaction all things are produced and all things are dissolved. As a concept the two polar elements referred originally to the shady and sunny sides of a valley or a hill but it developed into the relationship of any contrasting pair: those specified above (female-male, etc.) as well as cold-hot, wet-dry, weak-strong, etc. It is not a distinct system of thought by itself but permeates Chinese life and thought. A balance of yin and yang is essential to health. A deficiency of either principle can manifest as disease. (Encyclopedia Americana)Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Physician Executives: Physicians who serve in a medical and administrative capacity as head of an organized medical staff and who also may serve as liaison for the medical staff with the administration and governing board.Counterfeit Drugs: Drugs manufactured and sold with the intent to misrepresent its origin, authenticity, chemical composition, and or efficacy. Counterfeit drugs may contain inappropriate quantities of ingredients not listed on the label or package. In order to further deceive the consumer, the packaging, container, or labeling, may be inaccurate, incorrect, or fake.History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Drugs, Generic: Drugs whose drug name is not protected by a trademark. They may be manufactured by several companies.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Western World: A historical and cultural entity dispersed across the wide geographical area of Europe, as opposed to the East, Asia, and Africa. The term was used by scholars through the late medieval period. Thereafter, with the impact of colonialism and the transmission of cultures, Western World was sometimes expanded to include the Americas. (Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Travel Medicine: Multidisciplinary field focusing on prevention of infectious diseases and patient safety during international TRAVEL. Key element of patient's pre-travel visit to the physician is a health risk assessment.Licensure, Medical: The granting of a license to practice medicine.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions: Disorders that result from the intended use of PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS. Included in this heading are a broad variety of chemically-induced adverse conditions due to toxicity, DRUG INTERACTIONS, and metabolic effects of pharmaceuticals.Accreditation: Certification as complying with a standard set by non-governmental organizations, applied for by institutions, programs, and facilities on a voluntary basis.Hospitalists: Physicians who are employed to work exclusively in hospital settings, primarily for managed care organizations. They are the attending or primary responsible physician for the patient during hospitalization.Pharmacology, Clinical: The branch of pharmacology that deals directly with the effectiveness and safety of drugs in humans.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Mind-Body Relations, Metaphysical: The relation between the mind and the body in a religious, social, spiritual, behavioral, and metaphysical context. This concept is significant in the field of alternative medicine. It differs from the relationship between physiologic processes and behavior where the emphasis is on the body's physiology ( = PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY).Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.
Isaacs, Jennifer. Bush food: Aboriginal food and herbal medicine. "Nut". Biology Online Dictionary. October 3, 2005. Retrieved ...
Isaacs, J. 1987. Bush Food: Aboriginal Food and Herbal Medicine. Weldon, Sydney, Australia. Australian National Botanic Garden ...
Isaacs, W. B.; Visakorpi, T; Bova, G. S. (2009). "Copy number analysis indicates monoclonal origin of lethal metastatic ... The Journal of Experimental Medicine. 193 (6): 727-40. doi:10.1084/jem.193.6.727. PMC 2193412 . PMID 11257139. Denardo, D. G.; ... prostate cancer". Nature Medicine. 15 (5): 559-65. doi:10.1038/nm.1944. PMC 2839160 . PMID 19363497. Torres, L; Ribeiro, F. R ...
ISBN 0-7614-7344-0. Isaacs, Jennifer (2002). Bush Food: Aboriginal Food and Herbal Medicine. Frenchs Forest, New South Wales: ...
Robert Hare, M.D., (1858). From the Digital Collections of the National Library of Medicine. Isaacs, Ernest Joseph (1957). A ...
Denmeade, SR; Isaacs, JT (May 2002). "A history of prostate cancer treatment". Nature Reviews. Cancer. 2 (5): 389-96. doi: ... He went on to study medicine at Harvard Medical School and received his MD degree in 1924. He served his internship and ... Huggins was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1966. Huggins died 1997 in Chicago, Illinois at the age of 95 ... He was awarded the 1966 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for discovering in 1941 that hormones could be used to control ...
Equine stud farm medicine and surgery. Retrieved 2010-02-11. Norton, Mary E.; Chauhan, Suneet P.; Dashe, Jodi S. (2015-02-01 ... Isaacs H (January 2008). "Fetal hydrops associated with tumors". Am J Perinatol. 25 (1): 43-68. doi:10.1055/s-2007-1004826. ... Mirror syndrome "Hydrops Fetalis: eMedicine Pediatrics: Cardiac Disease and Critical Care Medicine". Retrieved 2010-02-11. ... "Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) Clinical Guideline #7: nonimmune hydrops fetalis". American Journal of Obstetrics ...
Isaacs, J. T. (2012). "Engineering a Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen-Activated Tumor Endothelial Cell Prodrug for Cancer ... Therapy". Science Translational Medicine. 4 (140): 140ra86. doi:10.1126/scitranslmed.3003886. PMC 3715055 . PMID 22745436. ...
"Farren Isaacs named a Beckman Young Investigator". Yale News. Yale University. December 17, 2012. Retrieved 17 October 2014. " ... Albert Einstein College of Medicine. 13 May 2009. Retrieved 17 October 2014. "Clodagh O'Shea Receives 2008 Beckman Young ... Isaacs Frank Alber Louis Bouchard William Dichtel Anne McNeil Daniel Zilberman David Masopust Herschel Wade Jon Lai Marc ...
It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health ... Herfarth HH, Long MD, Isaacs KL (2012). "Methotrexate: underused and ignored?". Digestive Diseases. 30 Suppl 3: 112-8. doi: ... 2013). Australian Medicines Handbook (2013 ed.). Adelaide: The Australian Medicines Handbook Unit Trust. ISBN 978-0-9805790-9-3 ... National Library of Medicine: Drug Information Portal - Methotrexate Pharmacy and pharmacology portal Medicine portal. ...
He trained in internal medicine at the Harvard Medical Service of Boston City Hospital. He then became an officer of the ... Steven A. Schroeder, Steve Isaacs (September 2004). "Class - The Ignored Determinant of the Nation's Health". New England ... In 1976 UCSF Chair of Medicine, Lloyd "Holly" Smith, recruited Dr. Schroeder to the faculty, where he created a Division of ... In addition to his work in the Division of General Medicine, Dr. Schroeder published widely in health services research, often ...
Kauff, Noah D.; Domchek, Susan M.; Friebel, Tara M.; Robson, Mark E.; Lee, Johanna; Garber, Judy E.; Isaacs, Claudine; Evans, D ... The New England Journal of Medicine. 346 (21): 1609-1615. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa020119. ISSN 1533-4406. PMID 12023992. ... Buys, Saundra S.; Partridge, Edward; Black, Amanda; Johnson, Christine C.; Lamerato, Lois; Isaacs, Claudine; Reding, Douglas J ...
Journal of Palliative Medicine. 2009 Jul;12(7):593-7. PMID 19594342 Meier DE. Finding my place. Journal of Palliative Medicine ... Springer: 2014 Hughes RG, Isaacs SL, Meier DE, (eds). Palliative Care: Transforming the Care of Serious Illness. Wiley/Jossey- ... Palliative Medicine: Politics and Policy. Journal of Palliative Medicine. 31 December 2009. PMID 20043709 Adler ED, Goldfinger ... Alexander Richman Commemorative Award for Humanism in Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, 1998 Founders Award of the ...
Dr Marjory Warren CBE MRCS LRCP (1897-1960): the mother of British geriatric medicine. J Med Biogr 2011;19:105-10. Isaacs 1965 ... Doctors of Medicine can opt for a two-year residency program in family medicine and complete a one-year enhanced skills program ... Doctors of Medicine (M.D.) can complete a three-year core internal medicine residency program, followed by two years of ... Training in some institutes are exclusive in the Department of Geriatric medicine, with rotations in Internal medicine, medical ...
Isaacs 1836a, p. xv - xx, Introduction. Isaacs 1836a, Chapter 1 - Shipwreck. Louis Herrman (December 1974). "Nathaniel Isaacs ... Two years after The Mary had foundered, the settlement had run out of medicine and fresh supplies had to be bought in Delagoa ... Isaacs 1836a, p. 146, Ch VIII. Isaacs 1836a, p. 223, Ch XII. "Greater St Lucia Wetland Park South Africa". Safari-Guide - The ... though it has been alleged that Isaacs invented that name because he had forgotten Maclean's real name. In 1825 Isaacs was ...
Isaacs, Ronald H. Divination, Magic, and Healing the Book of Jewish Folklore. Northvale N.J.: Jason Aronson, 1998. pg 55 (Zane ... 1999). Women's Medicine, Women's Culture: Abortion and Fortune-telling in Early Twentieth-Century Germany and the Netherlands. ... Discussing the role of fortune-telling in society, Ronald H. Isaacs, an American rabbi and author, opined, "Since time ...
Bush food: Aboriginal food and herbal medicine by Jennifer Isaacs Chaffey, Calder (June 2002). "A Fern which Changed Australian ...
Webber S, Wilkinson AR, Lindsell D, Hope PL, Dobson SR, Isaacs D (February 1990). "Neonatal pneumonia". Archives of Disease in ... antipyretics and cough medicine. Some forms of CAP can be prevented by vaccination and by abstaining from tobacco products. ... Archives of Internal Medicine. 157 (13): 1453-9. doi:10.1001/archinte.157.13.1453. PMID 9224224. "What is pneumonia? What ... The American Journal of Medicine. 120 (9): 783-90. doi:10.1016/j.amjmed.2007.04.023. PMID 17765048. Vardakas KZ, Siempos II, ...
Ralph Isaacs Ingersoll (1789-1872)-United States Minister to Russia, mayor of New Haven, Connecticut. Eli Ives (1779-1861)- ... Denison Olmsted (1791-1859)-Professor of Medicine and Natural Philosophy at Yale. One of the first to see Halley's Comet in ... professor of Medicine Chauncey Jerome (1793-1868)-mayor of New Haven, clockmaker Nathaniel Jocelyn (1796-1881)-portrait painter ...
Fogarty LR, Haack SK, Johnson HE, Brennan AK, Isaacs NM, Spencer C (2015). "Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. ... Current Molecular Medicine. 9 (2): 100-15. doi:10.2174/156652409787581637. PMID 19275621. Wielders CL, Fluit AC, Brisse S, ...
World Health Statistics 2011 - Table 6: Health workforce, infrastructure and essential medicines. Accessed 21 July 2011. Isaacs ... Scientific medicine has evolved slowly over the last few millennia and very rapidly over the last 150 years or so. As the ...
Harold Isaacs, The Tragedy of the Chinese Revolution, Secker and Warburg Publishers, 1938, p. 78. Nathaniel Cha, The Life of ... Qin R. "On Mao Zedong's thoughts about population". US National Library of Medicine, 29 March 1984 (2):1-3. Article in Chinese. ...
Black Report Graham, H., Understanding Health Inequalities, (2000), Open University Press Isaacs, J.D., Stephen L. and Steven A ... "Class - The Ignored Determinant of the Nation's Health". New England Journal of Medicine 351.11 (Sep 2004), 1137-1142. Black & ...
Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Authority (2006-04-11). "Cyproterone Acetate" (PDF). Giorgi EP, Shirley IM, Grant ... John V. Knaus; John H. Isaacs (6 December 2012). Office Gynecology: Advanced Management Concepts. Springer Science & Business ... 557-. ISBN 0-7020-5182-9. Jerome P. Kassirer; Harry L. Greene (1997). Current Therapy in Adult Medicine. Mosby. p. 174. ISBN ... ISBN 3-901299-34-3. New Zealand Medicines; Medical Devices Safety Authority (2005-12-09). "Data Sheet: Diane 35 ED". Archived ...
John Bell, Raymond Tallis, John Carey, Paul Bailey, Michael Arditti, Havi Carel and Tom Isaacs (of The Cure Parkinson's Trust ... 2009 Unboxing Medicine 2010 Stories, Language and Medicine 2011 Medicine and Values 2012 Belief 2013 Voice 2014 Frontiers 2015 ... NHS Trust Parabola Arts Centre Medicine Unboxed on Pinterest Medicine Unboxed on Vimeo Medicine Unboxed on Soundcloud Medicine ... Unboxing Medicine, 2009; Stories, Language and Medicine, 2010; Medicine and Values, 2011; Belief, 2012; Voice, 2013; Frontiers ...
Annals of Internal Medicine. 2002.. *^ Guaderrama, Noelani M.; Liu, Jianmin; Nager, Charles W.; Pretorius, Dolores H.; Sheean, ... Isaacs, Christine; 等, 编. Transvaginal Pudendal Nerve Block. WebMD LLC. [2015-07-19].. ...
Buy Evidence-based Pediatric Infectious Diseases by David Isaacs from Waterstones today! Click and Collect from your local ... Science, Technology & Medicine > Medicine > Clinical & internal medicine > Paediatric medicine Science, Technology & Medicine ... Evidence-based Pediatric Infectious Diseases - Evidence-Based Medicine (Paperback). David Isaacs (author) Sign in to write a ... Renowned Clinical Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, David Isaacs, and an expert consultant editor team, bring you the ...
Annals of Internal Medicine 2013, 159(4), 253-261. * Burmester GR, Charles-Schoeman C, Isaacs JD, Hendrikx T, Kwok K, Zwillich ... Clinical Medicine 2013, 13, 391-4. * Pratt AG, Lorenzi AR, Wilson G, Platt PN, Isaacs JD. Predicting persistent inflammatory ... Brown PM, Isaacs JD. Rheumatoid arthritis: from palliation to remission in two decades. Clinical Medicine 2014, 14(Suppl. 6), ... Isaacs JD, Ferraccioli G. The need for personalised medicine for rheumatoid arthritis. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 2011, ...
Isaacs earned his Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Glasgow in 1954,. Isaacs was awarded honours and the ... Alick Isaacs, Hutchinson Encyclopedia "Alick Isaacs Laboratory Notebooks 1938-1965". National Library of Medicine. Bruce, ... A collection of his laboratory notes is held at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland. Isaacs was born to ... Alick Isaacs FRS (17 July 1921 - 26 January 1967) was a British (Scottish) virologist, who is best known for his 1957 co- ...
John T. Isaacs Laboratory While there has been an explosion of knowledge about human carcinogenesis over the last 2 decades, ... Presently, a series of drugs discovered in the Isaacs lab are undergoing clinical trials in patients with metastatic cancer. ... The goal of the Isaacs lab is to change this situation by translating theory into therapy for solid malignancies, particularly ...
Dan E. Arking, PhD, is an associate professor at the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine and Department of Medicine ... William B. Isaacs Laboratory Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in men in the United States, although ... The Cammarato Lab is located in the Division of Cardiology in the Department of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School ... Research Areas: Nrf2, tobacco use, genetics, cancer, pulmonary medicine, environment, lung cancer ...
Karen M. Isaacs, MD, MPH. Assistant Professor, Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina ... Isaacs, MD, MPH, a family physician at Coastal Family Medicine in Wilmington, North Carolina. Isaacs is also a clinical ... Disclosure: Karen M. Isaacs, MD, MPH, has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships:. Received income in an ... It would be essential to dig deeper with a patient to make appropriate shared decisions about what medicine or dietary ...
Kim L. Isaacs, MD, PhD Professor of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology; Co-Director, UNC Multidisciplinary ... Professor of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology; Medical Director, UNC Hospitals Endoscopy Center UNC ... Professor of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology; Medical Director, UNC Hospitals Endoscopy Center UNC ... Professor of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology; Adjunct Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Director, ...
Yao S, Maghsoudlou D, Ambrosone CB . Breast cancer pharmacogenetics in the era of personalized medicine. Curr Breast Cancer Rep ... C Isaacs7. , *T J Hobday8. , *M Salim9. , *G N Hortobagyi10. , ... College of Medicine, Arizona Cancer Center, AZ, Tucson, USA. *R ... Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, MI, Ann Arbor, USA. *D F Hayes ... Department of medicine, Baystate Medical Center, MA, Springfield, USA. *J A Stewart ...
Scott Isaacs, MD, FACE, FACP, rated 3.9/5 by patients. 49 reviews, Phone number & practice locations, Endocrinologist in ... Isaacs is affiliated with Emory University School of Medicine and Grady Memorial Hospital. Dr. Isaacs has received 4 awards. He ... Scott Isaacs Dr. Scott Isaacs, MD, FACE, FACP is a Doctor primarily located in Atlanta, GA. He has 24 years of experience. His ... Internal Medicine An internist is a physician who focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of conditions that affect the adult ...
Electrodiagnostic Medicine -AANEM offers self-assessment exams, podcasts, course books, and journal reviews. AANEM educational ... Isaacs Syndrome: A Review * Journal Review by Aiesha Ahmed, MD, and Zachary Simmons, MD ... Free CME! Learn underlying disease characteristics of Isaacs syndrome as well as how to evaluate patients and distinguish ... American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine. Improving the Lives of Patients with Neuromuscular Diseases ...
Isaacs, Jennifer. Bush Food: Aboriginal Food and Herbal Medicine. Sydney: Weldons, 1987. ... many rural societies have lost knowledge of traditional medicine and have come to rely on Western medicine, which is not always ...
Isaacs JT. The biology of hormone refractory prostate cancer. Why does it develop? Urol Clin North Am. 1999;26:263-73.PubMed ... Thrall J. Personalized medicine. Radiology. 2004;231:613-6.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Applications of biochips: from diagnostics to personalized medicine. Curr Opin Drug Discov Devel. 2004;7(3):285-9.PubMedGoogle ... Bradbury M. (2011) The Role of Molecular Imaging in Personalized Medicine. In: Faro S., Mohamed F., Law M., Ulmer J. (eds) ...
National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD, 20894 USA ... Pownall ME, Isaacs HV. FGF Signalling in Vertebrate Development. San Rafael (CA): Morgan & Claypool Life Sciences; 2010. FGF ... Pownall ME, Isaacs HV. FGF Signalling in Vertebrate Development. San Rafael (CA): Morgan & Claypool Life Sciences; 2010. ... A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. ...
Isaacs D, Moxon ER. Immunisation. In: Weatherall DJ, Ledingham JGG, Warrel DA (eds), Oxford Text Book of Medicine. 3rd Edn, Vol ... eds), Harrisons Practice of Internal Medicine. 14th Edn, New York: McGraw Hill, 1998; pp 758-771.Google Scholar ...
Isaacs, Jennifer. Bush food: Aboriginal food and herbal medicine. "Nut". Biology Online Dictionary. October 3, 2005. Retrieved ...
Edited By:John T. Isaacs. Journal We offer a wide variety of journal content on Wiley Online Library. ...
Claudine Isaacs, MD. Claudine Isaacs, MD. *Professor of Medicine and Oncology *Georgetown University Medical School ...
Prof David Isaacs. Use of vaccines and immunobiological agents in clinical practice and preventive medicine. Clinical Professor ... Office of Medicines Authorisation. Market Authorisation Group, Therapeutic Goods Administration. Prof Kristine Macartney. ...
... promising and indicates that there could be other diseases and patients that could benefit from the use of off-patent medicines ... Medical research is increasingly focusing on how existing medicines, licensed for use in one condition, can also be used to ... Tom Isaacs. We are devastated to announce that Tom Isaacs, President and Co-founder of The Cure Parkinsons Trust (CPT) died on ... AMRC- Facilitating Adoption of Off-patent, Repurposed Medicines. The Cure Parkinsons Trust is pleased to have been involved in ...
Isaacs. SM. . Out-of-hospital treatment of opioid overdoses in an urban setting. ... Medicines for Patients After an Opioid Overdose Annals of Internal Medicine; 169 (3): I-16 ... Emergency Medicine, High Value Care, Hospital Medicine, Tobacco, Alcohol, and Other Substance Abuse. ... Presented at Society for Academic Emergency Medicine 2017, Orlando, Florida, 16-19 May 2017. ...
"In response to media reports that imply otherwise, Annals of Internal Medicine did not schedule the publication of the US ... Isaacs. C. Breast cancer in minority women.. Harris J, Lippman M, Morrow M, Osborne CK. Diseases of the Breast. 4th ed. ... Schechter: Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Mazer Building 110, Bronx, NY ... and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York), model M (M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas), and model W ( ...
Isaacs completed a residency at Manhattan E E T Hospital. He currently practices at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center Multi and ... Richard Isaacs, MD is a head & neck surgical oncology specialist in Sacramento, CA. Dr. ... Bariatric MedicineCardiologyFamily MedicineGastroenterologyInternal MedicineOB/GYNOncologyOrthopedic SurgeryPediatricsView All ... Bariatric MedicineCardiologyFamily MedicineGastroenterologyInternal MedicineOB/GYNOncologyOrthopedic SurgeryPediatricsView All ...
Papers of note in Science Translational Medicine 9 (399) Message Subject. (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you from Science ... R. Isaacs, * S. Mohan, * G. Plesa, * S. F. Lacey, * J.-M. Navenot, ...
Clinical advances and trends from the most trusted emergency medical news source in emergency medicine. ... Isaacs, Lawrence Isaacs, Lawrence Less Emergency Medicine News. 33(4):30, April 2011. ... Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw at Emergency Medicine News.. ...
Clinical advances and trends from the most trusted emergency medical news source in emergency medicine. ... Isaacs, Lawrence Less Emergency Medicine News. 31(11):18-19, November 2009. ... Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw at Emergency Medicine News.. ...
  • Renowned Clinical Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, David Isaacs, and an expert consultant editor team, bring you the first book to critically look at the evidence for decision making in pediatric infections. (waterstones.com)
  • The following piece by Dr Peter Young, Dr Ai-Lene Chan and Professor David Isaacs reviews the adverse psychological and physical health effects of mandatory detention doctors encounter, in order to highlight the need for ongoing discussion and transparency. (crikey.com.au)
  • Dr. Dujmovic Basuroski received her MD, Master of Science in Medicine and Doctor of Science in Medicine degrees and completed her residency in neurology at the University of Belgrade School of Medicine in Belgrade, Serbia. (unc.edu)
  • Daniel H. Lowenstein , M.D. , is the Robert B. and Ellinor Aird Professor of Neurology and Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Director of the UCSF Epilepsy Center, and Director of Physician-Scientist and Education Training Programs for the UCSF School of Medicine . (wikipedia.org)
  • Malekzadeh, R. Silent liver diseases in autopsies from forensic medicine of Tehran. (eurekaselect.com)
  • Fitness to drive: a core clinical forensic medicine responsibility - Parekh V. BACKGROUND: In the ACT in 2010 there was a series of fatal motor vehicle collisions which Clinical Forensic Medical Services attended to as part of their duties. (medworm.com)
  • Professor Tarnow-Mordi completed his medical training at the University of Cambridge, UK, followed by specialist training in Paediatrics and Neonatal Medicine. (edu.au)
  • The personal and professional welfare of the individual specialist in emergency medicine is a primary concern to the FLAAEM. (aaem.org)
  • If opting for an 'integrative approach' - which is intended to blend conventional medical procedures with non-conventional therapies - Dr. Isaacs stresses that your primary care physician (and oncologist) should be kept fully apprised of the treatments used. (naturalnews.com)
  • To better understand the challenges clinicians face in trying to address these pervasive outside influences, Medscape spoke with Karen M. Isaacs, MD, MPH, a family physician at Coastal Family Medicine in Wilmington, North Carolina. (medscape.com)
  • A specialist in emergency medicine is a physician who has achieved, through personal dedication and sacrifice, certification by either the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) or the American Osteopathic Board of Emergency Medicine (AOBEM). (aaem.org)
  • Even with these sobering statistics, board-certified physician and cancer expert Linda Isaacs, MD, offers a breath of fresh air - reporting that individualized nutritional protocols and the use of pancreatic enzymes can bring "remarkable" results. (naturalnews.com)
  • Only recently have scientific advancements, including the 'omics' sciences of genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, introduced an unprecedented wealth of individualized data, ushering in a new era of personalized medicine. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • This review describes novel strategies designed to permit tailoring of four major pharmacotherapeutic drug classes within vascular medicine: antiplatelet therapy, antihypertensive therapy, lipid-lowering therapy, and antithrombotic therapy. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Broadly speaking, the critical unmet needs in personalized vascular medicine can be categorized into risk assessment and pharmacotherapeutic management. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)