Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Food: Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.Meat Products: Articles of food which are derived by a process of manufacture from any portion of carcasses of any animal used for food (e.g., head cheese, sausage, scrapple).Food Supply: The production and movement of food items from point of origin to use or consumption.Food Analysis: Measurement and evaluation of the components of substances to be taken as FOOD.Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Food Preferences: The selection of one food over another.Food Labeling: Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a food or its container or wrapper. The concept includes ingredients, NUTRITIONAL VALUE, directions, warnings, and other relevant information.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Food Habits: Acquired or learned food preferences.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Food Industry: The industry concerned with processing, preparing, preserving, distributing, and serving of foods and beverages.Cooking: The art or practice of preparing food. It includes the preparation of special foods for diets in various diseases.Food Hypersensitivity: Gastrointestinal disturbances, skin eruptions, or shock due to allergic reactions to allergens in food.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Food Safety: Activities involved in ensuring the safety of FOOD including avoidance of bacterial and other contamination.Health Food: A non-medical term defined by the lay public as a food that has little or no preservatives, which has not undergone major processing, enrichment or refinement and which may be grown without pesticides. (from Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Food Preservation: Procedures or techniques used to keep food from spoiling.Fast Foods: Prepared food that is ready to eat or partially prepared food that has a final preparation time of a few minutes or less.Food Deprivation: The withholding of food in a structured experimental situation.Food, Fortified: Any food that has been supplemented with essential nutrients either in quantities that are greater than those present normally, or which are not present in the food normally. Fortified food includes also food to which various nutrients have been added to compensate for those removed by refinement or processing. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Food, Genetically Modified: Food derived from genetically modified organisms (ORGANISMS, GENETICALLY MODIFIED).Food Inspection: Examination of foods to assure wholesome and clean products free from unsafe microbes or chemical contamination, natural or added deleterious substances, and decomposition during production, processing, packaging, etc.Food Services: Functions, equipment, and facilities concerned with the preparation and distribution of ready-to-eat food.Food Chain: The sequence of transfers of matter and energy from organism to organism in the form of FOOD. Food chains intertwine locally into a food web because most organisms consume more than one type of animal or plant. PLANTS, which convert SOLAR ENERGY to food by PHOTOSYNTHESIS, are the primary food source. In a predator chain, a plant-eating animal is eaten by a larger animal. In a parasite chain, a smaller organism consumes part of a larger host and may itself be parasitized by smaller organisms. In a saprophytic chain, microorganisms live on dead organic matter.Food Quality: Ratings of the characteristics of food including flavor, appearance, nutritional content, and the amount of microbial and chemical contamination.Legislation, Food: Laws and regulations concerned with industrial processing and marketing of foods.Food Technology: The application of knowledge to the food industry.Food Additives: Substances which are of little or no nutritive value, but are used in the processing or storage of foods or animal feed, especially in the developed countries; includes ANTIOXIDANTS; FOOD PRESERVATIVES; FOOD COLORING AGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS (both plain and LOCAL); VEHICLES; EXCIPIENTS and other similarly used substances. Many of the same substances are PHARMACEUTIC AIDS when added to pharmaceuticals rather than to foods.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Food, Preserved: Food that has been prepared and stored in a way to prevent spoilage.Meat-Packing Industry: The aggregate enterprise of technically producing packaged meat.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Food Packaging: Containers, packaging, and packaging materials for processed and raw foods and beverages. It includes packaging intended to be used for storage and also used for preparation of foods such as microwave food containers versus COOKING AND EATING UTENSILS. Packaging materials may be intended for food contact or designated non-contact, for example, shipping containers. FOOD LABELING is also available.Poultry: Domesticated birds raised for food. It typically includes CHICKENS; TURKEYS, DUCKS; GEESE; and others.Food Preservatives: Substances capable of inhibiting, retarding or arresting the process of fermentation, acidification or other deterioration of foods.Infant Food: Food processed and manufactured for the nutritional health of children in their first year of life.Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Energy Intake: Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.Functional Food: Components of the usual diet that may provide health benefits beyond basic nutrients. Examples of functional foods include soy, nuts, chocolate, and cranberries (From NCCAM Backgrounder, March 2004, p3).Soy Foods: Foods made from SOYBEANS. Health benefits are ascribed to the high levels of DIETARY PROTEINS and ISOFLAVONES.Nutritive Value: An indication of the contribution of a food to the nutrient content of the diet. This value depends on the quantity of a food which is digested and absorbed and the amounts of the essential nutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrate, minerals, vitamins) which it contains. This value can be affected by soil and growing conditions, handling and storage, and processing.Food-Processing Industry: The productive enterprises concerned with food processing.Diet Surveys: Systematic collections of factual data pertaining to the diet of a human population within a given geographic area.Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.Food, Formulated: Food and dietary formulations including elemental (chemically defined formula) diets, synthetic and semisynthetic diets, space diets, weight-reduction formulas, tube-feeding diets, complete liquid diets, and supplemental liquid and solid diets.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Food Coloring Agents: Natural or synthetic dyes used as coloring agents in processed foods.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Salmonella Food Poisoning: Poisoning caused by ingestion of food harboring species of SALMONELLA. Conditions of raising, shipping, slaughtering, and marketing of domestic animals contribute to the spread of this bacterium in the food supply.Foods, Specialized: Foods and beverages prepared for use to meet specific needs such as infant foods.Food Assistance: Food or financial assistance for food given to those in need.Foodborne Diseases: Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.Dairy Products: Raw and processed or manufactured milk and milk-derived products. These are usually from cows (bovine) but are also from goats, sheep, reindeer, and water buffalo.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Food, Organic: Food that is grown or manufactured in accordance with nationally regulated production standards that include restrictions on the use of pesticides, non-organic fertilizers, genetic engineering, growth hormones, irradiation, antibiotics, and non-organic ingredients.Eggs: Animal reproductive bodies, or the contents thereof, used as food. The concept is differentiated from OVUM, the anatomic or physiologic entity.Food Irradiation: Treatment of food with RADIATION.Staphylococcal Food Poisoning: Poisoning by staphylococcal toxins present in contaminated food.Nutrition Policy: Guidelines and objectives pertaining to food supply and nutrition including recommendations for healthy diet.Hunger: The desire for FOOD generated by a sensation arising from the lack of food in the STOMACH.Diet, Vegetarian: Dietary practice of completely avoiding meat products in the DIET, consuming VEGETABLES, CEREALS, and NUTS. Some vegetarian diets called lacto-ovo also include milk and egg products.Chickens: Common name for the species Gallus gallus, the domestic fowl, in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. It is descended from the red jungle fowl of SOUTHEAST ASIA.Dietary Fats: Fats present in food, especially in animal products such as meat, meat products, butter, ghee. They are present in lower amounts in nuts, seeds, and avocados.Diet Records: Records of nutrient intake over a specific period of time, usually kept by the patient.United States Department of Agriculture: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with improving and maintaining farm income and developing and expanding markets for agricultural products. Through inspection and grading services it safeguards and insures standards of quality in food supply and production.Dietary Proteins: Proteins obtained from foods. They are the main source of the ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS.Cereals: Seeds from grasses (POACEAE) which are important in the diet.Consumer Product SafetyBody Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Food Service, Hospital: Hospital department that manages and supervises the dietary program in accordance with the patients' requirements.Food Dispensers, Automatic: Mechanical food dispensing machines.Taste: The ability to detect chemicals through gustatory receptors in the mouth, including those on the TONGUE; the PALATE; the PHARYNX; and the EPIGLOTTIS.Food Storage: Keeping food for later consumption.Refrigeration: The mechanical process of cooling.Fishes: A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.Heterocyclic Compounds: Ring compounds having atoms other than carbon in their nuclei. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Frozen FoodsPlants, Edible: An organism of the vegetable kingdom suitable by nature for use as a food, especially by human beings. Not all parts of any given plant are edible but all parts of edible plants have been known to figure as raw or cooked food: leaves, roots, tubers, stems, seeds, buds, fruits, and flowers. The most commonly edible parts of plants are FRUIT, usually sweet, fleshy, and succulent. Most edible plants are commonly cultivated for their nutritional value and are referred to as VEGETABLES.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Salmonella: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that utilizes citrate as a sole carbon source. It is pathogenic for humans, causing enteric fevers, gastroenteritis, and bacteremia. Food poisoning is the most common clinical manifestation. Organisms within this genus are separated on the basis of antigenic characteristics, sugar fermentation patterns, and bacteriophage susceptibility.Beverages: Liquids that are suitable for drinking. (From Merriam Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)United StatesAmines: A group of compounds derived from ammonia by substituting organic radicals for the hydrogens. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Nutritional Status: State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.RestaurantsNutrition Assessment: Evaluation and measurement of nutritional variables in order to assess the level of nutrition or the NUTRITIONAL STATUS of the individual. NUTRITION SURVEYS may be used in making the assessment.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Seafood: Marine fish and shellfish used as food or suitable for food. (Webster, 3d ed) SHELLFISH and FISH PRODUCTS are more specific types of SEAFOOD.Nutrition Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to the nutritional status of a human population within a given geographic area. Data from these surveys are used in preparing NUTRITION ASSESSMENTS.Weight Gain: Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.Sus scrofa: A species of SWINE, in the family Suidae, comprising a number of subspecies including the domestic pig Sus scrofa domestica.Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: The processes and properties of living organisms by which they take in and balance the use of nutritive materials for energy, heat production, or building material for the growth, maintenance, or repair of tissues and the nutritive properties of FOOD.Dietary Carbohydrates: Carbohydrates present in food comprising digestible sugars and starches and indigestible cellulose and other dietary fibers. The former are the major source of energy. The sugars are in beet and cane sugar, fruits, honey, sweet corn, corn syrup, milk and milk products, etc.; the starches are in cereal grains, legumes (FABACEAE), tubers, etc. (From Claudio & Lagua, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Dictionary, 3d ed, p32, p277)Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Mutagens: Chemical agents that increase the rate of genetic mutation by interfering with the function of nucleic acids. A clastogen is a specific mutagen that causes breaks in chromosomes.Nutritional Requirements: The amounts of various substances in food needed by an organism to sustain healthy life.Iron, Dietary: Iron or iron compounds used in foods or as food. Dietary iron is important in oxygen transport and the synthesis of the iron-porphyrin proteins hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochromes, and cytochrome oxidase. Insufficient amounts of dietary iron can lead to iron-deficiency anemia.Turkeys: Large woodland game BIRDS in the subfamily Meleagridinae, family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. Formerly they were considered a distinct family, Melegrididae.Appetite: Natural recurring desire for food. Alterations may be induced by APPETITE DEPRESSANTS or APPETITE STIMULANTS.Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of animals.UruguayObesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Shellfish: Aquatic invertebrates belonging to the phylum MOLLUSCA or the subphylum CRUSTACEA, and used as food.Food Parasitology: The presence of parasites in food and food products. For the presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food, FOOD MICROBIOLOGY is available.Appetite Regulation: Physiologic mechanisms which regulate or control the appetite and food intake.Dietary Fiber: The remnants of plant cell walls that are resistant to digestion by the alimentary enzymes of man. It comprises various polysaccharides and lignins.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Satiation: Full gratification of a need or desire followed by a state of relative insensitivity to that particular need or desire.
  • These include artificial fertilizers and pesticides, plant growth control, livestock nutrition additives and genetically modified foods that are not made using genetically modified tissues. (manshealthguide.com)
  • North Korean defector Hong Eun-hye demonstrates how North Korean people make rice cakes with corn powder at her North Korean food store in Seoul, South Korea, September 28, 2017. (swissinfo.ch)
  • In January 2016, Memphis Meats introduced its first meatball produced in a lab using cells extracted from a live cow and grown into tissues and then muscle. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • Tyson Foods, the largest animal agriculture corporation in the U.S., purchased a 5% stake in Beyond Meat in October 2016, two months after an undercover investigation exposed Tyson employees' torturing chickens and shareholders filed resolutions to reduce animal cruelty and consider plant-based meat investments. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to a recent report by researchers at Dalhousie University, Canadians are reducing their consumption of meat products in favour of plant-based proteins. (cp24.com)
  • In order to implement the sustainable meat principles, Maple Leaf plans to employ six strategies such as setting aggressive goals in the industry, investing in people, producing quality food, and focusing on plant-based proteins. (foodprocessing-technology.com)
  • As for some people's concerns that "lab meat" - also known as "cultured meat" and "clean meat" - is not natural, Roberts said that it is made of "real animal proteins that aim to minimize the use of natural resources, optimize food safety and provide a high-quality eating experience. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • The company aims to introduce hybrid products - combining plant proteins for texture and cultured fats that create the distinct aroma and flavour of meat. (fdiforum.net)
  • Let the water sit for a few minutes and you'll have meats and proteins that you can add into any of your favorite recipes. (thereadystore.com)
  • Consumers are looking with increasing delight for food and beverages featuring alternative proteins. (foodnavigator.com)
  • There are several ways to tenderize meat, chemically or physically, which mainly reduce the amounts of detectable connective tissue without causing extensive degradation of myofibrillar proteins. (hindawi.com)
  • The concentration of the enzymes varies among breeds of species, determining the higher or lower meat tenderness, due to increased or reduced proteolysis of myofibrillar proteins [ 11 , 12 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Said replicas include proteins selected based upon the temperature at which they gel and/or denature to replicate the behavior and qualities of meat during cooking, i.e., the firming, syneresis (water release), chew texture or mouth feel. (perfumerflavorist.com)
  • With 60% fresh, premium free-run turkey and chicken, wild-caught Flounder, and cage-free eggs, ACANA puppy & junior dog food delivers all the proteins and vitamins your growing dog needs to be happy and healthy. (mojosavings.com)
  • Half of the meats used are delivered fresh (refrigerated, without preservatives) or raw (flash-frozen, without preservatives), while the other half are dried to provide a concentrated and natural source of animal proteins and fats. (mojosavings.com)
  • As expected, the plant-based diet had the most positive impact on cholesterol levels, but what the researchers didn't expect was that the difference in "bad" cholesterol after the red and white meat diets was inconsequential. (cookinglight.com)
  • White meat and red meat both resulted in near identical levels of blood cholesterol. (cookinglight.com)
  • The unfortunate takeaway for meat lovers is that, though white meat may still be healthier than red meat in other regards, swapping white meat for red meat might not benefit you when it comes to lowering cholesterol. (cookinglight.com)
  • Norwegian meat group Nortura plans to integrate its red and white meat production to build the "foundation for more efficient operations" through knowledge sharing and economies of scale. (just-food.com)
  • The Other White Meat: Why You Should Eat Coconut for Strong Muscles and More! (onegreenplanet.org)
  • Rabbit meat is unique from other meats in that it is entirely white meat. (reference.com)
  • Specifically, the results show that kidney cancer patients consumed more red and white meat compared to healthy individuals. (medindia.net)
  • The results suggest that cooking method is an important factor contributing to the elevated RCC risk associated with consuming more meat, as both red and white meat resulted in increased risk, explained Wu. (medindia.net)
  • Sherman adds, "I always brace myself before sharing the data on red and processed meat consumption and mortality, CVD [cardiovascular disease] or cancer risks with my students because it sounds so unbelievably scary. (cpr.org)
  • Much like other studies of this nature, these results are very weak, showing weak associations and results are impossible to disentangle other lifestyle and dietary habits from meat and processed meat consumption based on observational data that is not meant to prove causality. (foodbusinessnews.net)
  • Funding will be used to expand R&D efforts and build the world's first cultured meat pilot production facility, estimated to begin operations in 2020, south of Tel Aviv. (fdiforum.net)
  • Though Dunkin Donuts has a policy limiting antibiotic use in the meat it serves, the researchers found the company does not have a timeline for achieving that goal. (cbsnews.com)
  • So in the end, though the researchers concluded that they did "not provide evidence for choosing white over red meat for reducing CVD risk," Krauss added to FoodNavigator that "the average results may or may not apply to a single individual. (cookinglight.com)
  • The latest study out of Harvard is another attempt by researchers there to take self-reported data based on food consumption questionnaires filled out by study participants every four years and try to draw broad conclusions. (foodbusinessnews.net)
  • Researchers examined the link between changes in red meat consumption over an eight-year period with mortality during the next eight years. (foodbusinessnews.net)
  • The study, being an observational one, could not establish cause, but the researchers gave several possible reasons for the link between red meat consumption and risk of death. (foodbusinessnews.net)
  • In a new, still unreleased, GFI-commissioned MindLab study of what's driving omnivore consumers to plant-based foods, researchers found that, for most people, the lack of a non-GMO label does not affect purchasing and, what's more, a non-GMO claim was not highly correlated with purchase intent. (forbes.com)
  • When the researchers say that there's sufficient evidence, they're claiming that there's enough convincing evidence to show that these types of meats actually cause cancer-evidence gleaned from animal experiments, studies of human diet and health, and so-called mechanical causes, such as cell mechanisms, of cancer. (gizmodo.co.uk)
  • As for the limited evidence showing that red meat is probably carcinogenic to humans, the researchers are saying that a positive association has been observed as it relates to the onset of colorectal cancer. (gizmodo.co.uk)
  • Researchers believe that there are at least two pathways by which cured meats damage tissues in the body. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • When cured meat intake was examined, the researchers found that 14 percent of low consumers, 20 percent of medium consumers, and 22 percent of high consumers had worsening symptoms. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Additionally, in the meat industry, economical aspects have stimulated researchers to use all the animal parts to maximize yields of marketable products. (hindawi.com)
  • Even in many countries where current use of antibiotics for food production is relatively low, researchers predict that consumption will explode over the next dozen years. (medindia.net)
  • Based on survey responses, the researchers estimated meat consumption and exposure to meat-cooking mutagens with the help of a National Cancer Institute database. (medindia.net)
  • When grilling or pan-frying meat, try to avoid charring it as much as possible, suggest the researchers. (medindia.net)
  • Researchers said people who ate less than 3 ounces (76 grams) of red or processed meat per day had a 20% higher chance of developing colon cancer compared to those who ate about a third of that much. (wlbt.com)
  • Overusing antibiotics in meat production helps to create drug-resistant superbugs -- our nation's largest chain restaurants can be part of the problem, or part of the solution," Dr. David Wallinga, Senior Health Officer with the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), one of the organizations that authored the new report, said in a statement. (cbsnews.com)
  • It should come as no surprise that the six final essays have an overall disdain for meat and an assumption that eating meat, given the means of production we use today, is a wrong that must be justified, is harmful to the environment, and is harmful to human health. (breitbart.com)
  • There was not a single response in the final six essays that took the position that eating meat is ethical without all the caveats about "sustainability," impacts on the environment, or impacts on human health. (breitbart.com)
  • Some 40 years ago, I took a long break from eating any animals, but soon I will be able to eat meat again without any qualms, without worrying about my health, cruelty to animals, or environmental degradation. (breitbart.com)
  • Apparently, eating any meat (even "sustainable" meat) is bad for your health, unless it's test tube meat. (breitbart.com)
  • A new study published in The BMJ can't tell you exactly how much red meat is OK to eat to maintain good health or prevent disease. (cpr.org)
  • MaxMeat is a grain free and legume free diet made from 90% meat and organs, this real meat air dried dog food offers optimal nutrition, health benefits, and taste. (onlynaturalpet.com)
  • The North American Meat Institute, Washington, responded with a statement: "Health outcomes are far more complicated than matching a single type of food to causes of death. (foodbusinessnews.net)
  • The center's director, Mindy Brashears, says the center's experience in food safety and antibiotic resistance monitoring in the meat industry helped to attract the federal grant, which she says will have a long term impact on public health. (bigspringherald.com)
  • Though sales of plant-based foods grew by 11.3% in 2019 , a growing chorus of critics say these foods are too processed for their liking, vegan junk food with a plant-based health halo. (forbes.com)
  • The Washington Post is calling it "one of the most aggressive stances against meat yet taken by a major health organisation," adding that it's "expected to face stiff criticism in the United States. (gizmodo.co.uk)
  • No doubt, it's an important report, but health experts say that we shouldn't exaggerate the extent of the findings, or rush to completely eliminate red and processed meats from our diets altogether. (gizmodo.co.uk)
  • Back in 2014, an international advisory committee listed the effects of consuming processed and red meats as a high priority study area for the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs program. (gizmodo.co.uk)
  • Due to the environmental, public health and animal welfare concerns associated with our current livestock system, it is vital to develop more sustainable food production methods," says lead author Natalie Rubio. (sciseek.com)
  • See why limiting or avoiding both processed and unprocessed red meat is the best decision for your health. (foodrevolution.org)
  • This is the largest study done so far to show increased mortality risks from different causes associated with consuming both processed and unprocessed red meat, and it underlines the importance of heme iron, nitrates, and nitrites in assessing the pathways related to health risks associated with red meat intake. (foodrevolution.org)
  • Some investigators believe that nitrates from vegetable sources may have potential benefits, particularly for cardiovascular health, but nitrate/nitrite from processed meat has been associated with increased risks of different cancers. (foodrevolution.org)
  • The way conventional meat is produced today creates challenges for the environment, animal welfare and human health. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • In terms of optimistic sentiments, respondents reported there are growth opportunities under the health and wellness banner and in how consumers use food as medicine. (meatpoultry.com)
  • Should you stop eating meat to save your health and the planet? (sbs.com.au)
  • A recent scientific review shows that rising global meat consumption may be damaging our health and the environment. (sbs.com.au)
  • The authors predict that this steep rise in meat consumption could negatively impact our health, increase carbon emissions and reduce biodiversity. (sbs.com.au)
  • Although meat is a concentrated source of nutrients for low-income families, it also enhances the risks of chronic ill health, such as from colorectal cancer and cardiovascular disease," the review reads. (sbs.com.au)
  • The World Health Organisation (WHO) states that although evidence red meat consumption has been linked to colorectal cancer, there is no proof of a cause and effect relationship. (sbs.com.au)
  • Ridoutt explains that instead of cutting back on meat consumption to save the planet and our health, we should limit the amount of junk food we eat. (sbs.com.au)
  • That being said, other previous research has shown links between processed meats and lung health, so the current work adds to the weight of evidence. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • There are studies that suggest all sorts of health issues are possible from consuming genetically modified foods. (city-data.com)
  • Though some claim that raw meat is superior to cooked meat in regards to nutritional value and health, there's limited evidence to support this notion. (healthline.com)
  • New survey confirms that 'health halos' cause flawed food assumptions. (hungry-girl.com)
  • According to the International Food Information Council Foundation's 12th Annual Food and Health Survey , Americans are completely confused when it comes to making healthy choices. (hungry-girl.com)
  • The National Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health Safety (ANSES) was directed to investigate nanomaterial usage in the food sector by France's Directorate General for Food (DGAL), the Directorate General for Health (DGS), the Directorate General for Work (DGT), the Directorate General for Risk Prevention (DGPR) and the Directorate General for Competition, Consumption and Fraud Prevention (DGCCRF). (foodnavigator.com)
  • Supermarkets have an opportunity - indeed, an obligation - to be a part of the solution in the face of this growing public health crisis," the organization said in a recent report on the overuse of antibiotics in animals raised for food and what supermarkets and consumers can do to stop it. (sfgate.com)
  • The thing is, we don't often get it in its natural state, and common preparation methods for the food makes it even worse for human health . (globalhealingcenter.com)
  • There's a heated debate regarding the health benefits - or lack thereof - of eating meat. (globalhealingcenter.com)
  • The best strategy to protect your health is to reduce or eliminate meat from your diet. (globalhealingcenter.com)
  • Raw meat dishes like tartare may be more common this time of year, but they still come with health risks. (usda.gov)
  • Consuming too much meat has been known to be a health risk factor for quite some time for everything from cancer to obesity. (heall.com)
  • It's a small price to pay for some great food and the good health of yourself and your family. (heall.com)
  • The Food & Environment Reporting Network is the first independent, non-profit news organization that produces in-depth and investigative journalism in the critically under-reported areas of food, agriculture, and environmental health. (thefern.org)
  • Eat more of these foods to help protect your health during flu season. (foodnetwork.com)
  • have generally come up with the same findings, that multidrug-resistant S. aureus are present in a variety of animal meats,' says Pascal James Imperato, MD, the dean of the School of Public Health at SUNY-Downstate Medical Center, in Brooklyn. (health.com)
  • Each year farmers and ranchers give millions of pounds of antibiotics to farm animals, most of them healthy, to make them grow faster and to prevent-rather than treat-diseases, says Price, the director of the Center for Food Microbiology and Environmental Health at the Translational Genomics Research Institute, a nonprofit organization in Flagstaff. (health.com)
  • She owns ShapeYourEnergy, a popular health and fitness website. (livestrong.com)
  • They believe the myth that the meat will give them strength, improved health or sexual vigour, such as an enlarged penis. (change.org)
  • I've often wondered if there's a connection between red meat and dairy allergies. (foodallergybuzz.com)
  • I am also lactose intolerant but I don't think dairy and my red meat allergy is connected. (foodallergybuzz.com)
  • By one estimate, 70% of sodium in the diet comes from processed foods, and 80% of that comes from the three sub-categories of processed meat, dairy (mostly cheese) and baked foods. (bakingbusiness.com)
  • Beyond Meat founder Ethan grew up spending weekends visiting his father's dairy farm in western Maryland, an experience that made him concerned about the welfare of the animals he cared for. (wikipedia.org)
  • Founder and CEO of Food Renegade, she's a passionate advocate for REAL FOOD -- food that's sustainable, organic, local, and traditionally-prepared according to the wisdom of our ancestors. (foodrenegade.com)
  • Instead, I opt to purchase humanely-raised meats from local, pasture-based sustainable ranches and farms. (foodrenegade.com)
  • Newser) - If meat grown by scientists using stem cells in a lab doesn't sound terribly appetizing, consider the perks: It's more sustainable, it doesn't involve killing any animals, and it uses less energy than growing real animals to butcher. (newser.com)
  • The principles developed by the company include the manufacture of sustainable meat, which is produced in accordance with the environmental standards that reduce impact across the lifecycle. (foodprocessing-technology.com)
  • The company's goal: "To bring meat to the plate in a more sustainable, affordable and delicious way. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • The study presented here is intended to benefit every stakeholder in the food chain from policymakers to consumers, and it offers guiding principles for a transition towards an ecologically and socially sustainable food system from a multi-level perspective. (eurekalert.org)
  • The most common bacteria that cause problems to humans when meat is not cooked properly are: Aureus, Salmonella, and Clostridium perfringens. (prezi.com)
  • More than 6,400 pounds of a Walmart brand's frozen meat have been recalled for possible salmonella contamination. (kdvr.com)
  • Common pathogens in raw meat include Salmonella , Clostridium perfringens , E. coli , Listeria monocytogenes , and Campylobacter ( 1 ). (healthline.com)
  • Since this food is considered 'ready to eat', once it is contaminated by foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella, the prospect for significant morbidity, mortality, and immeasurable economic losses can occur. (medworm.com)
  • We all know that resting meat-letting it sit off heat for a few moments before slicing or serving it-can help it retain more juices when you subsequently cut into it, right? (seriouseats.com)
  • There are conflicting theories as to why this is the case, the most common being that either the juices get redistributed within the meat so that no areas are oversaturated, or that the juices increase slightly in viscosity as they cool, allowing them to stay in place better. (seriouseats.com)
  • For Bora's family, it's spinach from their garden, although she says mashed potatoes, beans, eggs and cheese are popular options too. (jsonline.com)
  • This holiday season, Marshall is serving up a version of her mother's recipe at her soon-to-open butcher shop, offering customers the satisfaction of their favourite savoury staples - minus the meat. (cp24.com)
  • with Drexel University to PDPH partnered with Drexel Food Lab reformulate and tastetest a (DFL), which has experience reformulating recipe for hoagie rolls. (cdc.gov)
  • DFL experimented with varying salt levels in a generic recipe and performed taste tests with PDPH staff, DFL students, and city departments' food service staff, hospitals, and schools. (cdc.gov)
  • Real Fake Meats is already fielding online orders for meat-free holiday spreads featuring birdless turkey cutlets, veggie roasts, bacon-flavoured stuffing and charcuterie boards of mushroom pate and "baby fakeroni. (cp24.com)
  • A startling report by an international team of scientists suggests that processed meats like hotdogs and bacon are a definite cause of cancer, while red meat is a probable cause. (gizmodo.co.uk)
  • However, in 2015 the WHO warned against people eating too much processed meat (like bacon and salami) on a regular basis because, if consumed in excess, it may be carcinogenic. (sbs.com.au)
  • For an individual, the risk of developing colorectal cancer because of their consumption of processed meat remains small, but this risk increases with the amount of meat consumed," noted Kurt Straif, Head of the IARC Monographs Programme, in a statement . (gizmodo.co.uk)
  • Risk of death from cancer, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, infections, kidney disease, liver disease or lung disease all increased with the amount of meat consumed, and those people with the highest meat intake doubled their chances of dying from chronic liver disease. (foodrevolution.org)
  • The study examined the dietary habits of more than 536,000 individuals and found those who consumed the highest amount of meat over a 16-year period had a 26 percent higher rate of death from cancer, type 2 diabetes, stroke, infections, and diseases of the kidneys, respiratory tract, and liver. (foodrevolution.org)
  • The authors believe that people should start to change their diet and cut back on the amount of meat consumed. (sbs.com.au)
  • Cooking meat at high temperatures or over an open flame, such as when barbecuing or pan-frying, produces harmful carcinogenic compounds. (medindia.net)
  • This allowed Hu and his colleagues to compare people who increased their red and processed meat intake over time with those who had a relatively stable intake. (cpr.org)
  • Overall, those who increased their intake of processed red meat by about 3.5 servings a week had about a 13 percent higher risk of death during the study's eight-year follow-up period. (cpr.org)
  • BOSTON - A study published June 12 in The BMJ found an association between an increase in red meat intake and a heightened risk of death. (foodbusinessnews.net)
  • The study, which involved gathering data from more than 80,000 people in two other studies, showed increasing red meat intake by 3.5 servings a week or more over an eight-year period was associated with a 10% higher risk of death in the next eight years. (foodbusinessnews.net)
  • Overlooked is the importance of reducing the intake of discretionary foods to improve diet quality and reduce environmental impacts," says Ridoutt. (sbs.com.au)
  • This warns diners that there are risks associated with raw meat intake and that it may not be safe. (healthline.com)
  • This can be used by limiting fast food intake, imposing fee on price of veterinary antibiotics and regulation of antibiotic use. (medindia.net)
  • Limiting meat intake to the equivalent of one fast-food burger per person per day globally, could reduce antibiotic consumption in animals by 66 percent. (medindia.net)
  • We can restrict our meat consumption to a recommended daily intake, or adopt state-of-art livestock practices globally to reduce antibiotic consumption," study author Thomas Van Boeckel noted. (medindia.net)
  • We found elevated RCC risk associated with both meat intake and meat-cooking mutagens, suggesting independent effect of meat-cooking mutagens on RCC risk," said Xifeng Wu, M.D., Ph.D, professor, Epidemiology and senior author of the study. (medindia.net)
  • This study was also the first to investigate connections between genetic risk factors and intake of meat-cooking mutagens for RCC. (medindia.net)
  • Canadians are owed answers about how meat tainted with dangerous E. coli bacteria made it to store shelves in every Canadian province and territory, a Liberal MP said Tuesday. (cbc.ca)
  • And recent research has linked high red meat consumption - especially processed meats - with less diversity and abundance of healthy bacteria in the gut. (cpr.org)
  • She was aware that raw meat contains bacteria. (prezi.com)
  • The meat should be cooked through so that bacteria and parasites still alive in the food will be killed from the heat of cooking. (prezi.com)
  • Bacteria don't respect fences between livestock and people," said Jean Halloran , director of food policy initiatives for Consumers Union. (sfgate.com)
  • But, so far, no one has been able to draw a connection between the presence of those bacteria in meats and human illness. (health.com)
  • And the industry is getting some serious investments from the likes of Bill Gates, who contributed to the Impossible Burger, the veggie-based burger engineered to taste and even bleed like real meat . (newser.com)
  • It plans to use the money to accelerate the scaling up of "clean-meat" production and to reduce production costs to levels comparable to - and ultimately below - conventional meat costs. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • The company contends that producing meat from cells could require up to 90 percent less land and water while reducing greenhouse gas emissions created during conventional meat production. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • One alternative to eating conventional meat sold at the grocery store, is to eat organic meat. (heall.com)
  • In the initial challenge to its readers, the NYT asserted there were plenty of arguments explaining why eating meat is unethical but, in their minds, not a single good argument about why eating meat is ethical. (breitbart.com)
  • At first, I thought, 'oh no, another paper showing that eating red meat is bad,' " Sherman wrote via email. (cpr.org)
  • But a new study suggest that, at least when it comes to cholesterol, the trick to being healthy might have less to do with the color of a meat and more to do with eating less meat in general . (cookinglight.com)
  • This is a loaded subject for understandable reasons, and your food choices also branch out into the ethical world of spirituality where many traditions consider eating meat a sin. (hubpages.com)
  • I started having 'mystery' reactions back in May: rapid heart rate, flushing, difficulty breathing that I spent six months trying to pin down before I realized I was getting sick 3 hours after eating red meat. (foodallergybuzz.com)
  • It merely brought the existing literature together in a way that finally allowed scientists to make some definite proclamations about the cancer risks of eating processed and red meats. (gizmodo.co.uk)
  • Find out how you can make red meat part of your healthy eating plan. (businessinsider.com)
  • This global meat-eating trend is also expected to ramp up over time, as the world's population increases and people in various low income countries become wealthier. (sbs.com.au)
  • Eating Raw Meat: Is It Safe? (healthline.com)
  • Eating raw meat is a common practice in many cuisines around the world. (healthline.com)
  • This article reviews the safety of eating raw meat. (healthline.com)
  • When eating raw meat, the biggest risk that you may encounter is contracting a foodborne illness, which is commonly referred to as food poisoning . (healthline.com)
  • Thus, eating raw meat greatly increases your risk of developing foodborne illness, and you should proceed with caution. (healthline.com)
  • The most common risk associated with eating raw meat is food poisoning. (healthline.com)
  • Any potential benefits of eating raw meat are likely outweighed by the higher risk of contracting a foodborne illness. (healthline.com)
  • Data on the nutritional differences between raw and cooked meat is limited, and there are no notable benefits of eating raw meat over cooked meat. (healthline.com)
  • While eating raw meat is not guaranteed to be safe, there are a few ways to reduce your risk of getting sick. (healthline.com)
  • Ultimately, eating any kind of raw ground meat is much riskier than eating a raw steak or whole piece of meat. (healthline.com)
  • GrubHub reveals the most popular healthy-eating plans. (hungry-girl.com)
  • However, it has not always been clear why eating more meat elevates cancer risk, explained Stephanie Melkonian, Ph.D., postdoctoral fellow, Epidemiology and lead author of the study. (medindia.net)
  • For those of us who enjoy eating rabbit, its presence at Whole Foods had felt like progress. (newyorker.com)
  • The eating and chatter that accompany the cooking are reminders that comfort foods ease what ails us, take the chill out of winter and remind us of people we love. (jsonline.com)
  • With a variety of great tasting emergency food storage , Wise food customers don't dread having to eat their food storage, but rather they enjoy eating it. (prweb.com)
  • They evaluated over 800 studies analysing associations between more than a dozen forms of cancer with the consumption of processed or red meat in different countries and among populations with diverse diets. (gizmodo.co.uk)
  • Experiments to test whether a food causes cancer pose a massive logistical challenge - they require controlling the diets of thousands of test subjects over a course of many years. (gizmodo.co.uk)
  • According to estimates done by Global Burden of Disease Project, about 34,000 cancer deaths per year worldwide are attributable to diets high in processed meat. (sbs.com.au)
  • We have made a strategic decision to focus on our prepared foods product lines, and this transaction will allow us to execute that plan," said Greg Murray, President and CEO of Steak-umm Co. "At the same time, it will ensure that supermarkets and consumers will still have access to Steak-umms sandwich steaks and all of the brand equity that we have built up over the years. (foodprocessing.com)
  • Quaker Maid will manufacture Steak-umm-branded sandwich steaks from its meat processing facilities in Reading, Pa. (foodprocessing.com)
  • Preparation methods include slicing the meat into steaks and fillets. (wikipedia.org)
  • The meat is typically processed and consumed in steaks and fillets. (wikipedia.org)
  • When purchasing red meat, including steaks, many grocery shoppers often find red liquid in the bottom of the packaging, which you probably assumed was blood. (countryliving.com)
  • Rare steaks and burgers aren't exposed to heat for as long as well-done meats, causing more red myoglobin to be present. (countryliving.com)
  • Many have noted that Somalis, Sudanese, and Pacific Islanders are replacing Hispanic slaughterhouse workers, just like the Hispanic workers replaced Eastern European workers almost two decades ago, as meat processors pursue the lowest possible wage. (foodrevolution.org)
  • Meat processors Maple Leaf Foods Inc., for example, acquired two companies in this niche in recent years, Lightlife Foods and Field Roast GrainMeat Co. (cp24.com)
  • For obtaining this stamp, meat processors are required to use Serbian raw materials. (foodprocessing-technology.com)
  • He notes that if there were a more diverse network of local, smaller-scale meat processors, then any individual pandemic-related plant closure "would have a lot less impact. (thefern.org)
  • Whole Foods 'Humane' Standard is Driving Demand for Rabbit Meat. (onegreenplanet.org)
  • Whole Foods' launched a rabbit meat pilot program in summer 2014 in select markets supposedly in respond to consumer demand. (onegreenplanet.org)
  • Whole Foods claims it spent years creating standards that make its meat humane, and that they are simply responding to consumer demand. (onegreenplanet.org)
  • After all, the Whole Foods stores in the North Carolina District, 41 in total, only sold an average of five rabbits a week . (onegreenplanet.org)
  • If Whole Foods continues to expand its rabbit meat program, there could be some serious negative consequences in terms of increased demand and the treatment of rabbits. (onegreenplanet.org)
  • It is more expensive, but it is readily available in places like Whole Foods. (city-data.com)
  • Beyond Meat first released its Chicken-Free Strips exclusively to Whole Foods Markets in Northern California in 2012. (wikipedia.org)
  • The only large chain to exclusively carry meat from animals raised without antibiotics is Whole Foods Market, Halloran said. (sfgate.com)
  • On a recent evening, I was in the meat department at a Whole Foods in Philadelphia's Fairmount neighborhood, pondering what to cook for Easter brunch. (newyorker.com)
  • I'd never seen a protester at any of the Whole Foods where I shop in the Philly area. (newyorker.com)
  • When I returned home, empty-handed, a quick visit to the Whole Foods Web site confirmed that the company had put an end to a short-lived pilot rabbit program that had launched in the spring of 2014. (newyorker.com)
  • The program was, according to Whole Foods, the culmination of several years spent researching humane farming and butchering practices. (newyorker.com)
  • In a statement released when the meat was introduced, Whole Foods said that "lots of customers have requested that we carry rabbit," but acknowledged that "this product won't appeal to everyone. (newyorker.com)
  • Among the latter category were groups like People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals ( PETA ) and House Rabbit Society, which quickly targeted Whole Foods stores as "bunny butchers" and held demonstrations at dozens of locations across the country. (newyorker.com)
  • After only slightly more than a year, Whole Foods reversed course, quietly removing rabbit from its meat selection at the end of 2015. (newyorker.com)
  • To explain its decision, the chain posted only this brief statement: "Whole Foods Market was pleased to have worked with a small group of farmers to create a rabbit growing system that met our quality standards, unlike any other in the industry. (newyorker.com)
  • When I contacted Whole Foods for further comment, its communication team e-mailed me the same statement. (newyorker.com)
  • Hu notes that in this new study, as well as in previous research, the risks associated with red meat consumption are higher - and most pronounced - with processed red meats. (cpr.org)
  • Animal agriculture is responsible for about 18% of human-caused greenhouse gas emissions globally, according to the report, while consumers are analyzing their meat consumption because of the risks of high cholesterol and heart disease. (foodbusinessnews.net)
  • It is deeply troubling that the minister responsible for food safety, [Agriculture Minister] Gerry Ritz, continues to defend our food inspection system, even though it completely failed to detect tainted meat before it left the plant,' Valeriote said in a news release. (cbc.ca)
  • According to this Mother Earth News article , intensive grazing of meat animals will solve our topsoil crisis and help store carbon, reduce dependence on fossil fuel inputs, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. (foodrenegade.com)
  • Subscribe to Food Business News' free newsletters to stay up to date about the latest food and beverage news. (foodbusinessnews.net)
  • Mulcair said the government has cut the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's budget by $46.6 million and laid off 314 people. (cbc.ca)
  • Ironically, many people who are against immigration or foreign workers would be paying ten dollars or more for their fast food hamburgers without these cheap workers. (foodrevolution.org)
  • Not too many people remember that food giant Tyson was served in 2001 with a federal indictment charging that it paid smugglers to transport illegal workers to its operations from Mexico across the Rio Grande and supplied them with phony social security cards. (foodrevolution.org)
  • I understand that people may be sceptical about this report on meat because the experimental data is not terribly strong," said Paolo Boffetta, a professor of Tisch Cancer Institute at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine who has served on similar WHO panels. (gizmodo.co.uk)
  • To calculate the portion of lean meat per meal, multiply 4 ounces (or a quarter pound) times the number of people being served. (businessinsider.com)
  • People against the selling of rabbit meat, though, worry that the store is creating a demand that never existed in the first place. (onegreenplanet.org)
  • We enable people to enjoy locally grown eco-friendly and healthy foods that are reasonably priced and conveniently delivered. (foodconnect.org)
  • If all that isn't bad enough, there is food stuffs called "rendered" food, which is what people feed to their pets. (globalhealingcenter.com)
  • The use of antibiotics has some people concerned that it is creating antibiotic resistant microbial pathogens that can be transferred to people when foods are not thoroughly cooked. (heall.com)
  • Back in the day, people had injogogi to fill themselves up as a substitute for meat," said Cho Ui-sung, a North Korean who defected to the South in 2014. (swissinfo.ch)
  • Since people started to use their own initiative, studies indicate, person-to-person dealings have become the way millions of North Koreans procure basic necessities such as food and clothing. (swissinfo.ch)
  • And this makes it hard to measure how badly sanctions, which do not apply to North Korean food imports, are hurting ordinary people. (swissinfo.ch)
  • Pyongyang says 70 percent of North Koreans still use the state's central distribution system as their main source of food, the same number of people that the U.N. estimates are "food insecure. (swissinfo.ch)