Measles Vaccine: A live attenuated virus vaccine of chick embryo origin, used for routine immunization of children and for immunization of adolescents and adults who have not had measles or been immunized with live measles vaccine and have no serum antibodies against measles. Children are usually immunized with measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Measles: A highly contagious infectious disease caused by MORBILLIVIRUS, common among children but also seen in the nonimmune of any age, in which the virus enters the respiratory tract via droplet nuclei and multiplies in the epithelial cells, spreading throughout the MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM.Measles virus: The type species of MORBILLIVIRUS and the cause of the highly infectious human disease MEASLES, which affects mostly children.Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine: A combined vaccine used to prevent MEASLES; MUMPS; and RUBELLA.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Immunization Schedule: Schedule giving optimum times usually for primary and/or secondary immunization.Vaccines: Suspensions of killed or attenuated microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa), antigenic proteins, synthetic constructs, or other bio-molecular derivatives, administered for the prevention, amelioration, or treatment of infectious and other diseases.Mumps Vaccine: Vaccines used to prevent infection by MUMPS VIRUS. Best known is the live attenuated virus vaccine of chick embryo origin, used for routine immunization of children and for immunization of adolescents and adults who have not had mumps or been immunized with live mumps vaccine. Children are usually immunized with measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine.Guinea-Bissau: A republic in western Africa, south of SENEGAL and west of GUINEA. Its capital is Bissau.Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.Vaccines, Combined: Two or more vaccines in a single dosage form.Rubella Vaccine: A live attenuated virus vaccine of duck embryo or human diploid cell tissue culture origin, used for routine immunization of children and for immunization of nonpregnant adolescent and adult females of childbearing age who are unimmunized and do not have serum antibodies to rubella. Children are usually immunized with measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine. (Dorland, 28th ed)Vaccines, Inactivated: Vaccines in which the infectious microbial nucleic acid components have been destroyed by chemical or physical treatment (e.g., formalin, beta-propiolactone, gamma radiation) without affecting the antigenicity or immunogenicity of the viral coat or bacterial outer membrane proteins.Immunization Programs: Organized services to administer immunization procedures in the prevention of various diseases. The programs are made available over a wide range of sites: schools, hospitals, public health agencies, voluntary health agencies, etc. They are administered to an equally wide range of population groups or on various administrative levels: community, municipal, state, national, international.Viral Vaccines: Suspensions of attenuated or killed viruses administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious viral disease.Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine: A vaccine consisting of DIPHTHERIA TOXOID; TETANUS TOXOID; and whole-cell PERTUSSIS VACCINE. The vaccine protects against diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough.Vaccines, Synthetic: Small synthetic peptides that mimic surface antigens of pathogens and are immunogenic, or vaccines manufactured with the aid of recombinant DNA techniques. The latter vaccines may also be whole viruses whose nucleic acids have been modified.Vaccines, DNA: Recombinant DNA vectors encoding antigens administered for the prevention or treatment of disease. The host cells take up the DNA, express the antigen, and present it to the immune system in a manner similar to that which would occur during natural infection. This induces humoral and cellular immune responses against the encoded antigens. The vector is called naked DNA because there is no need for complex formulations or delivery agents; the plasmid is injected in saline or other buffers.Bacterial Vaccines: Suspensions of attenuated or killed bacteria administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious bacterial disease.Vaccines, Attenuated: Live vaccines prepared from microorganisms which have undergone physical adaptation (e.g., by radiation or temperature conditioning) or serial passage in laboratory animal hosts or infected tissue/cell cultures, in order to produce avirulent mutant strains capable of inducing protective immunity.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Mumps: An acute infectious disease caused by RUBULAVIRUS, spread by direct contact, airborne droplet nuclei, fomites contaminated by infectious saliva, and perhaps urine, and usually seen in children under the age of 15, although adults may also be affected. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Rubella: An acute infectious disease caused by the RUBELLA VIRUS. The virus enters the respiratory tract via airborne droplet and spreads to the LYMPHATIC SYSTEM.AIDS Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines containing inactivated HIV or some of its component antigens and designed to prevent or treat AIDS. Some vaccines containing antigens are recombinantly produced.Hemagglutination Inhibition Tests: Serologic tests in which a known quantity of antigen is added to the serum prior to the addition of a red cell suspension. Reaction result is expressed as the smallest amount of antigen which causes complete inhibition of hemagglutination.Mass Vaccination: Administration of a vaccine to large populations in order to elicit IMMUNITY.Immunization, Secondary: Any immunization following a primary immunization and involving exposure to the same or a closely related antigen.USSRVaccines, Subunit: Vaccines consisting of one or more antigens that stimulate a strong immune response. They are purified from microorganisms or produced by recombinant DNA techniques, or they can be chemically synthesized peptides.Vaccines, Conjugate: Semisynthetic vaccines consisting of polysaccharide antigens from microorganisms attached to protein carrier molecules. The carrier protein is recognized by macrophages and T-cells thus enhancing immunity. Conjugate vaccines induce antibody formation in people not responsive to polysaccharide alone, induce higher levels of antibody, and show a booster response on repeated injection.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Neutralization Tests: The measurement of infection-blocking titer of ANTISERA by testing a series of dilutions for a given virus-antiserum interaction end-point, which is generally the dilution at which tissue cultures inoculated with the serum-virus mixtures demonstrate cytopathology (CPE) or the dilution at which 50% of test animals injected with serum-virus mixtures show infectivity (ID50) or die (LD50).Immunity, Humoral: Antibody-mediated immune response. Humoral immunity is brought about by ANTIBODY FORMATION, resulting from TH2 CELLS activating B-LYMPHOCYTES, followed by COMPLEMENT ACTIVATION.Malaria Vaccines: Vaccines made from antigens arising from any of the four strains of Plasmodium which cause malaria in humans, or from P. berghei which causes malaria in rodents.Hemagglutinins, Viral: Specific hemagglutinin subtypes encoded by VIRUSES.Gambia: A republic in western Africa, constituting an enclave within SENEGAL extending on both sides of the Gambia River. Its capital is Banjul, formerly Bathurst.Immunization: Deliberate stimulation of the host's immune response. ACTIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of ANTIGENS or IMMUNOLOGIC ADJUVANTS. PASSIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of IMMUNE SERA or LYMPHOCYTES or their extracts (e.g., transfer factor, immune RNA) or transplantation of immunocompetent cell producing tissue (thymus or bone marrow).Papillomavirus Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS. Human vaccines are intended to reduce the incidence of UTERINE CERVICAL NEOPLASMS, so they are sometimes considered a type of CANCER VACCINES. They are often composed of CAPSID PROTEINS, especially L1 protein, from various types of ALPHAPAPILLOMAVIRUS.Antibody Affinity: A measure of the binding strength between antibody and a simple hapten or antigen determinant. It depends on the closeness of stereochemical fit between antibody combining sites and antigen determinants, on the size of the area of contact between them, and on the distribution of charged and hydrophobic groups. It includes the concept of "avidity," which refers to the strength of the antigen-antibody bond after formation of reversible complexes.Meningococcal Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with NEISSERIA MENINGITIDIS.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Morbillivirus: A genus of the family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE (subfamily PARAMYXOVIRINAE) where the virions of most members have hemagglutinin but not neuraminidase activity. All members produce both cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusion bodies. MEASLES VIRUS is the type species.Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis: A rare, slowly progressive encephalitis caused by chronic infection with the MEASLES VIRUS. The condition occurs primarily in children and young adults, approximately 2-8 years after the initial infection. A gradual decline in intellectual abilities and behavioral alterations are followed by progressive MYOCLONUS; MUSCLE SPASTICITY; SEIZURES; DEMENTIA; autonomic dysfunction; and ATAXIA. DEATH usually occurs 1-3 years after disease onset. Pathologic features include perivascular cuffing, eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusions, neurophagia, and fibrous gliosis. It is caused by the SSPE virus, which is a defective variant of MEASLES VIRUS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp767-8)Vitamin A: Retinol and derivatives of retinol that play an essential role in metabolic functioning of the retina, the growth of and differentiation of epithelial tissue, the growth of bone, reproduction, and the immune response. Dietary vitamin A is derived from a variety of CAROTENOIDS found in plants. It is enriched in the liver, egg yolks, and the fat component of dairy products.Hepatitis B Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines containing inactivated hepatitis B or some of its component antigens and designed to prevent hepatitis B. Some vaccines may be recombinantly produced.Immunity, Cellular: Manifestations of the immune response which are mediated by antigen-sensitized T-lymphocytes via lymphokines or direct cytotoxicity. This takes place in the absence of circulating antibody or where antibody plays a subordinate role.Immunity: Nonsusceptibility to the invasive or pathogenic effects of foreign microorganisms or to the toxic effect of antigenic substances.Antibody Formation: The production of ANTIBODIES by proliferating and differentiated B-LYMPHOCYTES under stimulation by ANTIGENS.Pertussis Vaccine: A suspension of killed Bordetella pertussis organisms, used for immunization against pertussis (WHOOPING COUGH). It is generally used in a mixture with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids (DTP). There is an acellular pertussis vaccine prepared from the purified antigenic components of Bordetella pertussis, which causes fewer adverse reactions than whole-cell vaccine and, like the whole-cell vaccine, is generally used in a mixture with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Poliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated: A suspension of formalin-inactivated poliovirus grown in monkey kidney cell tissue culture and used to prevent POLIOMYELITIS.Haemophilus Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines containing antigenic polysaccharides from Haemophilus influenzae and designed to prevent infection. The vaccine can contain the polysaccharides alone or more frequently polysaccharides conjugated to carrier molecules. It is also seen as a combined vaccine with diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine.Seroepidemiologic Studies: EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES based on the detection through serological testing of characteristic change in the serum level of specific ANTIBODIES. Latent subclinical infections and carrier states can thus be detected in addition to clinically overt cases.BCG Vaccine: An active immunizing agent and a viable avirulent attenuated strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, var. bovis, which confers immunity to mycobacterial infections. It is used also in immunotherapy of neoplasms due to its stimulation of antibodies and non-specific immunity.Rabies Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent and treat RABIES. The inactivated virus vaccine is used for preexposure immunization to persons at high risk of exposure, and in conjunction with rabies immunoglobulin, for postexposure prophylaxis.Rotavirus Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with ROTAVIRUS.Chickenpox Vaccine: A live, attenuated varicella virus vaccine used for immunization against chickenpox. It is recommended for children between the ages of 12 months and 13 years.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Cholera Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with VIBRIO CHOLERAE. The original cholera vaccine consisted of killed bacteria, but other kinds of vaccines now exist.Injections, Subcutaneous: Forceful administration under the skin of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the skin.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Smallpox Vaccine: A live VACCINIA VIRUS vaccine of calf lymph or chick embryo origin, used for immunization against smallpox. It is now recommended only for laboratory workers exposed to smallpox virus. Certain countries continue to vaccinate those in the military service. Complications that result from smallpox vaccination include vaccinia, secondary bacterial infections, and encephalomyelitis. (Dorland, 28th ed)Typhoid-Paratyphoid Vaccines: Vaccines used to prevent TYPHOID FEVER and/or PARATYPHOID FEVER which are caused by various species of SALMONELLA. Attenuated, subunit, and inactivated forms of the vaccines exist.Antigens, CD46: A ubiquitously expressed complement receptor that binds COMPLEMENT C3B and COMPLEMENT C4B and serves as a cofactor for their inactivation. CD46 also interacts with a wide variety of pathogens and mediates immune response.

Role of schools in the transmission of measles in rural Senegal: implications for measles control in developing countries. (1/862)

Patterns of measles transmission at school and at home were studied in 1995 in a rural area of Senegal with a high level of vaccination coverage. Among 209 case children with a median age of 8 years, there were no deaths, although the case fatality ratio has previously been 6-7% in this area. Forty percent of the case children had been vaccinated against measles; the proportion of vaccinated children was higher among secondary cases (47%) than among index cases (33%) (prevalence ratio = 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.76). Vaccinated index cases may have been less infectious than unvaccinated index cases, since they produced fewer clinical cases among exposed children (relative risk = 0.55, 95% CI 0.29-1.04). The secondary attack rate was lower in the schools than in the homes (relative risk = 0.31, 95% CI 0.20-0.49). The school outbreaks were protracted, with 4-5 generations of cases being seen in the two larger schools. Vaccine efficacy was found to be 57% (95% CI -23 to 85) in the schools and 74% (95% CI 62-82) in the residential compounds. Measles infection resulted in a mean of 3.8 days of absenteeism per case, though this did not appear to have an impact on the children's grades. Among the index cases, 56% of children were probably infected by neighbors in the community, and 7% were probably infected at health centers, 13% outside the community, and 24% in one of the three schools which had outbreaks during the epidemic. However, most of the school-related cases occurred at the beginning and therefore contributed to the general propagation of the epidemic. To prevent school outbreaks, it may be necessary to require vaccination prior to school entry and to revaccinate children in individual schools upon detection of cases of measles. Multidose measles vaccination schedules will be necessary to control measles in developing countries.  (+info)

I(2/862)

nvited commentary: vaccine failure or failure to vaccinate?  (+info)

W(3/862)

aning of vaccine-induced immunity: is it a problem in Africa?  (+info)

Seroepidemiological evaluation of 1989-91 mass vaccination campaigns against measles, in Italy. (4/862)

In 1989-91 anti-measles vaccination campaigns were conducted in several Italian regions to vaccinate all children aged between 13 months and 10-12 years without a history of measles or measles vaccination. This study was conducted to evaluate serological status after the mass vaccination campaigns. In 1994, capillary blood samples were collected from randomly selected children, aged 2-14 years, living in 13 local health units. Antibody titres were determined by ELISA. Blood spot samples were analysed for 4114 (75.6%) of 5440 selected children. Among the 835 that reported measles before 1990, 806 (96.5%) were immune and of the 2798 vaccinated, 2665 (95.2%) were immune. The Edmoston-Zagreb (E-Z) strain vaccine was associated with a lower level of immunity than the Schwarz (SW) strain. A history of measles identified almost all immune children. Vaccination with the SW strain conferred persistent immunity (at least 5 years) in 98% of vaccinees. The strategy was able to unite natural and induced immunity.  (+info)

Measles eradication: experience in the Americas. (5/862)

In 1994, the Ministers of Health from the Region of the Americas targeted measles for eradication from the Western Hemisphere by the year 2000. To achieve this goal, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) developed an enhanced measles eradication strategy. First, a one-time-only "catch-up" measles vaccination campaign is conducted among children aged 9 months to 14 years. Efforts are then made to vaccinate through routine health services ("keep-up") at least 95% of each newborn cohort at 12 months of age. Finally, to assure high population immunity among preschool-aged children, indiscriminate "follow-up" measles vaccination campaigns are conducted approximately every 4 years. These vaccination activities are accompanied by improvements in measles surveillance, including the laboratory testing of suspected measles cases. The implementation of the PAHO strategy has resulted in a marked reduction in measles incidence in all countries of the Americas. Indeed, in 1996 the all-time regional record low of 2109 measles cases was reported. There was a relative resurgence of measles in 1997 with over 20,000 cases, due to a large measles outbreak among infants, preschool-aged children and young adults in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Contributing factors for this outbreak included: low routine infant vaccination coverage, failure to conduct a "follow-up" campaign, presence of susceptible young adults, and the importation of measles virus, apparently from Europe. PAHO's strategy has been effective in interrupting measles virus circulation. This experience demonstrates that global measles eradication is an achievable goal using currently available measles vaccines.  (+info)

Timing of development of measles-specific immunoglobulin M and G after primary measles vaccination. (6/862)

A standard method for diagnosing measles is to detect measles-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) in the serum of infected persons. Interpreting a positive IgM result from a person with suspected measles can be difficult if the person has recently received a measles vaccine. We have previously demonstrated that measles-specific IgM may persist for at least 8 weeks after primary vaccination, but it is unknown how quickly IgM appears. This study determined the timing of the rise of measles-specific IgM and IgG after primary measles vaccination with Schwartz vaccine. Two hundred eighty 9-month-old children from Ethiopia presenting for routine measles vaccination were enrolled. Sera were collected before and either 1, 2, 3, or 4 weeks after vaccination and tested for measles-specific antibodies by an IgM capture enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and by an indirect IgG EIA. A total of 209 of the 224 children who returned for the second visit had prevaccination sera that were both IgM and IgG negative. The postvaccination IgM positivity rates for these 209 children were 2% at 1 week, 61% at 2 weeks, 79% at 3 weeks, and 60% at 4 weeks. The postvaccination IgG positivity rates were 0% at 1 week, 14% at 2 weeks, 81% at 3 weeks, and 85% at 4 weeks. We conclude that an IgM-positive result obtained by this antibody capture EIA is difficult to interpret if serum is collected between 8 days and 8 weeks after vaccination; in this situation, the diagnosis of measles should be based on an epidemiologic linkage to a confirmed case or on the detection of wild-type measles virus.  (+info)

Measles: effect of a two-dose vaccination programme in Catalonia, Spain. (7/862)

The study reports incidences of measles in Catalonia, Spain, as detected by surveillance, and analyses the specific characteristics of the outbreaks reported for the period 1986-95. Incidences per 100,000 inhabitants were calculated for the period 1971-95. The following variables were studied: year of presentation, number of cases, median age, transmission setting, cases with a record of vaccination and preventable cases. Associations between variables were determined using odds ratios (OR). The incidence of measles declined from 306.3 cases in 1971 to 30.9 in 1995. A total of 50 outbreaks were investigated. The outbreaks that occurred in the last two years of the study had a higher likelihood of having a transmission setting other than primary school (OR = 3.9); a median case age > 10 years (OR = 7.2); and fewer than 6 cases (OR = 2.3). The characteristics of recent outbreaks, marked by a rise both in transmission outside the primary-school setting and in median age, indicate the need for the introduction of a specific vaccination programme at the end of adolescence in addition to control of school-related outbreaks.  (+info)

Seroconversions in unvaccinated infants: further evidence for subclinical measles from vaccine trials in Niakhar, Senegal. (8/862)

BACKGROUND: Increases in measles antibodies without rash-illnesses have been documented in previously vaccinated children exposed to measles cases. The phenomenon has been incompletely evaluated in young unvaccinated infants with immunity of maternal origin. METHODS: Monthly cohorts of newborns were prospectively randomized to vaccine and placebo control groups during a trial of high-titre vaccines in Niakhar, Senegal. Measles antibodies were assayed in blood samples of enrolled children collected at 5 months old, when controls received a placebo injection, and at 10 months, when the placebo group was given measles vaccine. Intensive prospective surveillance for measles was conducted throughout the trial. RESULTS: One-fifth (n = 53) of the placebo controls seroconverted, with known exposure to a measles case in only three of them. None of the seroconverters developed a measles-like rash. Sixteen-fold or greater increases in titres were noted in about one-quarter of them. Compared with placebo controls who did not seroconvert, seroconverters were more likely to have had exposure to a measles case and to travel, more likely to be boys than girls, and had significantly lower baseline antibody titres. Measles was endemic in the study area throughout the trial. Seroconversions did not adversely effect subsequent nutritional indices or mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Although laboratory errors and inadvertent injection of vaccine rather than placebo may have played some role, they do not fully explain the above observations, which are consistent with subclinical measles in the seroconverters. The possible role of subclinical measles in occult transmission, its potential effect on the type and duration of subsequent immunity, and its impact on response to primary vaccination need to be determined.  (+info)

  • There are only two ways to be protected against measles: One is to have been naturally infected with the disease, which then gives you a specific immune response, and the other is to be vaccinated, Offit said. (nbcnews.com)
  • She goes on to state that the foreign DNA from vaccines can be incorporated into the host DNA which causes the immune system to fight against the foreign cells. (healthimpactnews.com)
  • Israel is currently struggling with its own outbreaks of measles, and like the one in the U.S., it's largely due to transmission between pockets of unvaccinated people (the woman was a flight attendant on an airline that regularly flies between the U.S. and Israel, so she may have contracted it in either country). (gizmodo.com)
  • With outbreaks of measles going on it's worth pointing out that there is a point here. (continentaltelegraph.com)
  • However, since data revealing the truth about vaccines is publicly available online through the federal government, the facts are going viral through the alternative press. (thenewamerican.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported 102 cases of measles in 14 states in the first 30 days of the new year, most of which were linked to an outbreak at Disneyland in California. (pewresearch.org)
  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about measles cases and outbreaks . (healthday.com)
  • The state saw more than 70 cases of measles this year, and Inslee signed the bill at Vancouver City Hall, in the county where most of those cases were centered. (apnews.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has reported that as of the end of last week, 764 cases of measles have been confirmed in 23 states. (apnews.com)
  • The cases have been linked to an outbreak at two Disney theme parks in Anaheim and park visitors who don't have the measles shot. (cbslocal.com)
  • The number of measles cases in the U.S. keeps growing. (nbcnews.com)
  • MANILA- (UPDATE) There is enough supply of measles vaccine, the Department of Health assured Filipinos Tuesday amid the increasing number of cases of the infectious disease. (abs-cbn.com)
  • For San Lazaro alone, we have seen a very huge jump for the number of measles cases,' De Guzman said. (abs-cbn.com)
  • The WHO said there are 17,298 reported measles cases in the Philippines from January to November 2018 alone, a huge leap from the 3,706 reported measles cases for the same period in 2017. (abs-cbn.com)
  • In fact, it is estimated that over 20 million cases of measles occur worldwide on an annual basis. (healthimpactnews.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that there have been 102 cases of measles reported so far in 2015. (learnu.org)
  • Romania has been hit the hardest, and saw 5,562 cases of the measles in 2017 alone, account for about 25% of all cases in Europe last year. (firstquotehealth.com)
  • There have already been over 800 cases of the measles reported in 2018 alone, a number that will surely rise. (firstquotehealth.com)
  • The last surviving member of the team of researchers that developed the measles vaccine 50 years ago believes it is "ludicrous," however, to get upset over the Center for Disease Control's December 5 announcement that there were 175 cases of the disease in the United States in 2013, a tripling of the annual average. (wordpress.com)
  • In a phone interview with The Times of Israel, Katz, professor emeritus of pediatrics at Duke University, emphasized that the measles cases in the US were all the result of the importation of the virus from other countries. (wordpress.com)
  • The vaccine court effectively said today that the thousands of pending claims represented by the three test cases are on extremely shaky ground. (wordpress.com)
  • HealthImpactNews.com editor Brian Shilhavy recounted that there have been no child measles deaths since 2003 in the United States, highlighting data from a CDC report issued in April of last year in response to a nationwide upsurge in measles cases. (thenewamerican.com)
  • Instead, it displays a graph illustrating the decline in overall U.S. measles cases - with no distinction of measles deaths - since the inoculation was introduced, a decidedly deceptive omission of earlier years' data. (thenewamerican.com)
  • In 2008 there were an estimated 164,000 measles deaths in children worldwide - nearly 450 deaths a day - and India accounts for about two-thirds of global measles deaths in infants and children. (healthcanal.com)
  • Hospital spokesperson Dr. Ferdinand de Guzman said on Monday night alone, 7 deaths were recorded, of which 3 are due to complications due to measles. (abs-cbn.com)
  • Why are there so many reports of measles vaccine deaths? (vaxopedia.org)
  • The deaths of more than 100 children have been officially linked to receiving a measles vaccine during the past decade, according to the federal government's Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). (thenewamerican.com)
  • After a painstaking search through this federal database of adverse effects, Shilhavy reported, "The search result contained 108 deaths over this period [i.e., 2004 to 2015 - ed.], resulting from four different measles vaccines sold in the United States during the past 10 years. (thenewamerican.com)
  • He continued, "This database reflects only deaths that were reported during the time frame, and therefore probably reflects a much lower number than actual deaths, since most doctors and health authorities believe vaccines are safe, and would not normally attribute a death to a vaccine and actually report it. (thenewamerican.com)
  • To describe 4 healthcare workers who developed measles despite pre-existing antimeasles antibody levels. (nih.gov)
  • Hospital employees working in patient care areas from July through November 1990 were screened for measles antibody levels using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay (EIA). (nih.gov)
  • Of 1,311 employees working in patient care areas, 900 (68.6%) had sera tested for measles antibody. (nih.gov)
  • At least 59 people in California have been infected with measles since December. (cbslocal.com)
  • But if you've had only one MMR shot (or don't know your vaccination history), there's no real harm in going to the doctor and asking them about getting the vaccine, especially if you're living in one of the five states (California, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, and Washington) where an outbreak is currently raging. (gizmodo.com)
  • The University of California announced on Friday that the college system will require new students beginning class in 2017 to be vaccinated against measles. (learnu.org)
  • The statement released on Friday from the University of California said, "The University of California will require incoming students to be screened for tuberculosis and vaccinated for measles, mumps, rubella, chicken pox, meningococcus, tetanus and whooping cough, under a plan set to take effect in 2017. (learnu.org)
  • Schools in California were closed for at least two weeks in 1917 because of measles epidemics. (vaxopedia.org)
  • What is the history of the measles vaccine? (reference.com)
  • However, the VAERS database reveals a markedly different history of the measles vaccine. (thenewamerican.com)
  • Existing evidence on the safety and effectiveness of MMR vaccine supports current policies of mass immunisation aimed at global measles eradication and in order to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with mumps and rubella. (vaxopedia.org)
  • The single measles vaccine is only available privately in the UK - there are usually two options Rouvax (sanofi Pasteur) and M-vax (egg free version made my SII). (mumsnet.com)
  • We aimed to assess whether measles vaccine effectiveness (VE) waned over time, and if so, whether differentially in measles-eliminated and measles-endemic settings. (elsevier.com)
  • Results: After screening 14,782 citations, we identified three full-text articles from measles-eliminated settings and 33 articles from measles-endemic settings. (elsevier.com)
  • In measles-endemic settings, one-dose VE increased by 1.5% (95% CI 0.5, 2.5) for every month increase in age at first dose of MCV. (elsevier.com)
  • In fact, in an unprotected population and one where measles isn't endemic it can be one of the great killers. (continentaltelegraph.com)
  • Pictures of measles are available from the websites of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, WebMD and Healthline. (reference.com)
  • For some countries, Ukraine for example, are struggling with measles outbreaks due to inability to fight the disease, stemming from poor healthcare services and infrastructure. (firstquotehealth.com)
  • So why are some parents still afraid to allow their kids to get vaccinated and protected, putting them at risk to get measles , a life-threatening disease ? (vaxopedia.org)
  • With almost no measles in the United States since the 1990s, today's generation of American parents are not familiar with the disease and buy in too easily to the anti-vaccination movement currently in vogue, said measles vaccine developer Dr. Samuel Katz. (wordpress.com)
  • Mainstream media clamor for mandatory vaccines, ignoring official statistics that show the drug is more dangerous than the disease. (thenewamerican.com)
  • Put another way, in the last 10 years an American child would have been highly more likely to die after receiving a measles shot than from contracting the disease itself. (thenewamerican.com)
  • Worth noting that we palefaces didn't conquer the Americas with guns but with germs, measles being one of the epidemics that carried off perhaps 90% of the indigenous population. (continentaltelegraph.com)
  • But Hviid is skeptical the new findings will make much difference among anti-vaccine activists. (healthday.com)
  • I am more concerned about the perhaps larger group of parents who encounter anti-vaccine pseudoscience and propaganda on the internet, and become concerned and uncertain. (healthday.com)
  • However, the anti-vaccine movement is not influenced by facts, by science or by logic, so I fear that another study demonstrating the safety of MMR vaccination will not sway those whose allegiance is not to reality, but to irrational arbitrary beliefs. (healthday.com)
  • Hopefully, our study can play a small part in turning the anti-vaccine tide," Hviid said. (healthday.com)
Measles Vaccine Virus Taqman-MGB
Measles Vaccine Virus Taqman-MGB (protocols.io)
83% Say Measles Vaccine Is Safe for Healthy Children | Pew Research Center
83% Say Measles Vaccine Is Safe for Healthy Children | Pew Research Center (pewresearch.org)
Health officials urge public to get measles vaccine - News - The Taunton Daily Gazette, Taunton, MA - Taunton, MA
Health officials urge public to get measles vaccine - News - The Taunton Daily Gazette, Taunton, MA - Taunton, MA (tauntongazette.com)
Measles Vaccine Debate Shifts Tone - WSJ
Measles Vaccine Debate Shifts Tone - WSJ (wsj.com)
NW measles outbreak sparks bitter debate over vaccine exemptions | KOMO
NW measles outbreak sparks bitter debate over vaccine exemptions | KOMO (komonews.com)
New Study Says No Link Between Measles Vaccine And Autism - NBC Chicago
New Study Says No Link Between Measles Vaccine And Autism - NBC Chicago (nbcchicago.com)
'Non-halal' measles-rubella vaccine hits resistance in Muslim Indonesia | South China Morning...
'Non-halal' measles-rubella vaccine hits resistance in Muslim Indonesia | South China Morning... (scmp.com)
Vaccine (Shot) for Measles | CDC
Vaccine (Shot) for Measles | CDC (cdc.gov)
Measles Vaccine-Preventable Diseases Infographic | CDC
Measles Vaccine-Preventable Diseases Infographic | CDC (cdc.gov)
Global Health Infographics
Global Health Infographics (cdc.gov)
Australia to cut benefits if kids aren't vaccinated - CNN
Australia to cut benefits if kids aren't vaccinated - CNN (edition.cnn.com)
Robert Koch | New Scientist
Robert Koch | New Scientist (newscientist.com)
MMR (measles mumps rubella) Vaccine - HL Pharma
MMR (measles mumps rubella) Vaccine - HL Pharma (hlpharma.com.au)
Measles Outbreak, Measles Vaccine: Top Questions Answered | HuffPost
Measles Outbreak, Measles Vaccine: Top Questions Answered | HuffPost (huffingtonpost.com)
What the Disneyland Measles Outbreak of 2014-15 Can Teach Us About How Stories Go Viral - News - Elsevier
What the Disneyland Measles Outbreak of 2014-15 Can Teach Us About How Stories Go Viral - News - Elsevier (journals.elsevier.com)
GMO Vaccine-Strain Measles vs Cancer - erv
GMO Vaccine-Strain Measles vs Cancer - erv (scienceblogs.com)
Japan Leads the Way in Child Health: No Compulsory Vaccines. Banned Measles Mumps Rubella (MMR) Vaccine - Global ResearchGlobal...
Japan Leads the Way in Child Health: No Compulsory Vaccines. Banned Measles Mumps Rubella (MMR) Vaccine - Global ResearchGlobal... (globalresearch.ca)
Can my baby get the measles vaccine early? How to protect your family and more - Los Angeles Times
Can my baby get the measles vaccine early? How to protect your family and more - Los Angeles Times (latimes.com)
Race is on to create 'halal' measles vaccine
Race is on to create 'halal' measles vaccine (telegraph.co.uk)
Selling Trade Liberalization Like the Measles Vaccine | Cato @ Liberty
Selling Trade Liberalization Like the Measles Vaccine | Cato @ Liberty (cato.org)
How safe is the new measles vaccine? | health and fitness | Hindustan Times
How safe is the new measles vaccine? | health and fitness | Hindustan Times (hindustantimes.com)
April 9, 1966 | Science News
April 9, 1966 | Science News (sciencenews.org)
Harriet Sinclair
Harriet Sinclair (newsweek.com)
Measles Outbreak, Measles Vaccine: Top Questions Answered | Live Science
Measles Outbreak, Measles Vaccine: Top Questions Answered | Live Science (livescience.com)
Here's how Louisiana doctors are using the drug that U.K. scientists tout for coronavirus | Health care/Hospitals | nola.com
Here's how Louisiana doctors are using the drug that U.K. scientists tout for coronavirus | Health care/Hospitals | nola.com (nola.com)
Measles on Rise as Parents Question Vaccine - Washington Post Investigations
Measles on Rise as Parents Question Vaccine - Washington Post Investigations (voices.washingtonpost.com)
What Vaccines Do You Need before and during Pregnancy? | CDC
What Vaccines Do You Need before and during Pregnancy? | CDC (cdc.gov)
What Vaccines Do Children Need before Starting School? | CDC
What Vaccines Do Children Need before Starting School? | CDC (cdc.gov)
Brazil to export low-cost measles and rubella vaccine - BBC News
Brazil to export low-cost measles and rubella vaccine - BBC News (bbc.co.uk)
EU wants coordinated vaccine push against measles, other diseases - Reuters
EU wants coordinated vaccine push against measles, other diseases - Reuters (reuters.com)
'First Face of America' explores how humans reached the New World | Science...
'First Face of America' explores how humans reached the New World | Science... (sciencenews.org)
Health | Science | AAAS
Health | Science | AAAS (sciencemag.org)
Roald Dahl's heartbreaking words about the measles vaccine - CBS News
Roald Dahl's heartbreaking words about the measles vaccine - CBS News (cbsnews.com)
Vaccine-Phobia: Get Wild at a Measles Party - DER SPIEGEL
Vaccine-Phobia: Get Wild at a Measles Party - DER SPIEGEL (spiegel.de)