Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)Maxillary Sinus: The air space located in the body of the MAXILLARY BONE near each cheek. Each maxillary sinus communicates with the middle passage (meatus) of the NASAL CAVITY on the same side.Dentition, Permanent: The 32 teeth of adulthood that either replace or are added to the complement of deciduous teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Tooth Eruption: The emergence of a tooth from within its follicle in the ALVEOLAR PROCESS of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE into the ORAL CAVITY. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Diagnosis, Oral: Examination of the mouth and teeth toward the identification and diagnosis of intraoral disease or manifestation of non-oral conditions.Pit and Fissure Sealants: Agents used to occlude dental enamel pits and fissures in the prevention of dental caries.Maxillary Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the MAXILLARY SINUS. In many cases, it is caused by an infection of the bacteria HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE; STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE; or STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS.Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Tooth Crown: The upper part of the tooth, which joins the lower part of the tooth (TOOTH ROOT) at the cervix (TOOTH CERVIX) at a line called the cementoenamel junction. The entire surface of the crown is covered with enamel which is thicker at the extremity and becomes progressively thinner toward the cervix. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p216)Space MaintenanceDental Pulp Cavity: The space in a tooth bounded by the dentin and containing the dental pulp. The portion of the cavity within the crown of the tooth is the pulp chamber; the portion within the root is the pulp canal or root canal.Tooth Root: The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)Tooth, Unerupted: A normal developing tooth which has not yet perforated the oral mucosa or one that fails to erupt in the normal sequence or time interval expected for the type of tooth in a given gender, age, or population group.Dental Pulp Capping: Application of a protective agent to an exposed pulp (direct capping) or the remaining thin layer of dentin over a nearly exposed pulp (indirect capping) in order to allow the pulp to recover and maintain its normal vitality and function.DMF Index: "Decayed, missing and filled teeth," a routinely used statistical concept in dentistry.Anodontia: Congenital absence of the teeth; it may involve all (total anodontia) or only some of the teeth (partial anodontia, hypodontia), and both the deciduous and the permanent dentition, or only teeth of the permanent dentition. (Dorland, 27th ed)Maxillary Sinus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MAXILLARY SINUS. They represent the majority of paranasal neoplasms.Dental Models: Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.School Dentistry: Preventive dental services provided for students in primary and secondary schools.Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Maxillary Nerve: The intermediate sensory division of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The maxillary nerve carries general afferents from the intermediate region of the face including the lower eyelid, nose and upper lip, the maxillary teeth, and parts of the dura.Dental Fissures: Deep grooves or clefts in the surface of teeth equivalent to class 1 cavities in Black's classification of dental caries.Fluorides, Topical: Fluorides, usually in pastes or gels, used for topical application to reduce the incidence of DENTAL CARIES.Maxillary Artery: A branch of the external carotid artery which distributes to the deep structures of the face (internal maxillary) and to the side of the face and nose (external maxillary).Molar, Third: The aftermost permanent tooth on each side in the maxilla and mandible.Dental Plaque Index: An index which scores the degree of dental plaque accumulation.Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Maxillary Neoplasms: Cancer or tumors of the MAXILLA or upper jaw.Dental Pulp CalcificationMaxillary DiseasesTooth Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the teeth.Toothbrushing: The act of cleaning teeth with a brush to remove plaque and prevent tooth decay. (From Webster, 3d ed)Cuspid: The third tooth to the left and to the right of the midline of either jaw, situated between the second INCISOR and the premolar teeth (BICUSPID). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p817)Palatal Expansion Technique: An orthodontic method used for correcting narrow or collapsed maxillary arches and functional cross-bite. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry),Dental Enamel: A hard thin translucent layer of calcified substance which envelops and protects the dentin of the crown of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in the body and is almost entirely composed of calcium salts. Under the microscope, it is composed of thin rods (enamel prisms) held together by cementing substance, and surrounded by an enamel sheath. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Dentin: The hard portion of the tooth surrounding the pulp, covered by enamel on the crown and cementum on the root, which is harder and denser than bone but softer than enamel, and is thus readily abraded when left unprotected. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Cariostatic Agents: Substances that inhibit or arrest DENTAL CARIES formation. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Bisphenol A-Glycidyl Methacrylate: The reaction product of bisphenol A and glycidyl methacrylate that undergoes polymerization when exposed to ultraviolet light or mixed with a catalyst. It is used as a bond implant material and as the resin component of dental sealants and composite restorative materials.Dental Arch: The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.Tooth, Impacted: A tooth that is prevented from erupting by a physical barrier, usually other teeth. Impaction may also result from orientation of the tooth in an other than vertical position in the periodontal structures.Cephalometry: The measurement of the dimensions of the HEAD.Bicuspid: One of the eight permanent teeth, two on either side in each jaw, between the canines (CUSPID) and the molars (MOLAR), serving for grinding and crushing food. The upper have two cusps (bicuspid) but the lower have one to three. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p822)Composite Resins: Synthetic resins, containing an inert filler, that are widely used in dentistry.Tooth Movement: Orthodontic techniques used to correct the malposition of a single tooth.Tooth Eruption, Ectopic: An abnormality in the direction of a TOOTH ERUPTION.Odontometry: Measurement of tooth characteristics.Paranasal Sinus Diseases: Diseases affecting or involving the PARANASAL SINUSES and generally manifesting as inflammation, abscesses, cysts, or tumors.Alveolar Process: The thickest and spongiest part of the maxilla and mandible hollowed out into deep cavities for the teeth.Orthodontic Appliances: Devices used for influencing tooth position. Orthodontic appliances may be classified as fixed or removable, active or retaining, and intraoral or extraoral. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p19)Malocclusion: Such malposition and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth as to interfere with the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Malocclusion, Angle Class III: Malocclusion in which the mandible is anterior to the maxilla as reflected by the first relationship of the first permanent molar (mesioclusion).Palate: The structure that forms the roof of the mouth. It consists of the anterior hard palate (PALATE, HARD) and the posterior soft palate (PALATE, SOFT).Orthodontic Appliance Design: The planning, calculation, and creation of an apparatus for the purpose of correcting the placement or straightening of teeth.Radiography, Panoramic: Extraoral body-section radiography depicting an entire maxilla, or both maxilla and mandible, on a single film.Malocclusion, Angle Class II: Malocclusion in which the mandible is posterior to the maxilla as reflected by the relationship of the first permanent molar (distoclusion).Extraoral Traction Appliances: Extraoral devices for applying force to the dentition in order to avoid some of the problems in anchorage control met with in intermaxillary traction and to apply force in directions not otherwise possible.Facial Bones: The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. While some consider the facial bones to comprise the hyoid (HYOID BONE), palatine (HARD PALATE), and zygomatic (ZYGOMA) bones, MANDIBLE, and MAXILLA, others include also the lacrimal and nasal bones, inferior nasal concha, and vomer but exclude the hyoid bone. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p113)Tooth Apex: The tip or terminal end of the root of a tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p62)Maxillary Osteotomy: Surgery of the upper jaw bone usually performed to correct upper and lower jaw misalignment.Palate, Hard: The anteriorly located rigid section of the PALATE.Maxillofacial Development: The process of growth and differentiation of the jaws and face.Maxillary Fractures: Fractures of the upper jaw.Denture, Complete, Upper: A complete denture replacing all the natural maxillary teeth and associated maxillary structures. It is completely supported by the oral tissue and underlying maxillary bone.Tooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Vertical Dimension: The length of the face determined by the distance of separation of jaws. Occlusal vertical dimension (OVD or VDO) or contact vertical dimension is the lower face height with the teeth in centric occlusion. Rest vertical dimension (VDR) is the lower face height measured from a chin point to a point just below the nose, with the mandible in rest position. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p250)Orthodontics, Corrective: The phase of orthodontics concerned with the correction of malocclusion with proper appliances and prevention of its sequelae (Jablonski's Illus. Dictionary of Dentistry).Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Orthodontic Anchorage Procedures: Attachment of orthodontic devices and materials to the MOUTH area for support and to provide a counterforce to orthodontic forces.Root Resorption: Resorption in which cementum or dentin is lost from the root of a tooth owing to cementoclastic or osteoclastic activity in conditions such as trauma of occlusion or neoplasms. (Dorland, 27th ed)Orthodontic Retainers: Orthodontic appliances, fixed or removable, used to maintain teeth in corrected positions during the period of functional adaptation following corrective treatment. These appliances are also used to maintain the positions of the teeth and jaws gained by orthodontic procedures. (From Zwemer, Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p263)Dental Occlusion: The relationship of all the components of the masticatory system in normal function. It has special reference to the position and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth for the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556, p472)Jaw, Edentulous: The total absence of teeth from either the mandible or the maxilla, but not both. Total absence of teeth from both is MOUTH, EDENTULOUS. Partial absence of teeth in either is JAW, EDENTULOUS, PARTIALLY.Dentition, Mixed: The complement of teeth in the jaws after the eruption of some of the permanent teeth but before all the deciduous teeth are absent. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Zygoma: Either of a pair of bones that form the prominent part of the CHEEK and contribute to the ORBIT on each side of the SKULL.Osteotomy, Le Fort: Transverse sectioning and repositioning of the maxilla. There are three types: Le Fort I osteotomy for maxillary advancement or the treatment of maxillary fractures; Le Fort II osteotomy for the treatment of maxillary fractures; Le Fort III osteotomy for the treatment of maxillary fractures with fracture of one or more facial bones. Le Fort III is often used also to correct craniofacial dysostosis and related facial abnormalities. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1203 & p662)Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: Computed tomography modalities which use a cone or pyramid-shaped beam of radiation.Orthodontic Wires: Wires of various dimensions and grades made of stainless steel or precious metal. They are used in orthodontic treatment.Malocclusion, Angle Class I: Malocclusion in which the mandible and maxilla are anteroposteriorly normal as reflected by the relationship of the first permanent molar (i.e., in neutroclusion), but in which individual teeth are abnormally related to each other.Tooth Fractures: Break or rupture of a tooth or tooth root.Tooth, Supernumerary: An extra tooth, erupted or unerupted, resembling or unlike the other teeth in the group to which it belongs. Its presence may cause malposition of adjacent teeth or prevent their eruption.Dental Implantation, Endosseous: Insertion of an implant into the bone of the mandible or maxilla. The implant has an exposed head which protrudes through the mucosa and is a prosthodontic abutment.Denture Design: The plan, delineation, and location of actual structural elements of dentures. The design can relate to retainers, stress-breakers, occlusal rests, flanges, framework, lingual or palatal bars, reciprocal arms, etc.Photography, Dental: Photographic techniques used in ORTHODONTICS; DENTAL ESTHETICS; and patient education.Tooth Socket: A hollow part of the alveolar process of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE where each tooth fits and is attached via the periodontal ligament.Orthodontics, Interceptive: Recognition and elimination of potential irregularities and malpositions in the developing dentofacial complex.Crowns: A prosthetic restoration that reproduces the entire surface anatomy of the visible natural crown of a tooth. It may be partial (covering three or more surfaces of a tooth) or complete (covering all surfaces). It is made of gold or other metal, porcelain, or resin.Root Canal Preparation: Preparatory activities in ROOT CANAL THERAPY by partial or complete extirpation of diseased pulp, cleaning and sterilization of the empty canal, enlarging and shaping the canal to receive the sealing material. The cavity may be prepared by mechanical, sonic, chemical, or other means. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1700)Orthognathic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed to repair or correct the skeletal anomalies of the jaw and its associated dental and facial structures (e.g. CLEFT PALATE).Tooth Mobility: Horizontal and, to a lesser degree, axial movement of a tooth in response to normal forces, as in occlusion. It refers also to the movability of a tooth resulting from loss of all or a portion of its attachment and supportive apparatus, as seen in periodontitis, occlusal trauma, and periodontosis. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p507 & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p313)Dental Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.Dentigerous Cyst: Most common follicular odontogenic cyst. Occurs in relation to a partially erupted or unerupted tooth with at least the crown of the tooth to which the cyst is attached protruding into the cystic cavity. May give rise to an ameloblastoma and, in rare instances, undergo malignant transformation.Nasal Bone: Either one of the two small elongated rectangular bones that together form the bridge of the nose.Chin: The anatomical frontal portion of the mandible, also known as the mentum, that contains the line of fusion of the two separate halves of the mandible (symphysis menti). This line of fusion divides inferiorly to enclose a triangular area called the mental protuberance. On each side, inferior to the second premolar tooth, is the mental foramen for the passage of blood vessels and a nerve.Pulpitis: Inflammation of the DENTAL PULP, usually due to bacterial infection in dental caries, tooth fracture, or other conditions causing exposure of the pulp to bacterial invasion. Chemical irritants, thermal factors, hyperemic changes, and other factors may also cause pulpitis.Dental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.Skull Base: The inferior region of the skull consisting of an internal (cerebral), and an external (basilar) surface.Tooth Migration: The movement of teeth into altered positions in relationship to the basal bone of the ALVEOLAR PROCESS and to adjoining and opposing teeth as a result of loss of approximating or opposing teeth, occlusal interferences, habits, inflammatory and dystrophic disease of the attaching and supporting structures of the teeth. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Lip: Either of the two fleshy, full-blooded margins of the mouth.Periapical Diseases: Diseases of the PERIAPICAL TISSUE surrounding the root of the tooth, which is distinguished from DENTAL PULP DISEASES inside the TOOTH ROOT.Tooth, Artificial: A fabricated tooth substituting for a natural tooth in a prosthesis. It is usually made of porcelain or plastic.Alveolar Ridge Augmentation: Preprosthetic surgery involving rib, cartilage, or iliac crest bone grafts, usually autologous, or synthetic implants for rebuilding the alveolar ridge.Nasal Cavity: The proximal portion of the respiratory passages on either side of the NASAL SEPTUM. Nasal cavities, extending from the nares to the NASOPHARYNX, are lined with ciliated NASAL MUCOSA.Paranasal Sinuses: Air-filled spaces located within the bones around the NASAL CAVITY. They are extensions of the nasal cavity and lined by the ciliated NASAL MUCOSA. Each sinus is named for the cranial bone in which it is located, such as the ETHMOID SINUS; the FRONTAL SINUS; the MAXILLARY SINUS; and the SPHENOID SINUS.Oral Surgical Procedures: Surgical procedures used to treat disease, injuries, and defects of the oral and maxillofacial region.Diastema: An abnormal opening or fissure between two adjacent teeth.Dental Stress Analysis: The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.Open Bite: A condition in which certain opposing teeth fail to establish occlusal contact when the jaws are closed.Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PARANASAL SINUSES.Orthodontic Extrusion: Orthodontic movement in the coronal direction achieved by outward tension on the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT. It does not include the operative procedure that CROWN LENGTHENING involves.Radiography, Dental: Radiographic techniques used in dentistry.Esthetics, Dental: Skills, techniques, standards, and principles used to improve the art and symmetry of the teeth and face to improve the appearance as well as the function of the teeth, mouth, and face. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p108)Dental Pulp Necrosis: Death of pulp tissue with or without bacterial invasion. When the necrosis is due to ischemia with superimposed bacterial infection, it is referred to as pulp gangrene. When the necrosis is non-bacterial in origin, it is called pulp mummification.Periodontal Ligament: The fibrous CONNECTIVE TISSUE surrounding the TOOTH ROOT, separating it from and attaching it to the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS).Oral Surgical Procedures, Preprosthetic: Surgery necessary for a denture to rest on a firm base, free from marked osseous protuberances or undercuts, and devoid of interfering muscle attachments, excess mucoperiosteum, hyperplasias, and fibrous or papillary growths.Tooth Cervix: The constricted part of the tooth at the junction of the crown and root or roots. It is often referred to as the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), the line at which the cementum covering the root of a tooth and the enamel of the tooth meet. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p530, p433)Retrognathia: A physical misalignment of the upper (maxilla) and lower (mandibular) jaw bones in which either or both recede relative to the frontal plane of the forehead.Activator Appliances: Loose-fitting removable orthodontic appliances which redirect the pressures of the facial and masticatory muscles onto the teeth and their supporting structures to produce improvements in tooth arrangements and occlusal relations.Radiography, Dental, Digital: A rapid, low-dose, digital imaging system using a small intraoral sensor instead of radiographic film, an intensifying screen, and a charge-coupled device. It presents the possibility of reduced patient exposure and minimal distortion, although resolution and latitude are inferior to standard dental radiography. A receiver is placed in the mouth, routing signals to a computer which images the signals on a screen or in print. It includes digitizing from x-ray film or any other detector. (From MEDLINE abstracts; personal communication from Dr. Charles Berthold, NIDR)Dental Occlusion, Centric: Contact between opposing teeth during a person's habitual bite.Sella Turcica: A bony prominence situated on the upper surface of the body of the sphenoid bone. It houses the PITUITARY GLAND.Tooth, Nonvital: A tooth from which the dental pulp has been removed or is necrotic. (Boucher, Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Orthodontic Appliances, Functional: Loose, usually removable intra-oral devices which alter the muscle forces against the teeth and craniofacial skeleton. These are dynamic appliances which depend on altered neuromuscular action to effect bony growth and occlusal development. They are usually used in mixed dentition to treat pediatric malocclusions. (ADA, 1992)Jaw Relation Record: A registration of any positional relationship of the mandible in reference to the maxillae. These records may be any of the many vertical, horizontal, or orientation relations. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry)Alveolar Bone Loss: Resorption or wasting of the tooth-supporting bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS) in the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE.Gingival NeoplasmsDental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Anatomic Variation: Peculiarities associated with the internal structure, form, topology, or architecture of organisms that distinguishes them from others of the same species or group.Jaw: Bony structure of the mouth that holds the teeth. It consists of the MANDIBLE and the MAXILLA.Radiography, Bitewing: Technique involving the passage of X-rays through oral structures to create a film record while a central tab or wing of dental X-ray film is being held between upper and lower teeth.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Post and Core Technique: Use of a metal casting, usually with a post in the pulp or root canal, designed to support and retain an artificial crown.Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in one or more of the PARANASAL SINUSES.Sinus Floor Augmentation: Guided BONE TRANSPLANTATION of the MAXILLARY SINUS surface with a BONE SUBSTITUTE grafting. It increases the bone volume at the site of the DENTAL IMPLANT and helps stabilize it.Tooth Preparation, Prosthodontic: The selected form given to a natural tooth when it is reduced by instrumentation to receive a prosthesis (e.g., artificial crown or a retainer for a fixed or removable prosthesis). The selection of the form is guided by clinical circumstances and physical properties of the materials that make up the prosthesis. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239)Dentition: The teeth collectively in the dental arch. Dentition ordinarily refers to the natural teeth in position in their alveoli. Dentition referring to the deciduous teeth is DENTITION, PRIMARY; to the permanent teeth, DENTITION, PERMANENT. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dens in Dente: Anomaly of the tooth, found chiefly in upper lateral incisors. It is characterized by invagination of the enamel at the incisal edge.Root Canal Obturation: Phase of endodontic treatment in which a root canal system that has been cleaned is filled through use of special materials and techniques in order to prevent reinfection.Oroantral Fistula: A fistula between the maxillary sinus and the oral cavity.Orthodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the prevention and correction of dental and oral anomalies (malocclusion).Tooth Attrition: The wearing away of a tooth as a result of tooth-to-tooth contact, as in mastication, occurring only on the occlusal, incisal, and proximal surfaces. It is chiefly associated with aging. It is differentiated from TOOTH ABRASION (the pathologic wearing away of the tooth substance by friction, as brushing, bruxism, clenching, and other mechanical causes) and from TOOTH EROSION (the loss of substance caused by chemical action without bacterial action). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p86)Dental Materials: Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.Root Canal Filling Materials: Materials placed inside a root canal for the purpose of obturating or sealing it. The materials may be gutta-percha, silver cones, paste mixtures, or other substances. (Dorland, 28th ed, p631 & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p187)Orthodontic Space Closure: Therapeutic closure of spaces caused by the extraction of teeth, the congenital absence of teeth, or the excessive space between teeth.Serial Extraction: The selective extraction of deciduous teeth during the stage of mixed dentition in accordance with the shedding and eruption of the teeth. It is done over an extended period to allow autonomous adjustment to relieve crowding of the dental arches during the eruption of the lateral incisors, canines, and premolars, eventually involving the extraction of the first premolar teeth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Jaw, Edentulous, Partially: Absence of teeth from a portion of the mandible and/or maxilla.Dental Articulators: Mechanical devices that simulate the temporomandibular joints and jaws to which maxillary and mandibular casts are attached. The entire assembly attempts to reproduce the movements of the mandible and the various tooth-to-tooth relationships that accompany those movements.Overbite: A malocclusion in which maxillary incisor and canine teeth project over the mandiblar teeth excessively. The overlap is measured perpendicular to the occlusal plane and is also called vertical overlap. When the overlap is measured parallel to the occlusal plane it is referred to as overjet.Ethmoid Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the ETHMOID SINUS. It may present itself as an acute (infectious) or chronic (allergic) condition.Denture, Partial, Fixed: A partial denture attached to prepared natural teeth, roots, or implants by cementation.Nose: A part of the upper respiratory tract. It contains the organ of SMELL. The term includes the external nose, the nasal cavity, and the PARANASAL SINUSES.Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Prognathism: A condition marked by abnormal protrusion of the mandible. (Dorland, 27th ed)Periapical Periodontitis: Inflammation of the PERIAPICAL TISSUE. It includes general, unspecified, or acute nonsuppurative inflammation. Chronic nonsuppurative inflammation is PERIAPICAL GRANULOMA. Suppurative inflammation is PERIAPICAL ABSCESS.Bite Force: The force applied by the masticatory muscles in dental occlusion.Odontogenesis: The process of TOOTH formation. It is divided into several stages including: the dental lamina stage, the bud stage, the cap stage, and the bell stage. Odontogenesis includes the production of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS), dentin (DENTINOGENESIS), and dental cementum (CEMENTOGENESIS).Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Facial Asymmetry: Congenital or acquired asymmetry of the face.Frontal Bone: The bone that forms the frontal aspect of the skull. Its flat part forms the forehead, articulating inferiorly with the NASAL BONE and the CHEEK BONE on each side of the face.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Fused Teeth: Two teeth united during development by the union of their tooth germs; the teeth may be joined by the enamel of their crowns, by their root dentin, or by both.Orthodontic Brackets: Small metal or ceramic attachments used to fasten an arch wire. These attachments are soldered or welded to an orthodontic band or cemented directly onto the teeth. Bowles brackets, edgewise brackets, multiphase brackets, ribbon arch brackets, twin-wire brackets, and universal brackets are all types of orthodontic brackets.Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the ear and its parts, the nose and nasal cavity, or the throat, including surgery of the adenoids, tonsils, pharynx, and trachea.Dental Pulp Test: Investigations conducted on the physical health of teeth involving use of a tool that transmits hot or cold electric currents on a tooth's surface that can determine problems with that tooth based on reactions to the currents.Dental Restoration Failure: Inability or inadequacy of a dental restoration or prosthesis to perform as expected.Smiling: A facial expression which may denote feelings of pleasure, affection, amusement, etc.Mandibular DiseasesMesial Movement of Teeth: Migration of the teeth toward the midline or forward in the DENTAL ARCH. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Age Determination by Teeth: A means of identifying the age of an animal or human through tooth examination.Mastication: The act and process of chewing and grinding food in the mouth.Dental Cementum: The bonelike rigid connective tissue covering the root of a tooth from the cementoenamel junction to the apex and lining the apex of the root canal, also assisting in tooth support by serving as attachment structures for the periodontal ligament. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Carticaine: A thiophene-containing local anesthetic pharmacologically similar to MEPIVACAINE.Dental Restoration, Permanent: A restoration designed to remain in service for not less than 20 to 30 years, usually made of gold casting, cohesive gold, or amalgam. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Forensic Dentistry: The application of dental knowledge to questions of law.Radiographic Magnification: Use of optic and geometric techniques to enhance radiographic image quality and interpretation. It includes use of microfocal X-ray tubes and intensifying fluoroscopic screens.Anesthesia, Dental: A range of methods used to reduce pain and anxiety during dental procedures.Tooth Germ: The collective tissues from which an entire tooth is formed, including the DENTAL SAC; ENAMEL ORGAN; and DENTAL PAPILLA. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Avulsion: Partial or complete displacement of a tooth from its alveolar support. It is commonly the result of trauma. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p312)Pulpectomy: Dental procedure in which the entire pulp chamber is removed from the crown and roots of a tooth.Denture, Partial, Removable: A partial denture designed and constructed to be removed readily from the mouth.Tooth Exfoliation: Physiologic loss of the primary dentition. (Zwemer, Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Stainless Steel: Stainless steel. A steel containing Ni, Cr, or both. It does not tarnish on exposure and is used in corrosive environments. (Grant & Hack's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Dental Fistula: An abnormal passage in the oral cavity on the gingiva.Dental Implantation: The grafting or inserting of a prosthetic device of alloplastic material into the oral tissue beneath the mucosal or periosteal layer or within the bone. Its purpose is to provide support and retention to a partial or complete denture.Administration, Buccal: Administration of a soluble dosage form between the cheek and gingiva. It may involve direct application of a drug onto the buccal mucosa, as by painting or spraying.Orbit: Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.Dental Implants, Single-Tooth: Devices, usually alloplastic, surgically inserted into or onto the jawbone, which support a single prosthetic tooth and serve either as abutments or as cosmetic replacements for missing teeth.Cleft Lip: Congenital defect in the upper lip where the maxillary prominence fails to merge with the merged medial nasal prominences. It is thought to be caused by faulty migration of the mesoderm in the head region.Titanium: A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)Dental Abutments: Natural teeth or teeth roots used as anchorage for a fixed or removable denture or other prosthesis (such as an implant) serving the same purpose.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Inlays: Restorations of metal, porcelain, or plastic made to fit a cavity preparation, then cemented into the tooth. Onlays are restorations which fit into cavity preparations and overlay the occlusal surface of a tooth or teeth. Onlays are retained by frictional or mechanical factors.Cranial Sutures: A type of fibrous joint between bones of the head.Dental Prosthesis Retention: Holding a DENTAL PROSTHESIS in place by its design, or by the use of additional devices or adhesives.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Piezosurgery: The use of HIGH-ENERGY SHOCK WAVES, in the frequency range of 20-30 kHz, to cut through mineralized tissue.Root Canal Irrigants: Chemicals used mainly to disinfect root canals after pulpectomy and before obturation. The major ones are camphorated monochlorophenol, EDTA, formocresol, hydrogen peroxide, metacresylacetate, and sodium hypochlorite. Root canal irrigants include also rinsing solutions of distilled water, sodium chloride, etc.Patient Care Planning: Usually a written medical and nursing care program designed for a particular patient.Hydatidiform Mole: Trophoblastic hyperplasia associated with normal gestation, or molar pregnancy. It is characterized by the swelling of the CHORIONIC VILLI and elevated human CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN. Hydatidiform moles or molar pregnancy may be categorized as complete or partial based on their gross morphology, histopathology, and karyotype.
... maxillary first premolar, maxillary second premolar, maxillary first molar, maxillary second molar, and maxillary third molar. ... At that time, the first permanent tooth erupts. This stage, during which a person has a combination of primary and permanent ... Maxillary first premolars and mandibular molars usually have two roots. Maxillary molars usually have three roots. Additional ... mandibular first molar, mandibular second molar, and mandibular third molar. Third molars are commonly called "wisdom teeth" ...
5 million in mandibular lateral incisor and 12 million in maxillary first molars). Enamel rods are found in rows along the ... In permanent teeth, the enamel rods near the cementoenamel junction (CEJ) tilt slightly more toward the root of the tooth than ... Permanent tooth:- From the dentinoenamel junction apically in the cervical third of the crown. Primary tooth:- From the ...
Excluding the third molars, missing permanent dentition accounts for 3.5-6.5%. Similar trends of missing teeth can be seen in ... CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) C M Woolf; John, SA; Revel, JP (May 1971). "Missing maxillary lateral incisors: ... The condition of missing over five (six or more) permanent teeth, excluding 3rd molars or wisdom teeth, has been called ... Hypodontia describes a situation where the patient is missing up to five permanent teeth, excluding the 3rd molars. Missing ...
... first molar and second molar is on average 1.7mm greater than that of the permanent successors on one side. The maxillary arch ... which is used to prevent upper first molars from moving forward after the maxillary first primary molar has been prematurely ... Therefore the space that is naturally created, is usually taken up by the movement of the permanent first molar moving mesially ... It is about 3.5mm in mandibles and 2mm in the maxillary arch. The adult premolar teeth are smaller than their predecessors, ...
Permanent maxillary molars are not considered to have any teeth that precede them. Despite being named "molars", the deciduous ... Maxillary molars have two buccal cusps and two lingual cusps. A fifth cusp that may form on the maxillary first molar is known ... The maxillary second molar is the tooth located laterally from both the maxillary first molars of the mouth but mesially from ... both maxillary third molars. This is true only in permanent teeth. In deciduous teeth, the maxillary second molar is the last ...
Usually, the first teeth seen in the mouth are the mandibular centrals and the last are the maxillary second molars. The ... All of these are gradually replaced with a permanent counterpart except for the primary first and second molars; they are ... The erupting permanent teeth cause root resorption, where the permanent teeth push on the roots of the primary teeth, causing ... They are usually lost and replaced by permanent teeth, but in the absence of permanent replacements, they can remain functional ...
Tongue crib is attached through a bar to two bands placed on the upper 1st molars. The crib is shaped like a horseshoe with ... It is shown that as long as the sucking habit stops before the eruption of permanent teeth, the open bite self-corrects. In ... Tongue crib is a removable applianced placed in the maxillary arch for the purpose of stopping the tongue thrusting habit. This ... If a patient has normal incisor show at rest smile, than molar intrusion may be done in these type of faces. Extrusion of ...
... instead of directly from the canines to the molars. The premolars in humans are the maxillary first premolar, maxillary second ... Molar teeth by definition are permanent teeth distal to the canines, preceded by deciduous premolars. In primitive placental ... In humans, there are two premolars per quadrant in the permanent set of teeth, making eight premolars total in the mouth. They ... They have properties of both the anterior canines and posterior molars, and so food can be transferred from the canines to the ...
In this modification, the maxillary and mandibular active plates are joined at the 1st permanent molar region using a U shaped ... The maxillary arch received Hawley retainer. After a while, Viggo realized that her daughter's occlusion remained the same. He ... Turning the screw lead to the maxillary arch to move anteriorly and a back thrust of the mandible This type of activator was ... A feature of this appliance is Coffin Spring which is used in the maxillary arch which may help with expansion of the upper ...
"Ankylosis of Primary Molars-A future Periodontal threat to the First Permanent Molars? - American Journal of Orthodontics and ... "Predisposing factors for severe incisor root resorption associated with impacted maxillary canines - American Journal of ... Kurol did his research in disorders about erupting pattern of human canine and molar teeth. He developed classifications to ... for his contributions made in the field of Orthodontics related to diagnosing and evaluating the eruption pattern of maxillary ...
Permanent teeth and their assigned numbers (Universal Tooth Numbering System) upper right 1. 3rd Molar (wisdom tooth) 2. 2nd ... The tooth designated "1" is the maxillary right third molar ("wisdom tooth") and the count continues along the upper teeth to ... 1st Molar (6-yr molar) 15. 2nd Molar (12-yr molar) 16. 3rd Molar (wisdom tooth) lower left 17. 3rd Molar (wisdom tooth) 18. 2nd ... 1st Molar (6-yr molar) 31. 2nd Molar (12-yr molar) 32. 3rd Molar (wisdom tooth) Dental notation FDI World Dental Federation ...
32 are used for permanent teeth. The tooth designated "1" is the maxillary right third molar ("wisdom tooth") and the count ... 1-8 for permanent and A-E for deciduous, both starting at the midline. For example, permanent upper left first molar: UL6 ISO ... When speaking about a certain tooth such as the permanent maxillary central incisor, the notation is pronounced "one, one". ... For permanent teeth, the upper right teeth begin with the number, "1". The upper left teeth begin with the number, "2". The ...
Unerupted permanent teeth underlie the deciduous teeth. Dentistry portal Carnassial Incisor Premolar Molar This article ... Borzabadi-Farahani, A. (2015). "Bilateral agenesis of maxillary permanent canines: Review of the literature". J Orthod Sci. 4: ... In most species, canines are the anterior-most teeth in the maxillary bone. The four canines in humans are the two maxillary ... As in the maxillary canine, the mesial incisal edge (or cusp ridge) is shorter than the distal side, however, the cusp is ...
Apart from the first molars, the incisors are also the first permanent teeth to erupt, following the same order as the primary ... maxillary lateral incisor (upper jaw, beside the maxillary central incisor). *mandibular central incisor (lower jaw, closest to ... Children with a full set of deciduous teeth (primary teeth) also have eight incisors, named the same way as in permanent teeth ... maxillary central incisor (upper jaw, closest to the center of the lips) ...
There are 32 permanent teeth and those of the maxillae erupt in a different order from permanent mandibular teeth. Maxillary ... the primary molars are replaced by permanent premolars. If any primary teeth are shed or lost before permanent teeth are ready ... second molar, and (8) third molar. Mandibular teeth typically erupt in the following order: (1) first molar (2) central incisor ... Then, the remaining permanent teeth erupt into the mouth during the permanent dentition stage. Although researchers agree that ...
Apart from the first molars, the incisors are also the first permanent teeth to erupt, following the same order as the primary ... The types of incisor are: maxillary central incisor (upper jaw, closest to the center of the lips) maxillary lateral incisor ( ... Typically, the mandibular central incisors erupt first, followed by the maxillary central incisors, the mandibular lateral ... named the same way as in permanent teeth. Young children may have from zero to eight incisors depending on the stage of their ...
... the width of the maxillary arch at the premolar and molar region by measure the mesio-distal widths of the four permanent ... The width from Left Molar to Right Molar or Measured Molar Value (MMV) can be calculated by using the S.I of incisors and ... In the maxillary arch instead of 80, Linder Harth Index uses 85 to achieve the Measured Molar Value. Dentition Analysis ... Maxillary teeth are often missing and Peg Laterals are often seen in the maxillary arch. Linder Hath index is derived from ...
The posterior maxillary molars and maxillary sinus are innervated by the same branch of nerves which is the maxillary division ... are not considered a risk of OAC due to the presence of developing permanent teeth and the small size of a developing maxillary ... Other known causes of OAC are fracture across the antral floor typically Le Fort I, displacement of posterior maxillary molar ... The maxillary sinus is known for its thin floor walls and close proximity to the posterior maxillary teeth. Dental procedures ...
... consisting of six maxillary and six mandibular molars, four maxillary and four mandibular premolars, two maxillary and two ... The first of the permanent teeth to erupt are the permanent first molars, right behind the last 'milk' molars of the primary ... These first permanent molars are important for the correct development of a permanent dentition. Up to the age of thirteen ... The full permanent dentition is completed much later during the permanent dentition period. The four last permanent teeth, the ...
"Preventive Treatment of Ectopically Erupting Maxillary Permanent Canines by Extraction of Deciduous Canines and First Molars: A ... constricted maxillary width, blocked out maxillary cuspids, lower crowding). One benefit of the Pre-Eruption Guidance approach ... Pre-eruption guidance treatment is usually begun after the four permanent upper and lower front teeth have erupted ( ... Patients may also avoid more expensive, later staged treatments involving permanent tooth extractions, longer time with fixed ...
Congenitally missing maxillary incisors. *First permanent molar relationship. *Posterior cross bite. *Tooth displacement ( ... the mesio-buccal cusp of the upper first permanent molar occludes in the buccal groove of the lower first permanent molar. ... Angle's classification (Molar) is used to describe the first permanent molar relationship from normal to malocclusion:[45] ... Class I: The molar relationship of the occlusion is normal or as described for the maxillary first molar, with malocclusion ...
Permanent maxillary molars are not considered to have any teeth that precede them. Despite being named "molars", the deciduous ... Maxillary first molarEdit. Main article: Maxillary first molar. The maxillary first molar is the tooth located laterally from ... Maxillary third molarEdit. Main article: Maxillary third molar. The maxillary third molar is the tooth located laterally from ... Maxillary second molarEdit. Main article: Maxillary second molar. The maxillary second molar is the tooth located laterally ...
Fourth and fifth molars that form behind the third molars are another kind of supernumerary teeth. There is evidence of ... The most common supernumerary tooth is a mesiodens, which is a malformed, peg-like tooth that occurs between the maxillary ... Supernumerary teeth in deciduous (baby) teeth are less common than in permanent teeth.[citation needed] The presence of a ... Molar-type extra teeth are the rarest form. Dental X-rays are often used to diagnose hyperdontia. It is suggested that ...
... is a process in the field of Orthodontics which is used to move molar teeth, especially permanent first ... The authors concluded that the effect of maxillary second and third molar eruption stage on molar distalization in both the ... It has been reported in the literature that eruption stage of 2nd molar has an impact on the distalization of the 1st permanent ... Lim, Seung-Min; Hong, Ryoon-Ki (2009-06-29). "Distal Movement of Maxillary Molars Using a Lever-arm and Mini-implant System". ...
Instead, the teeth that precede the permanent maxillary premolars are the deciduous maxillary molars. In the universal system ... the permanent maxillary premolars are designated by a number. The right permanent maxillary second premolar is known as "4", ... from both maxillary first molars. The function of this premolar is similar to that of first molars in regard to grinding being ... There are two cusps on maxillary second premolars, but both of them are less sharp then those of the maxillary first premolars ...
But Eomaia's molar to premolar ratio (it has more pre-molars than molars) is typical of eutherians, including placentals, and ... a small bone in a little slot in the maxillary process (extension). ... permanent dead link] *^ Michael J. Benton,Mikhail A. Shishkin,David M. Unwin, The Age of Dinosaurs in Russia and Mongolia ... Their "molars" have two parallel rows of tubercles, unlike the tribosphenic (three-peaked) molars of uncontested early crown ...
... the maturational stage of the mandibular second molar may be a reliable indicator for the timing of spontaneous eruption of the ... maxillary canine. PMID: 23301999 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]... ... Eruption of the permanent maxillary canines in relation to mandibular second molar maturity.. *. ... stage of the mandibular second molar may be a reliable indicator for the timing of spontaneous eruption of the maxillary canine ...
The permanent maxillary second molar: Canal number And configurations in a Tunisian population One of the major causes of ... Permanent maxillary second molar: Canal number And configurations. Share Tweet Pinit Email ... The permanent maxillary second molar: Canal number And configurations in a Tunisian population. By Soumaya Touzi 1, Rim Kallala ... 7] Gu.Y ,Wang.W , Ni.L.Four-rooted permanent maxillary first and second molars in a northwestern Chinese population, Archives ...
Background: The aim of the study was to determine whether the presence of two palatal roots (2PR) in permanent maxillary molars ... Background: The aim of the study was to determine whether the presence of two palatal roots (2PR) in permanent maxillary molars ... Gu Y, Wang W, Ni L. Four-rooted permanent maxillary first and second molars in a northwestern Chinese population. Arch Oral ... Carlsen O, Alexandersen V. Radix mesiolingualis and radix distolingualis in a collection of permanent maxillary molars. Acta ...
... maxillary molars and those of the permanent maxillary molars, even though their function are similar. The permanent maxillary ... the permanent maxillary second molars are designated by a number. The right permanent maxillary second molar is known as "2", ... Despite being named molars, the deciduous molars are followed by permanent premolars. The deciduous maxillary second molar is ... from both maxillary third molars. This is true only in permanent teeth. In deciduous (baby) teeth, the maxillary second molar ...
Nair Rohit, Khasnis Sandhya, Patil Jayaprakash D. Bilateral taurodontism in permanent maxillary first molar. Indian Journal of ... This condition is most commonly associated with permanent molars. This clinical entity occurs in the form of an isolated, ... Furthermore, it shows the typical presence of bilateral hypertaurodontism with respect to the maxillary first molar. ...
E : the second primary molar, #6 : the maxillary first permanent molar, #7 : the tooth germ of second permanent molar. Paired t ... E : the second primary molar, #6 : the maxillary first permanent molar, #7 : the tooth germ of the second permanent molar. ... the maxillary primary second molar and the tooth germ of the maxillary second permanent molar, and the maxillary FPM and the ... In conclusion, the angulation of the first permanent molar and tooth germ of the maxillary second permanent molar showed close ...
... maxillary molars and those of the permanent maxillary molars, even though their function are similar. The permanent maxillary ... The right permanent maxillary first molar is known as tooth "3", and the left permanent maxillary first molar is known as tooth ... The right permanent maxillary first molar is known as "16". The left permanent maxillary first molar is known as "26". ... Despite being named molars, the deciduous molars are followed by permanent premolars. Permanent maxillary first molar notation ...
The purpose of this paper was to report a ectopic eruption of a maxillary first permanent molar diagnosed in a nine-year-old ... This abnormality has been pointed out in the literature for the first permanent molars, mainly the maxillary ones. There is no ... Clinical management of the ectopic eruption of a maxillary first permanent molar - Case report. Stomatos [online]. 2012, vol.18 ... The early approach of the ectopic eruption of the first permanent molar can prevent effects such as the early root resorption ...
... maxillary atresia, premature eruption of first molar, asynchrony between the eruption of the maxillary first permanent molar ... second molar and impaction of the first permanent molar in the distal surface of the deciduous molar (Figure 3). ... the first permanent molar, associated with atypical root resorption of the adjacent deciduous molar. The deciduous second molar ... Ectopic eruption of maxillary first permanent molars in different areas of the United States. J Dent Child. 1982; 49(4):294-9 ...
... maxillary first premolar, maxillary second premolar, maxillary first molar, maxillary second molar, and maxillary third molar. ... All primary teeth are normally later replaced with their permanent counterparts. Permanent teeth[edit]. Among permanent teeth, ... Maxillary first premolars and mandibular molars usually have two roots. Maxillary molars usually have three roots. Additional ... The maxillary teeth are the maxillary central incisor, maxillary lateral incisor, maxillary canine, ...
Part III: PERMANENT POSTERIOR TEETH. 8. Maxillary Premolars. 9. Mandibular Premolars. 10. Maxillary First and Second Molars. 11 ... Part II: PERMANENT ANTERIOR TEETH. 5. Maxillary Incisors. 6. Mandibular Incisors. 7. Canines. ... Mandibular First and Second Molars. 12. Third Molars. Part IV: RELATED TOPICS. 13. Deciduous Dentition. 14. Tooth Development. ...
EVALUATION OF ROOT CANAL MORPHOLOGY OF MAXILLARY PERMANENT SECOND MOLARS USING CONE BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN CHENNAI - A ... The mean values of the length of mesiobuccal root of permanent maxillary second molars are 11.6997 mm in males and 11.0313 mm ... Aim:To study the variation in the root canal morphology of maxillary permanent second molars in the Chennai population based on ... Results:A total of 170 permanent maxillary second molars were examined in this study. Type 1 is commonly seen in males (90.59 ...
Sex determination potential of permanent maxillary molar widths and cusp diameters in a North Indian population ...
Prevalence and Distribution of Carabelli Cusp in Maxillary Molars in Deciduous and Permanent Dentition and Its Relation to ... Prevalence and Distribution of Carabelli Cusp in Maxillary Molars in Deciduous and Permanent Dentition and Its Relation to ... Associations between Carabelli trait and cusp areas in human permanent maxillary first molars. American Journal of Physical ... In addition, its bilateral occurrence like a shallow groove in first maxillary molars was related to larger tooth size in both ...
A survey on anatomy of mesiobucal root canal in permanent maxillary first molar using CBCT in Rafsanjan in 2018: a descriptive ... A survey on anatomy of mesiobucal root canal in permanent maxillary first molar using CBCT in Rafsanjan in 2018: a descriptive ... Citation: Z. Tafakhori ,M. Sheikh Fathollahi , [A survey on anatomy of mesiobucal root canal in permanent maxillary first molar ... this study aimed to determine the anatomy of mesiobuccal root canal in maxillary first permanent molars using CBCT (Cone-beam ...
Incidence of mesio-buccal canal (MB2) in permanent maxillary first molar in an ındian sub-population of pune by cbct- a ... Conclusion: Knowing the incidence of presence of MB2 canal in the first maxillary permanent molar is very essential for the ... The prevalence of MB-2 in maxillary first molar was found to be 67.5% in an Indian subpopulation. As far as root canal ... treatment modalities were retrospectively viewed for the presence of second MB2 canal in the permanent maxillary first molar. ...
Yuen, S., Chan, J., & Tay, F. (1985). Ectopic eruption of the maxillary permanent first molar: the effect of increased mesial ... Yuen, S. ; Chan, J. ; Tay, F. / Ectopic eruption of the maxillary permanent first molar : the effect of increased mesial ... Ectopic eruption of the maxillary permanent first molar: the effect of increased mesial angulation on arch length. Journal of ... Yuen, S, Chan, J & Tay, F 1985, Ectopic eruption of the maxillary permanent first molar: the effect of increased mesial ...
The mesial angle of the maxillary first permanent molars and the magnitude of the primary second molar distal root lesion ... Clinical effects of modified Nance arch appliance in the treatment of ectopic eruption of maxillary first permanent molar / 中华口 ... To evaluate the effect of modified Nance arch appliance in the treatment of ectopic eruption of maxillary first permanent molar ... p,,p,,b,METHODS,/b,Thirty children with unilateral ectopic eruption of maxillary first permanent molar were treated with ...
The Permanent Mandibular Premolars. 11. The Permanent Maxillary Molars. 12. The Permanent Mandibular Molars. 13. Pulp Chambers ... 6. The Permanent Maxillary Incisors. 7. The Permanent Mandibular Incisors. 8. The Permanent Canines, Maxillary and Mandibular. ... and Tooth Traits of the Permanent Dentition with tables for each tooth providing detailed information such as tooth notation, ...
METHODS Nonsurgical endodontic therapy of a left maxillary first molar with three roots and eight root canals was successfully ... INTRODUCTION Root canal treatment of maxillary molars presenting with complex root canal configurations can be diagnostically ... Endodontic management of maxillary permanent first molar with 6 root canals: 3 case reports.. Denzil Albuquerque, Jojo Kottoor ... Endodontic Management of Maxillary First Molar with 7 Canals - A Case Report. Ajit Narayan Hindlekar, Srinidhi, Jay Mahesh ...
Permanent maxillary first molar with three mesiobuccal canals.. Nair R, Khasnis S, Patil JD. ...
... including pulp therapy for primary and young permanent molars, extractions, space maintenance, and more. The most commonly ... It also clearly describes procedures for treatment in the primary and young permanent dentitions, ... 14 Ectopic Eruption of Maxillary Permanent Canines 121. Jane A. Soxman. 15 Infraocclusion of Mandibular Primary Molars 127. ... 13 Ectopic Eruption of Maxillary First Permanent Molar 107. Ari Kupietzky and Jane A. Soxman ...
MAXILLARY BUCCALLY DISPLACED CANINES: A NEW INSIGHT INTO AN OLD PROBLEM.(Report) by Pakistan Oral and Dental Journal; Health ... All teeth present except permanent 3rd molars. Patients of BDC with no dental crowding. Good quality pre-treatment records. ... The prevalence of peg-shaped maxillary permanent lateral incisors varies by race, population type, and sex. Altug-Atac and ... Panoramic radiographs were used to confirm the presence and size of maxillary lateral incisors. The size of maxillary lateral ...
maxillary. *tooth. *incisor. *permanent. *molar. *review. 53/53. Case Reports - Reviews sub-cluster 53. *purpura ...
the mandibular permanent teeth to erupt. Maxillary/Mandibular Second Molar - The maxillary and mandibular permanent molars come ... First molar, primary 04 Second molar, primary 05 First molar, permanent 06 Second molar, permanent 07 Third molar, permanent 08 ... Maxillary/Mandibular First Molar - The maxillary and mandibular first molars have multiple cusps. These permanent teeth come in ... the maxillary first molar is slightly back to the mandibular first molar; the mesiobuccal cusp of the maxillary first molar is ...
  • When orthodontic treatment is the choice, extraction of maxillary central incisors may provide the space to correct crowding or an increased overjet without a need for extraction of other posterior teeth [ 3 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Não há um fator etiológico específico para a erupção ectópica do primeiro molar permanente, onde diferentes fatores são relatados. (bvsalud.org)
  • A abordagem precoce da erupção ectópica do primeiro molar permanente poderá evitar sequelas, tais como a reabsorção radicular precoce do segundo molar decíduo adjacente, bem como a perda de espaço para erupção do pré-molar sucessor. (bvsalud.org)
  • O objetivo deste trabalho é descrever um caso de erupção ectópica de um primeiro molar permanente superior, em uma paciente de nove anos de idade, com reabsorção radicular severa do segundo molar decíduo adjacente. (bvsalud.org)
  • Houve tendência ao aumento da espessura óssea vestibular da raiz distovestibular do primeiro molar superior (p= 0,051), provavelmente devido à rotação do molar com o alinhamento. (usp.br)
  • Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) was described in Sweden in 1970, and the term was standardized by the European Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (EAPD) in 2003. (scielo.br)
  • Ectopic maxillary FPM is classified into two types: reversible and irreversible [ 5 ]. (kapd.org)
  • Once a permanent tooth is fully formed, this opening at the apex of a tooth root allows the nerves and blood vessels to provide nutrition to the pulp and aid in its ability to detect pathogens. (colgate.com)