One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.
Cancer or tumors of the MAXILLA or upper jaw.
Maxillary diseases refer to various medical conditions primarily affecting the maxilla (upper jaw) bone, including inflammatory processes, tumors, cysts, or traumatic injuries, which may cause symptoms such as pain, swelling, or functional impairment.
The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.
The measurement of the dimensions of the HEAD.
Either of a pair of bones that form the prominent part of the CHEEK and contribute to the ORBIT on each side of the SKULL.
Insertion of an implant into the bone of the mandible or maxilla. The implant has an exposed head which protrudes through the mucosa and is a prosthodontic abutment.
The air space located in the body of the MAXILLARY BONE near each cheek. Each maxillary sinus communicates with the middle passage (meatus) of the NASAL CAVITY on the same side.
The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. While some consider the facial bones to comprise the hyoid (HYOID BONE), palatine (HARD PALATE), and zygomatic (ZYGOMA) bones, MANDIBLE, and MAXILLA, others include also the lacrimal and nasal bones, inferior nasal concha, and vomer but exclude the hyoid bone. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p113)
The total absence of teeth from either the mandible or the maxilla, but not both. Total absence of teeth from both is MOUTH, EDENTULOUS. Partial absence of teeth in either is JAW, EDENTULOUS, PARTIALLY.
Extraoral devices for applying force to the dentition in order to avoid some of the problems in anchorage control met with in intermaxillary traction and to apply force in directions not otherwise possible.
Transverse sectioning and repositioning of the maxilla. There are three types: Le Fort I osteotomy for maxillary advancement or the treatment of maxillary fractures; Le Fort II osteotomy for the treatment of maxillary fractures; Le Fort III osteotomy for the treatment of maxillary fractures with fracture of one or more facial bones. Le Fort III is often used also to correct craniofacial dysostosis and related facial abnormalities. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1203 & p662)
The inferior region of the skull consisting of an internal (cerebral), and an external (basilar) surface.
The process of growth and differentiation of the jaws and face.
Extraoral body-section radiography depicting an entire maxilla, or both maxilla and mandible, on a single film.
Cancers or tumors of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE unspecified. For neoplasms of the maxilla, MAXILLARY NEOPLASMS is available and of the mandible, MANDIBULAR NEOPLASMS is available.
A prosthesis that gains its support, stability, and retention from a substructure that is implanted under the soft tissues of the basal seat of the device and is in contact with bone. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
The length of the face determined by the distance of separation of jaws. Occlusal vertical dimension (OVD or VDO) or contact vertical dimension is the lower face height with the teeth in centric occlusion. Rest vertical dimension (VDR) is the lower face height measured from a chin point to a point just below the nose, with the mandible in rest position. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p250)
Surgery necessary for a denture to rest on a firm base, free from marked osseous protuberances or undercuts, and devoid of interfering muscle attachments, excess mucoperiosteum, hyperplasias, and fibrous or papillary growths.
Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the jaw.
The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.
A physical misalignment of the upper (maxilla) and lower (mandibular) jaw bones in which either or both recede relative to the frontal plane of the forehead.
An immature epithelial tumor of the JAW originating from the epithelial rests of Malassez or from other epithelial remnants of the ENAMEL from the developmental period. It is a slowly growing tumor, usually benign, but displays a marked propensity for invasive growth.
Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.
Neoplasms produced from tooth-forming tissues.
Surgical procedures used to treat disease, injuries, and defects of the oral and maxillofacial region.
Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)
An orthodontic method used for correcting narrow or collapsed maxillary arches and functional cross-bite. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry),
Removable prosthesis constructed over natural teeth or implanted studs.
Tumors or cancer of the MANDIBLE.
The stable placement of surgically induced fractures of the mandible or maxilla through the use of elastics, wire ligatures, arch bars, or other splints. It is used often in the cosmetic surgery of retrognathism and prognathism. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p636)
The structure that forms the roof of the mouth. It consists of the anterior hard palate (PALATE, HARD) and the posterior soft palate (PALATE, SOFT).
Fractures of the upper jaw.
Surgery performed to repair or correct the skeletal anomalies of the jaw and its associated dental and facial structures (e.g. CLEFT PALATE).
A benign central bone tumor, usually of the jaws (especially the mandible), composed of fibrous connective tissue within which bone is formed.
The bone that forms the frontal aspect of the skull. Its flat part forms the forehead, articulating inferiorly with the NASAL BONE and the CHEEK BONE on each side of the face.
Either one of the two small elongated rectangular bones that together form the bridge of the nose.
Resorption or wasting of the tooth-supporting bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS) in the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE.
The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.
The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)
The anatomical frontal portion of the mandible, also known as the mentum, that contains the line of fusion of the two separate halves of the mandible (symphysis menti). This line of fusion divides inferiorly to enclose a triangular area called the mental protuberance. On each side, inferior to the second premolar tooth, is the mental foramen for the passage of blood vessels and a nerve.
The thickest and spongiest part of the maxilla and mandible hollowed out into deep cavities for the teeth.
Malocclusion in which the mandible is posterior to the maxilla as reflected by the relationship of the first permanent molar (distoclusion).
Preprosthetic surgery involving rib, cartilage, or iliac crest bone grafts, usually autologous, or synthetic implants for rebuilding the alveolar ridge.
The anteriorly located rigid section of the PALATE.
'Mandibular diseases' refer to various medical conditions that primarily affect the structure, function, or health of the mandible (lower jawbone), including but not limited to infections, tumors, developmental disorders, and degenerative diseases.
The planning, calculation, and creation of an apparatus for the purpose of correcting the placement or straightening of teeth.
Bony structure of the mouth that holds the teeth. It consists of the MANDIBLE and the MAXILLA.
A non-neoplastic inflammatory lesion, usually of the jaw or gingiva, containing large, multinucleated cells. It includes reparative giant cell granuloma. Peripheral giant cell granuloma refers to the gingiva (giant cell epulis); central refers to the jaw.
One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.
The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.
Loose-fitting removable orthodontic appliances which redirect the pressures of the facial and masticatory muscles onto the teeth and their supporting structures to produce improvements in tooth arrangements and occlusal relations.
The third tooth to the left and to the right of the midline of either jaw, situated between the second INCISOR and the premolar teeth (BICUSPID). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p817)
An extra tooth, erupted or unerupted, resembling or unlike the other teeth in the group to which it belongs. Its presence may cause malposition of adjacent teeth or prevent their eruption.
Absence of teeth from a portion of the mandible and/or maxilla.
A tooth that is prevented from erupting by a physical barrier, usually other teeth. Impaction may also result from orientation of the tooth in an other than vertical position in the periodontal structures.
A mixed tumor of odontogenic origin, in which both the epithelial and mesenchymal cells exhibit complete differentiation, resulting in the formation of tooth structures. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)
Loose, usually removable intra-oral devices which alter the muscle forces against the teeth and craniofacial skeleton. These are dynamic appliances which depend on altered neuromuscular action to effect bony growth and occlusal development. They are usually used in mixed dentition to treat pediatric malocclusions. (ADA, 1992)
A bony prominence situated on the upper surface of the body of the sphenoid bone. It houses the PITUITARY GLAND.
Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.
Cysts found in the jaws and arising from epithelium involved in tooth formation. They include follicular cysts (e.g., primordial cyst, dentigerous cyst, multilocular cyst), lateral periodontal cysts, and radicular cysts. They may become keratinized (odontogenic keratocysts). Follicular cysts may give rise to ameloblastomas and, in rare cases, undergo malignant transformation.
Tumors or cancer of the MAXILLARY SINUS. They represent the majority of paranasal neoplasms.
Such malposition and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth as to interfere with the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)
The relationship of all the components of the masticatory system in normal function. It has special reference to the position and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth for the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556, p472)
Orthodontic techniques used to correct the malposition of a single tooth.
One of the eight permanent teeth, two on either side in each jaw, between the canines (CUSPID) and the molars (MOLAR), serving for grinding and crushing food. The upper have two cusps (bicuspid) but the lower have one to three. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p822)
A fibro-osseous hereditary disease of the jaws. The swollen jaws and raised eyes give a cherubic appearance; multiple radiolucencies are evident upon radiographic examination.
Holding a DENTAL PROSTHESIS in place by its design, or by the use of additional devices or adhesives.
The complement of teeth in the jaws after the eruption of some of the permanent teeth but before all the deciduous teeth are absent. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
Congenital absence of the teeth; it may involve all (total anodontia) or only some of the teeth (partial anodontia, hypodontia), and both the deciduous and the permanent dentition, or only teeth of the permanent dentition. (Dorland, 27th ed)
'Gingival neoplasms' are abnormal, uncontrolled growths of tissue originating from the gingiva, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous), often manifesting as swellings, ulcerations, or masses within the oral cavity.
The posterior process on the ramus of the mandible composed of two parts: a superior part, the articular portion, and an inferior part, the condylar neck.
Devices used for influencing tooth position. Orthodontic appliances may be classified as fixed or removable, active or retaining, and intraoral or extraoral. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p19)
'Jaw diseases' is a broad term referring to various medical conditions affecting the temporomandibular joint, jawbones, or the surrounding muscles, including but not limited to dental disorders, jaw fractures, tumors, infections, and developmental abnormalities.
Most common follicular odontogenic cyst. Occurs in relation to a partially erupted or unerupted tooth with at least the crown of the tooth to which the cyst is attached protruding into the cystic cavity. May give rise to an ameloblastoma and, in rare instances, undergo malignant transformation.
A benign, rapidly growing, deeply pigmented tumor of the jaw and occasionally of other sites, consisting of an infiltrating mass of cells arranged in an alveolar pattern, and occurring almost exclusively in infants. Its source of origin is in dispute, the various theories giving rise to its several names. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A malocclusion in which maxillary incisor and canine teeth project over the mandiblar teeth excessively. The overlap is measured perpendicular to the occlusal plane and is also called vertical overlap. When the overlap is measured parallel to the occlusal plane it is referred to as overjet.
The constricted part of the tooth at the junction of the crown and root or roots. It is often referred to as the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), the line at which the cementum covering the root of a tooth and the enamel of the tooth meet. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p530, p433)
The phase of orthodontics concerned with the correction of malocclusion with proper appliances and prevention of its sequelae (Jablonski's Illus. Dictionary of Dentistry).
Abnormally small jaw.
A normal developing tooth which has not yet perforated the oral mucosa or one that fails to erupt in the normal sequence or time interval expected for the type of tooth in a given gender, age, or population group.
The 32 teeth of adulthood that either replace or are added to the complement of deciduous teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
Malocclusion in which the mandible and maxilla are anteroposteriorly normal as reflected by the relationship of the first permanent molar (i.e., in neutroclusion), but in which individual teeth are abnormally related to each other.
A condition marked by abnormal protrusion of the mandible. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The teeth collectively in the dental arch. Dentition ordinarily refers to the natural teeth in position in their alveoli. Dentition referring to the deciduous teeth is DENTITION, PRIMARY; to the permanent teeth, DENTITION, PERMANENT. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
An abnormal passage in the oral cavity on the gingiva.
A benign tumor composed of bone tissue or a hard tumor of bonelike structure developing on a bone (homoplastic osteoma) or on other structures (heteroplastic osteoma). (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Mechanical devices that simulate the temporomandibular joints and jaws to which maxillary and mandibular casts are attached. The entire assembly attempts to reproduce the movements of the mandible and the various tooth-to-tooth relationships that accompany those movements.
Congenital or acquired asymmetry of the face.
The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Recognition and elimination of potential irregularities and malpositions in the developing dentofacial complex.
Attachment of orthodontic devices and materials to the MOUTH area for support and to provide a counterforce to orthodontic forces.
A hollow part of the alveolar process of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE where each tooth fits and is attached via the periodontal ligament.
Orthodontic appliances, fixed or removable, used to maintain teeth in corrected positions during the period of functional adaptation following corrective treatment. These appliances are also used to maintain the positions of the teeth and jaws gained by orthodontic procedures. (From Zwemer, Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p263)
Total lack of teeth through disease or extraction.
A light and spongy (pneumatized) bone that lies between the orbital part of FRONTAL BONE and the anterior of SPHENOID BONE. Ethmoid bone separates the ORBIT from the ETHMOID SINUS. It consists of a horizontal plate, a perpendicular plate, and two lateral labyrinths.
A mixed radiolucent-radiopaque lesion of the jaws with features of both a cyst and a solid neoplasm. It is characterized microscopically by an epithelial lining showing a palisaded layer of columnar basal cells, presence of ghost cell keratinization, dentinoid, and calcification. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A benign, painful, tumor of bone characterized by the formation of osteoid tissue, primitive bone and calcified tissue. It occurs frequently in the spine of young persons. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed)
Natural teeth or teeth roots used as anchorage for a fixed or removable denture or other prosthesis (such as an implant) serving the same purpose.
The growth action of bone tissue as it assimilates surgically implanted devices or prostheses to be used as either replacement parts (e.g., hip) or as anchors (e.g., endosseous dental implants).
An odontogenic fibroma in which cells have developed into cementoblasts and which consists largely of cementum.
Contact between opposing teeth during a person's habitual bite.
A neoplasm containing HISTIOCYTES. Important forms include BENIGN FIBROUS HISTIOCYTOMA; and MALIGNANT FIBROUS HISTIOCYTOMA.
Devices, usually alloplastic, surgically inserted into or onto the jawbone, which support a single prosthetic tooth and serve either as abutments or as cosmetic replacements for missing teeth.
The intermediate sensory division of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The maxillary nerve carries general afferents from the intermediate region of the face including the lower eyelid, nose and upper lip, the maxillary teeth, and parts of the dura.
The emergence of a tooth from within its follicle in the ALVEOLAR PROCESS of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE into the ORAL CAVITY. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.
Resorption in which cementum or dentin is lost from the root of a tooth owing to cementoclastic or osteoclastic activity in conditions such as trauma of occlusion or neoplasms. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the teeth.
The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.
General name for two extinct orders of reptiles from the Mesozoic era: Saurischia and Ornithischia.
Congenital or postnatal overgrowth syndrome most often in height and occipitofrontal circumference with variable delayed motor and cognitive development. Other associated features include advanced bone age, seizures, NEONATAL JAUNDICE; HYPOTONIA; and SCOLIOSIS. It is also associated with increased risk of developing neoplasms in adulthood. Mutations in the NSD1 protein and its HAPLOINSUFFICIENCY are associated with the syndrome.
Rigid or flexible appliances that overlay the occlusal surfaces of the teeth. They are used to treat clenching and bruxism and their sequelae, and to provide temporary relief from muscle or temporomandibular joint pain.
A rare aggressive variant of chondrosarcoma, characterized by a biphasic histologic pattern of small compact cells intermixed with islands of cartilaginous matrix. Mesenchymal chondrosarcomas have a predilection for flat bones; long tubular bones are rarely affected. They tend to occur in the younger age group and are highly metastatic. (DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1456)
A localized arrested tooth development which appears to involve most commonly the anterior teeth, usually on one side of the midline, most often the maxillary central and lateral incisors. Roentgenographically, the teeth have a ghostlike appearance. Calcification and bits of prismatic enamel may be found in the pulp and the enamel is thin and absent in part. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)
Computed tomography modalities which use a cone or pyramid-shaped beam of radiation.
An abnormality in the direction of a TOOTH ERUPTION.
The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)
An abnormal opening or fissure between two adjacent teeth.
A registration of any positional relationship of the mandible in reference to the maxillae. These records may be any of the many vertical, horizontal, or orientation relations. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry)
A condition in which certain opposing teeth fail to establish occlusal contact when the jaws are closed.
Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The structures surrounding and supporting the tooth. Periodontium includes the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.
Death of a bone or part of a bone, either atraumatic or posttraumatic.
The upper part of the tooth, which joins the lower part of the tooth (TOOTH ROOT) at the cervix (TOOTH CERVIX) at a line called the cementoenamel junction. The entire surface of the crown is covered with enamel which is thicker at the extremity and becomes progressively thinner toward the cervix. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p216)
'Gingival diseases' is a general term for conditions affecting the soft tissues surrounding and supporting the teeth, primarily characterized by inflammation, bleeding, redness, or swelling, which can progress to periodontal disease if left untreated.
Either of the two fleshy, full-blooded margins of the mouth.
A branch of the external carotid artery which distributes to the deep structures of the face (internal maxillary) and to the side of the face and nose (external maxillary).
The largest of three bones that make up each half of the pelvic girdle.
A partial denture attached to prepared natural teeth, roots, or implants by cementation.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
The fibrous CONNECTIVE TISSUE surrounding the TOOTH ROOT, separating it from and attaching it to the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS).
Neoplasms of the bony part of the skull.
Training or retraining of the buccal, facial, labial, and lingual musculature in toothless conditions; DEGLUTITION DISORDERS; TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DISORDERS; MALOCCLUSION; and ARTICULATION DISORDERS.
Congenital fissure of the soft and/or hard palate, due to faulty fusion.
Congenital defect in the upper lip where the maxillary prominence fails to merge with the merged medial nasal prominences. It is thought to be caused by faulty migration of the mesoderm in the head region.
Inability or inadequacy of a dental restoration or prosthesis to perform as expected.
A dental specialty concerned with the prevention and correction of dental and oral anomalies (malocclusion).
The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.
The aftermost permanent tooth on each side in the maxilla and mandible.
A denture replacing all natural teeth and associated structures in both the maxilla and mandible.
The part of the face that is below the eye and to the side of the nose and mouth.
The retention of a denture in place by design, device, or adhesion.
Non-inflammatory enlargement of the gingivae produced by factors other than local irritation. It is characteristically due to an increase in the number of cells. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p400)
Either of a pair of compound bones forming the lateral (left and right) surfaces and base of the skull which contains the organs of hearing. It is a large bone formed by the fusion of parts: the squamous (the flattened anterior-superior part), the tympanic (the curved anterior-inferior part), the mastoid (the irregular posterior portion), and the petrous (the part at the base of the skull).
A disease of bone marked by thinning of the cortex by fibrous tissue containing bony spicules, producing pain, disability, and gradually increasing deformity. Only one bone may be involved (FIBROUS DYSPLASIA, MONOSTOTIC) or several (FIBROUS DYSPLASIA, POLYOSTOTIC).
A type of fibrous joint between bones of the head.
Congenital structural deformities, malformations, or other abnormalities of the cranium and facial bones.
Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.
Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the MAXILLARY SINUS. In many cases, it is caused by an infection of the bacteria HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE; STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE; or STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS.
Tumors or cancer of the PALATE, including those of the hard palate, soft palate and UVULA.
The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.
A slowly growing malignant neoplasm derived from cartilage cells, occurring most frequently in pelvic bones or near the ends of long bones, in middle-aged and old people. Most chondrosarcomas arise de novo, but some may develop in a preexisting benign cartilaginous lesion or in patients with ENCHONDROMATOSIS. (Stedman, 25th ed)
The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)
Inflammation and loss of connective tissues supporting or surrounding the teeth. This may involve any part of the PERIODONTIUM. Periodontitis is currently classified by disease progression (CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS; AGGRESSIVE PERIODONTITIS) instead of age of onset. (From 1999 International Workshop for a Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions, American Academy of Periodontology)
The proximal portion of the respiratory passages on either side of the NASAL SEPTUM. Nasal cavities, extending from the nares to the NASOPHARYNX, are lined with ciliated NASAL MUCOSA.
A computer based method of simulating or analyzing the behavior of structures or components.
Guided BONE TRANSPLANTATION of the MAXILLARY SINUS surface with a BONE SUBSTITUTE grafting. It increases the bone volume at the site of the DENTAL IMPLANT and helps stabilize it.
Moving a retruded mandible forward to a normal position. It is commonly performed for malocclusion and retrognathia. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
The act and process of chewing and grinding food in the mouth.
Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.
The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.
Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.
A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Canine sexual dimorphism in Egyptian Eocene anthropoid primates: Catopithecus and Proteopithecus. (1/1158)

Two very small late Eocene anthropoid primates, Catopithecus browni and Proteopithecus sylviae, from Fayum, Egypt show evidence of substantial sexual dimorphism in canine teeth. The degree of dimorphism suggests that these early anthropoids lived in social groups with a polygynous mating system and intense male-male competition. Catopithecus and Proteopithecus are smaller in estimated body size than any living primates showing canine dimorphism. The origin of canine dimorphism and polygyny in anthropoids was not associated with the evolution of large body size.  (+info)

A modern human pattern of dental development in lower pleistocene hominids from Atapuerca-TD6 (Spain). (2/1158)

The study of life history evolution in hominids is crucial for the discernment of when and why humans have acquired our unique maturational pattern. Because the development of dentition is critically integrated into the life cycle in mammals, the determination of the time and pattern of dental development represents an appropriate method to infer changes in life history variables that occurred during hominid evolution. Here we present evidence derived from Lower Pleistocene human fossil remains recovered from the TD6 level (Aurora stratum) of the Gran Dolina site in the Sierra de Atapuerca, northern Spain. These hominids present a pattern of development similar to that of Homo sapiens, although some aspects (e.g., delayed M3 calcification) are not as derived as that of European populations and people of European origin. This evidence, taken together with the present knowledge of cranial capacity of these and other late Early Pleistocene hominids, supports the view that as early as 0.8 Ma at least one Homo species shared with modern humans a prolonged pattern of maturation.  (+info)

Comparison of cephalometric analysis using a non-radiographic sonic digitizer (DigiGraph Workstation) with conventional radiography. (3/1158)

Cephalometric analysis conventionally requires radiographic exposure which may not be compatible with the growing concern over radiation hazards. Recently, the Dolphin Workstation Imaging System introduced to the dental profession a non-radiographic system, called the DigiGraph Workstation which may be an alternative to cephalometric radiography. The aims of this study were to compare the validity and reproducibility of cephalometric measurements obtained from the DigiGraph Workstation with conventional cephalometric radiographs. The sample consisted of 30 human dry skulls. Two replicated sets of lateral cephalograms were obtained with steel ball markers placed at the majority of the cephalometric landmarks. Duplicate tracings prepared from each radiograph were digitized to obtain cephalometric measurements using the computer software, Dentofacial Planner. For the DigiGraph Workstation, double sonic digitizations were repeated twice for each skull, on two occasions. Fifteen angular and one linear measurements were obtained from both methods and these findings compared using ANOVA, paired t-tests and F-tests. All, except one, cephalometric measurement showed significant differences between the two methods (P < 0.0001). The DigiGraph Workstation consistently produced higher values in 11 measurements (mean differences +0.5 to +15.7 degrees or mm) and lower values in four measurements (mean differences -0.2 to -3.5 degrees). The standard deviations of the differences between readings of both methods were large (0.4-5.8 degrees or mm). The reproducibility of the DigiGraph Workstation measurements was lower than that of the radiographic measurements. The method error of the DigiGraph Workstation ranged from 7 to 70 per cent, while that of radiographic tracings was less than 2 per cent. It was concluded that measurements obtained with the DigiGraph Workstation should be interpreted with caution.  (+info)

Morphological changes in periodontal mechanoreceptors of mouse maxillary incisors after the experimental induction of anterior crossbite: a light and electron microscopic observation using immunohistochemistry for PGP 9.5. (4/1158)

Ruffini nerve endings (mechanoreceptors) in the periodontal ligament (PDL) of mouse incisors were examined to elucidate whether experimentally-induced crossbites cause any changes or abnormalities in their morphology and distribution. Anterior guiding planes were attached to the mandibular incisors of 3-week-old C3H/HeSlc mice. At 3 days and 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks post-attachment of the appliance, the mice were sacrificed by perfusion fixation. Frozen sagittal cryostat sections of the decalcified maxillary incisors were processed for immunohistochemistry of protein gene product 9.5, followed by histochemical determination of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity to reveal sites of alveolar bone resorption. Despite the absence of bone resorption within the lingual PDL of control mice, distinct resorption sites were seen in the respective regions of the experimental animals. Unlike the controls, many Ruffini endings showing vague and swollen contours, with unusually long and pedunculated micro-projections were observed in the affected lingual PDL of the incisors in the experimental animals with short-term anterior crossbite induction. Club-shaped nerve terminations with few, if any, micro-projections were observed in the lingual PDL of experimental animals with long-term induction, as well as in aged control mouse incisors. Differences in the distribution of Ruffini endings were also observed. These results indicate that changing the direction of the force applied to the PDL results in rapid and prolonged changes in the morphology of Ruffini-like mechanoreceptors.  (+info)

Ectopic eruption of the maxillary canine quantified in three dimensions on cephalometric radiographs between the ages of 5 and 15 years. (5/1158)

The eruption paths of 20 ectopic maxillary canine teeth (10 right, 10 left) were measured in three dimensions on annual lateral and depressed postero-anterior cephalometric radiographs of 15 patients between the ages of 5 and 15 years and compared with the eruption of normal canines. It was found that between the ages of 8 and 12 years ectopic canines on the left side moved more anteriorly than the normally erupting canines and the same was true of the right canines between the ages of 7 and 12 years. While the ectopic canines moved occlusally, their vertical movement was less than normal which accounts for the clinical finding that canines are impacted in the palate at a high level. The average palatally ectopic canine always moves palatally, and never shares in the buccal movement shown by normally erupting canines between the ages of 10 and 12 years. It was interesting to find that the differences between growth of normal and ectopic canines in the lateral plane of space are present as early as 5-6 years.  (+info)

The length and eruption rates of incisor teeth in rats after one or more of them had been unimpeded. (6/1158)

The eruption rate and length of all four incisor teeth in rats were measured under ether anaesthesia by recording the position of marks on their labial surfaces at 2-day intervals, using calibrated graticules in microscope eyepieces. The rats were divided into four groups and either a lower, an upper, both a lower and an upper, or no incisors were unimpeded. This paper describes the changes when the unimpeded incisors returned to the occlusion. Neither the unimpeded nor the impeded incisors simply returned to control values immediately the period of unimpeded eruption ended, but showed transient changes in their lengths and eruption rates. The results confirm that eruption rates are determined by the sum of the lengths of the lower and upper incisors, rather than by their own lengths, with longer teeth erupting more slowly. Specifically, restoring the bevel to the incisors did not slow their eruption below normal impeded rates. The slowing of the eruption of the longer of two adjacent incisors was related to the length differences of the incisors in the same jaw, not to the sum of the differences in both jaws. Contact with the contralateral incisor in the opposite jaw slowed the eruption of an incisor more than contact with the ipsilateral incisor.  (+info)

Expression of chick Barx-1 and its differential regulation by FGF-8 and BMP signaling in the maxillary primordia. (7/1158)

The vertebrate face develops from a series of primordia surrounding the primitive mouth and is thought to be patterned by the differential expression of homeobox-containing genes. Here we describe the isolation of the chick homologue of the homeobox-containing gene, Barx-1, and show its expression in the developing facial primordia, stomach, and appendicular skeleton. In the maxillary primordia, mesenchymal expression of Barx-1 is complementary to that of Msx-1, which correlate with overlying epithelial expression of Fgf-8 and Bmp-4, respectively. We show that epithelial signals are required to maintain Barx-1 expression and that FGF-8 can substitute for the epithelium. By contrast, BMPs reduce Barx-1 expression and can antagonize FGF-8 signaling. This suggests that in vivo, FGF-8/BMP signaling may regulate Barx-1 gene expression. This provides evidence that the differential expression of FGF-8 and BMPs may determine homeobox-containing gene expression and hence patterning of the facial primordia.  (+info)

Jaw reflexes evoked by mechanical stimulation of teeth in humans. (8/1158)

Jaw reflexes evoked by mechanical stimulation of teeth in humans. The reflex response of jaw muscles to mechanical stimulation of an upper incisor tooth was investigated using the surface electromyogram (SEMG) of the masseter muscle and the bite force. With a slowly rising stimulus, the reflex response obtained on the masseter SEMG showed three different patterns of reflex responses; sole excitation, sole inhibition, and inhibition followed by excitation. Simultaneously recorded bite force, however, exhibited mainly one reflex response pattern, a decrease followed by an increase in the net closing force. A rapidly rising stimulus also induced several different patterns of reflex responses in the masseter SEMG. When the simultaneously recorded bite force was analyzed, however, there was only one reflex response pattern, a decrease in the net closing force. Therefore, the reflex change in the masseter muscle is not a good representative of the net reflex response of all jaw muscles to mechanical tooth stimulation. The net response is best expressed by the averaged bite force. The averaged bite force records showed that when the stimulus force was developing rapidly, the periodontal reflex could reduce the bite force and hence protect the teeth and supporting tissues from damaging forces. It also can increase the bite force; this might help keep food between the teeth if the change in force rate is slow, especially when the initial bite force is low.  (+info)

The maxilla is a paired bone that forms the upper jaw in vertebrates. In humans, it is a major bone in the face and plays several important roles in the craniofacial complex. Each maxilla consists of a body and four processes: frontal process, zygomatic process, alveolar process, and palatine process.

The maxillae contribute to the formation of the eye sockets (orbits), nasal cavity, and the hard palate of the mouth. They also contain the upper teeth sockets (alveoli) and help form the lower part of the orbit and the cheekbones (zygomatic arches).

Here's a quick rundown of its key functions:

1. Supports the upper teeth and forms the upper jaw.
2. Contributes to the formation of the eye sockets, nasal cavity, and hard palate.
3. Helps shape the lower part of the orbit and cheekbones.
4. Partakes in the creation of important sinuses, such as the maxillary sinus, which is located within the body of the maxilla.

Maxillary neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the maxilla, which is the upper jaw bone. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are slow-growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms can invade surrounding tissues and spread to distant sites.

Maxillary neoplasms can cause various symptoms such as swelling, pain, numbness, loose teeth, or difficulty in chewing or swallowing. They may also cause nasal congestion, nosebleeds, or visual changes if they affect the eye or orbit. The diagnosis of maxillary neoplasms usually involves a combination of clinical examination, imaging studies such as CT or MRI scans, and biopsy to determine the type and extent of the tumor.

Treatment options for maxillary neoplasms depend on several factors, including the type, size, location, and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health and preferences. Treatment may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these modalities. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence or metastasis and ensure optimal outcomes.

Maxillary diseases refer to conditions that affect the maxilla, which is the upper bone of the jaw. This bone plays an essential role in functions such as biting, chewing, and speaking, and also forms the upper part of the oral cavity, houses the upper teeth, and supports the nose and the eyes.

Maxillary diseases can be caused by various factors, including infections, trauma, tumors, congenital abnormalities, or systemic conditions. Some common maxillary diseases include:

1. Maxillary sinusitis: Inflammation of the maxillary sinuses, which are air-filled cavities located within the maxilla, can cause symptoms such as nasal congestion, facial pain, and headaches.
2. Periodontal disease: Infection and inflammation of the tissues surrounding the teeth, including the gums and the alveolar bone (which is part of the maxilla), can lead to tooth loss and other complications.
3. Maxillary fractures: Trauma to the face can result in fractures of the maxilla, which can cause pain, swelling, and difficulty breathing or speaking.
4. Maxillary cysts and tumors: Abnormal growths in the maxilla can be benign or malignant and may require surgical intervention.
5. Oral cancer: Cancerous lesions in the oral cavity, including the maxilla, can cause pain, swelling, and difficulty swallowing or speaking.

Treatment for maxillary diseases depends on the specific condition and its severity. Treatment options may include antibiotics, surgery, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy. Regular dental check-ups and good oral hygiene practices can help prevent many maxillary diseases.

The mandible, also known as the lower jaw, is the largest and strongest bone in the human face. It forms the lower portion of the oral cavity and plays a crucial role in various functions such as mastication (chewing), speaking, and swallowing. The mandible is a U-shaped bone that consists of a horizontal part called the body and two vertical parts called rami.

The mandible articulates with the skull at the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) located in front of each ear, allowing for movements like opening and closing the mouth, protrusion, retraction, and side-to-side movement. The mandible contains the lower teeth sockets called alveolar processes, which hold the lower teeth in place.

In medical terminology, the term "mandible" refers specifically to this bone and its associated structures.

Cephalometry is a medical term that refers to the measurement and analysis of the skull, particularly the head face relations. It is commonly used in orthodontics and maxillofacial surgery to assess and plan treatment for abnormalities related to the teeth, jaws, and facial structures. The process typically involves taking X-ray images called cephalograms, which provide a lateral view of the head, and then using various landmarks and reference lines to make measurements and evaluate skeletal and dental relationships. This information can help clinicians diagnose problems, plan treatment, and assess treatment outcomes.

The zygoma is the scientific name for the cheekbone. It is a part of the facial skeleton that forms the prominence of the cheek and houses the maxillary sinus, one of the pairs of paranasal sinuses. The zygomatic bone, also known as the malar bone, contributes to the formation of the zygoma.

Endosseous dental implantation is a medical procedure that involves the placement of an artificial tooth root (dental implant) directly into the jawbone. The term "endosseous" refers to the surgical placement of the implant within the bone (endo- meaning "within" and -osseous meaning "bony"). This type of dental implant is the most common and widely used method for replacing missing teeth.

During the procedure, a small incision is made in the gum tissue to expose the jawbone, and a hole is drilled into the bone to receive the implant. The implant is then carefully positioned and secured within the bone. Once the implant has integrated with the bone (a process that can take several months), a dental crown or bridge is attached to the implant to restore function and aesthetics to the mouth.

Endosseous dental implantation is a safe and effective procedure that has a high success rate, making it an excellent option for patients who are missing one or more teeth due to injury, decay, or other causes.

The maxillary sinuses, also known as the antrums of Highmore, are the largest of the four pairs of paranasal sinuses located in the maxilla bones. They are air-filled cavities that surround the nasolacrimal duct and are situated superior to the upper teeth and lateral to the nasal cavity. Each maxillary sinus is lined with a mucous membrane, which helps to warm, humidify, and filter the air we breathe. Inflammation or infection of the maxillary sinuses can result in conditions such as sinusitis, leading to symptoms like facial pain, headaches, and nasal congestion.

The facial bones, also known as the facial skeleton, are a series of bones that make up the framework of the face. They include:

1. Frontal bone: This bone forms the forehead and the upper part of the eye sockets.
2. Nasal bones: These two thin bones form the bridge of the nose.
3. Maxilla bones: These are the largest bones in the facial skeleton, forming the upper jaw, the bottom of the eye sockets, and the sides of the nose. They also contain the upper teeth.
4. Zygomatic bones (cheekbones): These bones form the cheekbones and the outer part of the eye sockets.
5. Palatine bones: These bones form the back part of the roof of the mouth, the side walls of the nasal cavity, and contribute to the formation of the eye socket.
6. Inferior nasal conchae: These are thin, curved bones that form the lateral walls of the nasal cavity and help to filter and humidify air as it passes through the nose.
7. Lacrimal bones: These are the smallest bones in the skull, located at the inner corner of the eye socket, and help to form the tear duct.
8. Mandible (lower jaw): This is the only bone in the facial skeleton that can move. It holds the lower teeth and forms the chin.

These bones work together to protect vital structures such as the eyes, brain, and nasal passages, while also providing attachment points for muscles that control chewing, expression, and other facial movements.

"Edentulous jaw" is a medical term used to describe a jaw that is missing all of its natural teeth. The term "edentulous" is derived from the Latin word "edentulus," which means "without teeth." This condition can affect either the upper jaw (maxilla) or the lower jaw (mandible), or both, resulting in a significant impact on an individual's ability to eat, speak, and maintain proper facial structure.

Edentulism is often associated with aging, as tooth loss becomes more common in older adults due to factors like gum disease, tooth decay, and injury. However, it can also affect younger individuals who have lost their teeth due to various reasons. Dental professionals typically recommend the use of dentures or dental implants to restore oral function and aesthetics for patients with edentulous jaws.

Extraoral traction appliances are orthodontic devices used to correct significant dental and skeletal discrepancies, typically in cases of severe malocclusion. These appliances are worn externally on the face or head, and they work by applying gentle force to the teeth and jaws to guide them into proper alignment.

Extraoral traction appliances can be used to treat a variety of orthodontic problems, including:

* Protruding front teeth (overjet)
* Severe crowding or spacing
* Class II or Class III malocclusions (where the upper and lower jaws do not align properly)
* Jaw growth abnormalities

There are several types of extraoral traction appliances, including:

1. **Headgear:** This is the most common type of extraoral appliance. It consists of a metal frame that attaches to braces on the back teeth and a strap that fits around the head or neck. The strap applies pressure to the teeth and jaws, helping to correct alignment issues.
2. **Facemask:** A facemask is used to treat Class III malocclusions, where the lower jaw protrudes forward. It consists of a metal frame that attaches to braces on the upper teeth and a strap that fits around the head. The strap pulls the upper jaw forward, helping to align it with the lower jaw.
3. **Reverse pull headgear:** This type of appliance is used to treat patients with a receding chin or small lower jaw. It works by applying pressure to the back of the head, which encourages the growth and development of the lower jaw.
4. **Jaw separators:** These are used in cases where the jaws need to be separated to allow for proper alignment. They consist of two metal bars that fit over the upper and lower teeth, with a screw mechanism that gradually increases the space between them.

Extraoral traction appliances can be uncomfortable to wear at first, but most patients adjust to them over time. It is important to follow the orthodontist's instructions carefully when wearing these appliances to ensure proper alignment and prevent damage to the teeth and jaws.

An "osteotomy" refers to a surgical procedure in which a bone is cut. A "Le Fort osteotomy" is a specific type of osteotomy that involves cutting and repositioning the middle (midface) portion of the facial bones. There are three types of Le Fort osteotomies, named after the French surgeon René Le Fort who first described them:

1. Le Fort I osteotomy: This procedure involves making a horizontal cut through the lower part of the maxilla (upper jaw) and separating it from the rest of the facial bones. It is often used to treat conditions such as severe jaw deformities or obstructive sleep apnea.
2. Le Fort II osteotomy: In this procedure, an upward curved cut is made through the lower part of the maxilla and the middle portion of the nasal bones. This allows for the repositioning of the midface and nose. It may be used to treat conditions such as severe facial fractures or congenital deformities.
3. Le Fort III osteotomy: A Le Fort III osteotomy involves making a cut through the upper part of the maxilla, the orbital bones (bones surrounding the eyes), and the zygomatic bones (cheekbones). This procedure allows for significant repositioning of the midface and is often used to treat severe facial fractures or congenital deformities.

It's important to note that Le Fort osteotomies are complex surgical procedures that should only be performed by experienced oral and maxillofacial surgeons or craniofacial surgeons.

The skull base is the lower part of the skull that forms the floor of the cranial cavity and the roof of the facial skeleton. It is a complex anatomical region composed of several bones, including the frontal, sphenoid, temporal, occipital, and ethmoid bones. The skull base supports the brain and contains openings for blood vessels and nerves that travel between the brain and the face or neck. The skull base can be divided into three regions: the anterior cranial fossa, middle cranial fossa, and posterior cranial fossa, which house different parts of the brain.

Maxillofacial development refers to the growth and formation of the bones, muscles, and soft tissues that make up the face and jaw (maxillofacial region). This process begins in utero and continues throughout childhood and adolescence. It involves the coordinated growth and development of multiple structures, including the upper and lower jaws (maxilla and mandible), facial bones, teeth, muscles, and nerves.

Abnormalities in maxillofacial development can result in a range of conditions, such as cleft lip and palate, jaw deformities, and craniofacial syndromes. These conditions may affect a person's appearance, speech, chewing, and breathing, and may require medical or surgical intervention to correct.

Healthcare professionals involved in the diagnosis and treatment of maxillofacial developmental disorders include oral and maxillofacial surgeons, orthodontists, pediatricians, geneticists, and other specialists.

Panoramic radiography is a specialized type of dental X-ray imaging that captures a panoramic view of the entire mouth, including the teeth, upper and lower jaws, and surrounding structures. It uses a special machine that rotates around the head, capturing images as it moves. This technique provides a two-dimensional image that is helpful in diagnosing and planning treatment for various dental conditions such as impacted teeth, bone abnormalities, and jaw disorders.

The panoramic radiograph can also be used to assess the development and positioning of wisdom teeth, detect cysts or tumors in the jaws, and evaluate the effects of trauma or injury to the mouth. It is a valuable tool for dental professionals as it allows them to see a comprehensive view of the oral structures, which may not be visible with traditional X-ray techniques.

It's important to note that while panoramic radiography provides valuable information, it should be used in conjunction with other diagnostic tools and clinical examinations to ensure accurate diagnosis and treatment planning.

Jaw neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the jawbone (mandible) or maxilla (upper jaw). These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are not considered life-threatening, but they can still cause problems by invading nearby tissues and causing damage. Malignant neoplasms, on the other hand, can spread to other parts of the body and can be life-threatening if not treated promptly and effectively.

Jaw neoplasms can present with various symptoms such as swelling, pain, loose teeth, numbness or tingling in the lips or tongue, difficulty chewing or swallowing, and jaw stiffness or limited movement. The diagnosis of jaw neoplasms typically involves a thorough clinical examination, imaging studies such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI, and sometimes a biopsy to determine the type and extent of the tumor.

Treatment options for jaw neoplasms depend on several factors, including the type, size, location, and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health and medical history. Treatment may involve surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these modalities. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence or metastasis (spread) of the neoplasm.

A dental prosthesis that is supported by dental implants is an artificial replacement for one or more missing teeth. It is a type of dental restoration that is anchored to the jawbone using one or more titanium implant posts, which are surgically placed into the bone. The prosthesis is then attached to the implants, providing a stable and secure fit that closely mimics the function and appearance of natural teeth.

There are several types of implant-supported dental prostheses, including crowns, bridges, and dentures. A single crown may be used to replace a single missing tooth, while a bridge or denture can be used to replace multiple missing teeth. The specific type of prosthesis used will depend on the number and location of the missing teeth, as well as the patient's individual needs and preferences.

Implant-supported dental prostheses offer several advantages over traditional removable dentures, including improved stability, comfort, and functionality. They also help to preserve jawbone density and prevent facial sagging that can occur when teeth are missing. However, they do require a surgical procedure to place the implants, and may not be suitable for all patients due to factors such as bone density or overall health status.

The term "vertical dimension" is used in dentistry, specifically in the field of prosthodontics, to refer to the measurement of the distance between two specific points in the vertical direction when the jaw is closed. The most common measurement is the "vertical dimension of occlusion," which is the distance between the upper and lower teeth when the jaw is in a balanced and comfortable position during resting closure.

The vertical dimension is an important consideration in the design and fabrication of dental restorations, such as dentures or dental crowns, to ensure proper function, comfort, and aesthetics. Changes in the vertical dimension can occur due to various factors, including tooth loss, jaw joint disorders, or muscle imbalances, which may require correction through dental treatment.

Preprosthetic oral surgical procedures are dental surgeries performed to prepare the mouth for the placement of dental prostheses such as dentures. These procedures aim to create a smooth, stable, and suitable foundation in the mouth to support the prosthesis and ensure its proper functioning, retention, and comfort.

Common preprosthetic oral surgical procedures include:

1. Alveoloplasty: This procedure involves reshaping the alveolar ridge (the bony ridge that supports the teeth) to create a more uniform and even surface. It helps to eliminate any sharp or irregular bony edges that may interfere with the fit or comfort of the denture.

2. Gingivectomy/Gingivoplasty: These procedures involve removing or reshaping excess gum tissue to improve the fit and appearance of the dental prosthesis. A gingivectomy removes a portion of the gum tissue, while a gingivoplasty sculpts and reshapes the existing gum tissue.

3. Frenectomy: This procedure involves removing or repositioning the frenum, a small fold of tissue that connects the lips, cheeks, or tongue to the jawbone. A lingual frenectomy may be necessary when the frenum restricts tongue movement and interferes with proper denture placement or speech.

4. Maxillary tori reduction: This procedure involves removing or reducing the size of tori, which are bony growths found on the roof of the mouth (maxilla). Large tori can make it difficult to wear a denture, so their removal or reduction can improve the fit and comfort of the prosthesis.

5. Ridge augmentation: This procedure involves adding bone grafting material to the jaw ridge to increase its height, width, or volume. This is often done when there is significant bone loss due to tooth extraction, periodontal disease, or other factors, making it difficult to achieve a secure and comfortable denture fit.

6. Exostectomy: This procedure involves removing small, benign bony growths (exostoses) that may develop on the hard palate or along the jaw ridge. These growths can interfere with the fit and comfort of a denture, so their removal can improve the prosthesis' functionality.

These procedures are typically performed by oral surgeons, periodontists, or prosthodontists who specialize in dental implants, oral surgery, and complex restorative treatments. The specific treatment plan will depend on each patient's individual needs and preferences.

Jaw abnormalities, also known as maxillofacial abnormalities, refer to any structural or functional deviations from the normal anatomy and physiology of the jaw bones (mandible and maxilla) and the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). These abnormalities can be present at birth (congenital) or acquired later in life due to various factors such as trauma, infection, tumors, or degenerative diseases.

Examples of jaw abnormalities include:

1. Micrognathia: a condition where the lower jaw is underdeveloped and appears recessed or small.
2. Prognathism: a condition where the lower jaw protrudes forward beyond the normal position.
3. Maxillary hypoplasia/aplasia: a condition where the upper jaw is underdeveloped or absent.
4. Mandibular hypoplasia/aplasia: a condition where the lower jaw is underdeveloped or absent.
5. Condylar hyperplasia: a condition where one or both of the condyles (the rounded ends of the mandible that articulate with the skull) continue to grow abnormally, leading to an asymmetrical jaw and facial deformity.
6. TMJ disorders: conditions affecting the temporomandibular joint, causing pain, stiffness, and limited movement.
7. Jaw tumors or cysts: abnormal growths that can affect the function and structure of the jaw bones.

Jaw abnormalities can cause various problems, including difficulty with chewing, speaking, breathing, and swallowing, as well as aesthetic concerns. Treatment options may include orthodontic treatment, surgery, or a combination of both, depending on the severity and nature of the abnormality.

The dental arch refers to the curved shape formed by the upper or lower teeth when they come together. The dental arch follows the curve of the jaw and is important for proper bite alignment and overall oral health. The dental arches are typically described as having a U-shaped appearance, with the front teeth forming a narrower section and the back teeth forming a wider section. The shape and size of the dental arch can vary from person to person, and any significant deviations from the typical shape or size may indicate an underlying orthodontic issue that requires treatment.

Retrognathia is a dental and maxillofacial term that refers to a condition where the mandible (lower jaw) is positioned further back than normal, relative to the maxilla (upper jaw). This results in the chin appearing recessed or set back, and can lead to various functional and aesthetic problems. In severe cases, retrognathia can interfere with speaking, chewing, and breathing, and may require orthodontic or surgical intervention for correction.

Ameloblastoma is a slow-growing, non-cancerous tumor that develops in the jawbone, typically in the lower jaw. It originates from the cells that form the enamel (the hard, outer surface of the teeth). This tumor can cause swelling, pain, and displacement or loosening of teeth. In some cases, it may also lead to fractures of the jawbone.

There are different types of ameloblastomas, including solid or multicystic, unicystic, and peripheral ameloblastoma. Treatment usually involves surgical removal of the tumor, with careful monitoring to ensure that it does not recur. In rare cases, more aggressive treatment may be necessary if the tumor is large or has invaded surrounding tissues.

It's important to note that while ameloblastomas are generally benign, they can still cause significant morbidity and should be treated promptly by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon or other qualified healthcare professional.

Dental implants are artificial tooth roots that are surgically placed into the jawbone to replace missing or extracted teeth. They are typically made of titanium, a biocompatible material that can fuse with the bone over time in a process called osseointegration. Once the implant has integrated with the bone, a dental crown, bridge, or denture can be attached to it to restore function and aesthetics to the mouth.

Dental implants are a popular choice for tooth replacement because they offer several advantages over traditional options like dentures or bridges. They are more stable and comfortable, as they do not rely on adjacent teeth for support and do not slip or move around in the mouth. Additionally, dental implants can help to preserve jawbone density and prevent facial sagging that can occur when teeth are missing.

The process of getting dental implants typically involves several appointments with a dental specialist called a prosthodontist or an oral surgeon. During the first appointment, the implant is placed into the jawbone, and the gum tissue is stitched closed. Over the next few months, the implant will fuse with the bone. Once this process is complete, a second surgery may be necessary to expose the implant and attach an abutment, which connects the implant to the dental restoration. Finally, the crown, bridge, or denture is attached to the implant, providing a natural-looking and functional replacement for the missing tooth.

Odontogenic tumors are a group of neoplasms that originate from the dental tissues or their remnants, including the odontogenic epithelium, ectomesenchyme, and/or their derivatives. These tumors can be benign or malignant and may affect the jaw bones and surrounding structures. They can cause various symptoms, such as swelling, pain, loosening of teeth, and altered bite. The classification of odontogenic tumors includes a wide range of entities with different biological behaviors, clinical features, and treatment approaches. Accurate diagnosis is essential for proper management and prognosis.

Oral surgical procedures refer to various types of surgeries performed in the oral cavity and maxillofacial region, which includes the mouth, jaws, face, and skull. These procedures are typically performed by oral and maxillofacial surgeons, who are dental specialists with extensive training in surgical procedures involving the mouth, jaws, and face.

Some common examples of oral surgical procedures include:

1. Tooth extractions: This involves removing a tooth that is damaged beyond repair or causing problems for the surrounding teeth. Wisdom tooth removal is a common type of tooth extraction.
2. Dental implant placement: This procedure involves placing a small titanium post in the jawbone to serve as a replacement root for a missing tooth. A dental crown is then attached to the implant, creating a natural-looking and functional replacement tooth.
3. Jaw surgery: Also known as orthognathic surgery, this procedure involves repositioning the jaws to correct bite problems or facial asymmetry.
4. Biopsy: This procedure involves removing a small sample of tissue from the oral cavity for laboratory analysis, often to diagnose suspicious lesions or growths.
5. Lesion removal: This procedure involves removing benign or malignant growths from the oral cavity, such as tumors or cysts.
6. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgery: This procedure involves treating disorders of the TMJ, which connects the jawbone to the skull and allows for movement when eating, speaking, and yawning.
7. Facial reconstruction: This procedure involves rebuilding or reshaping the facial bones after trauma, cancer surgery, or other conditions that affect the face.

Overall, oral surgical procedures are an important part of dental and medical care, helping to diagnose and treat a wide range of conditions affecting the mouth, jaws, and face.

An incisor is a type of tooth that is primarily designed for biting off food pieces rather than chewing or grinding. They are typically chisel-shaped, flat, and have a sharp cutting edge. In humans, there are eight incisors - four on the upper jaw and four on the lower jaw, located at the front of the mouth. Other animals such as dogs, cats, and rodents also have incisors that they use for different purposes like tearing or gnawing.

Palatal expansion technique is a dental or orthodontic treatment procedure that aims to widen the upper jaw (maxilla) by expanding the palate. This is typically done using a device called a palatal expander, which is attached to the upper molars and applies pressure to gradually separate the two bones that form the palate (the maxillary bones). As the appliance is activated (usually through turning a screw or key), it gently expands the palatal suture, allowing for an increase in the width of the upper dental arch. This procedure can help correct crossbites, crowding, and other jaw alignment issues. It's commonly used in children and adolescents but may also be employed in adults with certain conditions.

A dental prosthesis known as an "overlay denture" is a type of removable restoration that covers and restores only the occlusal (biting) surfaces of the natural teeth, while leaving the remaining tooth structure and surrounding soft tissues intact. This type of denture is typically used when there are still sufficient healthy tooth structures present to provide support and stability for the prosthesis.

Overlay dentures can be made from various materials such as acrylic resin or metal alloys, and they can be fabricated to fit over the natural teeth with precision, ensuring optimal comfort and functionality. These dentures are designed to improve the patient's ability to chew and speak properly, while also enhancing their smile and overall oral esthetics.

It is important to note that proper dental hygiene and regular check-ups with a dental professional are essential for maintaining good oral health and ensuring the longevity of an overlay denture.

Mandibular neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the mandible, which is the lower jawbone. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow-growing and rarely spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms can invade surrounding tissues and may metastasize (spread) to distant sites.

Mandibular neoplasms can have various causes, including genetic mutations, exposure to certain chemicals or radiation, and infection with certain viruses. The symptoms of mandibular neoplasms may include swelling or pain in the jaw, difficulty chewing or speaking, numbness in the lower lip or chin, loose teeth, and/or a lump or mass in the mouth or neck.

The diagnosis of mandibular neoplasms typically involves a thorough clinical examination, imaging studies such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans, and sometimes a biopsy to confirm the type and extent of the tumor. Treatment options depend on the type, stage, and location of the neoplasm, and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence or metastasis.

Jaw fixation techniques, also known as maxillomandibular fixation (MMF), are procedures used in dental and oral surgery to hold the jaw in a specific position. This is typically done by wiring the upper and lower teeth together or using elastic bands and other devices to keep the jaws aligned. The technique is often used after surgical procedures on the jaw, such as corrective jaw surgery (orthognathic surgery) or fracture repair, to help promote proper healing and alignment of the bones. It may also be used in the management of temporomandibular joint disorders or other conditions affecting the jaw. The duration of jaw fixation can vary depending on the specific procedure and individual patient needs, but it typically lasts several weeks.

The palate is the roof of the mouth in humans and other mammals, separating the oral cavity from the nasal cavity. It consists of two portions: the anterior hard palate, which is composed of bone, and the posterior soft palate, which is composed of muscle and connective tissue. The palate plays a crucial role in speech, swallowing, and breathing, as it helps to direct food and air to their appropriate locations during these activities.

Maxillary fractures, also known as Le Fort fractures, are complex fractures that involve the upper jaw or maxilla. Named after the French surgeon René Le Fort who first described them in 1901, these fractures are categorized into three types (Le Fort I, II, III) based on the pattern and level of bone involvement.

1. Le Fort I fracture: This type of maxillary fracture involves a horizontal separation through the lower part of the maxilla, just above the teeth's roots. It often results from direct blows to the lower face or chin.

2. Le Fort II fracture: A Le Fort II fracture is characterized by a pyramidal-shaped fracture pattern that extends from the nasal bridge through the inferior orbital rim and maxilla, ending at the pterygoid plates. This type of fracture usually results from forceful impacts to the midface or nose.

3. Le Fort III fracture: A Le Fort III fracture is a severe craniofacial injury that involves both the upper and lower parts of the face. It is also known as a "craniofacial dysjunction" because it separates the facial bones from the skull base. The fracture line extends through the nasal bridge, orbital rims, zygomatic arches, and maxilla, ending at the pterygoid plates. Le Fort III fractures typically result from high-impact trauma to the face, such as car accidents or assaults.

These fractures often require surgical intervention for proper alignment and stabilization of the facial bones.

Orthognathic surgical procedures are a type of surgery used to correct jaw misalignments and improve the bite and function of the jaws. The term "orthognathic" comes from the Greek words "orthos," meaning straight or correct, and "gnathos," meaning jaw. These surgeries are typically performed by oral and maxillofacial surgeons in conjunction with orthodontic treatment to achieve proper alignment of the teeth and jaws.

Orthognathic surgical procedures may be recommended for patients who have significant discrepancies between the size and position of their upper and lower jaws, which can result in problems with chewing, speaking, breathing, and sleeping. These procedures can also improve facial aesthetics by correcting jaw deformities and imbalances.

The specific surgical procedure used will depend on the nature and extent of the jaw misalignment. Common orthognathic surgical procedures include:

1. Maxillary osteotomy: This procedure involves making cuts in the upper jawbone (maxilla) and moving it forward or backward to correct a misalignment.
2. Mandibular osteotomy: This procedure involves making cuts in the lower jawbone (mandible) and moving it forward or backward to correct a misalignment.
3. Genioplasty: This procedure involves reshaping or repositioning the chin bone (mentum) to improve facial aesthetics and jaw function.
4. Orthognathic surgery for sleep apnea: This procedure involves repositioning the upper and/or lower jaws to open up the airway and improve breathing during sleep.

Orthognathic surgical procedures require careful planning and coordination between the surgeon, orthodontist, and patient. The process typically involves taking detailed measurements and images of the jaw and teeth, creating a surgical plan, and undergoing orthodontic treatment to align the teeth prior to surgery. After surgery, patients may need to wear braces or other appliances to maintain the alignment of their teeth and jaws during healing.

A fibroma, ossifying is a benign (non-cancerous) tumor that typically develops in the periodontal ligament, which is the tissue that connects the tooth to the jawbone. This type of fibroma is characterized by the formation of bone-like tissue within the tumor. It usually appears as a firm, slow-growing nodule or mass that can cause pain or discomfort, particularly when biting down on the affected tooth.

The exact cause of ossifying fibromas is not well understood, but they are thought to arise from an overgrowth of cells in the periodontal ligament. They are more common in women than men and typically occur in people between the ages of 20 and 40. Treatment usually involves surgical removal of the tumor, along with any affected tissue or teeth. In some cases, recurrence may occur, so regular follow-up appointments with a dental professional are recommended.

The frontal bone is the bone that forms the forehead and the upper part of the eye sockets (orbits) in the skull. It is a single, flat bone that has a prominent ridge in the middle called the superior sagittal sinus, which contains venous blood. The frontal bone articulates with several other bones, including the parietal bones at the sides and back, the nasal bones in the center of the face, and the zygomatic (cheek) bones at the lower sides of the orbits.

The nasal bones are a pair of small, thin bones located in the upper part of the face, specifically in the middle of the nose. They articulate with each other at the nasal bridge and with the frontal bone above, the maxillae (upper jaw bones) on either side, and the septal cartilage inside the nose. The main function of the nasal bones is to form the bridge of the nose and protect the nasal cavity. Any damage to these bones can result in a fracture or broken nose.

Alveolar bone loss refers to the breakdown and resorption of the alveolar process of the jawbone, which is the part of the jaw that contains the sockets of the teeth. This type of bone loss is often caused by periodontal disease, a chronic inflammation of the gums and surrounding tissues that can lead to the destruction of the structures that support the teeth.

In advanced stages of periodontal disease, the alveolar bone can become severely damaged or destroyed, leading to tooth loss. Alveolar bone loss can also occur as a result of other conditions, such as osteoporosis, trauma, or tumors. Dental X-rays and other imaging techniques are often used to diagnose and monitor alveolar bone loss. Treatment may include deep cleaning of the teeth and gums, medications, surgery, or tooth extraction in severe cases.

The skull is the bony structure that encloses and protects the brain, the eyes, and the ears. It is composed of two main parts: the cranium, which contains the brain, and the facial bones. The cranium is made up of several fused flat bones, while the facial bones include the upper jaw (maxilla), lower jaw (mandible), cheekbones, nose bones, and eye sockets (orbits).

The skull also provides attachment points for various muscles that control chewing, moving the head, and facial expressions. Additionally, it contains openings for blood vessels, nerves, and the spinal cord to pass through. The skull's primary function is to protect the delicate and vital structures within it from injury and trauma.

In the context of dentistry, a molar is a type of tooth found in the back of the mouth. They are larger and wider than other types of teeth, such as incisors or canines, and have a flat biting surface with multiple cusps. Molars are primarily used for grinding and chewing food into smaller pieces that are easier to swallow. Humans typically have twelve molars in total, including the four wisdom teeth.

In medical terminology outside of dentistry, "molar" can also refer to a unit of mass in the apothecaries' system of measurement, which is equivalent to 4.08 grams. However, this usage is less common and not related to dental or medical anatomy.

The "chin" is the lower, prominent part of the front portion of the jaw in humans and other animals. In medical terms, it is often referred to as the mentum or the symphysis of the mandible. The chin helps in protecting the soft tissues of the mouth and throat during activities such as eating, speaking, and swallowing. It also plays a role in shaping the overall appearance of the face. Anatomically, the chin is formed by the fusion of the two halves of the mandible (lower jawbone) at the symphysis menti.

The alveolar process is the curved part of the jawbone (mandible or maxilla) that contains sockets or hollow spaces (alveoli) for the teeth to be embedded. These processes are covered with a specialized mucous membrane called the gingiva, which forms a tight seal around the teeth to help protect the periodontal tissues and maintain oral health.

The alveolar process is composed of both compact and spongy bone tissue. The compact bone forms the outer layer, while the spongy bone is found inside the alveoli and provides support for the teeth. When a tooth is lost or extracted, the alveolar process begins to resorb over time due to the lack of mechanical stimulation from the tooth's chewing forces. This can lead to changes in the shape and size of the jawbone, which may require bone grafting procedures before dental implant placement.

Malocclusion, Angle Class II is a type of dental malocclusion where the relationship between the maxilla (upper jaw) and mandible (lower jaw) is such that the lower molar teeth are positioned posteriorly relative to the upper molar teeth. This results in an overbite, which means that the upper front teeth overlap the lower front teeth excessively. The classification was proposed by Edward Angle, an American orthodontist who is considered the father of modern orthodontics. In this classification system, Class II malocclusion is further divided into three subclasses (I, II, and III) based on the position of the lower incisors relative to the upper incisors.

Alveolar ridge augmentation is a surgical procedure in dentistry that aims to reconstruct or enhance the volume and shape of the alveolar ridge, which is the bony ridge that supports the dental arch and holds the teeth in place. This procedure is often performed in preparation for dental implant placement when the jawbone lacks sufficient width, height, or density to support the implant securely.

The alveolar ridge augmentation process typically involves several steps:

1. Assessment: The dentist or oral surgeon evaluates the patient's oral condition and takes dental images (such as X-rays or CBCT scans) to determine the extent of bone loss and plan the surgical procedure accordingly.
2. Grafting material selection: Depending on the specific needs of the patient, various grafting materials can be used, including autografts (patient's own bone), allografts (bone from a human donor), xenografts (bone from an animal source), or synthetic materials.
3. Surgical procedure: The oral surgeon exposes the deficient area of the alveolar ridge and carefully places the grafting material, ensuring proper contour and stabilization. In some cases, a barrier membrane may be used to protect the graft and promote healing.
4. Healing period: After the surgery, a healing period is required for the grafted bone to integrate with the existing jawbone. This process can take several months, depending on factors such as the size of the graft and the patient's overall health.
5. Implant placement: Once the alveolar ridge augmentation has healed and sufficient bone volume has been achieved, dental implants can be placed to support replacement teeth, such as crowns, bridges, or dentures.

Alveolar ridge augmentation is a valuable technique for restoring jawbone structure and function, enabling patients with significant bone loss to receive dental implants and enjoy improved oral health and aesthetics.

The hard palate is the anterior, bony part of the roof of the mouth, forming a vertical partition between the oral and nasal cavities. It is composed of the maxilla and palatine bones, and provides attachment for the muscles of the soft palate, which functions in swallowing, speaking, and breathing. The hard palate also contains taste buds that contribute to our ability to taste food.

Mandibular diseases refer to conditions that affect the mandible, or lower jawbone. These diseases can be classified as congenital (present at birth) or acquired (developing after birth). They can also be categorized based on the tissues involved, such as bone, muscle, or cartilage. Some examples of mandibular diseases include:

1. Mandibular fractures: These are breaks in the lower jawbone that can result from trauma or injury.
2. Osteomyelitis: This is an infection of the bone and surrounding tissues, which can affect the mandible.
3. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders: These are conditions that affect the joint that connects the jawbone to the skull, causing pain and limited movement.
4. Mandibular tumors: These are abnormal growths that can be benign or malignant, and can develop in any of the tissues of the mandible.
5. Osteonecrosis: This is a condition where the bone tissue dies due to lack of blood supply, which can affect the mandible.
6. Cleft lip and palate: This is a congenital deformity that affects the development of the face and mouth, including the lower jawbone.
7. Mandibular hypoplasia: This is a condition where the lower jawbone does not develop properly, leading to a small or recessed chin.
8. Developmental disorders: These are conditions that affect the growth and development of the mandible, such as condylar hyperplasia or hemifacial microsomia.

Orthodontic appliance design refers to the creation and development of medical devices used in orthodontics, which is a branch of dentistry focused on the diagnosis, prevention, and correction of dental and facial irregularities. The design process involves creating a customized treatment plan for each patient, based on their specific needs and goals.

Orthodontic appliances can be removable or fixed and are used to move teeth into proper alignment, improve jaw function, and enhance the overall appearance of the smile. Some common types of orthodontic appliances include braces, aligners, palatal expanders, and retainers.

The design of an orthodontic appliance typically involves several factors, including:

1. The specific dental or facial problem being addressed
2. The patient's age, overall health, and oral hygiene habits
3. The patient's lifestyle and personal preferences
4. The estimated treatment time and cost
5. The potential risks and benefits of the appliance

Orthodontic appliance design is a complex process that requires a thorough understanding of dental anatomy, biomechanics, and materials science. It is typically performed by an orthodontist or a dental technician with specialized training in this area. The goal of orthodontic appliance design is to create a device that is both effective and comfortable for the patient, while also ensuring that it is safe and easy to use.

In medical terms, the jaw is referred to as the mandible (in humans and some other animals), which is the lower part of the face that holds the lower teeth in place. It's a large, horseshoe-shaped bone that forms the lower jaw and serves as a attachment point for several muscles that are involved in chewing and moving the lower jaw.

In addition to the mandible, the upper jaw is composed of two bones known as the maxillae, which fuse together at the midline of the face to form the upper jaw. The upper jaw holds the upper teeth in place and forms the roof of the mouth, as well as a portion of the eye sockets and nasal cavity.

Together, the mandible and maxillae allow for various functions such as speaking, eating, and breathing.

A giant cell granuloma is a type of non-cancerous (benign) lesion characterized by the presence of large collections of immune cells called macrophages, which have fused together to form multinucleated giant cells. These lesions can occur in various tissues throughout the body but are most commonly found in the oral cavity and jawbone.

Giant cell granulomas can be further classified into two types: central (or bone) giant cell granuloma and peripheral giant cell granuloma. Central giant cell granulomas arise from the bone, while peripheral giant cell granulomas occur in the soft tissues of the gingiva or mouth lining.

Central giant cell granulomas are more aggressive than peripheral ones and can cause significant bone destruction if left untreated. They typically affect younger individuals, with a higher prevalence in females than males. The exact cause of central giant cell granulomas is not well understood but may be associated with local trauma, hormonal imbalances, or genetic factors.

Peripheral giant cell granulomas are less aggressive and usually present as painless, slow-growing nodules on the gums. They typically affect adults, with a higher prevalence in females than males. Peripheral giant cell granulomas may be associated with local irritants such as plaque, calculus, or dental restorations.

Treatment for giant cell granulomas depends on their size, location, and aggressiveness. Surgical excision is the most common treatment approach, but other options such as curettage, corticosteroid injections, or medication therapy may also be considered. Regular follow-up appointments with a healthcare provider are essential to monitor for recurrence.

A tooth is a hard, calcified structure found in the jaws (upper and lower) of many vertebrates and used for biting and chewing food. In humans, a typical tooth has a crown, one or more roots, and three layers: the enamel (the outermost layer, hardest substance in the body), the dentin (the layer beneath the enamel), and the pulp (the innermost layer, containing nerves and blood vessels). Teeth are essential for proper nutrition, speech, and aesthetics. There are different types of teeth, including incisors, canines, premolars, and molars, each designed for specific functions in the mouth.

A dental prosthesis is a device that replaces missing teeth or parts of teeth and restores their function and appearance. The design of a dental prosthesis refers to the plan and specifications used to create it, including the materials, shape, size, and arrangement of the artificial teeth and any supporting structures.

The design of a dental prosthesis is typically based on a variety of factors, including:

* The number and location of missing teeth
* The condition of the remaining teeth and gums
* The patient's bite and jaw alignment
* The patient's aesthetic preferences
* The patient's ability to chew and speak properly

There are several types of dental prostheses, including:

* Dentures: A removable appliance that replaces all or most of the upper or lower teeth.
* Fixed partial denture (FPD): Also known as a bridge, this is a fixed (non-removable) appliance that replaces one or more missing teeth by attaching artificial teeth to the remaining natural teeth on either side of the gap.
* Removable partial denture (RPD): A removable appliance that replaces some but not all of the upper or lower teeth.
* Implant-supported prosthesis: An artificial tooth or set of teeth that is supported by dental implants, which are surgically placed in the jawbone.

The design of a dental prosthesis must be carefully planned and executed to ensure a good fit, proper function, and natural appearance. It may involve several appointments with a dentist or dental specialist, such as a prosthodontist, to take impressions, make measurements, and try in the finished prosthesis.

Activator appliances are a type of removable orthodontic device used to expand the arch of the teeth and make other adjustments to the bite. They are typically made of acrylic material and may include metal components such as screws or wires that can be adjusted to apply pressure to specific teeth or areas of the jaw.

The activator appliance works by using gentle forces to gradually move the teeth into their desired positions over time. It is often used in conjunction with other orthodontic treatments, such as braces or aligners, to help achieve optimal results. The appliance may be worn for several hours each day or overnight, depending on the specific treatment plan.

Activator appliances are typically custom-made for each patient based on a detailed evaluation of their oral structure and bite pattern. They can be used to treat a variety of orthodontic issues, including overbites, underbites, crossbites, and crowded teeth. Regular adjustments and follow-up appointments with an orthodontist are necessary to ensure that the appliance is working effectively and to make any necessary modifications to the treatment plan.

A cuspid, also known as a canine tooth or cuspid tooth, is a type of tooth in mammals. It is the pointiest tooth in the dental arch and is located between the incisors and bicuspids (or premolars). Cuspids have a single cusp or pointed tip that is used for tearing and grasping food. In humans, there are four cuspids, two on the upper jaw and two on the lower jaw, one on each side of the dental arch.

A supernumerary tooth, also known as hyperdontia, refers to an additional tooth or teeth that grow beyond the regular number of teeth in the dental arch. These extra teeth can erupt in various locations of the dental arch and may occur in any of the tooth types, but they are most commonly seen as extra premolars or molars, and less frequently as incisors or canines. Supernumerary teeth may be asymptomatic or may cause complications such as crowding, displacement, or impaction of adjacent teeth, and therefore, they often require dental treatment.

Edentulous partially refers to a condition where some teeth are missing in the jaw but not all. In other words, it is a state of having fewer teeth than normal for that particular dental arch. A dental arch can be either the upper or lower jaw.

In medical terms, "edentulous" means lacking teeth. So, when we say "jaw, edentulous, partially," it indicates a jaw that has some missing teeth. This condition is different from being completely edentulous, which refers to having no teeth at all in the dental arch.

Being edentulous or partially edentulous can impact an individual's ability to eat, speak, and affect their overall quality of life. Dental professionals often recommend various treatment options, such as dentures, bridges, or implants, to restore functionality and aesthetics for those who are partially edentulous.

An impacted tooth is a condition where a tooth fails to erupt into the oral cavity within its expected time frame, resulting in its partial or complete entrapment within the jawbone or soft tissues. This commonly occurs with wisdom teeth (third molars) but can affect any tooth. Impacted teeth may cause problems such as infection, decay of adjacent teeth, gum disease, or cyst formation, and they may require surgical removal.

Odontoma is a type of odontogenic tumor, which means it arises from the tissues that form teeth. It is considered a benign or non-cancerous tumor and is typically slow-growing. Odontomas are usually asymptomatic and are often discovered on routine dental X-rays or during procedures such as wisdom tooth removal.

Odontomas can be classified into two types: complex and compound. Complex odontomas are composed of a haphazard mixture of dental tissue, including enamel, dentin, and cementum, while compound odontomas contain small tooth-like structures called denticles.

These tumors typically occur in the posterior region of the jaw, and while they are usually asymptomatic, some patients may experience symptoms such as swelling, pain, or displacement of teeth. Treatment for odontomas typically involves surgical removal of the tumor.

Functional Orthodontic Appliances are removable or fixed devices used in orthodontics to correct the alignment and/or positioning of jaw bones and/or teeth. They work by harnessing the power of muscle function and growth to achieve desired changes in the dental arches and jaws. These appliances are typically used in growing children and adolescents, but can also be used in adults in certain cases. Examples of functional orthodontic appliances include activators, bionators, twin blocks, and Herbst appliances. The specific type of appliance used will depend on the individual patient's needs and treatment goals.

The Sella Turcica, also known as the Turkish saddle, is a depression or fossa in the sphenoid bone located at the base of the skull. It forms a housing for the pituitary gland, which is a small endocrine gland often referred to as the "master gland" because it controls other glands and makes several essential hormones. The Sella Turcica has a saddle-like shape, with its anterior and posterior clinoids forming the front and back of the saddle, respectively. This region is of significant interest in neuroimaging and clinical settings, as various conditions such as pituitary tumors or other abnormalities may affect the size, shape, and integrity of the Sella Turcica.

Dental models are replicas of a patient's teeth and surrounding oral structures, used in dental practice and education. They are typically created using plaster or other materials that harden to accurately reproduce the shape and position of each tooth, as well as the contours of the gums and palate. Dental models may be used for a variety of purposes, including treatment planning, creating custom-fitted dental appliances, and teaching dental students about oral anatomy and various dental procedures. They provide a tactile and visual representation that can aid in understanding and communication between dentists, patients, and other dental professionals.

Odontogenic cysts are a type of cyst that originates from the dental tissues or odontogenic apparatus. They are typically found in the jawbones, and can be classified as developmental or inflammatory in origin. Developmental odontogenic cysts arise from remnants of the tooth-forming structures, while inflammatory odontogenic cysts result from an infection or injury to a tooth.

The most common types of odontogenic cysts include:

1. Periapical cyst - an inflammatory cyst that forms at the tip of the root of a dead or non-vital tooth.
2. Dentigerous cyst - a developmental cyst that surrounds the crown of an unerupted or impacted tooth.
3. Follicular cyst - a type of dentigerous cyst that forms around the crown of an unerupted wisdom tooth.
4. Odontogenic keratocyst - a developmental cyst that arises from the dental lamina and has a high recurrence rate.
5. Lateral periodontal cyst - a rare, developmental cyst that forms in the periodontal ligament of a vital tooth.

Odontogenic cysts can cause various symptoms such as swelling, pain, or numbness in the affected area. They may also displace or resorb adjacent teeth. Diagnosis is typically made through radiographic imaging and histopathological examination of tissue samples obtained through biopsy. Treatment options include surgical excision, marsupialization (a procedure that creates an opening between the cyst and oral cavity), or enucleation (removal of the cyst lining).

Maxillary sinus neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the maxillary sinuses, which are located in the upper part of your cheekbones, below your eyes. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign neoplasms may include conditions such as an osteoma (a benign bone tumor), a papilloma (a benign growth of the lining of the sinus), or a fibrous dysplasia (a condition where bone is replaced by fibrous tissue).

Malignant neoplasms, on the other hand, can be primary (originating in the maxillary sinuses) or secondary (spreading to the maxillary sinuses from another site in the body). Common types of malignant tumors that arise in the maxillary sinus include squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and mucoepidermoid carcinoma.

Symptoms of maxillary sinus neoplasms may include nasal congestion, nosebleeds, facial pain or numbness, vision changes, and difficulty swallowing or speaking. Treatment options depend on the type, size, and location of the tumor but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Malocclusion is a term used in dentistry and orthodontics to describe a misalignment or misrelation between the upper and lower teeth when they come together, also known as the bite. It is derived from the Latin words "mal" meaning bad or wrong, and "occludere" meaning to close.

There are different types of malocclusions, including:

1. Class I malocclusion: The most common type, where the upper teeth slightly overlap the lower teeth, but the bite is otherwise aligned.
2. Class II malocclusion (overbite): The upper teeth significantly overlap the lower teeth, causing a horizontal or vertical discrepancy between the dental arches.
3. Class III malocclusion (underbite): The lower teeth protrude beyond the upper teeth, resulting in a crossbite or underbite.

Malocclusions can be caused by various factors such as genetics, thumb sucking, tongue thrusting, premature loss of primary or permanent teeth, and jaw injuries or disorders. They may lead to several oral health issues, including tooth decay, gum disease, difficulty chewing or speaking, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction. Treatment for malocclusions typically involves orthodontic appliances like braces, aligners, or retainers to realign the teeth and correct the bite. In some cases, surgical intervention may be necessary.

Dental occlusion refers to the alignment and contact between the upper and lower teeth when the jaws are closed. It is the relationship between the maxillary (upper) and mandibular (lower) teeth when they approach each other, as occurs during chewing or biting.

A proper dental occlusion, also known as a balanced occlusion, ensures that the teeth and jaw joints function harmoniously, reducing the risk of tooth wear, damage, and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Malocclusion, on the other hand, refers to improper alignment or contact between the upper and lower teeth, which may require orthodontic treatment or dental restorations to correct.

Tooth movement, in a dental and orthodontic context, refers to the physical change in position or alignment of one or more teeth within the jaw bone as a result of controlled forces applied through various orthodontic appliances such as braces, aligners, or other orthodontic devices. The purposeful manipulation of these forces encourages the periodontal ligament (the tissue that connects the tooth to the bone) to remodel, allowing the tooth to move gradually over time into the desired position. This process is crucial in achieving proper bite alignment, correcting malocclusions, and enhancing overall oral function and aesthetics.

A bicuspid valve, also known as a mitral valve in the heart, is a heart valve that has two leaflets or cusps. It lies between the left atrium and the left ventricle and helps to regulate blood flow between these two chambers of the heart. In a healthy heart, the bicuspid valve opens to allow blood to flow from the left atrium into the left ventricle and closes tightly to prevent blood from flowing back into the left atrium during contraction of the ventricle.

A congenital heart defect known as a bicuspid aortic valve occurs when the aortic valve, which normally has three leaflets or cusps, only has two. This can lead to narrowing of the valve (aortic stenosis) or leakage of the valve (aortic regurgitation), which can cause symptoms and may require medical treatment.

Cherubism is a rare, genetic disorder that affects the bones of the jaw. It is characterized by the replacement of the normal bone with fibrous tissue and cysts, leading to progressive enlargement of the lower jaw (mandible) and, less commonly, the upper jaw (maxilla). The swelling gives the cheeks a fuller appearance, which may resemble the chubby faces of cherubs in art.

The condition typically becomes apparent between the ages of 2 and 7, and it usually progresses until the teenage years, when it begins to stabilize and eventually regress in early adulthood. Cherubism is caused by mutations in the SH3BP2 gene and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, meaning that a child has a 50% chance of inheriting the condition if one parent is affected.

While cherubism can cause significant facial deformities, it rarely affects the person's ability to eat, speak, or breathe. Treatment options include observation, orthodontic treatment, and surgical intervention to remove the cysts and reshape the jawbones if necessary.

Dental prosthesis retention refers to the means by which a dental prosthesis, such as a denture, is held in place in the mouth. The retention can be achieved through several methods, including:

1. Suction: This is the most common method of retention for lower dentures, where the shape and fit of the denture base create suction against the gums to hold it in place.
2. Mechanical retention: This involves the use of mechanical components such as clasps or attachments that hook onto remaining natural teeth or dental implants to hold the prosthesis in place.
3. Adhesive retention: Dental adhesives can be used to help secure the denture to the gums, providing additional retention and stability.
4. Implant retention: Dental implants can be used to provide a more secure and stable retention of the dental prosthesis. The implant is surgically placed in the jawbone and acts as an anchor for the prosthesis.

Proper retention of a dental prosthesis is essential for optimal function, comfort, and speech. A well-retained prosthesis can help prevent sore spots, improve chewing efficiency, and enhance overall quality of life.

Mixed dentition is a stage of dental development in which both primary (deciduous) teeth and permanent teeth are present in the mouth. This phase typically begins when the first permanent molars erupt, around the age of 6, and continues until all of the primary teeth have been replaced by permanent teeth, usually around the age of 12-13.

During this stage, a person will have a mix of smaller, temporary teeth and larger, more durable permanent teeth. Proper care and management of mixed dentition is essential for maintaining good oral health, as it can help to prevent issues such as crowding, misalignment, and decay. Regular dental check-ups and proper brushing and flossing techniques are crucial during this stage to ensure the best possible outcomes for long-term oral health.

Anodontia is a medical term that refers to the congenital absence or lack of development of all primary (deciduous) and/or permanent teeth. It is a rare dental condition that affects tooth development and can be isolated or associated with various syndromes and genetic disorders.

In anodontia, the dental tissues responsible for forming teeth, including the dental lamina, dental papilla, and dental follicle, fail to develop properly, resulting in missing teeth. The condition can affect all teeth or only some of them, leading to partial anodontia.

Anodontia is different from hypodontia, which refers to the congenital absence of one or more, but not all, teeth. It is also distinct from oligodontia, which is the absence of six or more permanent teeth, excluding third molars (wisdom teeth).

People with anodontia may experience difficulties in chewing, speaking, and maintaining oral hygiene, leading to various dental and social problems. Prosthodontic treatments, such as dentures or implants, are often necessary to restore oral function and aesthetics.

Gingival neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that occur in the gingiva, which are the part of the gums that surround the teeth. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms include conditions such as fibromas, papillomas, and hemangiomas, while malignant neoplasms are typically squamous cell carcinomas.

Gingival neoplasms can present with a variety of symptoms, including swelling, bleeding, pain, and loose teeth. They may also cause difficulty with chewing, speaking, or swallowing. The exact cause of these neoplasms is not always known, but risk factors include tobacco use, alcohol consumption, poor oral hygiene, and certain viral infections.

Diagnosis of gingival neoplasms typically involves a thorough clinical examination, including a dental exam and biopsy. Treatment options depend on the type and stage of the neoplasm, but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches. Regular dental check-ups and good oral hygiene practices can help to detect gingival neoplasms at an early stage and improve treatment outcomes.

The mandibular condyle is a part of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in the human body. It is a rounded eminence at the end of the mandible (lower jawbone) that articulates with the glenoid fossa of the temporal bone in the skull, allowing for movements such as opening and closing the mouth, chewing, speaking, and swallowing. The mandibular condyle has both a fibrocartilaginous articular surface and a synovial joint capsule surrounding it, which provides protection and lubrication during these movements.

Orthodontic appliances are devices used in orthodontics, a branch of dentistry focused on the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of dental and facial irregularities. These appliances can be fixed or removable and are used to align teeth, correct jaw relationships, or modify dental forces. They can include braces, aligners, palatal expanders, space maintainers, and headgear, among others. The specific type of appliance used depends on the individual patient's needs and the treatment plan developed by the orthodontist.

Jaw diseases refer to a variety of conditions that affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the surrounding muscles, as well as dental disorders that can impact the jaw. Some common examples include:

1. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMD): These are problems with the TMJ and the muscles that control jaw movement. Symptoms may include pain, clicking or popping sounds, and limited movement of the jaw.

2. Osteonecrosis of the Jaw: This is a condition where bone in the jaw dies due to lack of blood supply. It can be caused by radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or certain medications.

3. Dental Cavities: These are holes in the teeth caused by bacteria. If left untreated, they can cause pain, infection, and damage to the jawbone.

4. Periodontal Disease: This is an infection of the gums and bones that support the teeth. Advanced periodontal disease can lead to loss of teeth and damage to the jawbone.

5. Jaw Fractures: These are breaks in the jawbone, often caused by trauma.

6. Oral Cancer: This is a type of cancer that starts in the mouth or throat. If not treated early, it can spread to the jaw and other parts of the body.

7. Cysts and Tumors: These are abnormal growths in the jawbone or surrounding tissues. While some are benign (non-cancerous), others can be malignant (cancerous).

8. Osteomyelitis: This is an infection of the bone, often occurring in the lower jaw. It can cause pain, swelling, and fever.

9. Oral Thrush: This is a fungal infection that causes white patches on the inside of the mouth. If left untreated, it can spread to the jaw and other parts of the body.

10. Sinusitis: Inflammation of the sinuses can sometimes cause pain in the upper jaw.

A dentigerous cyst is a type of odontogenic cyst that forms around the crown of an unerupted tooth. It is typically slow-growing and often asymptomatic, but it can cause displacement or resorption of adjacent teeth if it becomes large enough. Dentigerous cysts are more common in permanent teeth than primary teeth, and they are more likely to occur in the mandible (lower jaw) than the maxilla (upper jaw). They are usually diagnosed through radiographic examination and can be treated by surgical removal of the cyst along with the affected tooth. If left untreated, dentigerous cysts can continue to grow and may eventually develop into a tumor or cancer.

A neuroectodermal tumor, melanotic, also known as a melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy or MNTI, is a rare, typically benign but locally aggressive tumor that originates from the neural crest cells, a type of stem cell that gives rise to various tissues in the body, including nerve cells and pigment-producing cells called melanocytes.

MNTIs are usually found in the head and neck region of infants under one year of age, although they can occur in older children and adults as well. These tumors are characterized by the presence of melanin, a dark pigment that gives them a black or brown color.

MNTIs typically grow rapidly and can cause symptoms such as swelling, pain, or difficulty breathing if they are located in the head or neck region. Treatment usually involves surgical removal of the tumor, and the prognosis is generally good, especially if the tumor is completely removed. However, there is a risk of recurrence, so close follow-up with a healthcare provider is necessary.

An overbite, also known as "malocclusion of class II division 1" in dental terminology, is an orthodontic condition where the upper front teeth excessively overlap the lower front teeth when biting down. This means that the upper incisors are positioned too far forward or the lower incisors are too far back. A slight overbite is considered normal and healthy, as it allows the front teeth to perform their functions properly, such as biting and tearing food. However, a significant overbite can lead to various problems like difficulty in chewing, speaking, and maintaining good oral hygiene. It may also cause wear and tear on the teeth, jaw pain, or even contribute to temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). Orthodontic treatment, such as braces or aligners, is often recommended to correct a severe overbite and restore proper bite alignment.

The term "tooth cervix" is not commonly used in medical dentistry with a specific technical definition. However, if you are referring to the "cervical region of a tooth," it generally refers to the area where the crown (the visible part of the tooth) meets the root (the portion of the tooth that is below the gum line). This region is also sometimes referred to as the "cementoenamel junction" (CEJ), where the enamel covering of the crown meets the cementum covering of the root. Dental issues such as tooth decay, receding gums, or abrasion can affect this area and may require professional dental treatment.

Orthodontics is a specialized branch of dentistry that focuses on the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of dental and facial irregularities. The term "corrective" in this context refers to the use of appliances (such as braces, aligners, or other devices) to move teeth into their proper position and correct malocclusion (bad bite). This not only improves the appearance of the teeth but also helps to ensure better function, improved oral health, and overall dental well-being.

The goal of corrective orthodontics is to create a balanced and harmonious relationship between the teeth, jaws, and facial structures. Treatment may be recommended for children, adolescents, or adults and can help address various issues such as crowding, spacing, overbites, underbites, crossbites, open bites, and jaw growth discrepancies. A combination of techniques, including fixed or removable appliances, may be used to achieve the desired outcome. Regular follow-up appointments are necessary throughout treatment to monitor progress and make any necessary adjustments.

Micrognathism is a medical term that refers to a condition where the lower jaw (mandible) is abnormally small or underdeveloped. This can result in various dental and skeletal problems, including an improper bite (malocclusion), difficulty speaking, chewing, or swallowing, and sleep apnea. Micrognathism may be congenital or acquired later in life due to trauma, disease, or surgical removal of part of the jaw. Treatment options depend on the severity of the condition and can include orthodontic treatment, surgery, or a combination of both.

A tooth is classified as "unerupted" when it has not yet penetrated through the gums and entered the oral cavity. This can apply to both primary (baby) teeth and permanent (adult) teeth. The reasons for a tooth's failure to erupt can vary, including crowding of teeth, lack of sufficient space, or anatomical barriers such as bone or soft tissue. In some cases, unerupted teeth may need to be monitored or treated, depending on the specific situation and any symptoms experienced by the individual.

Permanent dentition is the second and final set of teeth that humans grow during their lifetime. These teeth are also known as adult or secondary teeth and typically begin to erupt in the mouth around the age of 6 or 7 years old, with all permanent teeth usually present by the time a person reaches their late teens or early twenties.

There are 32 teeth in a complete set of permanent dentition, including 8 incisors, 4 canines, 8 premolars (also called bicuspids), and 12 molars (including 4 third molars or wisdom teeth). The primary function of permanent teeth is to help with biting, chewing, and grinding food into smaller pieces that are easier to swallow and digest. Proper care and maintenance of permanent teeth through good oral hygiene practices, regular dental checkups, and a balanced diet can help ensure their longevity and health throughout a person's life.

Malocclusion, Angle Class I is a type of dental malocclusion where the misalignment of teeth is not severe enough to affect the overall function or appearance of the bite significantly. Named after Edward Angle, the founder of modern orthodontics, this classification indicates that the mesiobuccal cusp of the upper first molar is aligned with the buccal groove of the lower first molar. Although the bite appears normal, there might be crowding, spacing, or rotations present in the teeth, which can lead to aesthetic concerns and potential periodontal issues if left untreated.

Prognathism is a dental and maxillofacial term that refers to a condition where the jaw, particularly the lower jaw (mandible), protrudes or sticks out beyond the normal range, resulting in the forward positioning of the chin and teeth. It can be classified as horizontal or vertical, depending on whether the protrusion is side-to-side or up-and-down.

This condition can be mild or severe and may affect one's appearance and dental health. In some cases, it can also cause issues with speaking, chewing, and breathing. Prognathism can be a result of genetic factors or certain medical conditions, such as acromegaly or gigantism. Treatment options for prognathism include orthodontic treatment, surgery, or a combination of both.

Dentition refers to the development, arrangement, and appearance of teeth in the dental arch. It includes the number, type, size, and shape of teeth, as well as their alignment and relationship with each other and the surrounding structures in the oral cavity. Dentition can be classified into two main types: deciduous (primary) dentition and permanent (secondary) dentition. Deciduous dentition consists of 20 temporary teeth that erupt during infancy and childhood, while permanent dentition consists of 32 teeth that replace the deciduous teeth and last for a lifetime, excluding the wisdom teeth which may or may not erupt. Abnormalities in dentition can indicate various dental and systemic conditions, making it an essential aspect of oral health assessment and diagnosis.

A dental fistula is an abnormal connection or tunnel that develops between the oral cavity and the skin or other soft tissues, usually as a result of an infection in the teeth or surrounding structures. The infection can lead to the formation of a pus-filled sac (abscess) that eventually breaks through the bone or soft tissue, creating a small opening or channel that allows the pus to drain out.

The dental fistula is often accompanied by symptoms such as pain, swelling, redness, and difficulty swallowing or chewing. The infection can spread to other parts of the body if left untreated, so it's important to seek medical attention promptly if you suspect that you have a dental fistula.

The treatment for a dental fistula typically involves addressing the underlying infection, which may involve antibiotics, drainage of the abscess, and/or removal of the affected tooth or teeth. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to repair the damage to the bone or soft tissue and prevent further complications.

Osteoma is a benign (noncancerous) tumor that is made up of mature bone tissue. It usually grows slowly over a period of years and is most commonly found in the skull or jaw, although it can occur in other bones of the body as well. Osteomas are typically small, but they can grow to be several centimeters in size. They may cause symptoms if they press on nearby tissues or structures, such as nerves or blood vessels. In some cases, osteomas may not cause any symptoms and may only be discovered during routine imaging studies. Treatment for osteoma is typically not necessary unless it is causing problems or growing rapidly. If treatment is needed, it may involve surgical removal of the tumor.

A dental articulator is a mechanical device that is used in dentistry to simulate the movement and relationship of the upper and lower jaws (maxilla and mandible). It is essentially a hinge-like instrument that helps dental professionals replicate the patient's unique jaw movements and create dental restorations, such as crowns, bridges, or dentures, which fit accurately and comfortably.

Dental articulators come in various designs and complexities, but they generally consist of an upper and lower portion that represent the maxilla and mandible, respectively. These portions are connected by an adjustable arm, called a condylar element, which mimics the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) movement. This allows for the simulation of different jaw movements, such as opening, closing, protrusion, and lateral excursions.

By using a dental articulator, dentists can precisely design, adjust, and verify the fit, form, and function of dental restorations before placing them in the patient's mouth. This helps ensure optimal occlusal (bite) relationships, improved aesthetics, and increased patient comfort and satisfaction.

Facial asymmetry refers to a condition in which the facial features are not identical or proportionate on both sides of a vertical line drawn down the middle of the face. This can include differences in the size, shape, or positioning of facial features such as the eyes, ears, nose, cheeks, and jaw. Facial asymmetry can be mild and barely noticeable, or it can be more severe and affect a person's appearance and/or functionality of the mouth and jaw.

Facial asymmetry can be present at birth (congenital) or can develop later in life due to various factors such as injury, surgery, growth disorders, nerve damage, or tumors. In some cases, facial asymmetry may not cause any medical problems and may only be of cosmetic concern. However, in other cases, it may indicate an underlying medical condition that requires treatment.

Depending on the severity and cause of the facial asymmetry, treatment options may include cosmetic procedures such as fillers or surgery, orthodontic treatment, physical therapy, or medication to address any underlying conditions.

Tooth extraction is a dental procedure in which a tooth that is damaged or poses a threat to oral health is removed from its socket in the jawbone. This may be necessary due to various reasons such as severe tooth decay, gum disease, fractured teeth, crowded teeth, or for orthodontic treatment purposes. The procedure is performed by a dentist or an oral surgeon, under local anesthesia to numb the area around the tooth, ensuring minimal discomfort during the extraction process.

Interceptive orthodontics refers to a branch of orthodontics that focuses on the early interception and treatment of dental or oral issues in children, typically between the ages of 6 and 10. The goal of interceptive orthodontics is to correct developing problems before they become more serious and require extensive treatment in the future.

Interceptive orthodontic treatments may include the use of appliances such as space maintainers, palatal expanders, or partial braces to guide the growth and development of the teeth and jaws. These treatments can help to:

* Create more space for crowded teeth
* Correct bite problems
* Improve facial symmetry
* Guide jaw growth and development
* Reduce the risk of tooth damage due to thumb sucking or tongue thrusting habits

By addressing these issues early on, interceptive orthodontics can help to prevent more extensive and costly treatments later in life. It is important to note that not all children will require interceptive orthodontic treatment, and a thorough evaluation by an orthodontist is necessary to determine the most appropriate course of action for each individual case.

Orthodontic anchorage procedures refer to the methods and techniques used in orthodontics to achieve stable, controlled movement of teeth during treatment. The term "anchorage" describes the point of stability around which other teeth are moved.

There are two main types of anchorage: absolute and relative. Absolute anchorage is when the force applied to move teeth does not cause any unwanted movement in the area providing stability. Relative anchorage is when some degree of reciprocal movement is expected in the area providing stability.

Orthodontic appliances, such as mini-screws, palatal implants, and headgear, are often used to provide additional anchorage reinforcement. These devices help control the direction and magnitude of forces applied during treatment, ensuring predictable tooth movement and maintaining proper alignment and occlusion (bite).

In summary, orthodontic anchorage procedures involve the strategic use of various appliances and techniques to establish a stable foundation for moving teeth during orthodontic treatment. This helps ensure optimal treatment outcomes and long-term stability of the dentition.

A tooth socket, also known as an alveolus (plural: alveoli), refers to the hollow cavity or space in the jawbone where a tooth is anchored. The tooth socket is part of the alveolar process, which is the curved part of the maxilla or mandible that contains multiple tooth sockets for the upper and lower teeth, respectively.

Each tooth socket has a specialized tissue called the periodontal ligament, which attaches the root of the tooth to the surrounding bone. This ligament helps absorb forces generated during biting and chewing, allowing for comfortable and efficient mastication while also maintaining the tooth's position within the jawbone. The tooth socket is responsible for providing support, stability, and nourishment to the tooth through its blood vessels and nerves.

Orthodontic retainers are dental appliances that are custom-made and used after orthodontic treatment (such as braces) to help maintain the new position of teeth. They can be fixed or removable and are designed to keep the teeth in place while the surrounding gums and bones stabilize in their new positions. Retainers play a crucial role in preserving the investment made during orthodontic treatment, preventing the teeth from shifting back to their original positions.

"Edentulous mouth" is a medical term used to describe a condition where an individual has no remaining natural teeth in either their upper or lower jaw, or both. This situation can occur due to various reasons such as tooth decay, gum disease, trauma, or aging. Dentists often recommend dental prosthetics like dentures to restore oral function and aesthetics for individuals with edentulous mouths.

The ethmoid bone is a paired, thin, and lightweight bone that forms part of the skull's anterior cranial fossa and contributes to the formation of the orbit and nasal cavity. It is located between the frontal bone above and the maxilla and palatine bones below. The ethmoid bone has several important features:

1. Cribriform plate: This is the horizontal, sieve-like portion that forms part of the anterior cranial fossa and serves as the roof of the nasal cavity. It contains small openings (foramina) through which olfactory nerves pass.
2. Perpendicular plate: The perpendicular plate is a vertical structure that projects downward from the cribriform plate, forming part of the nasal septum and separating the left and right nasal cavities.
3. Superior and middle nasal conchae: These are curved bony projections within the lateral walls of the nasal cavity that help to warm, humidify, and filter incoming air.
4. Lacrimal bone: The ethmoid bone articulates with the lacrimal bone, forming part of the medial wall of the orbit.
5. Frontal process: This is a thin, vertical plate that articulates with the frontal bone above the orbit.
6. Sphenoidal process: The sphenoidal process connects the ethmoid bone to the sphenoid bone posteriorly.

The ethmoid bone plays a crucial role in protecting the brain and providing structural support for the eyes, as well as facilitating respiration by warming, humidifying, and filtering incoming air.

An Odontogenic Cyst, Calcifying is a specific type of cyst that originates from the dental tissues. It's also known as a calcifying odontogenic cyst or Gorlin cyst. This cyst is characterized by the presence of calcified structures within its lining.

The calcifications can appear as flecks or more complex structures, such as teeth-like formations. The lining of this cyst often contains ghost cells, which are the remains of epithelial cells that have undergone calcification.

These cysts are typically slow-growing and asymptomatic, although they can sometimes cause swelling or pain if they become large enough to compress adjacent tissues. They are most commonly found in the jaw bones, particularly the mandible.

While the exact cause of calcifying odontogenic cysts is not fully understood, they are thought to arise from developmental abnormalities in the tissues that form teeth. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the cyst.

Osteoblastoma is a rare, benign (non-cancerous) bone tumor that originates from osteoblasts, which are cells responsible for bone formation. It typically affects children and young adults, with around two-thirds of cases occurring in individuals under 30 years old.

Osteoblastomas usually develop in the long bones of the body, such as the femur (thigh bone) or tibia (shin bone), but they can also occur in the vertebrae of the spine. The tumor tends to grow slowly and may cause symptoms like pain, swelling, or tenderness in the affected area. In some cases, it can lead to pathological fractures (fractures caused by weakened bone structure).

While osteoblastomas are generally not life-threatening, they can be locally aggressive and cause significant morbidity if left untreated. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, followed by curettage (scraping) and bone grafting to fill the void created by the tumor excision. In some cases, adjuvant therapies like cryosurgery or radiation therapy may be used to ensure complete tumor eradication.

A dental abutment is a component of a dental implant restoration that connects the implant to the replacement tooth or teeth. It serves as a support structure and is attached to the implant, which is surgically placed in the jawbone. The abutment provides a stable foundation for the placement of a crown, bridge, or denture, depending on the patient's individual needs.

Dental abutments can be made from various materials such as titanium, zirconia, or other biocompatible materials. They come in different shapes and sizes to accommodate the specific requirements of each implant case. The selection of an appropriate dental abutment is crucial for ensuring a successful and long-lasting dental implant restoration.

Osseointegration is a direct structural and functional connection between living bone and the surface of an implant. It's a process where the bone grows in and around the implant, which is typically made of titanium or another biocompatible material. This process provides a solid foundation for dental prosthetics, such as crowns, bridges, or dentures, or for orthopedic devices like artificial limbs. The success of osseointegration depends on various factors, including the patient's overall health, the quality and quantity of available bone, and the surgical technique used for implant placement.

Cementoma is a benign (non-cancerous) tumor that primarily affects the jaw bones, particularly the lower jaw (mandible). It is characterized by the growth of abnormal cementum-like tissue within the bone. Cementum is a hard tissue that covers the roots of teeth and helps anchor them to the jawbone.

There are different types of cementomas, including:

1. Periapical cemental dysplasia (PCD): This type of cementoma usually affects the anterior region of the lower jaw and is often associated with non-vital teeth. It typically presents as a small, radiopaque (dark) area on an X-ray.

2. Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia (FCOD): FCOD is a more widespread form of cementoma that affects multiple areas of the jawbones. It primarily affects middle-aged women and can cause significant bone remodeling, leading to radiopaque lesions on X-rays.

3. Gigantiform cementoma: This rare, aggressive type of cementoma typically affects children and adolescents. It can cause rapid bone growth and expansion, resulting in facial deformities and functional impairments.

4. Ossifying fibroma: Although not strictly a cementoma, ossifying fibroma shares some similarities with these tumors. It is characterized by the formation of both bone and cementum-like tissue within the lesion.

Treatment for cementomas depends on their size, location, and growth rate. Small, asymptomatic lesions may not require treatment, while larger or symptomatic ones might need surgical removal to prevent complications such as tooth displacement, infection, or pathological fractures. Regular follow-ups with dental X-rays are essential to monitor the progression of these lesions.

Dental occlusion, centric refers to the alignment and contact of the opposing teeth when the jaw is closed in a neutral position, specifically with the mandible (lower jaw) positioned in maximum intercuspation. This means that all teeth are in full contact with their corresponding teeth in the opposite jaw, and the condyles of the mandible are seated in the most posterior portion of the glenoid fossae (the sockets in the skull where the mandible articulates). Centric occlusion is an important concept in dentistry as it serves as a reference point for establishing proper bite relationships during restorative dental treatment.

Histiocytoma is a general term used to describe a group of disorders characterized by an abnormal accumulation or proliferation of histiocytes, which are a type of immune cell. These cells normally play a role in fighting infection and helping to heal wounds. However, when they multiply excessively, they can form tumors known as histiocytomas.

There are several types of histiocytomas, including:

1. Cutaneous histiocytoma: This is the most common type of histiocytoma, which typically appears as a small, raised, hairless, and pink or red bump on the skin. It usually affects dogs, but can also occur in cats and rarely in humans. These tumors are benign and often regress spontaneously within a few months.
2. Systemic histiocytoses: These are less common types of histiocytomas that involve multiple organs and tissues throughout the body. They can be further classified into several subtypes, such as Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD), and malignant histiocytosis. These conditions can range from benign to malignant and may require aggressive treatment, including chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

It is important to note that while histiocytomas are generally benign, they can sometimes mimic other more serious conditions. Therefore, it is essential to have any suspicious growths evaluated by a veterinarian or healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and management.

A dental implant is a surgical component that interfaces with the bone of the jaw or skull to support a dental prosthesis such as a crown, bridge, denture, facial prosthesis or to act as an orthodontic anchor.

A single-tooth dental implant specifically refers to the replacement of a single missing tooth. The process typically involves three stages:

1. Placement: A titanium screw is placed into the jawbone where the missing tooth once was, acting as a root for the new tooth.
2. Osseointegration: Over several months, the jawbone grows around and fuses with the implant, creating a strong and stable foundation for the replacement tooth.
3. Restoration: A custom-made crown is attached to the implant, restoring the natural appearance and function of the missing tooth.

Single-tooth dental implants are a popular choice because they look, feel, and function like natural teeth, and they do not require the alteration of adjacent teeth, as is necessary with traditional bridgework.

The maxillary nerve, also known as the second division of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V2), is a primary sensory nerve that provides innervation to the skin of the lower eyelid, side of the nose, part of the cheek, upper lip, and roof of the mouth. It also supplies sensory fibers to the mucous membranes of the nasal cavity, maxillary sinus, palate, and upper teeth. Furthermore, it contributes motor innervation to the muscles involved in chewing (muscles of mastication), specifically the tensor veli palatini and tensor tympani. The maxillary nerve originates from the trigeminal ganglion and passes through the foramen rotundum in the skull before reaching its target areas.

Tooth eruption is the process by which a tooth emerges from the gums and becomes visible in the oral cavity. It is a normal part of dental development that occurs in a predictable sequence and timeframe. Primary or deciduous teeth, also known as baby teeth, begin to erupt around 6 months of age and continue to emerge until approximately 2-3 years of age. Permanent or adult teeth start to erupt around 6 years of age and can continue to emerge until the early twenties.

The process of tooth eruption involves several stages, including the formation of the tooth within the jawbone, the movement of the tooth through the bone and surrounding tissues, and the final emergence of the tooth into the mouth. Proper tooth eruption is essential for normal oral function, including chewing, speaking, and smiling. Any abnormalities in the tooth eruption process, such as delayed or premature eruption, can indicate underlying dental or medical conditions that require further evaluation and treatment.

In medical terms, "fossils" do not have a specific or direct relevance to the field. However, in a broader scientific context, fossils are the remains or impressions of prehistoric organisms preserved in petrified form or as a mold or cast in rock. They offer valuable evidence about the Earth's history and the life forms that existed on it millions of years ago.

Paleopathology is a subfield of paleontology that deals with the study of diseases in fossils, which can provide insights into the evolution of diseases and human health over time.

Root resorption is a process that occurs when the body's own cells, called odontoclasts, break down and destroy the hard tissue of the tooth root. This can occur as a result of various factors such as trauma, infection, or orthodontic treatment. In some cases, it may be a normal part of the tooth development and eruption process in children. However, excessive or pathological root resorption can lead to weakening and loss of the tooth. It is often asymptomatic and discovered during routine dental x-rays.

Tooth abnormalities refer to any variations or irregularities in the size, shape, number, structure, or development of teeth that deviate from the typical or normal anatomy. These abnormalities can occur in primary (deciduous) or permanent teeth and can be caused by genetic factors, environmental influences, systemic diseases, or localized dental conditions during tooth formation.

Some examples of tooth abnormalities include:

1. Microdontia - teeth that are smaller than normal in size.
2. Macrodontia - teeth that are larger than normal in size.
3. Peg-shaped teeth - teeth with a narrow, conical shape.
4. Talon cusps - additional cusps or points on the biting surface of a tooth.
5. Dens invaginatus - an abnormal development where the tooth crown has an extra fold or pouch that can trap bacteria and cause dental problems.
6. Taurodontism - teeth with large pulp chambers and short roots.
7. Supernumerary teeth - having more teeth than the typical number (20 primary and 32 permanent teeth).
8. Hypodontia - missing one or more teeth due to a failure of development.
9. Germination - two adjacent teeth fused together, usually occurring in the front teeth.
10. Fusion - two separate teeth that have grown together during development.

Tooth abnormalities may not always require treatment unless they cause functional, aesthetic, or dental health issues. A dentist can diagnose and manage tooth abnormalities through various treatments, such as fillings, extractions, orthodontic care, or restorative procedures.

In medical terms, the face refers to the front part of the head that is distinguished by the presence of the eyes, nose, and mouth. It includes the bones of the skull (frontal bone, maxilla, zygoma, nasal bones, lacrimal bones, palatine bones, inferior nasal conchae, and mandible), muscles, nerves, blood vessels, skin, and other soft tissues. The face plays a crucial role in various functions such as breathing, eating, drinking, speaking, seeing, smelling, and expressing emotions. It also serves as an important identifier for individuals, allowing them to be recognized by others.

Dinosaurs are a group of reptiles that were the dominant terrestrial vertebrates for over 160 million years, from the late Triassic period until the end of the Cretaceous period. They first appeared approximately 230 million years ago and went extinct around 65 million years ago.

Dinosaurs are characterized by their upright stance, with legs positioned directly under their bodies, and a wide range of body sizes and shapes. Some dinosaurs were enormous, such as the long-necked sauropods that could reach lengths of over 100 feet, while others were small and agile.

Dinosaurs are classified into two main groups: the saurischians (lizard-hipped) and the ornithischians (bird-hipped). The saurischians include both the large carnivorous theropods, such as Tyrannosaurus rex, and the long-necked sauropods. The ornithischians were primarily herbivores and included a diverse array of species, such as the armored ankylosaurs and the horned ceratopsians.

Despite their extinction, dinosaurs have left a lasting impact on our planet and continue to be a source of fascination for people of all ages. The study of dinosaurs, known as paleontology, has shed light on many aspects of Earth's history and the evolution of life on our planet.

Sotos Syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by excessive early growth and developmental delay. It is also known as cerebral gigantism. The symptoms typically include:

1. Large size at birth, with rapid postnatal growth leading to tall stature in early childhood.
2. Developmental delay, often becoming apparent after the first year of life. This may include delayed milestones in sitting, standing, walking, and speaking.
3. Macrocephaly (large head size).
4. Characteristic facial features such as a high forehead, prominent jaw, and wide-spaced eyes.
5. Learning difficulties or intellectual disability, ranging from mild to severe.
6. Increased risk of seizures, particularly in infancy and childhood.
7. Behavioral problems such as ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) or autism spectrum disorders.

The syndrome is caused by mutations in the NSD1 gene, which is located on chromosome 5. This gene provides instructions for making a protein that helps regulate gene expression. In Sotos Syndrome, the mutated NSD1 gene doesn't function properly, leading to overgrowth and developmental delay. The syndrome is usually inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, meaning that only one copy of the altered gene, inherited from either parent, is sufficient to cause the disorder. However, most cases result from new (de novo) mutations in the gene and occur in people with no family history of the disorder.

Occlusal splints, also known as bite guards or night guards, are removable dental appliances that are used to provide protection and stabilization for the teeth and jaw joint (temporomandibular joint or TMJ). They are typically made of hard acrylic or soft materials and are custom-fit to a patient's mouth.

Occlusal splints work by covering and separating the upper and lower teeth, preventing them from coming into contact with each other. This can help to reduce tooth grinding and clenching (bruxism), which can cause tooth wear, sensitivity, and TMJ disorders. They may also be used to help stabilize the jaw joint and muscles in patients with TMJ disorders or to provide protection for teeth that have undergone restorative dental work.

It is important to note that occlusal splints should only be worn under the guidance of a dentist, as improper use can lead to further dental problems.

Chondrosarcoma, mesenchymal is a type of chondrosarcoma, which is a malignant (cancerous) tumor that arises from cartilaginous tissue. It is a rare and aggressive subtype of chondrosarcoma, accounting for less than 10% of all cases.

Mesenchymal chondrosarcomas are characterized by their undifferentiated small round blue cells intermixed with well-differentiated cartilaginous areas. They can occur in any age group but are more common in children and young adults. These tumors can arise in any bone, but they most commonly involve the long bones of the extremities, pelvis, and spine.

Mesenchymal chondrosarcomas tend to be aggressive with a high risk of local recurrence and metastasis (spread) to other parts of the body, such as the lungs, lymph nodes, or other bones. Treatment typically involves surgical resection of the tumor, often followed by radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. The prognosis for mesenchymal chondrosarcoma is generally poorer than for other subtypes of chondrosarcoma due to its aggressive behavior and higher likelihood of metastasis.

Odontodysplasia is a rare dental developmental disorder that affects the teeth, both primary (deciduous) and permanent. It is characterized by the abnormal development of the teeth, resulting in small, misshapen, discolored, and widely spaced teeth. The enamel, dentin, and pulp may all be affected, leading to weakened and susceptible teeth.

The medical definition of Odontodysplasia is as follows:

A developmental anomaly of dental hard tissues affecting both the primary and permanent dentitions, characterized by hypoplastic or hypocalcified enamel and dentin, with or without abnormalities in tooth shape, size, and number. The condition may affect one or multiple teeth and can lead to increased susceptibility to dental caries, periodontal disease, and other oral health complications.

The exact cause of Odontodysplasia is not fully understood, but it is believed to be related to genetic factors, environmental influences, or a combination of both. The diagnosis is typically made based on clinical examination, radiographic findings, and sometimes histological evaluation. Treatment options may include restorative dental procedures, orthodontic treatment, and extraction of severely affected teeth.

Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a medical imaging technique that uses a cone-shaped X-ray beam to create detailed, cross-sectional images of the body. In dental and maxillofacial radiology, CBCT is used to produce three-dimensional images of the teeth, jaws, and surrounding bones.

CBCT differs from traditional computed tomography (CT) in that it uses a cone-shaped X-ray beam instead of a fan-shaped beam, which allows for a faster scan time and lower radiation dose. The X-ray beam is rotated around the patient's head, capturing data from multiple angles, which is then reconstructed into a three-dimensional image using specialized software.

CBCT is commonly used in dental implant planning, orthodontic treatment planning, airway analysis, and the diagnosis and management of jaw pathologies such as tumors and fractures. It provides detailed information about the anatomy of the teeth, jaws, and surrounding structures, which can help clinicians make more informed decisions about patient care.

However, it is important to note that CBCT should only be used when necessary, as it still involves exposure to ionizing radiation. The benefits of using CBCT must be weighed against the potential risks associated with radiation exposure.

Ectopic tooth eruption is a condition where a tooth fails to erupt into its normal position in the dental arch. Instead, it emerupts in an abnormal location, such as in the wrong direction or through another tissue like the gums, palate, or jawbone. This can occur due to various reasons, including genetics, crowding of teeth, or trauma. Ectopic tooth eruption may cause problems with oral function and dental health, and treatment options depend on the severity and location of the ectopic tooth.

Osteotomy is a surgical procedure in which a bone is cut to shorten, lengthen, or change its alignment. It is often performed to correct deformities or to realign bones that have been damaged by trauma or disease. The bone may be cut straight across (transverse osteotomy) or at an angle (oblique osteotomy). After the bone is cut, it can be realigned and held in place with pins, plates, or screws until it heals. This procedure is commonly performed on bones in the leg, such as the femur or tibia, but can also be done on other bones in the body.

A diastema is a gap or space that occurs between two teeth. The most common location for a diastema is between the two upper front teeth (central incisors). Diastemas can be caused by various factors, including:

1. Tooth size discrepancy: If the size of the teeth is smaller than the size of the jawbone, spaces may occur between the teeth. This is a common cause of diastema in children as their jaws grow and develop faster than their teeth. In some cases, these gaps close on their own as the permanent teeth erupt and fully emerge.
2. Thumb sucking or pacifier use: Prolonged thumb sucking or pacifier use can exert pressure on the front teeth, causing them to protrude and creating a gap between them. This habit typically affects children and may result in a diastema if it persists beyond the age of 4-5 years.
3. Tongue thrust: Tongue thrust is a condition where an individual pushes their tongue against the front teeth while speaking or swallowing. Over time, this force can push the front teeth forward and create a gap between them.
4. Missing teeth: When a person loses a tooth due to extraction, decay, or injury, the surrounding teeth may shift position and cause gaps to form between other teeth.
5. Periodontal disease: Advanced periodontal (gum) disease can lead to bone loss and receding gums, which can result in spaces between the teeth.
6. Genetic factors: Some people have a natural tendency for their front teeth to be widely spaced due to genetic predisposition.

Diastemas can be closed through various orthodontic treatments, such as braces or aligners, or by using dental restorations like bonding, veneers, or crowns. The appropriate treatment option depends on the underlying cause of the diastema and the individual's overall oral health condition.

A Jaw Relation Record (also known as a "mounted cast" or "articulated record") is a dental term used to describe the process of recording and replicating the precise spatial relationship between the upper and lower jaws. This information is crucial in various dental treatments, such as designing and creating dental restorations, dentures, or orthodontic appliances.

The Jaw Relation Record typically involves these steps:

1. Determining the optimal jaw position (occlusion) during a clinical procedure called "bite registration." This is done by using various materials like waxes, silicones, or impression compounds to record the relationship between the upper and lower teeth in a static position or at specific movements.
2. Transferring this bite registration to an articulator, which is a mechanical device that simulates jaw movement. The articulator holds dental casts (replicas of the patient's teeth) and allows for adjustments based on the recorded jaw relationship.
3. Mounting the dental casts onto the articulator according to the bite registration. This creates an accurate representation of the patient's oral structures, allowing dentists or technicians to evaluate, plan, and fabricate dental restorations that will fit harmoniously in the mouth and provide optimal function and aesthetics.

In summary, a Jaw Relation Record is a critical component in dental treatment planning and restoration design, as it captures and replicates the precise spatial relationship between the upper and lower jaws.

An open bite, in dental terminology, refers to a type of malocclusion (or misalignment) where the upper and lower teeth do not make contact with each other when the jaw is closed. More specifically, the front teeth of both the upper and lower jaws fail to meet or overlap normally, creating an opening in the bite. This condition can lead to various problems such as difficulty in biting, chewing, speaking clearly, and even cause temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). Open bite can be caused by several factors including thumb sucking, tongue thrusting, genetic factors, or abnormal jaw development. Treatment usually involves orthodontic intervention, possibly with the use of appliances or even surgery in severe cases.

In the context of medicine, particularly in anatomy and physiology, "rotation" refers to the movement of a body part around its own axis or the long axis of another structure. This type of motion is three-dimensional and can occur in various planes. A common example of rotation is the movement of the forearm bones (radius and ulna) around each other during pronation and supination, which allows the hand to be turned palm up or down. Another example is the rotation of the head during mastication (chewing), where the mandible moves in a circular motion around the temporomandibular joint.

The periodontium is a complex structure in the oral cavity that surrounds and supports the teeth. It consists of four main components:
1. Gingiva (gums): The pink, soft tissue that covers the crown of the tooth and extends down to the neck of the tooth, where it meets the cementum.
2. Cementum: A specialized, calcified tissue that covers the root of the tooth and provides a surface for the periodontal ligament fibers to attach.
3. Periodontal ligament (PDL): A highly vascular and cell-rich connective tissue that attaches the cementum of the tooth root to the alveolar bone, allowing for tooth mobility and absorption of forces during chewing.
4. Alveolar bone: The portion of the jawbone that contains the sockets (alveoli) for the teeth. It is a spongy bone with a rich blood supply that responds to mechanical stresses from biting and chewing, undergoing remodeling throughout life.

Periodontal diseases, such as gingivitis and periodontitis, affect the health and integrity of the periodontium, leading to inflammation, bleeding, pocket formation, bone loss, and ultimately tooth loss if left untreated.

Osteonecrosis is a medical condition characterized by the death of bone tissue due to the disruption of blood supply. Also known as avascular necrosis, this process can lead to the collapse of the bone and adjacent joint surfaces, resulting in pain, limited mobility, and potential deformity if left untreated. Osteonecrosis most commonly affects the hips, shoulders, and knees, but it can occur in any bone. The condition may be caused by trauma, corticosteroid use, alcohol abuse, certain medical conditions (like sickle cell disease or lupus), or for no apparent reason (idiopathic).

A tooth crown is a type of dental restoration that covers the entire visible portion of a tooth, restoring its shape, size, and strength. It is typically made of materials like porcelain, ceramic, or metal alloys and is custom-made to fit over the prepared tooth. The tooth crown is cemented in place and becomes the new outer surface of the tooth, protecting it from further damage or decay.

The process of getting a tooth crown usually involves two dental appointments. During the first appointment, the dentist prepares the tooth by removing any decay or damaged tissue and shaping the tooth to accommodate the crown. An impression is then taken of the prepared tooth and sent to a dental laboratory where the crown is fabricated. In the meantime, a temporary crown is placed over the prepared tooth to protect it until the permanent crown is ready. At the second appointment, the temporary crown is removed, and the permanent crown is cemented in place.

Tooth crowns are often recommended for several reasons, including:

* To restore a broken or fractured tooth
* To protect a weakened tooth from further damage or decay
* To support a large filling when there isn't enough natural tooth structure left
* To cover a dental implant
* To improve the appearance of a discolored or misshapen tooth

Overall, a tooth crown is an effective and long-lasting solution for restoring damaged or decayed teeth and improving oral health.

Gingival diseases are infections or inflammations that affect the gingiva, which is the part of the gum around the base of the teeth. These diseases can be caused by bacteria found in dental plaque and can lead to symptoms such as redness, swelling, bleeding, and receding gums. If left untreated, gingival diseases can progress to periodontal disease, a more serious condition that can result in tooth loss. Common types of gingival diseases include gingivitis and periodontitis.

In medical terms, a "lip" refers to the thin edge or border of an organ or other biological structure. However, when people commonly refer to "the lip," they are usually talking about the lips on the face, which are part of the oral cavity. The lips are a pair of soft, fleshy tissues that surround the mouth and play a crucial role in various functions such as speaking, eating, drinking, and expressing emotions.

The lips are made up of several layers, including skin, muscle, blood vessels, nerves, and mucous membrane. The outer surface of the lips is covered by skin, while the inner surface is lined with a moist mucous membrane. The muscles that make up the lips allow for movements such as pursing, puckering, and smiling.

The lips also contain numerous sensory receptors that help detect touch, temperature, pain, and other stimuli. Additionally, they play a vital role in protecting the oral cavity from external irritants and pathogens, helping to keep the mouth clean and healthy.

The maxillary artery is a branch of the external carotid artery that supplies the deep structures of the face and head. It originates from the external carotid artery just below the neck of the mandible and passes laterally to enter the parotid gland. Within the gland, it gives off several branches, including the deep auricular, anterior tympanic, and middle meningeal arteries.

After leaving the parotid gland, the maxillary artery travels through the infratemporal fossa, where it gives off several more branches, including the inferior alveolar, buccinator, and masseteric arteries. These vessels supply blood to the teeth, gums, and muscles of mastication.

The maxillary artery also gives off the sphenopalatine artery, which supplies the nasal cavity, nasopharynx, and palate. Additionally, it provides branches that supply the meninges, dura mater, and brain. Overall, the maxillary artery plays a critical role in providing blood flow to many structures in the head and neck region.

The ilium is the largest and broadest of the three parts that make up the hip bone or coxal bone. It is the uppermost portion of the pelvis and forms the side of the waist. The ilium has a curved, fan-like shape and articulates with the sacrum at the back to form the sacroiliac joint. The large, concave surface on the top of the ilium is called the iliac crest, which can be felt as a prominent ridge extending from the front of the hip to the lower back. This region is significant in orthopedics and physical examinations for its use in assessing various medical conditions and performing certain maneuvers during the physical examination.

A partial denture that is fixed, also known as a fixed partial denture or a dental bridge, is a type of prosthetic device used to replace one or more missing teeth. Unlike removable partial dentures, which can be taken out of the mouth for cleaning and maintenance, fixed partial dentures are permanently attached to the remaining natural teeth or implants surrounding the gap left by the missing tooth or teeth.

A typical fixed partial denture consists of an artificial tooth (or pontic) that is fused to one or two crowns on either side. The crowns are cemented onto the prepared surfaces of the adjacent teeth, providing a stable and secure attachment for the pontic. This creates a natural-looking and functional replacement for the missing tooth or teeth.

Fixed partial dentures offer several advantages over removable options, including improved stability, comfort, and aesthetics. However, they typically require more extensive preparation of the adjacent teeth, which may involve removing some healthy tooth structure to accommodate the crowns. Proper oral hygiene is essential to maintain the health of the supporting teeth and gums, as well as the longevity of the fixed partial denture. Regular dental check-ups and professional cleanings are also necessary to ensure the continued success of this type of restoration.

X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging method that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional (tomographic) images (virtual "slices") of the body. These cross-sectional images can then be used to display detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body.

The term "computed tomography" is used instead of "CT scan" or "CAT scan" because the machines take a series of X-ray measurements from different angles around the body and then use a computer to process these data to create detailed images of internal structures within the body.

CT scanning is a noninvasive, painless medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. CT imaging provides detailed information about many types of tissue including lung, bone, soft tissue and blood vessels. CT examinations can be performed on every part of the body for a variety of reasons including diagnosis, surgical planning, and monitoring of therapeutic responses.

In computed tomography (CT), an X-ray source and detector rotate around the patient, measuring the X-ray attenuation at many different angles. A computer uses this data to construct a cross-sectional image by the process of reconstruction. This technique is called "tomography". The term "computed" refers to the use of a computer to reconstruct the images.

CT has become an important tool in medical imaging and diagnosis, allowing radiologists and other physicians to view detailed internal images of the body. It can help identify many different medical conditions including cancer, heart disease, lung nodules, liver tumors, and internal injuries from trauma. CT is also commonly used for guiding biopsies and other minimally invasive procedures.

In summary, X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging technique that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional images of the body. It provides detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body, allowing physicians to diagnose and treat medical conditions.

The periodontal ligament, also known as the "PDL," is the soft tissue that connects the tooth root to the alveolar bone within the dental alveolus (socket). It consists of collagen fibers organized into groups called principal fibers and accessory fibers. These fibers are embedded into both the cementum of the tooth root and the alveolar bone, providing shock absorption during biting and chewing forces, allowing for slight tooth movement, and maintaining the tooth in its position within the socket.

The periodontal ligament plays a crucial role in the health and maintenance of the periodontium, which includes the gingiva (gums), cementum, alveolar bone, and the periodontal ligament itself. Inflammation or infection of the periodontal ligament can lead to periodontal disease, potentially causing tooth loss if not treated promptly and appropriately.

Skull neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop within the skull. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They can originate from various types of cells, such as bone cells, nerve cells, or soft tissues. Skull neoplasms can cause various symptoms depending on their size and location, including headaches, seizures, vision problems, hearing loss, and neurological deficits. Treatment options include surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. It is important to note that a neoplasm in the skull can also refer to metastatic cancer, which has spread from another part of the body to the skull.

Myofunctional therapy, also known as orofacial myofunctional therapy, is a type of treatment that aims to correct improper muscle function in the face and mouth. It typically involves a series of exercises and techniques designed to improve oral rest posture, swallowing patterns, chewing, and speech. The goal of myofunctional therapy is to restore normal muscle function, which can help alleviate a variety of symptoms such as tongue thrust, mouth breathing, sleep-disordered breathing, and even some orthodontic problems. This type of therapy is usually provided by a trained speech-language pathologist, dentist, or orthodontist.

Cleft palate is a congenital birth defect that affects the roof of the mouth (palate). It occurs when the tissues that form the palate do not fuse together properly during fetal development, resulting in an opening or split in the palate. This can range from a small cleft at the back of the soft palate to a complete cleft that extends through the hard and soft palates, and sometimes into the nasal cavity.

A cleft palate can cause various problems such as difficulty with feeding, speaking, hearing, and ear infections. It may also affect the appearance of the face and mouth. Treatment typically involves surgical repair of the cleft palate, often performed during infancy or early childhood. Speech therapy, dental care, and other supportive treatments may also be necessary to address related issues.

Cleft lip is a congenital birth defect that affects the upper lip, causing it to develop incompletely or split. This results in an opening or gap in the lip, which can range from a small split to a significant separation that extends into the nose. Cleft lip is often accompanied by cleft palate, which is a similar condition affecting the roof of the mouth.

The medical definition of cleft lip is as follows:

A congenital deformity resulting from failure of fusion of the maxillary and medial nasal processes during embryonic development, leading to a varying degree of separation or split in the upper lip, ranging from a minor notch to a complete cleft extending into the nose. It may occur as an isolated anomaly or in association with other congenital defects, such as cleft palate.

Cleft lip can be surgically corrected through various reconstructive procedures, typically performed during infancy or early childhood. The specific treatment plan depends on the severity and location of the cleft, as well as any associated medical conditions. Early intervention and comprehensive care from a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals are crucial for optimal outcomes in cleft lip repair.

Dental restoration failure refers to the breakdown or loss of functionality of a dental restoration, which is a procedure performed to restore the function, integrity, and morphology of a tooth that has been damaged due to decay, trauma, or wear. The restoration can include fillings, crowns, veneers, bridges, and implants. Failure of dental restorations can occur due to various reasons such as recurrent decay, fracture, poor fit, or material failure, leading to further damage or loss of the tooth.

Orthodontics is a specialized branch of dentistry that focuses on the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of dental and facial irregularities. This involves correcting teeth that are improperly positioned, often using braces or other appliances to move them into the correct position over time. The goal of orthodontic treatment is to create a healthy, functional bite and improve the appearance of the teeth and face.

Orthodontists are dental specialists who have completed additional training beyond dental school in order to become experts in this field. They use various techniques and tools, such as X-rays, models of the teeth, and computer imaging, to assess and plan treatment for each individual patient. The type of treatment recommended will depend on the specific needs and goals of the patient.

Orthodontic treatment can be beneficial for people of all ages, although it is most commonly started during childhood or adolescence when the teeth and jaws are still growing and developing. However, more and more adults are also seeking orthodontic treatment to improve their smile and oral health.

Bone transplantation, also known as bone grafting, is a surgical procedure in which bone or bone-like material is transferred from one part of the body to another or from one person to another. The graft may be composed of cortical (hard outer portion) bone, cancellous (spongy inner portion) bone, or a combination of both. It can be taken from different sites in the same individual (autograft), from another individual of the same species (allograft), or from an animal source (xenograft). The purpose of bone transplantation is to replace missing bone, provide structural support, and stimulate new bone growth. This procedure is commonly used in orthopedic, dental, and maxillofacial surgeries to repair bone defects caused by trauma, tumors, or congenital conditions.

A third molar is the most posterior of the three molars present in an adult human dental arch. They are also commonly known as wisdom teeth, due to their late eruption period which usually occurs between the ages of 17-25, a time traditionally associated with gaining maturity and wisdom.

Anatomically, third molars have four cusps, making them the largest of all the teeth. However, not everyone develops third molars; some people may have one, two, three or no third molars at all. In many cases, third molars do not have enough space to fully erupt and align properly with the rest of the teeth, leading to impaction, infection, or other dental health issues. As a result, third molars are often extracted if they cause problems or if there is a risk they will cause problems in the future.

A complete denture is a removable dental appliance that replaces all of the teeth in an upper or lower arch. It is also commonly referred to as a "full denture." A complete denture is created specifically to fit a patient's mouth and can be made of either acrylic resin (plastic) or metal and acrylic resin.

The upper complete denture covers the palate (roof of the mouth), while the lower complete denture is shaped like a horseshoe to leave room for the tongue. Dentures are held in place by forming a seal with the gums and remaining jawbone structure, and can be secured further with the use of dental adhesives.

Complete dentures not only restore the ability to eat and speak properly but also help support the facial structures, improving the patient's appearance and overall confidence. It is important to maintain regular dental check-ups even if all teeth are missing, as the dentist will monitor the fit and health of the oral tissues and make any necessary adjustments to the denture.

A "cheek" is the fleshy, muscular area of the face that forms the side of the face below the eye and above the jaw. It contains the buccinator muscle, which helps with chewing by moving food to the back teeth for grinding and also assists in speaking and forming facial expressions. The cheek also contains several sensory receptors that allow us to perceive touch, temperature, and pain in this area of the face. Additionally, there is a mucous membrane lining inside the mouth cavity called the buccal mucosa which covers the inner surface of the cheek.

Denture retention, in the field of dentistry, refers to the ability of a dental prosthesis (dentures) to maintain its position and stability within the mouth. It is achieved through various factors including the fit, shape, and design of the denture, as well as the use of dental implants or adhesives. Proper retention helps ensure comfortable and effective chewing, speaking, and smiling for individuals who have lost some or all of their natural teeth.

Gingival hyperplasia is a condition characterized by an abnormal growth or enlargement of the gingiva (gum tissue). This condition can be caused by various factors, including bacterial infection, certain medications (such as phenytoin, cyclosporine, and nifedipine), systemic diseases (such as leukemia, vitamin C deficiency, and Crohn's disease), and genetic disorders.

The enlarged gum tissue can be uncomfortable, irritated, and prone to bleeding, especially during brushing or flossing. It may also make it difficult to maintain good oral hygiene, which can increase the risk of dental caries and periodontal disease. Treatment for gingival hyperplasia typically involves improving oral hygiene, controlling any underlying causes, and in some cases, surgical removal of the excess tissue.

The temporal bone is a paired bone that is located on each side of the skull, forming part of the lateral and inferior walls of the cranial cavity. It is one of the most complex bones in the human body and has several important structures associated with it. The main functions of the temporal bone include protecting the middle and inner ear, providing attachment for various muscles of the head and neck, and forming part of the base of the skull.

The temporal bone is divided into several parts, including the squamous part, the petrous part, the tympanic part, and the styloid process. The squamous part forms the lateral portion of the temporal bone and articulates with the parietal bone. The petrous part is the most medial and superior portion of the temporal bone and contains the inner ear and the semicircular canals. The tympanic part forms the lower and anterior portions of the temporal bone and includes the external auditory meatus or ear canal. The styloid process is a long, slender projection that extends downward from the inferior aspect of the temporal bone and serves as an attachment site for various muscles and ligaments.

The temporal bone plays a crucial role in hearing and balance, as it contains the structures of the middle and inner ear, including the oval window, round window, cochlea, vestibule, and semicircular canals. The stapes bone, one of the three bones in the middle ear, is entirely encased within the petrous portion of the temporal bone. Additionally, the temporal bone contains important structures for facial expression and sensation, including the facial nerve, which exits the skull through the stylomastoid foramen, a small opening in the temporal bone.

Fibrous Dysplasia of Bone is a rare, benign bone disorder that is characterized by the replacement of normal bone tissue with fibrous (scar-like) and immature bone tissue. This results in weakened bones that are prone to fractures, deformities, and pain. The condition can affect any bone in the body but most commonly involves the long bones of the legs, arms, and skull. It can occur as an isolated finding or as part of a genetic disorder called McCune-Albright syndrome. The exact cause of fibrous dysplasia is not fully understood, but it is believed to result from a genetic mutation that occurs during early bone development. There is no cure for fibrous dysplasia, and treatment typically focuses on managing symptoms and preventing complications.

Cranial sutures are the fibrous joints that connect and hold together the bones of the skull (cranium) in humans and other animals. These sutures provide flexibility for the skull during childbirth and growth, allowing the skull to expand as the brain grows in size, especially during infancy and early childhood.

There are several cranial sutures in the human skull, including:

1. The sagittal suture, which runs along the midline of the skull, connecting the two parietal bones.
2. The coronal suture, which connects the frontal bone to the two parietal bones.
3. The lambdoid suture, which connects the occipital bone to the two parietal bones.
4. The squamosal suture, which connects the temporal bone to the parietal bone.
5. The frontosphenoidal and sphenoethmoidal sutures, which connect the frontal bone, sphenoid bone, and ethmoid bone in the anterior cranial fossa.

These sutures are typically made up of a specialized type of connective tissue called Sharpey's fibers, which interdigitate with each other to form a strong yet flexible joint. Over time, as the skull bones fully fuse together, these sutures become less prominent and eventually ossify (turn into bone). In some cases, abnormalities in cranial suture development or fusion can lead to medical conditions such as craniosynostosis.

Craniofacial abnormalities refer to a group of birth defects that affect the development of the skull and face. These abnormalities can range from mild to severe and may involve differences in the shape and structure of the head, face, and jaws, as well as issues with the formation of facial features such as the eyes, nose, and mouth.

Craniofacial abnormalities can be caused by genetic factors, environmental influences, or a combination of both. Some common examples of craniofacial abnormalities include cleft lip and palate, craniosynostosis (premature fusion of the skull bones), and hemifacial microsomia (underdevelopment of one side of the face).

Treatment for craniofacial abnormalities may involve a team of healthcare professionals, including plastic surgeons, neurosurgeons, orthodontists, speech therapists, and other specialists. Treatment options may include surgery, bracing, therapy, and other interventions to help improve function and appearance.

In medical terms, the orbit refers to the bony cavity or socket in the skull that contains and protects the eye (eyeball) and its associated structures, including muscles, nerves, blood vessels, fat, and the lacrimal gland. The orbit is made up of several bones: the frontal bone, sphenoid bone, zygomatic bone, maxilla bone, and palatine bone. These bones form a pyramid-like shape that provides protection for the eye while also allowing for a range of movements.

Maxillary sinusitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation or infection of the maxillary sinuses, which are air-filled cavities located in the upper part of the cheekbones. These sinuses are lined with mucous membranes that produce mucus to help filter and humidify the air we breathe.

When the maxillary sinuses become inflamed or infected, they can fill with fluid and pus, leading to symptoms such as:

* Pain or pressure in the cheeks, upper teeth, or behind the eyes
* Nasal congestion or stuffiness
* Runny nose or postnasal drip
* Reduced sense of smell or taste
* Headache or facial pain
* Fatigue or fever (in cases of bacterial infection)

Maxillary sinusitis can be caused by viruses, bacteria, or fungi, and may also result from allergies, structural abnormalities, or exposure to environmental irritants such as smoke or pollution. Treatment typically involves managing symptoms with over-the-counter remedies or prescription medications, such as decongestants, antihistamines, or antibiotics. In some cases, more invasive treatments such as sinus surgery may be necessary.

Palatal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that occur on the palate, which is the roof of the mouth. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slower growing and less likely to spread, while malignant neoplasms are more aggressive and can invade nearby tissues and organs.

Palatal neoplasms can have various causes, including genetic factors, environmental exposures, and viral infections. They may present with symptoms such as mouth pain, difficulty swallowing, swelling or lumps in the mouth, bleeding, or numbness in the mouth or face.

The diagnosis of palatal neoplasms typically involves a thorough clinical examination, imaging studies, and sometimes biopsy to determine the type and extent of the growth. Treatment options depend on the type, size, location, and stage of the neoplasm but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence or spread of the neoplasm.

Dental stress analysis is a method used in dentistry to evaluate the amount and distribution of forces that act upon teeth and surrounding structures during biting, chewing, or other functional movements. This analysis helps dental professionals identify areas of excessive stress or strain that may lead to dental problems such as tooth fracture, mobility, or periodontal (gum) disease. By identifying these areas, dentists can develop treatment plans to reduce the risk of dental issues and improve overall oral health.

Dental stress analysis typically involves the use of specialized equipment, such as strain gauges, T-scan occlusal analysis systems, or finite element analysis software, to measure and analyze the forces that act upon teeth during various functional movements. The results of the analysis can help dentists determine the best course of treatment, which may include adjusting the bite, restoring damaged teeth with crowns or fillings, or fabricating custom-made oral appliances to redistribute the forces evenly across the dental arch.

Overall, dental stress analysis is an important tool in modern dentistry that helps dental professionals diagnose and treat dental problems related to occlusal (bite) forces, ensuring optimal oral health and function for their patients.

Chondrosarcoma is a type of cancer that develops in the cartilaginous tissue, which is the flexible and smooth connective tissue found in various parts of the body such as the bones, ribs, and nose. It is characterized by the production of malignant cartilage cells that can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body (metastasis).

Chondrosarcomas are typically slow-growing tumors but can be aggressive in some cases. They usually occur in adults over the age of 40, and men are more commonly affected than women. The most common sites for chondrosarcoma development include the bones of the pelvis, legs, and arms.

Treatment for chondrosarcoma typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, along with radiation therapy or chemotherapy in some cases. The prognosis for chondrosarcoma depends on several factors, including the size and location of the tumor, the grade of malignancy, and whether it has spread to other parts of the body.

A tooth root is the part of a tooth that is embedded in the jawbone and cannot be seen when looking at a person's smile. It is the lower portion of a tooth that typically has a conical shape and anchors the tooth to the jawbone through a periodontal ligament. The tooth root is covered by cementum, a specialized bone-like tissue, and contains nerve endings and blood vessels within its pulp chamber.

The number of roots in a tooth can vary depending on the type of tooth. For example, incisors typically have one root, canines may have one or two roots, premolars usually have one or two roots, and molars often have two to four roots. The primary function of the tooth root is to provide stability and support for the crown of the tooth, allowing it to withstand the forces of biting and chewing.

Periodontitis is a severe form of gum disease that damages the soft tissue and destroys the bone supporting your teeth. If left untreated, it can lead to tooth loss. It is caused by the buildup of plaque, a sticky film of bacteria that constantly forms on our teeth. The body's immune system fights the bacterial infection, which causes an inflammatory response. If the inflammation continues for a long time, it can damage the tissues and bones that support the teeth.

The early stage of periodontitis is called gingivitis, which is characterized by red, swollen gums that bleed easily when brushed or flossed. When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to periodontitis. In addition to plaque, other factors that increase the risk of developing periodontitis include smoking or using tobacco products, poor oral hygiene, diabetes, a weakened immune system, and genetic factors.

Regular dental checkups and good oral hygiene practices, such as brushing twice a day, flossing daily, and using an antimicrobial mouth rinse, can help prevent periodontitis. Treatment for periodontitis may include deep cleaning procedures, medications, or surgery in severe cases.

The nasal cavity is the air-filled space located behind the nose, which is divided into two halves by the nasal septum. It is lined with mucous membrane and is responsible for several functions including respiration, filtration, humidification, and olfaction (smell). The nasal cavity serves as an important part of the upper respiratory tract, extending from the nares (nostrils) to the choanae (posterior openings of the nasal cavity that lead into the pharynx). It contains specialized structures such as turbinate bones, which help to warm, humidify and filter incoming air.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Finite Element Analysis" (FEA) is not a medical term. It is a computational technique used in engineering and physical sciences. FEA is a computerized method for predicting how a product reacts to real-world forces, vibration, heat, fluid flow, and other physical effects. It's a way that engineers can simulate the performance of a product or system before it is built, which can help reduce costs, improve quality, and shorten the development time.

However, in a medical context, FEA might be used in the field of biomechanical engineering to analyze the mechanical behavior of biological systems, such as bones, joints, or soft tissues, under various loads and conditions. This can help researchers and clinicians better understand the mechanisms of injury, disease, or the effects of treatment, and develop more effective prevention, diagnostic, or therapeutic strategies.

Sinus floor augmentation, also known as sinus lift or maxillary sinus floor elevation, is a surgical procedure in dental medicine that aims to increase the amount of bone in the upper jaw (maxilla) in the area of the premolars and molars. This procedure is typically performed in preparation for dental implant placement in cases where there is insufficient bone height or density due to alveolar bone resorption, anatomical variations such as pneumatization of the maxillary sinus, or complications from previous oral surgery.

During the sinus floor augmentation procedure, a small opening is made in the upper jawbone, usually through the side of the mouth (buccal approach) or from inside the mouth (crestal approach). The membrane lining the sinus cavity (sinus membrane or Schneiderian membrane) is carefully lifted and detached from the underlying bone, creating a space between the sinus floor and the jawbone. Bone graft material, which can be autogenous (patient's own), allogeneic (donor-derived), xenogeneic (animal-derived), or synthetic, is then placed into this space to stimulate new bone growth. The opening in the jawbone is then closed with sutures, and a healing period follows before dental implant placement can be considered.

The primary goal of sinus floor augmentation is to provide adequate bone volume and quality for successful dental implant integration and long-term stability.

Mandibular advancement is a treatment approach used in dentistry and sleep medicine, which involves the surgical or non-surgical forward movement of the mandible (lower jaw) to address certain medical conditions. The most common use of mandibular advancement is in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), where the tongue and soft tissues at the back of the throat can collapse into the airway during sleep, causing obstruction and breathing difficulties.

Mandibular advancement devices (MADs) are often used in non-surgical treatments. These custom-made oral appliances look similar to mouthguards or sports guards and are worn during sleep. They work by holding the lower jaw in a slightly forward position, which helps to keep the airway open and prevents the tongue and soft tissues from collapsing into it.

Surgical mandibular advancement is another option for patients with severe OSA who cannot tolerate or do not respond well to MADs or other treatments like continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). In this procedure, the jaw is surgically moved forward and stabilized in that position using plates, screws, or wires. This creates more space in the airway and reduces the risk of obstruction during sleep.

In summary, mandibular advancement refers to the movement of the lower jaw forward, either through non-surgical means like MADs or surgical interventions, with the primary goal of treating obstructive sleep apnea by maintaining a patent airway during sleep.

Mastication is the medical term for the process of chewing food. It's the first step in digestion, where food is broken down into smaller pieces by the teeth, making it easier to swallow and further digest. The act of mastication involves not only the physical grinding and tearing of food by the teeth but also the mixing of the food with saliva, which contains enzymes that begin to break down carbohydrates. This process helps to enhance the efficiency of digestion and nutrient absorption in the subsequent stages of the digestive process.

Bone substitutes are materials that are used to replace missing or damaged bone in the body. They can be made from a variety of materials, including natural bone from other parts of the body or from animals, synthetic materials, or a combination of both. The goal of using bone substitutes is to provide structural support and promote the growth of new bone tissue.

Bone substitutes are often used in dental, orthopedic, and craniofacial surgery to help repair defects caused by trauma, tumors, or congenital abnormalities. They can also be used to augment bone volume in procedures such as spinal fusion or joint replacement.

There are several types of bone substitutes available, including:

1. Autografts: Bone taken from another part of the patient's body, such as the hip or pelvis.
2. Allografts: Bone taken from a deceased donor and processed to remove any cells and infectious materials.
3. Xenografts: Bone from an animal source, typically bovine or porcine, that has been processed to remove any cells and infectious materials.
4. Synthetic bone substitutes: Materials such as calcium phosphate ceramics, bioactive glass, and polymer-based materials that are designed to mimic the properties of natural bone.

The choice of bone substitute material depends on several factors, including the size and location of the defect, the patient's medical history, and the surgeon's preference. It is important to note that while bone substitutes can provide structural support and promote new bone growth, they may not have the same strength or durability as natural bone. Therefore, they may not be suitable for all applications, particularly those that require high load-bearing capacity.

Three-dimensional (3D) imaging in medicine refers to the use of technologies and techniques that generate a 3D representation of internal body structures, organs, or tissues. This is achieved by acquiring and processing data from various imaging modalities such as X-ray computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, or confocal microscopy. The resulting 3D images offer a more detailed visualization of the anatomy and pathology compared to traditional 2D imaging techniques, allowing for improved diagnostic accuracy, surgical planning, and minimally invasive interventions.

In 3D imaging, specialized software is used to reconstruct the acquired data into a volumetric model, which can be manipulated and viewed from different angles and perspectives. This enables healthcare professionals to better understand complex anatomical relationships, detect abnormalities, assess disease progression, and monitor treatment response. Common applications of 3D imaging include neuroimaging, orthopedic surgery planning, cancer staging, dental and maxillofacial reconstruction, and interventional radiology procedures.

Reconstructive surgical procedures are a type of surgery aimed at restoring the form and function of body parts that are defective or damaged due to various reasons such as congenital abnormalities, trauma, infection, tumors, or disease. These procedures can involve the transfer of tissue from one part of the body to another, manipulation of bones, muscles, and tendons, or use of prosthetic materials to reconstruct the affected area. The goal is to improve both the physical appearance and functionality of the body part, thereby enhancing the patient's quality of life. Examples include breast reconstruction after mastectomy, cleft lip and palate repair, and treatment of severe burns.

Titanium is not a medical term, but rather a chemical element (symbol Ti, atomic number 22) that is widely used in the medical field due to its unique properties. Medically, it is often referred to as a biocompatible material used in various medical applications such as:

1. Orthopedic implants: Titanium and its alloys are used for making joint replacements (hips, knees, shoulders), bone plates, screws, and rods due to their high strength-to-weight ratio, excellent corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility.
2. Dental implants: Titanium is also commonly used in dental applications like implants, crowns, and bridges because of its ability to osseointegrate, or fuse directly with bone tissue, providing a stable foundation for replacement teeth.
3. Cardiovascular devices: Titanium alloys are used in the construction of heart valves, pacemakers, and other cardiovascular implants due to their non-magnetic properties, which prevent interference with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans.
4. Medical instruments: Due to its resistance to corrosion and high strength, titanium is used in the manufacturing of various medical instruments such as surgical tools, needles, and catheters.

In summary, Titanium is a chemical element with unique properties that make it an ideal material for various medical applications, including orthopedic and dental implants, cardiovascular devices, and medical instruments.

The maxilla is a paired bone - the two maxillae unite with each other at the intermaxillary suture. The maxilla consists of: ... Maxilla shown in green. Skull. Maxilla shown in white. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Maxilla. Maxillofacial surgery ... Sometimes (e.g. in bony fish), the maxilla is called "upper maxilla", with the mandible being the "lower maxilla". Conversely, ... The maxilla is ossified in membrane. Mall and Fawcett maintain that it is ossified from two centers only, one for the maxilla ...
2008: Maxilla Blue 2009: BumRap: Underpass Logic (Also ft. prod from Bashir) 2010: Maxilla Blue Vol. 2 2011: BumRap: Median ... "Galapagos4". Maxilla Blue Homepage Maxilla Blue FaceBook page Galapagos4 Artist Page (Articles with short description, Short ... Maxilla Blue is an American hip hop trio based out of Des Moines, Iowa formed in 2006, consisting of the Emcee Ashphate ... To date, no featuring of any other vocal artist has appeared on a Maxilla Blue record, as all production and Turntablism has ...
... "maxillae", although they are not homologous with mandibulate maxillae. In millipedes, the second maxillae have been lost, ... In arthropods, the maxillae (singular maxilla) are paired structures present on the head as mouthparts in members of the clade ... The second maxillae, which partly cover the first maxillae, consist of only a telopodite and a coxosternite. The telopodite is ... In most cases, two pairs of maxillae are present and in different arthropod groups the two pairs of maxillae have been ...
... is a tree in the family Meliaceae. The specific epithet maxilla-pisticis is from the Latin meaning ... Chisocheton maxilla-pisticis is found in Borneo and the Philippines. Its habitat is lowland rain forest. "Chisocheton maxilla- ... Mabberley, David J.; Sing, Anne M. (March 2007). "Chisocheton maxilla-pisticis Mabb.". In Soepadmo, E.; Saw, L. G.; Chung, R. C ...
The maxilla was uncovered at a depth of 10 feet 6 inches (3.20 m) and was located directly beneath a key 'granular stalagmite' ... When the maxilla was excavated in 1927, it was analyzed by Sir Arthur Keith and determined to be of anatomically modern type. ... The Kent's Cavern maxilla was determined to possess early modern human characteristics in all but 3 of the 16 dental ... The Kents Cavern 4 maxilla is a human fossil consisting of a right canine, third premolar, and first molar as well as the bone ...
... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Frontal process of maxilla. ... The frontal process of maxilla is a strong plate, which projects upward, medialward, and backward from the maxilla, forming ... Left and right frontal process of maxilla, and upper teeth. Animation. Articulation of left palatine bone with maxilla. The ... Anatomy photo:22:os-1903 at the SUNY Downstate Medical Center - "Osteology of the Skull: The Maxilla" "Anatomy diagram: ...
Inferior surface of maxilla. Palatine process shown in red. Inferior surface of maxilla. The bony palate and alveolar arch. ... In human anatomy of the mouth, the palatine process of maxilla (palatal process), is a thick, horizontal process of the maxilla ... When the two maxillae are articulated, a funnel-shaped opening, the incisive foramen, is seen in the middle line, immediately ... Left maxilla. Nasal surface. Base of skull. Inferior surface. Roof, floor, and lateral wall of left nasal cavity. Sagittal ...
In bony fish, the maxilla is called the "upper maxilla," with the mandible being the "lower maxilla". The alveolar process of ... Twisting maxilla mechanism: The depression of the mandible causes the maxilla to twist about the longitudinal axis resulting in ... In more advanced teleosts, the premaxilla is enlarged and has teeth, while the maxilla is toothless. The maxilla functions to ... The lower jaw and maxilla (main upper fixed bone of the jaw) are then pulled back to close the mouth, and the fish is able to ...
Maxilla • Maxillary canine • Maxillary central incisor • Maxillary first molar • Maxillary first premolar • Maxillary lateral ... Alveolar process of maxilla • Alveolar ridge • Amalgam • Ameloblast • Ameloblastic fibroma • Ameloblastin • Ameloblastoma • ...
"maxilla (Videography)". IMVDb. Archived from the original on July 15, 2022. Retrieved July 2, 2022. "Last Dance by One Ok Rock ...
The origin at the maxilla may also be repositioned for better symmetry. Due to it being superficial, the nasalis muscle can be ... The alar part (dilator naris muscle) arises from the maxilla over the lateral incisor and inserts into the greater alar ... It consists of two parts, transverse and alar: The transverse part (compressor naris muscle) arises from the maxilla, above and ... Position of nasalis muscle (shown in red). Left maxilla. Outer surface. Menick, Frederick J. (2008). "CHAPTER 4 - Small ...
malacophagy feeding on mollusks (and parasitoids of mollusks). maxilla Mouthpart. The maxillae are paired and arranged behind ... trophi The mouthparts of Arthropoda such as insects; typically labrum, mandible, maxilla, labium. trophus The singular form of ...
An incisive canal courses through each maxilla. Below, the two incisive canals typically converge medially. Each incisive canal ... Left maxilla. Nasal surface. Base of skull. Inferior surface. Roof, floor, and lateral wall of left nasal cavity. The ...
"Cervalces Scotti." Maxilla & Mandible. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Oct. 2014. . "Stag-moose". Illinois State Museum. Retrieved 2007-03- ...
Left maxilla. Anterior nasal spine shown in red. Skull. Anterior view. Anterior nasal spine shown in red. Right maxilla. ... The anterior nasal spine, or anterior nasal spine of maxilla, is a bony projection in the skull that serves as a cephalometric ... The Maxilla" "Anatomy diagram: 34256.000-1". Roche Lexicon - illustrated navigator. Elsevier. Archived from the original on ...
While the maxillae also extend in front of the external nares in P. applebyi, in this species, the maxillae are low and the ... The maxillae bear elongate, slim front portions are not symmetrical. The maxillae of P. prostaxilis are unique in shape; they ... In some specimens, none of their borders are formed by the maxillae (back upper tooth-bearing bones) as they are cut off by the ... P. prostaxalis can be distinguished from P. applebyi and from other ichthyosaurs by the large, tall, and triangular maxilla ...
Second maxilla with palp; endite well developed. During early years the majority of their diet is composed of sea plankton, sea ...
upper mandible Also, maxilla. The upper part of a bird's bill or beak, roughly corresponding to the upper jaw of mammals, it is ... The ridge line on the upper maxilla may extend to a prominent crest on the front of the face and on the head, such as in the " ... All beaks are composed of two jaws, generally known as the upper mandible (or maxilla) and lower mandible (or mandible), ...
"ONE OK ROCK - "The Beginning" , Maxilla Inc". Maxilla.jp. 2012-08-29. Retrieved 2012-08-29. "【オリコン】ONE OK ROCK、実写映画『るろうに剣心』主題歌で ... The music video for the title track was directed by Maxilla, released before the single on August 14, 2012. The video begins ...
Maxilla are nearly parallel. All legs with spines and hair. Female is larger than male, usually about 6.55 to 8.25 mm in length ...
There were four teeth in the premaxilla, 18 in the maxilla, and 22 to 24 in the dentary. An unusual part of the skeleton is the ... There were four teeth in the premaxilla, 14-16 in the maxilla, and 17-19 in the dentary. Mamenchisaurus have forked chevrons ( ... The type specimen (CV 02501) included skull material; maxilla, dentary, and basioccipital. Additional material includes dorsal ...
The maxilla touches the prefrontal. The jugal bone has an unusual L-shape with a very long front branch and an almost absent ... The inner edge of the rear part of the ascending branch of the maxilla touches the rim of the bony nostril with a low but ... The ascending branch of the maxilla has a complex connection with a top process of the lacrimal bone, being wedged between its ... The fifth cranial nerve, the nervus trigeminus, has extra exits for the branches towards the maxilla and the lower jaw, whereas ...
A camlike link between the maxilla and premaxilla aids protrusion, wherein the maxilla rotates and helps push the premaxilla ... maxilla excluded from the gape; a physoclistous gas bladder; anal and pelvic fins with spines; two apparent and evident dorsal ...
The maxilla is long (approx. two and a half times the length of jugal) and forms most of the lateral margin of the skull. ... There are two premaxillae that are narrow as compared to the maxillary bones and extend in the two long maxilla bones which ... According to Jouve and Barbosa and perhaps depending on the age of the animal, each maxilla bears 13-19 teeth. An important ... The last premaxilla and first maxilla are widely separated by a fourth dentary tooth. Alveoli are widely spaced anteriorly and ...
... maxilla lacks a rostrodorsal process; quadrate straight in lateral view; ilium with dorsal margin convex dorsally, non-pendant ...
The female's maxilla is slaty. She is gray where the male is green, and the gray of the breast extends further into the upper ...
Mouth (oral cavity) Left maxilla. Outer surface. Base of skull. Inferior surface. Unerupted permanent teeth underlie the ...
The maxilla bears 13 teeth. The teeth are relatively large, with a crown length up to seven centimetres. The teeth are ... A maxilla fragment, specimen OUM J13506, was, in 1869 assigned, by Thomas Huxley, to M. bucklandii. In 1992 Robert Thomas ... A rather stubby snout is suggested by the fact that the front branch of the maxilla was short. In the depression around the ... The interdental plates have smooth inner sides, whereas those of the maxilla are vertically grooved; the same combination is ...
The female's maxilla is dark. The lattice-tailed trogon is found along the Caribbean slope for the length of Costa Rica and ...
1983) noted that the maxilla of Y. magnus has an additional fenestra within the antorbital fossa, whereas Y. shangyouensis ... a left maxilla; ZDM 9013, two teeth and ZDM 9014, a right hind limb. It was first described by Gao (1993), and all specimens ...
The maxilla is a paired bone - the two maxillae unite with each other at the intermaxillary suture. The maxilla consists of: ... Maxilla shown in green. Skull. Maxilla shown in white. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Maxilla. Maxillofacial surgery ... Sometimes (e.g. in bony fish), the maxilla is called "upper maxilla", with the mandible being the "lower maxilla". Conversely, ... The maxilla is ossified in membrane. Mall and Fawcett maintain that it is ossified from two centers only, one for the maxilla ...
The primary bones of the face are the mandible, maxilla, frontal bone, nasal bones, and zygoma. ... Maxilla. The maxilla has several roles. It houses the teeth, forms the roof of the oral cavity, forms the floor of and ... The maxilla projects laterally to form the zygomatic process, which articulates with the zygoma to form the lateral portion of ... In the midline of the anterior surface of the maxilla is found a prominence, called the anterior nasal spine, with a lateral ...
... long maxillae and mandibles with mandibles longer than maxillae in Anopheles; (B) long maxillae and mandibles with maxillae ... short or intermediate length of maxillae with no mandibles in Mimomyia and Tripteroides; and (E) no maxillae and mandibles in ... Maxillae and mandibles of males of 44 species of 12 mosquito genera and females of three autogenous genera and two partially ... Length of maxillae and mandibles of autogenous females are reduced to the same level as conspecific males. In contrast, females ...
Diagnostic Information Enlarging Radiolucency of the Right Posterior Maxilla dentalcare.com ... denies recreational drug exposure Clinical Findings The periapical radiographs of the right posterior maxilla show an enlarging ... 3 showing an enlarging radiolucent lesion of the right posterior maxilla. ...
Chronic Inflammation on the Right Side of the Maxilla ReferenceInformation ... Plexiform unicystic ameloblastoma of the maxilla. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol) 5. [Ackermann G, Cohen MA, Altini M. The ... Hemangioma of the maxilla with associated dentigerous cyst: report of a case. J Oral Surg 1966;24:169-72.](http://www.ncbi.nlm. ... nih.gov/pubmed?term=Hemangioma of the maxilla with associated dentigerous cyst: report of a case. J Oral Surg) ...
Check reviews and buy Real Research Quality Human Fetal Half Maxilla - Single today. ... ️Buy Real Research Quality Human Fetal Half Maxilla - Single at the lowest price in United States. ...
Online download statistics by month: March 2013 to November ...
One-Year Results Assessing the Performance of Prosthetic Rehabilitations in the Posterior Maxilla Supported by 4-mm Extrashort ...
Complete reconstruction of an atrophied maxilla can be successfully achieved by means of guided bone regeneration for ... Long-term Evaluation of Peri-implant Bone Level after Reconstruction of Severely Atrophic Edentulous Maxilla via Vertical and ... Conclusion: Complete reconstruction of an atrophied maxilla can be successfully achieved by means of guided bone regeneration ... Keywords: edentulous maxilla; guided bone regeneration; horizontal ridge augmentation; maxillary reconstruction; sinus ...
et sp., which is represented by an incomplete right maxilla that represents a previously unknown non-eilenodontine lineage and ... et sp., which is represented by an incomplete right maxilla that represents a previously unknown non-eilenodontine lineage and ... A late Campanian sphenodontid maxilla from northern Patagonia ; American Museum novitates, no. 3581. ...
Advancement of the maxilla may increase the distance between the soft palate and the posterior pharyngeal wall in patients with ... Advancement of the maxilla may increase the distance between the soft palate and the posterior pharyngeal wall in patients with ... Long-term speech outcome after anterior distraction osteogenesis of the maxilla in patients with cleft lip and palate. *Mark ... article{64702752-9158-4257-a316-b5fb16b5f4c1, abstract = {{Advancement of the maxilla may increase the distance between the ...
zones, sinus wall, zygoma, dental, dentristry, reconstruction, teeth, tooth, arch, denture, implant
Sapatilhas com brilhantes em cor Nude com sola transparente Forma calça pequeno, se o seu tamanho variar entre dois tamanhos aconselhamos o tamanho maior
Tallinna Maxilla Hambakliinik Rotermannis 6 232 302, rotermanni@maxilla.ee. *Tartu Maxilla Hambakliinik 7 371 100 tartu@maxilla ... Tallinna Maxilla Hambakliinik Novira Plazas 6 601 006, tallinn@maxilla.ee. * ... Igas Maxilla Hambakliiniku osakonnas vastutab kaebuste menetlemise protseduuri eest osakonnajuhataja.. Kaebuseid on võimalik ...
maxilla A creative agency/visual production based in Tokyo. From strategic planning to music video, we dedicate our souls to ...
Albertosaurus was a large, meat-eating dinosaur from the late Cretaceous period about 68 to 65 million years ago. It was a theropod related to T. rex but smaller in size. Albertosaurus was about 8.6 m long and weighed about 2500 kg. This replica is cast from a specimen found in Alberta, Canada. The original fossil is i
Casos Clinicos - allograft, Box Technique TM, puros, RECONSTRUCTION, resorbed maxilla., sonic weld rx, Zimmer Implants - mayo 4 ... After six months , we founded a nice alveolar ridge at the pre maxilla area. The new bone formation allowed to instal the sixth ... Upper maxilla reconstruction and distal tilted implant plus two more at the tuberocity area. ...
Eriotstarbeliste tööruumide teostamine. Klientidele kvaliteetne tööruumide mööbel ja tehnika. Maxilla Tähesaju , Tehtud tööd
2023 Maxilla Packaging. Unit 4 Kingswood Trading Estate, London Road, Pembroke Dock, SA72 4RS. All Rights Reserved. Privacy ...
SKU: 019.021.112 Category: Series S Tags: Default implantation, Maxilla, Oral mucosa, Prosthetic ...
Maxilla is the Latin name for the upper jaw. Unlike the movable lower jaw, the upper jaw stays firmly in place - just like the ...
Silverback Xtreme Maxilla. Silverback Maxilla is a biodegradable drivetrain cleaner that cuts through grease, chain oil and ... The maxilla is safe to use on metals, plastics, rubber and seals, this is also perfect to use in a chain cleaning device. ...
Congenital defect of the right maxilla. The nasal septum has deviated to the right with resulting nasal blockage. The skull has ... Congenital defect of the right maxilla. The nasal septum has deviated to the right with resulting nasal blockage. The skull has ...
Maxilla & Mandible, Ltd.. Clean and modern redesign of Maxilla & Mandible, LTD-focusing on attracting museums, educational ... Even though the company has refocused its brand, Maxilla & Mandible still supports and encourages the natural history community ...
The primary bones of the face are the mandible, maxilla, frontal bone, nasal bones, and zygoma. ... Maxilla. The maxilla has several roles. It houses the teeth, forms the roof of the oral cavity, forms the floor of and ... The maxilla projects laterally to form the zygomatic process, which articulates with the zygoma to form the lateral portion of ... In the midline of the anterior surface of the maxilla is found a prominence, called the anterior nasal spine, with a lateral ...
The primary bones of the face are the mandible, maxilla, frontal bone, nasal bones, and zygoma. ... Maxilla. The maxilla has several roles. It houses the teeth, forms the roof of the oral cavity, forms the floor of and ... The maxilla projects laterally to form the zygomatic process, which articulates with the zygoma to form the lateral portion of ... In the midline of the anterior surface of the maxilla is found a prominence, called the anterior nasal spine, with a lateral ...
... evidence that flapless surgery could be a viable and predictable treatment method for implant placement in posterior maxilla ... Is flapless implant surgery a viable option in posterior maxilla? A review, Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg (2012): Article in Press ... Limited evidence that a flapless approach to implant placement in posterior maxilla is effective. 1 Response » ... The current data obtained from posterior maxilla areas showed that flapless surgery could be a viable and predictable treatment ...
maxilla「AD Works 2022」 ▼ Fashion ▼ PRADA×Harpers BAZAAR - "Dear." Client : PRADADirection : maxilla ファッションブラ … 続きを読む maxilla「 ... maxilla「AD Works 2022」” — Helixes.log data-secret=gIlO5Vxw7P frameborder=0 marginwidth=0 marginheight=0 ... blockquote class=wp-embedded-content data-secret=gIlO5Vxw7P,,a href=https://log.helixes.co/ad-works-2022,maxilla「AD Works ...
The alveolar arch of the maxilla is the inferior free margin of the alveolar process. (1) ... The alveolar arch of the maxilla is the inferior free margin of the alveolar process. (1) ...
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  • Maxilla & Mandible, Ltd. (kimcortes.com)
  • Clean and modern redesign of Maxilla & Mandible, LTD-focusing on attracting museums, educational institutions, and high-end private clientele looking for services including fossil skeleton acquisition and private appraisal consultations. (kimcortes.com)
  • Even though the company has refocused its brand, Maxilla & Mandible still supports and encourages the natural history community by providing an every expanding gallery and press section for exploration and study. (kimcortes.com)
  • The maxillae are in touch with every facial bone except the mandible. (mewingpedia.com)
  • In simpler terms, the upper jaw is called the maxilla and the lower one is called the mandible. (mewingpedia.com)
  • The reason being that the development of the lower jaw, the mandible, is strongly related to the development of the upper jaw, the maxilla. (mewingpedia.com)
  • More importantly, the maxilla (upper jaw) and mandible (lower jaw) is extended well beyond the nasion. (mewingpedia.com)
  • ProMed OMS Supply offers Maxilla with Mucosa, Mandible with Mucosa, and Mandible with Knife Ridge Deformity. (omssupply.com)
  • Outcome of the surgery was as planned and the maxilla was now normally positioned in relation to the mandible. (smbalaji.com)
  • Patients generally report with a history of painless expansion of a tooth bearing portion of the mandible, but the lesions of the maxilla are less common. (journalcra.com)
  • The average time from emergence of the first tooth to the last tooth was 17.8 months in the mandible and 15.8 months in the maxilla for boys and 22.1 and 20.1 months respectively for girls. (who.int)
  • It consists of the MANDIBLE and the MAXILLA. (bvsalud.org)
  • Ameloblastoma was commonest in the third decade of life and more in the mandible than maxilla. (bvsalud.org)
  • In bony fish, amphibians, and reptiles, both maxilla and premaxilla are relatively plate-like bones, forming only the sides of the upper jaw, and part of the face, with the premaxilla also forming the lower boundary of the nostrils. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maxilla is the Latin name for the upper jaw. (zagrebdesignweek.com)
  • Two of these facial bones are called maxillae, these form the upper jaw. (mewingpedia.com)
  • Kuidas saab Tallinna Maxilla Hambakliinik Novira Plazas-ga ühendust võtta? (jow.ee)
  • To the best of the authors' knowledge, there is very limited clinical data on the outcomes of simultaneous guided bone regeneration (GBR) for horizontal and/or vertical bone gain for the reconstruction of severely atrophic edentulous maxilla. (nih.gov)
  • Letné pneumatiky pre ľahké nákladné automobily či dodávky za dobrú cenu, to sú Matador MPS330 Maxilla 2. (spintero.sk)
  • Oproti predchodkyni je Matador MPS330 Maxilla 2 lepší najmä v životnosti a vlastnostiach na mokrej vozovke. (spintero.sk)
  • Ak hľadáte pneu pre dodávky za dobrú cenu, voľte letné pneumatiky Matador MPS330 Maxilla 2! (spintero.sk)
  • which is represented by an incomplete right maxilla that represents a previously unknown non-eilenodontine lineage and illustrates the diversity and role of sphenodontians in the tetrapod communities of the late Mesozoic of South America. (amnh.org)
  • Congenital defect of the right maxilla. (creighton.edu)
  • This is the right maxilla of T-rex. (bigfootcasts.com)
  • Advancement of the maxilla may increase the distance between the soft palate and the posterior pharyngeal wall in patients with cleft lip and palate, implying a risk of velopharyngeal dysfunction. (lu.se)
  • The maxilla (PL: maxillae /mækˈsɪliː/) in vertebrates is the upper fixed (not fixed in Neopterygii) bone of the jaw formed from the fusion of two maxillary bones. (wikipedia.org)
  • The alveolar process of the maxillae holds the upper teeth, and is referred to as the maxillary arch. (wikipedia.org)
  • His 3D CT revealed a split maxilla with maxillary hypoplasia. (smbalaji.com)
  • denies recreational drug exposure Clinical Findings The periapical radiographs of the right posterior maxilla show an enlarging destructive radiolucent lesion involving the roots of teeth #2 and #3 (Figures 1 and 2). (dentalcare.com)
  • Three month follow-up radiograph following completion of endodontic therapy on tooth #3 showing an enlarging radiolucent lesion of the right posterior maxilla. (dentalcare.com)
  • This review assesses the outcomes of flapless implant surgery in the posterior maxilla. (nationalelfservice.net)
  • The current data obtained from posterior maxilla areas showed that flapless surgery could be a viable and predictable treatment method for implant placement, indicating efficacy and clinical effectiveness. (nationalelfservice.net)
  • Is flapless implant surgery a viable option in posterior maxilla? (nationalelfservice.net)
  • The maxilla is a paired bone - the two maxillae unite with each other at the intermaxillary suture. (wikipedia.org)
  • These fuse with the maxilla proper to form the bone found in humans, and some other mammals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Complete reconstruction of an atrophied maxilla can be successfully achieved by means of guided bone regeneration for horizontal and/or vertical bone gain including bilateral sinus augmentation using a mixture of anorganic bovine bone and autologous bone. (nih.gov)
  • This was followed by Le Fort 1 bone cuts to the maxilla and the maxilla was downfractured. (smbalaji.com)
  • This paperdescribes a case of follicular adenomatoid odontogenic tumor present in the maxilla, treated by enucleation and curettage with 30 months follow-up without clinical and radiographic signs of injury recurrence. (bvsalud.org)
  • Use of application of navigation system to odontogenic benign tumors with maxilla. (biomedres.info)
  • Odontogenic myxoma: ambiguous pathology of anterior maxilla. (bvsalud.org)
  • This report describes a rare case of odontogenic myxoma of the anterior maxilla in a 14-year-old boy, with an emphasis on its epidemiology , clinical presentation, histopathology, diagnosis and treatment planning . (bvsalud.org)
  • Each maxilla assists in forming the boundaries of three cavities: the roof of the mouth the floor and lateral wall of the nasal cavity the wall of the orbit Each maxilla also enters into the formation of two fossae: the infratemporal and pterygopalatine, and two fissures, the inferior orbital and pterygomaxillary. (wikipedia.org)
  • Globular mass seen arising from lateral wall of left maxilla measuring 5 cms x 4 cms. (drtbalu.co)
  • CT scan image showing cyst involving the anterolateral wall of left maxilla. (drtbalu.co)
  • There is a predilection for the anterior maxilla and the involvement of an impacted tooth, usually the canine, is recurrent, featuring follicular variant. (bvsalud.org)
  • Swellings in the anterior maxilla are uncommon and if present can be deemed as paradoxical conundrums presenting diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. (bvsalud.org)
  • K08.26 is a billable ICD code used to specify a diagnosis of severe atrophy of the maxilla. (icd.codes)
  • The alveolar arch of the maxilla is the inferior free margin of the alveolar process. (xranatomy.com)
  • A 49-year-old woman was referred to the oral surgeon's office by her family dentist due to a lesion on the left side of the maxilla noted in a panoramic film. (drbicuspid.com)
  • Under general anesthesia, a crevicular incision was made in maxilla followed by elevation of a mucoperiosteal flap. (smbalaji.com)
  • Each maxilla attaches laterally to the zygomatic bones (cheek bones). (wikipedia.org)
  • The Maxilla), ethnicity, and histologic variants of the histologic variants of conventional are follicular, ameloblastoma. (bvsalud.org)
  • The maxilla was also backwardly placed and with a narrow arch. (smbalaji.com)
  • Maxillae and mandibles of males of 44 species of 12 mosquito genera and females of three autogenous genera and two partially autogenous species were examined under light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. (bioone.org)
  • In contrast, females of partially autogenous species have complete maxillae and mandibles as in females of anautogenous species. (bioone.org)
  • If an individual has his/her chin set backward, it is likely due to a recessed maxilla. (mewingpedia.com)
  • Another drawback of a weak chin caused by a recessed maxilla is an easily developed double chin. (mewingpedia.com)
  • citation needed] A maxilla fracture is a form of facial fracture. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hard palate that is the roof of the mouth, is formed by the two palatine processes of the maxillae join together with the two palatine bones. (mewingpedia.com)
  • It also has an influence on all the other facial bones and hence, a recessed maxilla can tweak a lot when it comes to the appearance of your face. (mewingpedia.com)
  • This problem is fueled with bad habits such as mouth breathing, the maxilla recession negatively impacts the airway. (mewingpedia.com)
  • A maxilla fracture is often the result of facial trauma such as violence, falls or automobile accidents. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this blog, we are going to be discussing how maxilla and forward facial growth play a pivotal role when it comes to your jawline and facial structure. (mewingpedia.com)
  • One of the major setbacks and the most problematic one about having a recessed maxilla is that it heavily affects facial attractiveness and causes quite some functional issues. (mewingpedia.com)
  • Developing a recessed maxilla during puberty can impact an individual's facial features a lot. (mewingpedia.com)
  • Hemangioma of the maxilla with associated dentigerous cyst: report of a case. (dentalcare.com)
  • http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Hemangioma of the maxilla with associated dentigerous cyst: report of a case. (dentalcare.com)
  • Maxilla fractures are classified according to the Le Fort classification. (wikipedia.org)
  • The maxillae and mandibles of male mosquitoes are delicate, tape-like structures with lengths characterizing genera or higher level classification units. (bioone.org)
  • Your maxilla forms the center of the face and covers a wide area. (mewingpedia.com)
  • In addition to the visual and aesthetic drawbacks, having a recessed maxilla is accompanied by a set of functional problems as well. (mewingpedia.com)
  • After six months , we founded a nice alveolar ridge at the pre maxilla area. (marchesani.cl)
  • For example, when the maxilla is situated backward than usual, it reduces the size of the airway which can cause sleep difficulties like- snoring and sleep apnea. (mewingpedia.com)
  • At Golborne & Maxilla, we believe that our approach to early reading is accessible to all learners regardless of background, we are committed to giving our children the best possible start to their life, which will ensure success in the future. (rbkc.sch.uk)
  • At Golborne & Maxilla, we believe reading is a crucial life skill. (rbkc.sch.uk)
  • Maxilla is a clean, responsive, retina ready and modern WordPress theme suitable for personal blogs or small and medium sized magazine websites. (designorbital.com)
  • An incisional biopsy was carried out and the report was suggestive of ossifying fibroma of the maxilla. (journalcra.com)
  • Isra Wahid , Toshihiko Sunahara , and Motoyoshi Mogi "Maxillae and Mandibles of Male Mosquitoes and Female Autogenous Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae)," Journal of Medical Entomology 40(2), 150-158, (1 March 2003). (bioone.org)