Tumors or cancer of the MANDIBLE.
Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
Neoplasms containing cyst-like formations or producing mucin or serum.
Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.
Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.
Tumors or cancers of the KIDNEY.
Abnormal growths of tissue that follow a previous neoplasm but are not metastases of the latter. The second neoplasm may have the same or different histological type and can occur in the same or different organs as the previous neoplasm but in all cases arises from an independent oncogenic event. The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause.
An adenocarcinoma producing mucin in significant amounts. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.
Conditions which cause proliferation of hemopoietically active tissue or of tissue which has embryonic hemopoietic potential. They all involve dysregulation of multipotent MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS, most often caused by a mutation in the JAK2 PROTEIN TYROSINE KINASE.
An immature epithelial tumor of the JAW originating from the epithelial rests of Malassez or from other epithelial remnants of the ENAMEL from the developmental period. It is a slowly growing tumor, usually benign, but displays a marked propensity for invasive growth.
A locally aggressive, osteolytic neoplasm of the long bones, probably of epithelial origin and most often involving the TIBIA.
Cancers or tumors of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE unspecified. For neoplasms of the maxilla, MAXILLARY NEOPLASMS is available and of the mandible, MANDIBULAR NEOPLASMS is available.
A chronic suppurative and cicatricial disease of the apocrine glands occurring chiefly in the axillae in women and in the groin and anal regions in men. It is characterized by poral occlusion with secondary bacterial infection, evolving into abscesses which eventually rupture. As the disease becomes chronic, ulcers appear, sinus tracts enlarge, fistulas develop, and fibrosis and scarring become evident.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Neoplasms produced from tooth-forming tissues.
Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.
Tumors or cancer of the PALATE, including those of the hard palate, soft palate and UVULA.
Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the FRONTAL SINUS. In many cases, it is caused by an infection of the bacteria STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE or HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE.
Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.
Differentiated tissue of the central nervous system composed of NERVE CELLS, fibers, DENDRITES, and specialized supporting cells.
Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.
Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)

Multi-bracket appliance in management of mandibular reconstruction with vascularized bone graft. (1/281)

BACKGROUND: The most commonly used tool for maxillo-mandibular fixation to the patient who underwent reconstruction using a vascularized bone graft after mandibular resection is a dental arch-bar. However, the occlusal relationship achieved by this method is not ideal. Different from the dental arch-bar, the multi-bracket appliance which is frequently used in orthodontic treatment can control the position of each individual tooth three dimensionally. Thus, this appliance was applied for maxillo-mandibular fixation to patients who underwent mandibular reconstruction using a vascularized bone graft. METHODS: A multi-bracket appliance was applied to three patients. Prior to the surgery, standard edgewise brackets were bonded to the teeth in the maxilla and in the remaining mandible. After mandibular resection, wires for maxillo-mandibular fixation were applied. The harvested bone was then carefully fixed with miniplates to maintain the occlusion. The multi-bracket appliance was worn for 3 months when the wound contraction became mild. RESULTS: All three cases demonstrated stable and good occlusion. They also demonstrated satisfactory post-surgical facial appearance. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to conventional dental arch-bars, a multi-bracket appliance offers improved management of mandibular reconstruction. Firstly, its properties are helpful in maintaining occlusion of the remaining dentition accurately in bone grafting procedure as well as protecting against postsurgical wound contraction. Secondly, the multi-bracket appliance keeps the oral cavity clean without periodontal injury. As a result, stable occlusion of the residual teeth and good facial appearance were obtained.  (+info)

Cemento-ossifying fibroma presenting as a mass of the parapharyngeal and masticator space. (2/281)

We report a case of cemento-ossifying fibroma that presented as a large extraosseous mass in the masticator and parapharyngeal space. CT scanning and MR imaging showed a large extraosseous mass with central conglomerated, well-matured ossified nodules and fatty marrow. The central matured ossified nodules were of low density on CT scans and high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted MR images. Multiplanar reformatted CT scans revealed the origin of the mass to be at the extraction site of the right lower second molar tooth.  (+info)

Skull metastasis of Ewing's sarcoma--three case reports. (3/281)

Three cases of skull metastasis of Ewing's sarcoma were treated. The metastatic lesion was located at the midline of the skull above the superior sagittal sinus in all cases. Surgery was performed in two patients with solitary skull lesions involving short segments of the superior sagittal sinus without remarkable systemic metastasis, resulting in good outcome. The third patient had extensive, multiple tumors involving the superior sagittal sinus which could not be excised, and died due to intracranial hypertension. The surgical indication for skull metastasis of Ewing's sarcoma depends on the location and length of the involved superior sagittal sinus, and general condition.  (+info)

The relationship between accessory foramina and tumour spread on the medial mandibular surface. (4/281)

The medial cortical surface of the mandible can be involved by tumour infiltration from the floor of the mouth. A detailed study of spread via accessory foramina through the edentulous alveolar crest has been previously undertaken, but no similar study has been carried out for the medial surface. In order to gain further appreciation of the mode of tumour spread, a study of the number and distribution of accessory foramina on the medial mandibular surface was performed on 89 mandibles. The number of foramina varied greatly from specimen to specimen. In the ascending ramus above the inferior dental foramen, 3 mandibles showed no foramina; the condylar section possessed the greatest proportion followed by the sigmoid and the coronoid. On the rest of the medial surface below the inferior dental foramen, all specimens showed at least 1 accessory foramen; the greatest concentration was in the middle third along the path of the inferior dental canal, followed by the upper third and the lower third section. Accessory foramina were repeatedly present at certain dedicated sites. The medial facing wall of the inferior dental foramen was found to be the commonest dedicated site (98.3%) followed by foramina on either side of the genial tubercles (71.9%), the digastric fossa (71.9%) and the median foramen above the genial tubercles (64%). The findings of this study are in keeping with the current observation that the lower border is least commonly involved in tumour spread. In view of the presence of accessory foramina along the inferior dental canal and especially on the medial facing wall of the inferior dental foramen, it is imperative to preclude tumour spread in this region prior to undertaking the conservative rim resection procedure. Medial to the symphysis the alveolar mucosa dips down almost to the level of the dedicated foramina in the vicinity of the genial tubercles. As a general rule the attached muscle forms a barrier to tumour spread except in the later stages, however, in irradiated mandibles resistance to spread has been previously reported to be diminished. Under these circumstances, it is possible that the numerous accessory foramina reported in this study could facilitate a direct pathway into the cancellous bone.  (+info)

Amyloid-producing odontogenic tumor in a Shih-Tzu dog. (5/281)

A 9-month-old male Shih-Tzu dog had a right mandibular tumor composed of strands, or nest-like proliferation of epithelial cells with abundant fibrous stroma characterized by spheroid to large nodular deposition of amyloid with Congo-red stain. Globule calcification was also seen throughout the tumor tissue and the spheroid depositions often had a concentrically laminated structure (Liesegang rings). The case was diagnosed as amyloid-producing odontogenic tumor in a dog.  (+info)

Intraosseous neurilemmoma of the mandible. (6/281)

We report a rare case of intraosseous neurilemmoma of the mandible, with an emphasis on radiographic findings. The tumor, located mainly in the premolar region, presented as an expansive, unilocular, well-defined, radiolucent lesion on plain radiography. No dilatation of the mandibular canal was identified. MR imaging helped to identify the solid nature of the tumor. A biopsy was necessary to make the final diagnosis because of the relatively nonspecific nature of the lesion.  (+info)

Ewing's sarcoma of the head and neck. (7/281)

CONTEXT: Ewing's sarcoma is a rare neoplasm, which usually arises in long bones of the limbs and in flat bones of the pelvis, with the involvement of head and neck bones being very unusual. CASE REPORT: a case of Ewing's sarcoma occurring in the mandible of a 35-year-old female. Pain and swelling of the tumor were the main complaints. The early hypothesis was an undifferentiated malignant neoplasm, possibly a sarcoma. The CT scan depicted an expansive lesion, encapsulated, with septa and characteristics of soft tissue, involving the left side of the mandible and extending to the surrounding tissues. The patient underwent surgical excision of the lesion, the definitive diagnosis of Ewing's sarcoma was established, and the patient commenced on radiotherapy.  (+info)

Aggressive epithelial odontogenic ghost cell tumor in the mandible: CT and MR imaging findings. (8/281)

We report a case of aggressive epithelial odontogenic ghost cell tumor arising from the mandible in a 32-year-old man. On CT and MR studies, the tumor was seen as a large, heterogeneous soft-tissue mass that caused marked destruction of the mandible and invaded the mouth floor and tongue base. The tumor displayed a variety of densities and signal intensities on CT and MR images, which correlated well with the degree of cellularity of epithelial islands, abundance of ghost cells and eosinophilic materials, calcification, and cystic areas on histologic sections. Owing to the unpredictable biological behavior of this type of tumor, careful, long-term follow-up is highly recommended.  (+info)

Mandibular neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the mandible, which is the lower jawbone. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow-growing and rarely spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms can invade surrounding tissues and may metastasize (spread) to distant sites.

Mandibular neoplasms can have various causes, including genetic mutations, exposure to certain chemicals or radiation, and infection with certain viruses. The symptoms of mandibular neoplasms may include swelling or pain in the jaw, difficulty chewing or speaking, numbness in the lower lip or chin, loose teeth, and/or a lump or mass in the mouth or neck.

The diagnosis of mandibular neoplasms typically involves a thorough clinical examination, imaging studies such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans, and sometimes a biopsy to confirm the type and extent of the tumor. Treatment options depend on the type, stage, and location of the neoplasm, and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence or metastasis.

Pancreatic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the pancreas that can be benign or malignant. The pancreas is a gland located behind the stomach that produces hormones and digestive enzymes. Pancreatic neoplasms can interfere with the normal functioning of the pancreas, leading to various health complications.

Benign pancreatic neoplasms are non-cancerous growths that do not spread to other parts of the body. They are usually removed through surgery to prevent any potential complications, such as blocking the bile duct or causing pain.

Malignant pancreatic neoplasms, also known as pancreatic cancer, are cancerous growths that can invade and destroy surrounding tissues and organs. They can also spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body, such as the liver, lungs, or bones. Pancreatic cancer is often aggressive and difficult to treat, with a poor prognosis.

There are several types of pancreatic neoplasms, including adenocarcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors, solid pseudopapillary neoplasms, and cystic neoplasms. The specific type of neoplasm is determined through various diagnostic tests, such as imaging studies, biopsies, and blood tests. Treatment options depend on the type, stage, and location of the neoplasm, as well as the patient's overall health and preferences.

Neoplasms are abnormal growths of cells or tissues in the body that serve no physiological function. They can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms are aggressive, invasive, and can metastasize to distant sites.

Neoplasms occur when there is a dysregulation in the normal process of cell division and differentiation, leading to uncontrolled growth and accumulation of cells. This can result from genetic mutations or other factors such as viral infections, environmental exposures, or hormonal imbalances.

Neoplasms can develop in any organ or tissue of the body and can cause various symptoms depending on their size, location, and type. Treatment options for neoplasms include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy, among others.

Neoplasms: Neoplasms refer to abnormal growths of tissue that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They occur when the normal control mechanisms that regulate cell growth and division are disrupted, leading to uncontrolled cell proliferation.

Cystic Neoplasms: Cystic neoplasms are tumors that contain fluid-filled sacs or cysts. These tumors can be benign or malignant and can occur in various organs of the body, including the pancreas, ovary, and liver.

Mucinous Neoplasms: Mucinous neoplasms are a type of cystic neoplasm that is characterized by the production of mucin, a gel-like substance produced by certain types of cells. These tumors can occur in various organs, including the ovary, pancreas, and colon. Mucinous neoplasms can be benign or malignant, and malignant forms are often aggressive and have a poor prognosis.

Serous Neoplasms: Serous neoplasms are another type of cystic neoplasm that is characterized by the production of serous fluid, which is a thin, watery fluid. These tumors commonly occur in the ovary and can be benign or malignant. Malignant serous neoplasms are often aggressive and have a poor prognosis.

In summary, neoplasms refer to abnormal tissue growths that can be benign or malignant. Cystic neoplasms contain fluid-filled sacs and can occur in various organs of the body. Mucinous neoplasms produce a gel-like substance called mucin and can also occur in various organs, while serous neoplasms produce thin, watery fluid and commonly occur in the ovary. Both mucinous and serous neoplasms can be benign or malignant, with malignant forms often being aggressive and having a poor prognosis.

Skin neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the skin that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They result from uncontrolled multiplication of skin cells, which can form various types of lesions. These growths may appear as lumps, bumps, sores, patches, or discolored areas on the skin.

Benign skin neoplasms include conditions such as moles, warts, and seborrheic keratoses, while malignant skin neoplasms are primarily classified into melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma. These three types of cancerous skin growths are collectively known as non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs). Melanoma is the most aggressive and dangerous form of skin cancer, while NMSCs tend to be less invasive but more common.

It's essential to monitor any changes in existing skin lesions or the appearance of new growths and consult a healthcare professional for proper evaluation and treatment if needed.

Multiple primary neoplasms refer to the occurrence of more than one primary malignant tumor in an individual, where each tumor is unrelated to the other and originates from separate cells or organs. This differs from metastatic cancer, where a single malignancy spreads to multiple sites in the body. Multiple primary neoplasms can be synchronous (occurring at the same time) or metachronous (occurring at different times). The risk of developing multiple primary neoplasms increases with age and is associated with certain genetic predispositions, environmental factors, and lifestyle choices such as smoking and alcohol consumption.

Kidney neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the kidney tissues that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can originate from various types of kidney cells, including the renal tubules, glomeruli, and the renal pelvis.

Malignant kidney neoplasms are also known as kidney cancers, with renal cell carcinoma being the most common type. Benign kidney neoplasms include renal adenomas, oncocytomas, and angiomyolipomas. While benign neoplasms are generally not life-threatening, they can still cause problems if they grow large enough to compromise kidney function or if they undergo malignant transformation.

Early detection and appropriate management of kidney neoplasms are crucial for improving patient outcomes and overall prognosis. Regular medical check-ups, imaging studies, and urinalysis can help in the early identification of these growths, allowing for timely intervention and treatment.

A "second primary neoplasm" is a distinct, new cancer or malignancy that develops in a person who has already had a previous cancer. It is not a recurrence or metastasis of the original tumor, but rather an independent cancer that arises in a different location or organ system. The development of second primary neoplasms can be influenced by various factors such as genetic predisposition, environmental exposures, and previous treatments like chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

It is important to note that the definition of "second primary neoplasm" may vary slightly depending on the specific source or context. In general medical usage, it refers to a new, separate cancer; however, in some research or clinical settings, there might be more precise criteria for defining and diagnosing second primary neoplasms.

Adenocarcinoma, mucinous is a type of cancer that begins in the glandular cells that line certain organs and produce mucin, a substance that lubricates and protects tissues. This type of cancer is characterized by the presence of abundant pools of mucin within the tumor. It typically develops in organs such as the colon, rectum, lungs, pancreas, and ovaries.

Mucinous adenocarcinomas tend to have a distinct appearance under the microscope, with large pools of mucin pushing aside the cancer cells. They may also have a different clinical behavior compared to other types of adenocarcinomas, such as being more aggressive or having a worse prognosis in some cases.

It is important to note that while a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma, mucinous can be serious, the prognosis and treatment options may vary depending on several factors, including the location of the cancer, the stage at which it was diagnosed, and the individual's overall health.

Thyroid neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the thyroid gland, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can vary in size and may cause a noticeable lump or nodule in the neck. Thyroid neoplasms can also affect the function of the thyroid gland, leading to hormonal imbalances and related symptoms. The exact causes of thyroid neoplasms are not fully understood, but risk factors include radiation exposure, family history, and certain genetic conditions. It is important to note that most thyroid nodules are benign, but a proper medical evaluation is necessary to determine the nature of the growth and develop an appropriate treatment plan.

Myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) are a group of rare, chronic blood cancers that originate from the abnormal proliferation or growth of one or more types of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow. These disorders result in an overproduction of mature but dysfunctional blood cells, which can lead to serious complications such as blood clots, bleeding, and organ damage.

There are several subtypes of MPDs, including:

1. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML): A disorder characterized by the overproduction of mature granulocytes (a type of white blood cell) in the bone marrow, leading to an increased number of these cells in the blood. CML is caused by a genetic mutation that results in the formation of the BCR-ABL fusion protein, which drives uncontrolled cell growth and division.
2. Polycythemia Vera (PV): A disorder characterized by the overproduction of all three types of blood cells - red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets - in the bone marrow. This can lead to an increased risk of blood clots, bleeding, and enlargement of the spleen.
3. Essential Thrombocythemia (ET): A disorder characterized by the overproduction of platelets in the bone marrow, leading to an increased risk of blood clots and bleeding.
4. Primary Myelofibrosis (PMF): A disorder characterized by the replacement of normal bone marrow tissue with scar tissue, leading to impaired blood cell production and anemia, enlargement of the spleen, and increased risk of infections and bleeding.
5. Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia (CNL): A rare disorder characterized by the overproduction of neutrophils (a type of white blood cell) in the bone marrow, leading to an increased number of these cells in the blood. CNL can lead to an increased risk of infections and organ damage.

MPDs are typically treated with a combination of therapies, including chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, and stem cell transplantation. The choice of treatment depends on several factors, including the subtype of MPD, the patient's age and overall health, and the presence of any comorbidities.

Ameloblastoma is a slow-growing, non-cancerous tumor that develops in the jawbone, typically in the lower jaw. It originates from the cells that form the enamel (the hard, outer surface of the teeth). This tumor can cause swelling, pain, and displacement or loosening of teeth. In some cases, it may also lead to fractures of the jawbone.

There are different types of ameloblastomas, including solid or multicystic, unicystic, and peripheral ameloblastoma. Treatment usually involves surgical removal of the tumor, with careful monitoring to ensure that it does not recur. In rare cases, more aggressive treatment may be necessary if the tumor is large or has invaded surrounding tissues.

It's important to note that while ameloblastomas are generally benign, they can still cause significant morbidity and should be treated promptly by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon or other qualified healthcare professional.

Adamantinoma is a rare, slow-growing malignant (cancerous) tumor that typically develops in the tibia or fibula bones of the lower leg. It primarily affects young adults and can be difficult to diagnose due to its rarity and nonspecific symptoms.

The name "adamantinoma" comes from its microscopic appearance, which resembles that of a type of skin cancer called adamantinoma of the skin or adamantoblastoma. However, they are not related.

Adamantinomas are characterized by the presence of epithelial cells (cells that line the outer surface of the body and internal organs) within the bone tissue. These tumors tend to be locally aggressive, meaning they can invade surrounding tissues and bones. In some cases, adamantinomas may metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body, such as the lungs or lymph nodes.

Treatment for adamantinoma usually involves surgical removal of the tumor, along with a portion of the affected bone. In some cases, reconstruction or limb-sparing surgery may be necessary to maintain function and appearance. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy are not typically effective against adamantinomas, but they might be used in specific situations or as part of clinical trials.

Regular follow-up appointments with a healthcare provider are essential for monitoring the patient's condition and detecting any potential recurrence or metastasis early on.

Jaw neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the jawbone (mandible) or maxilla (upper jaw). These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are not considered life-threatening, but they can still cause problems by invading nearby tissues and causing damage. Malignant neoplasms, on the other hand, can spread to other parts of the body and can be life-threatening if not treated promptly and effectively.

Jaw neoplasms can present with various symptoms such as swelling, pain, loose teeth, numbness or tingling in the lips or tongue, difficulty chewing or swallowing, and jaw stiffness or limited movement. The diagnosis of jaw neoplasms typically involves a thorough clinical examination, imaging studies such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI, and sometimes a biopsy to determine the type and extent of the tumor.

Treatment options for jaw neoplasms depend on several factors, including the type, size, location, and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health and medical history. Treatment may involve surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these modalities. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence or metastasis (spread) of the neoplasm.

Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition that typically affects areas of the body where there are sweat glands, such as the armpits, groin, and buttocks. The main features of HS are recurrent boil-like lumps or abscesses (nodules) that form under the skin. These nodules can rupture and drain pus, leading to painful, swollen, and inflamed lesions. Over time, these lesions may heal, only to be replaced by new ones, resulting in scarring and tunnel-like tracts (sinus tracts) beneath the skin.

HS is a debilitating condition that can significantly impact an individual's quality of life, causing physical discomfort, emotional distress, and social isolation. The exact cause of HS remains unclear, but it is thought to involve a combination of genetic, hormonal, and environmental factors. Treatment options for HS include topical and oral antibiotics, biologic therapies, surgical interventions, and lifestyle modifications, such as weight loss and smoking cessation.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

Odontogenic tumors are a group of neoplasms that originate from the dental tissues or their remnants, including the odontogenic epithelium, ectomesenchyme, and/or their derivatives. These tumors can be benign or malignant and may affect the jaw bones and surrounding structures. They can cause various symptoms, such as swelling, pain, loosening of teeth, and altered bite. The classification of odontogenic tumors includes a wide range of entities with different biological behaviors, clinical features, and treatment approaches. Accurate diagnosis is essential for proper management and prognosis.

Cranial nerve neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop within or near the cranial nerves. These nerves are responsible for transmitting sensory and motor information between the brain and various parts of the head, neck, and trunk. There are 12 pairs of cranial nerves, each with a specific function and location in the skull.

Cranial nerve neoplasms can be benign or malignant and may arise from the nerve itself (schwannoma, neurofibroma) or from surrounding tissues that invade the nerve (meningioma, epidermoid cyst). The growth of these tumors can cause various symptoms depending on their size, location, and rate of growth. Common symptoms include:

* Facial weakness or numbness
* Double vision or other visual disturbances
* Hearing loss or tinnitus (ringing in the ears)
* Difficulty swallowing or speaking
* Loss of smell or taste
* Uncontrollable eye movements or drooping eyelids

Treatment for cranial nerve neoplasms depends on several factors, including the type, size, location, and extent of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence or complications.

Palatal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that occur on the palate, which is the roof of the mouth. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slower growing and less likely to spread, while malignant neoplasms are more aggressive and can invade nearby tissues and organs.

Palatal neoplasms can have various causes, including genetic factors, environmental exposures, and viral infections. They may present with symptoms such as mouth pain, difficulty swallowing, swelling or lumps in the mouth, bleeding, or numbness in the mouth or face.

The diagnosis of palatal neoplasms typically involves a thorough clinical examination, imaging studies, and sometimes biopsy to determine the type and extent of the growth. Treatment options depend on the type, size, location, and stage of the neoplasm but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence or spread of the neoplasm.

Frontal sinusitis is a type of sinus infection that specifically involves the frontal sinuses, which are located in the forehead region above the eyes. The condition is characterized by inflammation and infection of the mucous membrane lining the frontal sinuses, leading to symptoms such as headaches, facial pain or pressure, nasal congestion, and thick nasal discharge.

Frontal sinusitis can be caused by viral, bacterial, or fungal infections, as well as structural issues like nasal polyps or deviated septum that obstruct the sinus drainage pathways. Treatment options for frontal sinitis may include antibiotics, nasal decongestants, corticosteroids, saline nasal irrigation, and in some cases, endoscopic sinus surgery to alleviate obstructions and improve sinus drainage.

Cranial nerves are a set of twelve pairs of nerves that originate from the brainstem and skull, rather than the spinal cord. These nerves are responsible for transmitting sensory information (such as sight, smell, hearing, and taste) to the brain, as well as controlling various muscles in the head and neck (including those involved in chewing, swallowing, and eye movement). Each cranial nerve has a specific function and is named accordingly. For example, the optic nerve (cranial nerve II) transmits visual information from the eyes to the brain, while the vagus nerve (cranial nerve X) controls parasympathetic functions in the body such as heart rate and digestion.

Nerve tissue, also known as neural tissue, is a type of specialized tissue that is responsible for the transmission of electrical signals and the processing of information in the body. It is a key component of the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. Nerve tissue is composed of two main types of cells: neurons and glial cells.

Neurons are the primary functional units of nerve tissue. They are specialized cells that are capable of generating and transmitting electrical signals, known as action potentials. Neurons have a unique structure, with a cell body (also called the soma) that contains the nucleus and other organelles, and processes (dendrites and axons) that extend from the cell body and are used to receive and transmit signals.

Glial cells, also known as neuroglia or glia, are non-neuronal cells that provide support and protection for neurons. There are several different types of glial cells, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, and Schwann cells. These cells play a variety of roles in the nervous system, such as providing structural support, maintaining the proper environment for neurons, and helping to repair and regenerate nerve tissue after injury.

Nerve tissue is found throughout the body, but it is most highly concentrated in the brain and spinal cord, which make up the central nervous system (CNS). The peripheral nerves, which are the nerves that extend from the CNS to the rest of the body, also contain nerve tissue. Nerve tissue is responsible for transmitting sensory information from the body to the brain, controlling muscle movements, and regulating various bodily functions such as heart rate, digestion, and respiration.

Cranial nerve diseases refer to conditions that affect the cranial nerves, which are a set of 12 pairs of nerves that originate from the brainstem and control various functions in the head and neck. These functions include vision, hearing, taste, smell, movement of the eyes and face, and sensation in the face.

Diseases of the cranial nerves can result from a variety of causes, including injury, infection, inflammation, tumors, or degenerative conditions. The specific symptoms that a person experiences will depend on which cranial nerve is affected and how severely it is damaged.

For example, damage to the optic nerve (cranial nerve II) can cause vision loss or visual disturbances, while damage to the facial nerve (cranial nerve VII) can result in weakness or paralysis of the face. Other common symptoms of cranial nerve diseases include pain, numbness, tingling, and hearing loss.

Treatment for cranial nerve diseases varies depending on the underlying cause and severity of the condition. In some cases, medication or surgery may be necessary to treat the underlying cause and relieve symptoms. Physical therapy or rehabilitation may also be recommended to help individuals regain function and improve their quality of life.

Head and neck neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the head and neck region, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These tumors can develop in various sites, including the oral cavity, nasopharynx, oropharynx, larynx, hypopharynx, paranasal sinuses, salivary glands, and thyroid gland.

Benign neoplasms are slow-growing and generally do not spread to other parts of the body. However, they can still cause problems if they grow large enough to press on surrounding tissues or structures. Malignant neoplasms, on the other hand, can invade nearby tissues and organs and may also metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body.

Head and neck neoplasms can have various symptoms depending on their location and size. Common symptoms include difficulty swallowing, speaking, or breathing; pain in the mouth, throat, or ears; persistent coughing or hoarseness; and swelling or lumps in the neck or face. Early detection and treatment of head and neck neoplasms are crucial for improving outcomes and reducing the risk of complications.

Smaller mandibular neoplasms have been enucleated where the cavity of the tumour is curetted, allowing preservation of the bone ... The neoplasms are often associated with the presence of unerupted teeth, displacement of adjacent teeth and resorption of roots ... Thus, surgery is the most common treatment of this neoplasm. A case of giant ameloblastoma was recently reported and managed ... V600E mutation is also seen in other malignant and benign neoplasms, which activate the MAP kinase pathway required for cell ...
... mandibular neoplasms MeSH C07.320.515.601 - maxillary neoplasms MeSH C07.320.515.692 - palatal neoplasms MeSH C07.320.610.291 ... lip neoplasms MeSH C07.465.565.692 - palatal neoplasms MeSH C07.465.565.824 - salivary gland neoplasms MeSH C07.465.565.824.695 ... salivary gland neoplasms MeSH C07.465.815.718.589 - parotid neoplasms MeSH C07.465.815.718.870 - sublingual gland neoplasms ... sublingual gland neoplasms MeSH C07.465.565.824.885 - submandibular gland neoplasms MeSH C07.465.565.925 - tongue neoplasms ...
... skull neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721.450 - jaw neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721.450.583 - mandibular neoplasms MeSH C04.588. ... skull base neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.828 - spinal neoplasms MeSH C04.588.180.260 - breast neoplasms, male MeSH C04.588.180.390 ... bile duct neoplasms MeSH C04.588.274.120.250.250 - common bile duct neoplasms MeSH C04.588.274.120.401 - gallbladder neoplasms ... palatal neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721.600 - nose neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721.656 - orbital neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721. ...
... skull neoplasms MeSH C05.116.231.754.450 - jaw neoplasms MeSH C05.116.231.754.450.583 - mandibular neoplasms MeSH C05.116. ... mandibular neoplasms MeSH C05.500.499.601 - maxillary neoplasms MeSH C05.500.499.692 - palatal neoplasms MeSH C05.500.607.221 ... palatal neoplasms MeSH C05.116.231.754.600 - nose neoplasms MeSH C05.116.231.754.659 - orbital neoplasms MeSH C05.116.231.754. ... mandibular neoplasms MeSH C05.500.607.655 - prognathism MeSH C05.500.607.813 - retrognathism MeSH C05.500.693.528 - maxillary ...
Mino M, Pilch BZ, Faquin WC (December 2003). "Expression of KIT (CD117) in neoplasms of the head and neck: an ancillary marker ... Radiographs: An OPG (orthopantomogram) can be taken to rule out mandibular involvement. A chest radiograph may also be taken to ... Salivary gland tumours, also known as mucous gland adenomas or neoplasms, are tumours that form in the tissues of salivary ... It can distinguish an intrinsic from an extrinsic neoplasm. Ultrasonic images of malignant tumours include ill-defined margins ...
... development of a lesion into a bulla or a malignant neoplasm. Lumps and swellings can occur due to a variety of conditions, ... associated with Paget's disease FOM Most commonly salivary calculi and denture-induced hyperplasia Mucocele Ranula Mandibular ... sound occurs this tends to be a swelling overlying a bony cyst Surface texture Abnormal vascular changes suggests neoplasm ... xerostomia Developmental Unerupted teeth Odontogenic cysts Eruption cysts Haemangioma Lymphangioma Palatal tori and mandibular ...
Since a cementoblastoma is a benign neoplasm, it grossly forms a mass of cementum-like tissue as an irregular or round mass ... It usually involves the permanent mandibular molars or premolars. The involved tooth usually has a vital pulp. It is attached ... Cementoblastoma, or benign cementoblastoma, is a relatively rare benign neoplasm of the cementum of the teeth. It is derived ... attached to the roots of a tooth, usually the permanent mandibular first molar. A cementoblastoma in a radiograph appears as a ...
Cerebro oculo skeleto renal syndrome Cerebro reno digital syndrome Cerebroarthrodigital syndrome Cerebro-costo-mandibular ... Carrington syndrome Cartilage hair hypoplasia like syndrome Cartilage-hair hypoplasia Cartilaginous neoplasms Cartwright-Nelson ... hypoxia Cerebral malformations hypertrichosis claw hands Cerebral palsy Cerebral thrombosis Cerebral ventricle neoplasms ... Choriocarcinoma Chorioretinitis Chorioretinopathy dominant form microcephaly Choroid plexus cyst Choroid plexus neoplasms ...
... hand deformity mandibulofacial dysostosis Split hand split foot malformation autosomal reces Split hand split foot mandibular ... muscular atrophy Spinal atrophy ophthalmoplegia pyramidal syndrome Spinal cord disorder Spinal cord injury Spinal cord neoplasm ... corneal dystrophy Spinocerebellar degenerescence book type Spirochetes disease Spirurida infections Spleen neoplasm Splenic ...
Mandibular trismus is a rare finding but may be present with larger swellings. Dysphagia may also be present in some cases. ... Typically presents unilaterally in submandibular gland that cannot be differentiated clinically from a neoplasm, with pain an ... Key factors to also consider which are less common 1. Mandibular trismus - restricted mouth opening to its full extent (of ...
Examples include neoplasms of the gingival or alveolar mucosa (usually squamous cell carcinoma),: 299 conditions which cause ... maxillary or mandibular division),: 487 trigeminal neuralgia, cluster headache, and trigeminal neuropathies. Very rarely, a ... Consequently, acute or chronic maxillary sinusitis can be perceived as maxillary toothache, and neoplasms of the sinus (such as ...
Mandibular division of the trifacial nerve. Masseter muscle. Deep dissection. Mummification process. Horizontal MRI scan of a ... and maxillofacial neoplasms. However, no other signs are present except those involved in changes in occlusion intraorally such ... Its function is believed to be the retraction of the mandible and the stabilization of the mandibular coronoid process. Along ... the masseter is innervated by the anterior division of the mandibular division (V3) of the trigeminal nerve. The innervation ...
This contains the mandibular foramen, leading to the mandibular canal through which the inferior alveolar nerve passes. This ... Certain neoplasms can spread into the infratemporal fossa. This can be surgically removed through the middle cranial fossa. The ... The mandibular nerve, the third branch of the trigeminal nerve (CN V3), also known as the "inferior maxillary nerve", enters ... The mandibular nerve gives off four nerves to the four muscles of mastication in the infratemporal fossa. These are the ...
Benign neoplasms, Salivary gland neoplasia, Connective and soft tissue neoplasms). ... It is usually mobile unless found in the palate and can cause atrophy of the mandibular ramus when located in the parotid gland ... "Salivary Gland Neoplasms". Medscape.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link) Updated: Jan 13, 2021 Diagrams ... The benign tumors of the submandibular gland is treated by simple excision with preservation of mandibular branch of the facial ...
Abdominal neoplasms Aberrant subclavian artery Ablepharon macrostomia syndrome Abnormal systemic venous return Abruzzo-Erickson ... Acquired ichthyosis Acquired prothrombin deficiency Acquired syphilis Acral dysostosis dyserythropoiesis Acral renal mandibular ... X-linked Adrenal incidentaloma Adrenal insufficiency Adrenal macropolyadenomatosis Adrenal medulla neoplasm Adrenocortical ... Abdominal cystic lymphangioma Abdominal defects Abdominal musculature absent microphthalmia joint laxity Abdominal neoplasm / ...
... mandibular fractures MeSH C21.866.260.275.500.400.510 - maxillary fractures MeSH C21.866.260.275.500.500 - mandibular injuries ... neoplasms, radiation-induced MeSH C21.866.733.579 - osteoradionecrosis MeSH C21.866.733.720 - radiation injuries, experimental ... mandibular fractures MeSH C21.866.404.750.467.611 - maxillary fractures MeSH C21.866.404.750.684 - orbital fractures MeSH ...
These neoplasms were initially regarded as eosinophilias, hypereosinophilias, Myeloid leukemias, myeloproliferative neoplasms, ... This mutation results in craniosynostosis, mandibular prognathism, hypertelorism, brachydactyly, and inter-phalangeal joint ... Unlike many other myeloid neoplasms with eosinophil such as those caused by Platelet-derived growth factor receptor A or ...
They may also occur on the mandibular retromolar pad and tonsillar areas, but any oral surface may be involved. There is no ... The pathologist must be careful to differentiate such lesions from salivary neoplasms with sebaceous cells, such as sebaceous ...
However, sometimes these masses are considered neoplasm: Keratocyst Calcifying odontogenic cyst According to the current (2005 ... "Aneurysmal bone cyst of mandibular condyle: A case report and review of the literature". Journal of Craniomaxillofacial Surgery ...
Distribution of the maxillary and mandibular nerves, and the submaxillary ganglion. Mucus cell are identifiable by the lack of ... Steve C Lee, MD, PhD (22 December 2022). "Salivary Gland Neoplasms". Medscape.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: ...
The cause of pain is the mandibular nerve of the foramen ovale, through which the tumor enters the calvarium. Symptoms include ... Neoplasm stubs). ...
Common sites of oral cancer are the lower lip, the floor of the mouth, and the sides, underside of the tongue and mandibular ... creates immunodeficiencies which allow opportunistic infections or neoplasms to proliferate. Bacterial processes leading to ...
... lingual mandibular salivary gland depression, lingual mandibular cortical defect, latent bone cyst, or static bone cyst) is a ... Neoplasms, such as metastatic squamous cell carcinoma to the submandibular lymph nodes or a salivary gland tumour, could create ... It was originally proposed by Stafne that some parts of the submandibular gland could be trapped during mandibular ossification ... Various synonyms have been used to describe this bone cavity including Stafne bone defect, lingual cortical mandibular defect, ...
This damage can occur with a stroke, Bell palsy, or parotid salivary gland cancer (malignant neoplasm) because the facial nerve ... In contrast, the nearby masticatory muscles are supplied by the mandibular nerve, a branch of the trigeminal nerve (cranial ...
Each gland lies behind the mandibular ramus and in front of the mastoid process of the temporal bone. The gland can be felt on ... Pleomorphic adenoma is seen to be a common benign neoplasm of the salivary gland and has an overall incidence of 54-68%. The ... Pain is more common in patients with parotid cancer (10-29% feel pain) than those with benign neoplasms (only 2.5-4%), but pain ... Each parotid is wrapped around the mandibular ramus, and secretes serous saliva through the parotid duct into the mouth, to ...
... some have classified OKCs as benign neoplasms. The best evidence to suggest that this type of cyst is not a neoplasm is that it ... Used with care near mandibular canal and the neurovascular bundle within. Marsupialization which involves the surgical opening ... Odontogenic Keratocyst underwent the reclassification as it is no longer considered a neoplasm due to a lack of quality ... with some pathologists still considering Odontogenic Keratocyst as a neoplasm in line with the previous classification. ...
The CT scan's weakness is its lack of differentiation between pseudocysts and cystic neoplasm. Also, the intravenous contrast ... Zadik, Yehuda; Aktaş, Alper; Drucker, Scott; Nitzan, Dorrit W. (2012). "Aneurysmal bone cyst of mandibular condyle: A case ...
February 2019). "RBM10 truncation in astroblastoma in a patient with history of mandibular ameloblastoma: A case report". ... 2011). "Whole-exome sequencing uncovers frequent GNAS mutations in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas". ...
If the dysplastic neoplasm was asymptomatic no care would have been necessary, but a symptomatic neoplasm would have required a ... KDP 20, also known as Krapina Dental Person 20, is represented by four mandibular teeth. All four of these teeth show various ...
When they lack a communication to the mouth, the main risk is the chance of a cyst or neoplasm forming in the tissues around ... ISBN 978-1-55009-234-9. Juodzbalys G, Daugela P (July 2013). "Mandibular third molar impaction: review of literature and a ... Completely unerupted wisdom teeth usually result in no symptoms, although they can sometimes develop cysts or neoplasms. ... 141 Estimates of the incidence of cysts or other neoplasms (almost all benign) around impacted teeth average at 3%, usually ...
Smaller mandibular neoplasms have been enucleated where the cavity of the tumour is curetted, allowing preservation of the bone ... The neoplasms are often associated with the presence of unerupted teeth, displacement of adjacent teeth and resorption of roots ... Thus, surgery is the most common treatment of this neoplasm. A case of giant ameloblastoma was recently reported and managed ... V600E mutation is also seen in other malignant and benign neoplasms, which activate the MAP kinase pathway required for cell ...
... the pterygomaxillary fissure to the masticator space allows potential spread of neoplasm between the maxillary and mandibular ... The mandibular division continues as the inferior alveolar nerve and enters the mandibular canal through the mandibular foramen ... The mandibular division is often affected by masses in the masticator space. Lesions found here are usually primary tumors from ... The mandibular division also gives off the auriculotemporal nerve, which passes through the parotid gland to supply sensation ...
Odontogenic Tumors; Mandible [pathology]; Recurrence; Mandibular Neoplasms. · Portugués · Portugués · Portugués. © 2023 UPE/FO ...
... the diagnosis and treatment of salivary gland neoplasms remain com... ... Neoplasms that arise in the salivary glands are relatively rare, yet they represent a wide variety of both benign and malignant ... The marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve and the anterior facial vein pass superficially to the gland. Posteriorly, ... Salivary gland neoplasms make up 6% of all head and neck tumors. [1] The incidence of salivary gland neoplasms as a whole is ...
Tongue neoplasm Related Clinical Trial. Oral Microbioma and Oral Malignant Disease Tolerance and Benefits of Mandibular ... Tolerance and Benefits of Mandibular Advanced Device for Snoring and Sleep Apnea in Oropharyngeal Cancer.. March 4, 2023. ... Improved Implant for Reconstruction Purposes After Mandibular Resection Cell-free Tumor DNA in Head and Neck Cancer Patients ... Assessment of Mandibular Bone Invasion With MRI Using SWIFT Effect of FDG-PET/CT for Simulation and Radiation Treatment ...
... the diagnosis and treatment of salivary gland neoplasms remain com... ... Neoplasms that arise in the salivary glands are relatively rare, yet they represent a wide variety of both benign and malignant ... The marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve and the anterior facial vein pass superficially to the gland. Posteriorly, ... Salivary gland neoplasms make up 6% of all head and neck tumors. [1] The incidence of salivary gland neoplasms as a whole is ...
Histologically, the oral mucosa and mandibular bone were infiltrated by a neoplasm consisting of a mixed population of ... In the present case, we report a case of left peri mandibular soft tissue, soft to firm, tender swelling in a 39-year-old ... We report the case of a 13-year-old neutered male cat presented with a mandibular gingival neoformation. A computed tomography ... Ameloblastic fibro-odontosarcoma with mandibular bone invasion and regional lymph node metastasis in a cat: case report. ...
... , Case Reports , Mandibular Neoplasms , Mandibular Neoplasms/diagnosis , Mandibular Neoplasms/epidemiology 8. ... Background: Ameloblastoma is a benign epithelial odontogenic neoplasm which is common among the dwellers of sub-Saharan Africa ... Ameloblastoma is a benign epithelial odontogenic neoplasm which is common amongst the Yoruba ethinc group. The various ...
The use of SPECT/CT to assess resorptive activity in mandibular condyles. Munakata, K., Miyashita, H., Nakahara, T., Shiba, H. ...
Mandibular Condyle. *Mandibular Fractures. *Soft Tissue Neoplasms. *Surgery, Oral. *Temporomandibular Joint. *Temporomandibular ...
Mandibular condyle is not involved. (A) Axial view, post-contrast, soft tissue window. (B) Axial view. (C) Coronal view. (D) ... Core needle biopsy of the lesion was completed which showed a giant cell rich neoplasm. NGY elected to proceed with subtotal ... The mandibular condyle was not involved by the primary tumor. OMS elected to reconstruct the glenoid fossa and zygomatic arch ... The goal of treatment was to create a reconstruction that would withstand the load of the mandibular condyle during function, ...
El esqueleto facial está constituido por los huesos situados entre la base del cráneo y la región mandibular. Mientras que ... SKULL NEOPLASMS; craniofacial dysmorphism: index under CRANIOFACIAL ABNORMALITIES; craniofacial dysplasia or craniofacial ... The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. While some consider the ... The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. While some consider the ...
Age group 20-40 Both males and females Forward head posture and temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction for more than 3 months. ... Pain due to underlying condition i.e. neoplasm, vascular disease - Infection, inflammation - Erupting 3rd molar/dental origin ... Comparison of Gold Fish Exercises and Cervico-thoracic Postural Correction Training in Patients With Temporo-mandibular Joint ...
In large psittacines, the maxillary keratin will be replaced every 6 months, and the mandibular keratin every 2-3 months. The ... Previously reported oropharyngeal neoplasms in psittacines include fibrosarcoma, lymphoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. Biopsy ... Fractures of the beak and symphyseal fractures of the mandible have also been reported - mandibular symphyseal fractures often ... Three types of beak malformations are seen in young psittacines: lateral deviation of the maxilla (scissor beak), mandibular ...
Treatment with anti-Sclerostin antibody to stimulate mandibular bone formation.. Tamplen M, Fowler T, Markey J, Knott PD, Suva ... Vidian Nerve Schwannoma: A Rare Skull-Base Neoplasm Presenting with Ocular Manifestations: A Case Report and Literature Review. ...
Pulmonary Medicine, Public Health, Health Sciences, Respiratory System, Respiratory System Abnormalities, Lung, Neoplasms, ... Mandibular Injuries, Pediatric Dentistry, Dental Physiological Phenomena, Dental Occlusion, Nose Diseases, Nasal Cavity, ... Neoplasms, Medical Oncology, Oncology Service, Hospital, Oncology Nursing, Radiotherapy, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy ...
AccessoryMandibular Canal. Mandibular Salivary Gland Defect (Stafne). Mandible-Maxilla IdiopathicOsteosclerosis ... "Neoplasm,Malignant, Odontogenic". MalignantAmeloblastoma and AmeloblasticCarcinoma. "Neoplasm,Malignant, Nonodontogenic". ...
... hematoxylin-eosin-stained preparations of the excised mandibular bone of 62 patients with carcinoma of the mandibular gingiva ... hematoxylin-eosin-stained preparations of the excised mandibular bone of 62 patients with carcinoma of the mandibular gingiva ... hematoxylin-eosin-stained preparations of the excised mandibular bone of 62 patients with carcinoma of the mandibular gingiva ... hematoxylin-eosin-stained preparations of the excised mandibular bone of 62 patients with carcinoma of the mandibular gingiva ...
Trophoblastic Neoplasms, Pelvic Reconstructive Surgery, Neovagina, Obstetrics and Gynecology ... Mandibular Reconstruction, Otolaryngology/Facial Plastic Surgery ...
In the perinodal adipose tissue of 1 mandibular lymph node, we found distinct formation of caverns lined by endothelial cells, ... an endothelial neoplasm of the dermis, oral cavity and intestinal organs. The tumors are highly vascularized and characterized ... The tonsils and mandibular and axillary lymph nodes showed similar foci of fibrovascular tissue. ...
Ozkan BT, Celik S, Durmus E. Paresthesia of the mental nerve stem from periapical infection of mandibular canine tooth: a case ... and supra/infraclavicular lymphadenopathy may identify signs of possible infection or neoplasm. ... Pertinent to burning mouth syndrome (BMS), the lingual branch of the mandibular nerve (V3) supplies the anterior two-thirds of ... What is the physiology of the lingual branch of the mandibular nerve (V3) in burning mouth syndrome (BMS)? ...
Labial surfaces of 50 extracted and frozen bovine mandibular young permanent incisors were used. The etchant used in this study ...
... with thermoluminescent dosimeters and Gafchromic film for cone beam computed tomography examination of the posterior mandibular ...
I. Neoplasms of the parotid and adrenal glands. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1955;15:1391-415. Eddy BE, Stewart SE, Stanton MF, Marcotte ... The salivary glands are detailed below: The two parotid glands are major salivary glands wrapped around the mandibular ramus in ... is a rare, low-grade benign salivary gland neoplasm. The most common involved site is the parotid gland, ... González-García, R ... Around 50% of the tumours found in the submandibular glands are benign ... also known as mucous gland adenomas or neoplasms, ...
Rațiu, C, Ilea, A, Gal, FA, Ruxanda, F, Boşca, BA, Miclăuș, V. Mandibular aneurysmal bone cyst in an elderly patient: Case ... Hypercementosis and Odontogenic Epithelial Hyperplasia Associated with a Tooth Root Remnant Mimicking a Neoplasm. A Case Report ... Liu Zhang Li Li Liu Zheng Su Wang (2019) Chronic Osteomyelitis With Proliferative Periostitis Of The Mandibular Body: Report Of ... Montevecchi , Checchi , Bonetti A (2012) Management of a Deeply Impacted Mandibular Third Molar and Associated Large ...
Clinical-pathological Correlation of CD68 and CD8 in Tumor Immune Microenvironment of Salivary Gland Neoplasms Pages 1399-1409 ... of advanced platelet rich fibrin combined with nano-crystalline hydroxyapatite bone substitute for management of mandibular ...
C, If the mesiobuccal cusp of the perпїЅ manent maxillary frst molar occludes distal to the mandibular facial groove. ... be borne in mind that based mostly characteristics of neoplasms, ii) number of cells remaining in proliferative pool ( ...
  • Most series report that about 80% of parotid neoplasms are benign, with the relative proportion of malignancy increasing in the smaller glands. (medscape.com)
  • The most common tumor of the parotid gland is the pleomorphic adenoma , which represents about 60% of all parotid neoplasms, as seen in the table below. (medscape.com)
  • Common parotid neoplasms. (medscape.com)
  • Namin AW , Ong AA, Agamawi YW, McIlwain W, Ducic Y. Why the Facelift Incision Should Be the Preferred Approach for Benign Parotid Neoplasms. (drnamin.com)
  • Neoplasms that arise in the salivary glands are relatively rare, yet they represent a wide variety of both benign and malignant histologic subtypes as seen in the image below. (medscape.com)
  • Although researchers have learned much from the study of this diverse group of tumors over the years, the diagnosis and treatment of salivary gland neoplasms remain complex and challenging problems for the head and neck surgeon. (medscape.com)
  • Some common salivary gland neoplasms are listed in the table below. (medscape.com)
  • Salivary gland neoplasms make up 6% of all head and neck tumors. (medscape.com)
  • [ 1 ] The incidence of salivary gland neoplasms as a whole is approximately 5.5 cases per 100,000 individuals in the United States, with malignant neoplasms accounting for 0.9 cases per 100,000. (medscape.com)
  • Salivary gland neoplasms most commonly appear in the sixth decade of life. (medscape.com)
  • Among salivary gland neoplasms, 80% arise in the parotid glands, 10-15% arise in the submandibular glands, and the remainder arise in the sublingual and minor salivary glands. (medscape.com)
  • Almost half of all submandibular gland neoplasms and most sublingual and minor salivary gland tumors are malignant. (medscape.com)
  • Salivary gland neoplasms are rare in children. (medscape.com)
  • In children, 35% of salivary gland neoplasms are malignant. (medscape.com)
  • Contrasting information was derived through a literature review by Louredo et al, which indicated that in pediatric patients, most salivary gland neoplasms (75.4%) are malignant. (medscape.com)
  • Salivary gland neoplasms occurred with slightly greater frequency in girls (57.4% of patients) than in boys. (medscape.com)
  • [ 1 ] The incidence of salivary gland neoplasms as a whole is approximately 1.5 cases per 100,000 individuals in the United States. (medscape.com)
  • The etiology of salivary gland neoplasms is not fully understood. (medscape.com)
  • Recent evidence suggests that the bicellular stem cell theory is the more probable etiology of salivary gland neoplasms. (medscape.com)
  • is a rare, low-grade benign salivary gland neoplasm. (lookformedical.com)
  • Nonsquamous cell cancers, including minor salivary gland cancers, sarcomas, and melanomas, account for the other half (see the histologic distribution of hard palate malignant neoplasms and the histologic types and frequencies of minor salivary gland neoplasms of the palate below). (medscape.com)
  • This type of odontogenic neoplasm was designated as an adamantinoma in 1885 by the French physician Louis-Charles Malassez. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ameloblastoma is a benign epithelial odontogenic neoplasm which is common amongst the Yoruba ethinc group. (bvsalud.org)
  • Background: Ameloblastoma is a benign epithelial odontogenic neoplasm which is common among the dwellers of sub-Saharan Africa. (bvsalud.org)
  • [ 4 , 5 ] ) Benign neoplasms occur more frequently in women than in men, but malignant tumors are distributed equally between the sexes. (medscape.com)
  • The treatment is simple excision and exclusion of a malignant neoplasm. (lookformedical.com)
  • Fractures of the beak and symphyseal fractures of the mandible have also been reported - mandibular symphyseal fractures often do not heal well in avian species. (vin.com)
  • Three types of beak malformations are seen in young psittacines: lateral deviation of the maxilla (scissor beak), mandibular prognathism (under bite), and compression deformities of the mandible. (vin.com)
  • AFO presents asymptomatically with gradual, radiography revealed a lesion with several de- expansive growth and occurs more frequently grees of radiopacity in the left mandibular ramus in the posterior region of the mandible. (bvsalud.org)
  • Involvement of the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve may manifest as hypesthesia along the mandible or wasting of the temporalis or masseter muscles. (medscape.com)
  • Ferguson K, Wong K, DeHart AN, Richter G. Intraosseous resection of mandibular arteriovenous malformations: A mandible sparing multi-disciplinary case series. (uams.edu)
  • Due to thin bone and weak barriers, the neoplasm can extend into the sinonasal passages, pterygomaxillary fossa and eventually into the cranium and brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Management of temporal bone defects with preserved mandibular condyle. (pocketdentistry.com)
  • Cone-beam computed tomography revealed expanded buccal and lingual cortical bones, perforation of the lingual cortical bone, and displacement of the mandibular canal. (bvsalud.org)
  • We sought to clarify the correlation among a computed tomography (CT) or a panoramic radiography (PR) pattern of bone destruction, a histologic pattern of bone destruction, and a mode of invasion in carcinoma of the mandibular gingiva. (elsevierpure.com)
  • CT images, panoramic radiographs, and decalcified, hematoxylin-eosin-stained preparations of the excised mandibular bone of 62 patients with carcinoma of the mandibular gingiva were retrospectively evaluated. (elsevierpure.com)
  • The CT pattern and the PR pattern of bone destruction reflect the histologic pattern of bone destruction caused by carcinoma of the mandibular gingiva but are not associated with the mode of invasion of the tumor. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Clinical evaluation of advanced platelet rich fibrin combined with nano-crystalline hydroxyapatite bone substitute for management of mandibular molar grade II furcation defects: a randomized controlled clinical trial. (ekb.eg)
  • Tamplen M, Fowler T, Markey J, Knott PD, Suva LJ, Alliston T. Treatment with anti-Sclerostin antibody to stimulate mandibular bone formation. (uams.edu)
  • RV, Centeno VA. Chronic Exposure to Fluoride During Gestation and Lactation Increases Mandibular Bone Volume of Suckling Rats. (uams.edu)
  • SBCs and ABCs were included in the section 'Neoplasms and other bone lesions' in the 1992 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts, but as their clinicopathology became better understood, these entities were found not to be true cysts or neoplasms, and they are now classified under the section 'Giant cell lesions and bone cysts' in the 2017 WHO classification. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A case study by Fukai et al of a patient with perineural spread of adenoid cystic carcinoma along the mandibular nerve suggested that progression of this lesion is associated with elevated expression of ephrin type-A receptor 2 and a transition of the tumor cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype. (medscape.com)
  • Zustin J, Friedrich RE (2010) Hypercementosis and Odontogenic Epithelial Hyperplasia Associated with a Tooth Root Remnant Mimicking a Neoplasm. (jscreative.com.au)
  • Age group 20-40 Both males and females Forward head posture and temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction for more than 3 months. (who.int)
  • Rare orbital invasion of the neoplasm has also been reported. (wikipedia.org)
  • Variability in pathologic interpretation of mandibular invasion. (drnamin.com)
  • Tolerance and Benefits of Mandibular Advanced Device for Snoring and Sleep Apnea in Oropharyngeal Cancer. (checkorphan.org)
  • 52% desmoplastic ameloblastomas showed mandibular involvement, with a tendency to anterior region. (wikipedia.org)
  • SCCs are the most frequent neoplasms to exhibit this behavior, followed by adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC), lymphoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma . (medscape.com)
  • In large psittacines, the maxillary keratin will be replaced every 6 months, and the mandibular keratin every 2-3 months. (vin.com)
  • 8 Anecdotally, birds tend to recover faster from avulsion of the maxillary beak versus the mandibular beak. (vin.com)
  • The left maxillary and mandibular permanent first molars were decayed and had sharp jagged edges. (jcdr.net)
  • Core needle biopsy of the lesion was completed which showed a giant cell rich neoplasm. (pocketdentistry.com)
  • Mehta ST, Moores N, Yamashiro D, Siddiqi F, Gociman B. Protection of the Temporomandibular Joint During Syndromic Mandibular Distraction With a Novel Condylar Offloading Device. (uams.edu)
  • Gonzalez SR, Jones JK, Golinko MS. Surgical Approach in a Patient With Agnathia-Otocephaly Complex: Three-Stage Mandibular Distraction Protocol. (uams.edu)
  • The neoplasms are often associated with the presence of unerupted teeth, displacement of adjacent teeth and resorption of roots. (wikipedia.org)
  • The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. (bvsalud.org)
  • The goal of treatment was to create a reconstruction that would withstand the load of the mandibular condyle during function, provide a stopping position for the joint, allow for freedom of movement, maintain the patient's occlusion, minimize pain, and to provide a cosmetically acceptable result. (pocketdentistry.com)
  • 20. Unilateral Creeping Destruction of Deformed Mandibular Ramus and Angle Associated with Extensive Facial Plexiform Neurofibroma in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: A Case Report with Analysis of the Literature for Diagnosing Osteolytic Events of the Mandible in Tumor-suppressor Gene Syndrome. (nih.gov)
  • For neoplasms of the maxilla, MAXILLARY NEOPLASMS is available and of the mandible, MANDIBULAR NEOPLASMS is available. (bvsalud.org)
  • This neoplasm is most commonly associated with the mandible of young horses and has not been previously reported in vertebrae in veterinary medicine. (bvsalud.org)
  • Urip Murtedjo3 Abstract Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic epithelial neoplasm of the mandible originating from the undifferentiated enamel layer. (damaacademia.com)
  • AFO presents asymptomatically with gradual, radiography revealed a lesion with several de- expansive growth and occurs more frequently grees of radiopacity in the left mandibular ramus in the posterior region of the mandible. (bvsalud.org)
  • When does mandibular growth occur in the rostral mandible? (brainscape.com)
  • The reconstruction of oromandibular defects (mandibular reconstruction) following surgical extirpation of oral cavity carcinoma presents a significant surgical challenge. (medscape.com)
  • Loss of these functions, independent of any mandibular continuity defect, can vastly hinder oral function and competence, and many patients receive little benefit in deglutination with aggressive mandibular reconstruction. (medscape.com)
  • Modern techniques of mandibular reconstruction, such as CAD-CAM technology and rapid prototyping, offer new means by which reconstructive surgery can be planned to optimise aesthetic outcomes and prosthetic rehabilitation. (unibo.it)
  • CAD-CAM mandibular reconstruction procedures using vascularised bone free-flap transfers were performed on 10 patients with benign or malignant neoplasms. (unibo.it)
  • Step-by-step mandibular reconstruction with free fibula flap modelling. (hunimed.eu)
  • Reconstruction for Oral Neoplasms in Indian Setup: Redebating the Utility of Radial Artery Free Flaps Aiyer RG, Gupta R, Damania V, Shah M, Sharma A Dept of Otorhinolaryngology and Dept of Reconstructive Surgery, Medical College and Shree Sayaji General Hospital, Baroda, India (Manuscript) Apr. (entworld.org)
  • 1. Non-odontogenic Intraosseous Radiolucent Lesions of the Mandibular Body Are Rare Findings on Panoramic Views of Patients With Neurofibromatosis Type 1. (nih.gov)
  • In a minority of cases, brown tumor (severe hyperparathyroidism) and odontogenic neoplasms, such as ameloblastoma, were suspected clinically and radiographically. (researchsquare.com)
  • Maxillary and mandibular odontogenic myxomas: case report. (balimedicaljournal.org)
  • Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a relatively uncommon distinct odontogenic neoplasm that was first described by Steensland in 1905 [ 1 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Most series report that about 80% of parotid neoplasms are benign, with the relative proportion of malignancy increasing in the smaller glands. (medscape.com)
  • Seven years later, she presented with macroglossia and a benign mandibular cyst. (medscape.com)
  • Although researchers have learned much from the study of this diverse group of tumors over the years, the diagnosis and treatment of salivary gland neoplasms remain complex and challenging problems for the head and neck surgeon. (medscape.com)
  • Salivary gland neoplasms make up 6% of all head and neck tumors. (medscape.com)
  • A case study by Fukai et al of a patient with perineural spread of adenoid cystic carcinoma along the mandibular nerve suggested that progression of this lesion is associated with elevated expression of ephrin type-A receptor 2 and a transition of the tumor cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype. (medscape.com)
  • 1) 초창기에 SFT는 흉막에서만 발견되는 것으로 생각되었고 중피종(mesothelioma)의 아형으로 생각되었지만 현재는 SFT는 섬유아세포 감엽종양(fibroblastic mesenchymal neoplasm)의 성격을 띄고 있고 흉막이외의 곳에서도 발생하는 것으로 보고되고 있다. (kjhno.org)
  • Transverse maxillary deficiency was the most common deformity, followed by maxillary anteroposterior deficiency associated with mandibular anteroposterior excess. (isciii.es)
  • The most common tumor of the parotid gland is the pleomorphic adenoma , which represents about 60% of all parotid neoplasms, as seen in the table below. (medscape.com)
  • The patient underwent surgical removal of both neoplasms, which were diagnosed as a rhabdomyosarcoma and a Wilms tumor. (medscape.com)
  • Traumatic Mandibular Fractures: Pendulum Swinging Towards Closed Reduction Gupta R, Suryanarayan S, Sharma A, Pandya VK, Sathaye S Dept. of E.N.T. & Head-Neck Surgery, Medical College & S.S.G. Hospital, Vadodara, Gujarat, India (Manuscript) Jun. (entworld.org)
  • Salivary gland neoplasms most commonly appear in the sixth decade of life. (medscape.com)
  • CAD-CAM-generated fibular surgical guides afford improved accuracy when used to restore native anatomy, especially in the context of mandibular arch restoration, and both operating room time and related costs are reduced during fibular sectioning. (unibo.it)
  • Among salivary gland neoplasms, 80% arise in the parotid glands, 10-15% arise in the submandibular glands, and the remainder arise in the sublingual and minor salivary glands. (medscape.com)
  • Many patients with oral cancers or acquired mandibular defects use tobacco products, either alone or with alcohol. (medscape.com)
  • Salivary gland neoplasms occurred with slightly greater frequency in girls (57.4% of patients) than in boys. (medscape.com)
  • Mandibular set-back was the intervention most frequently performed. (isciii.es)