Reward: An object or a situation that can serve to reinforce a response, to satisfy a motive, or to afford pleasure.Disease Management: A broad approach to appropriate coordination of the entire disease treatment process that often involves shifting away from more expensive inpatient and acute care to areas such as preventive medicine, patient counseling and education, and outpatient care. This concept includes implications of appropriate versus inappropriate therapy on the overall cost and clinical outcome of a particular disease. (From Hosp Pharm 1995 Jul;30(7):596)Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Conditioning, Operant: Learning situations in which the sequence responses of the subject are instrumental in producing reinforcement. When the correct response occurs, which involves the selection from among a repertoire of responses, the subject is immediately reinforced.Anticipation, Psychological: The ability to foresee what is likely to happen on the basis of past experience. It is largely a frontal lobe function.Nucleus Accumbens: Collection of pleomorphic cells in the caudal part of the anterior horn of the LATERAL VENTRICLE, in the region of the OLFACTORY TUBERCLE, lying between the head of the CAUDATE NUCLEUS and the ANTERIOR PERFORATED SUBSTANCE. It is part of the so-called VENTRAL STRIATUM, a composite structure considered part of the BASAL GANGLIA.Case Management: A traditional term for all the activities which a physician or other health care professional normally performs to insure the coordination of the medical services required by a patient. It also, when used in connection with managed care, covers all the activities of evaluating the patient, planning treatment, referral, and follow-up so that care is continuous and comprehensive and payment for the care is obtained. (From Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2nd ed)Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Reinforcement (Psychology): The strengthening of a conditioned response.Patient Care Management: Generating, planning, organizing, and administering medical and nursing care and services for patients.Self Stimulation: Stimulation of the brain, which is self-administered. The stimulation may result in negative or positive reinforcement.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Punishment: The application of an unpleasant stimulus or penalty for the purpose of eliminating or correcting undesirable behavior.Pain Management: A form of therapy that employs a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach for easing the suffering and improving the quality of life of those experiencing pain.Dopamine: One of the catecholamine NEUROTRANSMITTERS in the brain. It is derived from TYROSINE and is the precursor to NOREPINEPHRINE and EPINEPHRINE. Dopamine is a major transmitter in the extrapyramidal system of the brain, and important in regulating movement. A family of receptors (RECEPTORS, DOPAMINE) mediate its action.Impulsive Behavior: An act performed without delay, reflection, voluntary direction or obvious control in response to a stimulus.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Risk Management: The process of minimizing risk to an organization by developing systems to identify and analyze potential hazards to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences, and by attempting to handle events and incidents which do occur in such a manner that their effect and cost are minimized. Effective risk management has its greatest benefits in application to insurance in order to avert or minimize financial liability. (From Slee & Slee: Health care terms, 2d ed)Probability Learning: Usually refers to the use of mathematical models in the prediction of learning to perform tasks based on the theory of probability applied to responses; it may also refer to the frequency of occurrence of the responses observed in the particular study.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Basal Ganglia: Large subcortical nuclear masses derived from the telencephalon and located in the basal regions of the cerebral hemispheres.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Prefrontal Cortex: The rostral part of the frontal lobe, bounded by the inferior precentral fissure in humans, which receives projection fibers from the MEDIODORSAL NUCLEUS OF THE THALAMUS. The prefrontal cortex receives afferent fibers from numerous structures of the DIENCEPHALON; MESENCEPHALON; and LIMBIC SYSTEM as well as cortical afferents of visual, auditory, and somatic origin.Rats, Long-Evans: An outbred strain of rats developed in 1915 by crossing several Wistar Institute white females with a wild gray male. Inbred strains have been derived from this original outbred strain, including Long-Evans cinnamon rats (RATS, INBRED LEC) and Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima Fatty rats (RATS, INBRED OLETF), which are models for Wilson's disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, respectively.Conditioning (Psychology): A general term referring to the learning of some particular response.Feedback, Psychological: A mechanism of information stimulus and response that may control subsequent behavior, cognition, perception, or performance. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Ventral Tegmental Area: A region in the MESENCEPHALON which is dorsomedial to the SUBSTANTIA NIGRA and ventral to the RED NUCLEUS. The mesocortical and mesolimbic dopaminergic systems originate here, including an important projection to the NUCLEUS ACCUMBENS. Overactivity of the cells in this area has been suspected to contribute to the positive symptoms of SCHIZOPHRENIA.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Conditioning, Classical: Learning that takes place when a conditioned stimulus is paired with an unconditioned stimulus.Cocaine: An alkaloid ester extracted from the leaves of plants including coca. It is a local anesthetic and vasoconstrictor and is clinically used for that purpose, particularly in the eye, ear, nose, and throat. It also has powerful central nervous system effects similar to the amphetamines and is a drug of abuse. Cocaine, like amphetamines, acts by multiple mechanisms on brain catecholaminergic neurons; the mechanism of its reinforcing effects is thought to involve inhibition of dopamine uptake.Reinforcement Schedule: A schedule prescribing when the subject is to be reinforced or rewarded in terms of temporal interval in psychological experiments. The schedule may be continuous or intermittent.Gambling: An activity distinguished primarily by an element of risk in trying to obtain a desired goal, e.g., playing a game of chance for money.Drive: A state of internal activity of an organism that is a necessary condition before a given stimulus will elicit a class of responses; e.g., a certain level of hunger (drive) must be present before food will elicit an eating response.Association Learning: The principle that items experienced together enter into a connection, so that one tends to reinstate the other.Food Preferences: The selection of one food over another.Behavior, Addictive: The observable, measurable, and often pathological activity of an organism that portrays its inability to overcome a habit resulting in an insatiable craving for a substance or for performing certain acts. The addictive behavior includes the emotional and physical overdependence on the object of habit in increasing amount or frequency.Corpus Striatum: Striped GRAY MATTER and WHITE MATTER consisting of the NEOSTRIATUM and paleostriatum (GLOBUS PALLIDUS). It is located in front of and lateral to the THALAMUS in each cerebral hemisphere. The gray substance is made up of the CAUDATE NUCLEUS and the lentiform nucleus (the latter consisting of the GLOBUS PALLIDUS and PUTAMEN). The WHITE MATTER is the INTERNAL CAPSULE.Games, Experimental: Games designed to provide information on hypotheses, policies, procedures, or strategies.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Information Management: Management of the acquisition, organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of information. (From Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1994)Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Anhedonia: Inability to experience pleasure due to impairment or dysfunction of normal psychological and neurobiological mechanisms. It is a symptom of many PSYCHOTIC DISORDERS (e.g., DEPRESSIVE DISORDER, MAJOR; and SCHIZOPHRENIA).Economics, Behavioral: The combined discipline of psychology and economics that investigates what happens in markets in which some of the agents display human limitations and complications.Appetitive Behavior: Animal searching behavior. The variable introductory phase of an instinctive behavior pattern or sequence, e.g., looking for food, or sequential courtship patterns prior to mating.Self Administration: Administration of a drug or chemical by the individual under the direction of a physician. It includes administration clinically or experimentally, by human or animal.Limbic System: A set of forebrain structures common to all mammals that is defined functionally and anatomically. It is implicated in the higher integration of visceral, olfactory, and somatic information as well as homeostatic responses including fundamental survival behaviors (feeding, mating, emotion). For most authors, it includes the AMYGDALA; EPITHALAMUS; GYRUS CINGULI; hippocampal formation (see HIPPOCAMPUS); HYPOTHALAMUS; PARAHIPPOCAMPAL GYRUS; SEPTAL NUCLEI; anterior nuclear group of thalamus, and portions of the basal ganglia. (Parent, Carpenter's Human Neuroanatomy, 9th ed, p744; NeuroNames, http://rprcsgi.rprc.washington.edu/neuronames/index.html (September 2, 1998)).Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors: Drugs that block the transport of DOPAMINE into axon terminals or into storage vesicles within terminals. Most of the ADRENERGIC UPTAKE INHIBITORS also inhibit dopamine uptake.Airway Management: Evaluation, planning, and use of a range of procedures and airway devices for the maintenance or restoration of a patient's ventilation.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Neural Pathways: Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.Substance Withdrawal Syndrome: Physiological and psychological symptoms associated with withdrawal from the use of a drug after prolonged administration or habituation. The concept includes withdrawal from smoking or drinking, as well as withdrawal from an administered drug.Goals: The end-result or objective, which may be specified or required in advance.Macaca mulatta: A species of the genus MACACA inhabiting India, China, and other parts of Asia. The species is used extensively in biomedical research and adapts very well to living with humans.Sucrose: A nonreducing disaccharide composed of GLUCOSE and FRUCTOSE linked via their anomeric carbons. It is obtained commercially from SUGARCANE, sugar beet (BETA VULGARIS), and other plants and used extensively as a food and a sweetener.Gyrus Cinguli: One of the convolutions on the medial surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES. It surrounds the rostral part of the brain and CORPUS CALLOSUM and forms part of the LIMBIC SYSTEM.Pleasure: Sensation of enjoyment or gratification.Caudate Nucleus: Elongated gray mass of the neostriatum located adjacent to the lateral ventricle of the brain.Amygdala: Almond-shaped group of basal nuclei anterior to the INFERIOR HORN OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLE of the TEMPORAL LOBE. The amygdala is part of the limbic system.Task Performance and Analysis: The detailed examination of observable activity or behavior associated with the execution or completion of a required function or unit of work.Discrimination Learning: Learning that is manifested in the ability to respond differentially to various stimuli.Mesencephalon: The middle of the three primitive cerebral vesicles of the embryonic brain. Without further subdivision, midbrain develops into a short, constricted portion connecting the PONS and the DIENCEPHALON. Midbrain contains two major parts, the dorsal TECTUM MESENCEPHALI and the ventral TEGMENTUM MESENCEPHALI, housing components of auditory, visual, and other sensorimoter systems.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Frontal Lobe: The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.Food: Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.Flupenthixol: A thioxanthene neuroleptic that, unlike CHLORPROMAZINE, is claimed to have CNS-activating properties. It is used in the treatment of psychoses although not in excited or manic patients. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p595)Plant Nectar: Sugar-rich liquid produced in plant glands called nectaries. It is either produced in flowers or other plant structures, providing a source of attraction for pollinating insects and animals, as well as being a nutrient source to animal mutualists which provide protection of plants against herbivores.Cocaine-Related Disorders: Disorders related or resulting from use of cocaine.Management Information Systems: Systems designed to provide information primarily concerned with the administrative functions associated with the provision and utilization of services; also includes program planning, etc.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Functional Neuroimaging: Methods for visualizing REGIONAL BLOOD FLOW, metabolic, electrical, or other physiological activities in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM using various imaging modalities.Dopamine Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate DOPAMINE RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of dopamine or exogenous agonists. Many drugs used in the treatment of psychotic disorders (ANTIPSYCHOTIC AGENTS) are dopamine antagonists, although their therapeutic effects may be due to long-term adjustments of the brain rather than to the acute effects of blocking dopamine receptors. Dopamine antagonists have been used for several other clinical purposes including as ANTIEMETICS, in the treatment of Tourette syndrome, and for hiccup. Dopamine receptor blockade is associated with NEUROLEPTIC MALIGNANT SYNDROME.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.Nicotine: Nicotine is highly toxic alkaloid. It is the prototypical agonist at nicotinic cholinergic receptors where it dramatically stimulates neurons and ultimately blocks synaptic transmission. Nicotine is also important medically because of its presence in tobacco smoke.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Neostriatum: The phylogenetically newer part of the CORPUS STRIATUM consisting of the CAUDATE NUCLEUS and PUTAMEN. It is often called simply the striatum.Token Economy: A practice whereby tokens representing money, toys, candy, etc., are given as secondary reinforcers contingent upon certain desired behaviors or performances.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Dopaminergic Neurons: Neurons whose primary neurotransmitter is DOPAMINE.Receptors, Dopamine D2: A subfamily of G-PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTORS that bind the neurotransmitter DOPAMINE and modulate its effects. D2-class receptor genes contain INTRONS, and the receptors inhibit ADENYLYL CYCLASES.Medication Therapy Management: Assistance in managing and monitoring drug therapy for patients receiving treatment for cancer or chronic conditions such as asthma and diabetes, consulting with patients and their families on the proper use of medication; conducting wellness and disease prevention programs to improve public health; overseeing medication use in a variety of settings.Extinction, Psychological: The procedure of presenting the conditioned stimulus without REINFORCEMENT to an organism previously conditioned. It refers also to the diminution of a conditioned response resulting from this procedure.Sweetening Agents: Substances that sweeten food, beverages, medications, etc., such as sugar, saccharine or other low-calorie synthetic products. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)United StatesConservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Database Management Systems: Software designed to store, manipulate, manage, and control data for specific uses.Compulsive Behavior: The behavior of performing an act persistently and repetitively without it leading to reward or pleasure. The act is usually a small, circumscribed behavior, almost ritualistic, yet not pathologically disturbing. Examples of compulsive behavior include twirling of hair, checking something constantly, not wanting pennies in change, straightening tilted pictures, etc.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Reversal Learning: Any situation where an animal or human is trained to respond differentially to two stimuli (e.g., approach and avoidance) under reward and punishment conditions and subsequently trained under reversed reward values (i.e., the approach which was previously rewarded is punished and vice versa).Medial Forebrain Bundle: A complex group of fibers arising from the basal olfactory regions, the periamygdaloid region, and the septal nuclei, and passing to the lateral hypothalamus. Some fibers continue into the tegmentum.Amphetamine: A powerful central nervous system stimulant and sympathomimetic. Amphetamine has multiple mechanisms of action including blocking uptake of adrenergics and dopamine, stimulation of release of monamines, and inhibiting monoamine oxidase. Amphetamine is also a drug of abuse and a psychotomimetic. The l- and the d,l-forms are included here. The l-form has less central nervous system activity but stronger cardiovascular effects. The d-form is DEXTROAMPHETAMINE.Bees: Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.Saccharin: Flavoring agent and non-nutritive sweetener.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Taste: The ability to detect chemicals through gustatory receptors in the mouth, including those on the TONGUE; the PALATE; the PHARYNX; and the EPIGLOTTIS.
  • The pharmacy on medication education and adherence, diabetes team has enrolled over 300 participants into a pro- education, and diabetes self-management, including gram model based on the Asheville Project, which blood glucose monitoring, nutrition, and physical has been offered in Asheville, North Carolina, activity. (booksc.org)
  • Medication therapy management (MTM) model.1 of our current health care system and retail pharmacy environments, such as mail-order pharmacy, drive-through pharmacy windows, and fast-paced retail pharmacies, have placed pharmacists in a University of Louisville Hospital Outpatient Center challenging atmosphere to provide face-to-face, Pharmacy. (booksc.org)
  • Pharmacy Medication Therapy Management: A Critical Piece of the Diabetes Management Puzzle TINA M. CLAYPOOL, PharmD, CDE Downloaded from aip.sagepub.com at University of New England on June 5, 2015 C Medication Therapy Review linical pharmacists can help improve Intervention and/or Referral patient health by providing medication Possible referral of patient to physician, another pharmacist or other healthcare professional therapy management to patients with chronic conditions, including diabetes. (booksc.org)
  • Medication therapy management (MTM) is a term used to describe a broad range of health care services provided by pharmacists, the medication experts on the health care team (see Figure 1). (booksc.org)
  • He indicated that with the discounts available insurance intermediaries have found it much easier to sell risk management advice to their clients, and pointed out that "risks that do not aggregate or correlate are currently extremely attractive to the market in this post-September 11 period, it is increasingly important to examine ways of creating risk separation and looking at risk in different ways. (insurancejournal.com)
  • The rewards in expanding to new markets can far outweigh the risks, especially if companies take smart steps to minimize and manage their exposure to risks. (inboundlogistics.com)
  • As organizations continue to outsource, form partnerships and share data with third parties, a strong vendor risk management program that stays ahead or risks in the information supply chain has to be a top priority. (inboundlogistics.com)
  • While the rewards of global operations are substantial, so are the risks. (inboundlogistics.com)
  • In the next instalment of the just-food management briefing, we take a look at the risks and rewards on offer for overseas companies expanding in China's rapidly evolving e-tail space. (just-food.com)
  • Morgan Lewis partner David Miller is quoted in The Hedge Fund Law Report , detailing the risks and rewards of corporate access - meetings between institutional investors and company executives that cover general matters in the company, market, or industry. (morganlewis.com)
  • We just wrapped our October issue of Risk Management magazine today, and the cover story discusses the opportunities and risks for companies who use social media like blogs, Twitter and YouTube to enhance their brands and sell products. (riskmanagementmonitor.com)
  • Here's the quests that you'll find in your Field Research list during July 2020 - but remember, these quests are rewarded at random from PokeStops, so which you see is entirely down to chance. (vg247.com)
  • Earlier, management had decided to announce third-quarter fiscal 2020 results on Apr 21. (yahoo.com)
  • Michael Armstrong is a Companion and former Chief Examiner of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), a managing partner of E-Reward and an independent management consultant. (koganpage.com)
  • With the improvements in the behavioral research and theories, psychologists started looking at how people reacted to rewards and what motivated them to do what they were doing, and as a result of this, psychologists started creating motivational theories, which is very closely affiliated with reward management. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most people assimilate "rewards", with salary raise or bonuses, but this is only one kind of reward, extrinsic reward. (wikipedia.org)
  • In every place that I have ever worked, the assumption has been that if you want people to work harder, offer them more money, and to keep them working hard, reward their hard work with a bonus (positive reinforcement). (oreilly.com)
  • People want more out of life than just professional status and flash rewards. (personneltoday.com)
  • Stephen Moir, HR director at Cambridgeshire County Council and reward lead for the Public Sector People Managers' Association, agrees. (personneltoday.com)
  • Some people love when given praise in front of the audience, while other prefer more personal and quiet way to tell them that they are rewarded. (blogswow.com)
  • Basically, Performance management classifies procedures, accomplishes, and improves the performance of people in the company. (bartleby.com)
  • Too many make people management changes in isolation of reward. (employment-studies.co.uk)
  • When I was the CISO at the Port of Seattle, I implemented a fun and simple approach for rewarding people for their good ideas and efforts known as the "You Done Good" awards. (techtarget.com)
  • To support you in this process, we offer a wide range of in-house training, including generic and specific job-related training, coaching in personal and interpersonal skills, training in people management, as well as language training. (europa.eu)
  • That's why we need emergency management coordinators to develop plans and ensure that procedures are in place to help people affected by natural disasters or other emergencies. (trade-schools.net)
  • People should never be rewarded for breaking into software and finding weaknesses. (eweek.com)
  • Total reward may seem to some like one of those 'management-speak' specials, a term that everyone bandies around but that means different things to different people. (employeebenefits.co.uk)
  • The Routledge Companion to Reward Management provides a prestige reference work and a state-of-the-art compilation, mapping out contemporary developments and debates on rewarding people in employment, and how they relate to business, corporate governance and management. (routledge.com)
  • Becoming the partner of strategy execution through designing relevant employee reward, e-learning and development structures to match the organization's long term and short term goals is important for every company. (essaysprofessors.com)
  • Primary Care First is a set of voluntary five-year payment model options that reward value and quality by offering innovative payment model structures to support delivery of advanced primary care. (cms.gov)
  • For employers , we take a highly bespoke and context-sensitive approach to ensure that reward delivers the desired objectives. (employment-studies.co.uk)
  • Insufficient attention is given to the detail of management and communications - identifying stakeholders, obtaining their views, building support for proposals, getting business sign off, communicating outcomes, training in new processes and evaluating results against initial objectives. (employment-studies.co.uk)
  • DMS Progrowers, a provider of post-harvest management to kiwifruit growers, reduced energy costs per tray of fruit by 22 per cent and locked in savings of around $100,000 a year. (nzherald.co.nz)
  • In our 35 years, Rewards Network has helped nearly 100,000 local restaurants grow their business. (rewardsnetwork.com)
  • Charles Cotton, the CIPD's Adviser on Reward, Peter Newhouse, Global Head of Reward at Unilever and Frances Richardson, Head of Reward at Oxfam, discuss. (cipd.co.uk)
  • Peter Newhouse who's global head of reward at Unilever and Frances Richardson, head of reward at Oxfam. (cipd.co.uk)
  • More is always better when it comes to credit card rewards, and in keeping with this theme, Navy Federal Credit Union has upgraded the earning capabilities of its More Rewards American Express Card. (credit-land.com)
  • Pay deals are proving difficult and budgets have been slashed, but there are ways to reward your staff despite the credit crunch, discovers Nick Martindale. (personneltoday.com)
  • While I cannot hope to make the reader into a reward expert just by reading this book, I have shared my views on what I see as important in reward management. (employeebenefits.co.uk)
  • This software makes it easier for managers to make good reward decisions, makes it easier to ensure they comply with guidelines, and automates a lot of the workflow. (halogensoftware.com)
  • Make sure your management software is able to interpret the data (generated in dry, complicated form) coming from the switch and display it in graphical form, so you can see what is happening in your network. (enterprisenetworkingplanet.com)
  • This card was built to provide the best rewards for purchases they make every day," he added. (credit-land.com)
  • Rewards Network agrees to pay its merchant cash advance clients upfront in a lump sum for a percentage of sales they will make over time. (wikipedia.org)
  • The content in this course is based on the Body of Competency and Knowledge (BoCK), 2015 of Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). (skillsoft.com)
  • While the alignment of rewards with overall talent management was the top challenge across all geographies, the approaches to achieve this goal truly reflected the economic, cultural and political nuances of the local regions," said Jason Flynn, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP, in the report. (shrm.org)
  • While the 1x points base rewards rate might seem low for a business card, the U.S. Bank Business Select Rewards card offers savvy spenders an opportunity to maximize their rewards by choosing one bonus category to earn 3x the points. (creditcards.com)
  • Rather than offer a flat rewards rate or use rotating bonus categories, the U.S. Bank Business Select Rewards card asks its users to choose one bonus category to earn three times the rewards, with no point limits. (creditcards.com)
  • You'll only earn one point per dollar on all other purchases, but you'll be able to ramp up your rewards by choosing your bonus category strategically. (creditcards.com)
  • Thanks to a direct integration of Steroids, Eidoo users can provide liquidity and earn rewards without ever leaving their mobile wallets. (medium.com)
  • Earn Membership Reward points on all eligible transactions. (americanexpress.com)
  • Only American Express FX International Payments clients with a valid American Express Business or Corporate Card are eligible to earn Membership Rewards. (americanexpress.com)
  • You will earn 1 Membership Rewards point for every AU$15 you spend in foreign currency payments. (americanexpress.com)
  • The author demonstrates in a didactically appropriate manner how companies can use ERM in a concrete way to achieve better risk-reward decisions under uncertainty. (springer.com)
  • I saw this page, http://riskrewardlimited.com/treasury-management, on the Risk Reward Web site and thought you might be interested. (riskrewardlimited.com)
  • It contacted its local training supplier who asked Risk Reward to provide a specialist derivatives auditor to train its audit staff in Connecticut. (riskrewardlimited.com)