Sperm Count: A count of SPERM in the ejaculum, expressed as number per milliliter.Sperm Head: The anterior portion of the spermatozoon (SPERMATOZOA) that contains mainly the nucleus with highly compact CHROMATIN material.Sperm Capacitation: The structural and functional changes by which SPERMATOZOA become capable of oocyte FERTILIZATION. It normally requires exposing the sperm to the female genital tract for a period of time to bring about increased SPERM MOTILITY and the ACROSOME REACTION before fertilization in the FALLOPIAN TUBES can take place.Sperm Maturation: The maturing process of SPERMATOZOA after leaving the testicular SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES. Maturation in SPERM MOTILITY and FERTILITY takes place in the EPIDIDYMIS as the sperm migrate from caput epididymis to cauda epididymis.Sperm Transport: Passive or active movement of SPERMATOZOA from the testicular SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES through the male reproductive tract as well as within the female reproductive tract.Sperm-Ovum Interactions: Interactive processes between the oocyte (OVUM) and the sperm (SPERMATOZOA) including sperm adhesion, ACROSOME REACTION, sperm penetration of the ZONA PELLUCIDA, and events leading to FERTILIZATION.Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic: An assisted fertilization technique consisting of the microinjection of a single viable sperm into an extracted ovum. It is used principally to overcome low sperm count, low sperm motility, inability of sperm to penetrate the egg, or other conditions related to male infertility (INFERTILITY, MALE).Infertility, Male: The inability of the male to effect FERTILIZATION of an OVUM after a specified period of unprotected intercourse. Male sterility is permanent infertility.Acrosome: The cap-like structure covering the anterior portion of SPERM HEAD. Acrosome, derived from LYSOSOMES, is a membrane-bound organelle that contains the required hydrolytic and proteolytic enzymes necessary for sperm penetration of the egg in FERTILIZATION.Sperm Midpiece: The middle piece of the spermatozoon is a highly organized segment consisting of MITOCHONDRIA, the outer dense fibers and the core microtubular structure.Fertilization: The fusion of a spermatozoon (SPERMATOZOA) with an OVUM thus resulting in the formation of a ZYGOTE.Semen: The thick, yellowish-white, viscid fluid secretion of male reproductive organs discharged upon ejaculation. In addition to reproductive organ secretions, it contains SPERMATOZOA and their nutrient plasma.Sperm Banks: Centers for acquiring and storing semen.Semen Preservation: The process by which semen is kept viable outside of the organism from which it was derived (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Epididymis: The convoluted cordlike structure attached to the posterior of the TESTIS. Epididymis consists of the head (caput), the body (corpus), and the tail (cauda). A network of ducts leaving the testis joins into a common epididymal tubule proper which provides the transport, storage, and maturation of SPERMATOZOA.Men: Human males as cultural, psychological, sociological, political, and economic entities.Semen Analysis: The quality of SEMEN, an indicator of male fertility, can be determined by semen volume, pH, sperm concentration (SPERM COUNT), total sperm number, sperm viability, sperm vigor (SPERM MOTILITY), normal sperm morphology, ACROSOME integrity, and the concentration of WHITE BLOOD CELLS.Zona Pellucida: A tough transparent membrane surrounding the OVUM. It is penetrated by the sperm during FERTILIZATION.Testis: The male gonad containing two functional parts: the SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES for the production and transport of male germ cells (SPERMATOGENESIS) and the interstitial compartment containing LEYDIG CELLS that produce ANDROGENS.Ejaculation: The emission of SEMEN to the exterior, resulting from the contraction of muscles surrounding the male internal urogenital ducts.Fertility: The capacity to conceive or to induce conception. It may refer to either the male or female.Oligospermia: A condition of suboptimal concentration of SPERMATOZOA in the ejaculated SEMEN to ensure successful FERTILIZATION of an OVUM. In humans, oligospermia is defined as a sperm count below 20 million per milliliter semen.Cryopreservation: Preservation of cells, tissues, organs, or embryos by freezing. In histological preparations, cryopreservation or cryofixation is used to maintain the existing form, structure, and chemical composition of all the constituent elements of the specimens.Sperm Whale: The species Physeter catodon (also called Physeter macrocephalus), in the family Physeteridae. The common name is derived from the milky wax substance in its head (spermaceti). The species also produces an intestinal secretion AMBERGRIS, which was previously used in perfumes. The sperm whale is the largest toothed MAMMAL in the world.Ovum: A mature haploid female germ cell extruded from the OVARY at OVULATION.Asthenozoospermia: A condition in which the percentage of progressively motile sperm is abnormally low. In men, it is defined as Seminal Plasma Proteins: Proteins found in SEMEN. Major seminal plasma proteins are secretory proteins from the male sex accessory glands, such as the SEMINAL VESICLES and the PROSTATE. They include the seminal vesicle-specific antigen, an ejaculate clotting protein; and the PROSTATE-SPECIFIC ANTIGEN, a protease and an esterase.Protamines: A group of simple proteins that yield basic amino acids on hydrolysis and that occur combined with nucleic acid in the sperm of fish. Protamines contain very few kinds of amino acids. Protamine sulfate combines with heparin to form a stable inactive complex; it is used to neutralize the anticoagulant action of heparin in the treatment of heparin overdose. (From Merck Index, 11th ed; Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p692)Men's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of men.Insemination, Artificial: Artificial introduction of SEMEN or SPERMATOZOA into the VAGINA to facilitate FERTILIZATION.Sea Urchins: Somewhat flattened, globular echinoderms, having thin, brittle shells of calcareous plates. They are useful models for studying FERTILIZATION and EMBRYO DEVELOPMENT.Azoospermia: A condition of having no sperm present in the ejaculate (SEMEN).Oocytes: Female germ cells derived from OOGONIA and termed OOCYTES when they enter MEIOSIS. The primary oocytes begin meiosis but are arrested at the diplotene state until OVULATION at PUBERTY to give rise to haploid secondary oocytes or ova (OVUM).Egg Proteins: Proteins which are found in eggs (OVA) from any species.Vasectomy: Surgical removal of the ductus deferens, or a portion of it. It is done in association with prostatectomy, or to induce infertility. (Dorland, 28th ed)Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Seminal Vesicle Secretory Proteins: The secretory proteins of the seminal vesicles are proteins and enzymes that are important in the rapid clotting of the ejaculate. The major clotting protein is seminal vesicle-specific antigen. Many of these seminal vesicle proteins are under androgen regulation, and are substrates for the prostatic enzymes, such as the PROSTATE-SPECIFIC ANTIGEN, a protease and an esterase.Fallopian Tubes: A pair of highly specialized muscular canals extending from the UTERUS to its corresponding OVARY. They provide the means for OVUM collection, and the site for the final maturation of gametes and FERTILIZATION. The fallopian tube consists of an interstitium, an isthmus, an ampulla, an infundibulum, and fimbriae. Its wall consists of three histologic layers: serous, muscular, and an internal mucosal layer lined with both ciliated and secretory cells.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Cryoprotective Agents: Substances that provide protection against the harmful effects of freezing temperatures.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Whales: Large marine mammals of the order CETACEA. In the past, they were commercially valued for whale oil, for their flesh as human food and in ANIMAL FEED and FERTILIZERS, and for baleen. Today, there is a moratorium on most commercial whaling, as all species are either listed as endangered or threatened.Insemination: The deposit of SEMEN or SPERMATOZOA into the VAGINA to facilitate FERTILIZATION.Genitalia, Male: The male reproductive organs. They are divided into the external organs (PENIS; SCROTUM;and URETHRA) and the internal organs (TESTIS; EPIDIDYMIS; VAS DEFERENS; SEMINAL VESICLES; EJACULATORY DUCTS; PROSTATE; and BULBOURETHRAL GLANDS).Pregnancy Rate: The ratio of the number of conceptions (CONCEPTION) including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; and fetal losses, to the mean number of females of reproductive age in a population during a set time period.Vitelline Membrane: The plasma membrane of the egg.Microinjections: The injection of very small amounts of fluid, often with the aid of a microscope and microsyringes.Testosterone: A potent androgenic steroid and major product secreted by the LEYDIG CELLS of the TESTIS. Its production is stimulated by LUTEINIZING HORMONE from the PITUITARY GLAND. In turn, testosterone exerts feedback control of the pituitary LH and FSH secretion. Depending on the tissues, testosterone can be further converted to DIHYDROTESTOSTERONE or ESTRADIOL.Contraceptive Agents, Male: Chemical substances or agents with contraceptive activity in males. Use for male contraceptive agents in general or for which there is no specific heading.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.DNA Fragmentation: Splitting the DNA into shorter pieces by endonucleolytic DNA CLEAVAGE at multiple sites. It includes the internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, which along with chromatin condensation, are considered to be the hallmarks of APOPTOSIS.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Aneuploidy: The chromosomal constitution of cells which deviate from the normal by the addition or subtraction of CHROMOSOMES, chromosome pairs, or chromosome fragments. In a normally diploid cell (DIPLOIDY) the loss of a chromosome pair is termed nullisomy (symbol: 2N-2), the loss of a single chromosome is MONOSOMY (symbol: 2N-1), the addition of a chromosome pair is tetrasomy (symbol: 2N+2), the addition of a single chromosome is TRISOMY (symbol: 2N+1).Copulation: Sexual union of a male and a female in non-human species.Reproductive Techniques: Methods pertaining to the generation of new individuals, including techniques used in selective BREEDING, cloning (CLONING, ORGANISM), and assisted reproduction (REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, ASSISTED).Homosexuality, Male: Sexual attraction or relationship between males.Reproductive Techniques, Assisted: Clinical and laboratory techniques used to enhance fertility in humans and animals.Oviducts: Ducts that serve exclusively for the passage of eggs from the ovaries to the exterior of the body. In non-mammals, they are termed oviducts. In mammals, they are highly specialized and known as FALLOPIAN TUBES.Y Chromosome: The male sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and none of the female gametes in humans and in some other male-heterogametic species in which the homologue of the X chromosome has been retained.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Zygote: The fertilized OVUM resulting from the fusion of a male and a female gamete.Vasovasostomy: Surgical anastomosis or fistulization of the spermatic ducts to restore fertility in a previously vasectomized male.Chromomycin A3: Glycosidic antibiotic from Streptomyces griseus used as a fluorescent stain of DNA and as an antineoplastic agent.Povidone: A polyvinyl polymer of variable molecular weight; used as suspending and dispersing agent and vehicle for pharmaceuticals; also used as blood volume expander.Epididymal Secretory Proteins: Proteins secreted by the epididymal epithelium. These proteins are both tissue- and species-specific. They are important molecular agents in the process of sperm maturation.Cervix Mucus: A slightly alkaline secretion of the endocervical glands. The consistency and amount are dependent on the physiological hormone changes in the menstrual cycle. It contains the glycoprotein mucin, amino acids, sugar, enzymes, and electrolytes, with a water content up to 90%. The mucus is a useful protection against the ascent of bacteria and sperm into the uterus. (From Dictionary of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1988)Chromosomes, Human, Y: The human male sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and none of the female gametes in humans.Chromatin: The material of CHROMOSOMES. It is a complex of DNA; HISTONES; and nonhistone proteins (CHROMOSOMAL PROTEINS, NON-HISTONE) found within the nucleus of a cell.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Testicular Diseases: Pathological processes of the TESTIS.Infertility: Inability to reproduce after a specified period of unprotected intercourse. Reproductive sterility is permanent infertility.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Meiosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division, occurring during maturation of the GERM CELLS. Two successive cell nucleus divisions following a single chromosome duplication (S PHASE) result in daughter cells with half the number of CHROMOSOMES as the parent cells.Insemination, Artificial, Homologous: Human artificial insemination in which the husband's semen is used.Genitalia, Female: The female reproductive organs. The external organs include the VULVA; BARTHOLIN'S GLANDS; and CLITORIS. The internal organs include the VAGINA; UTERUS; OVARY; and FALLOPIAN TUBES.Insemination, Artificial, Heterologous: Human artificial insemination in which the semen used is that of a man other than the woman's husband.Sex Characteristics: Those characteristics that distinguish one SEX from the other. The primary sex characteristics are the OVARIES and TESTES and their related hormones. Secondary sex characteristics are those which are masculine or feminine but not directly related to reproduction.Seminiferous Tubules: The convoluted tubules in the TESTIS where sperm are produced (SPERMATOGENESIS) and conveyed to the RETE TESTIS. Spermatogenic tubules are composed of developing germ cells and the supporting SERTOLI CELLS.In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence: A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Scrotum: A cutaneous pouch of skin containing the testicles and spermatic cords.Echinodermata: A phylum of the most familiar marine invertebrates. Its class Stelleroidea contains two subclasses, the Asteroidea (the STARFISH or sea stars) and the Ophiuroidea (the brittle stars, also called basket stars and serpent stars). There are 1500 described species of STARFISH found throughout the world. The second class, Echinoidea, contains about 950 species of SEA URCHINS, heart urchins, and sand dollars. A third class, Holothuroidea, comprises about 900 echinoderms known as SEA CUCUMBERS. Echinoderms are used extensively in biological research. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, pp773-826)Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Klinefelter Syndrome: A form of male HYPOGONADISM, characterized by the presence of an extra X CHROMOSOME, small TESTES, seminiferous tubule dysgenesis, elevated levels of GONADOTROPINS, low serum TESTOSTERONE, underdeveloped secondary sex characteristics, and male infertility (INFERTILITY, MALE). Patients tend to have long legs and a slim, tall stature. GYNECOMASTIA is present in many of the patients. The classic form has the karyotype 47,XXY. Several karyotype variants include 48,XXYY; 48,XXXY; 49,XXXXY, and mosaic patterns ( 46,XY/47,XXY; 47,XXY/48,XXXY, etc.).Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Sex Ratio: The number of males per 100 females.Flagella: A whiplike motility appendage present on the surface cells. Prokaryote flagella are composed of a protein called FLAGELLIN. Bacteria can have a single flagellum, a tuft at one pole, or multiple flagella covering the entire surface. In eukaryotes, flagella are threadlike protoplasmic extensions used to propel flagellates and sperm. Flagella have the same basic structure as CILIA but are longer in proportion to the cell bearing them and present in much smaller numbers. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Freezing: Liquids transforming into solids by the removal of heat.Seminal Vesicles: A saclike, glandular diverticulum on each ductus deferens in male vertebrates. It is united with the excretory duct and serves for temporary storage of semen. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Acridine Orange: A cationic cytochemical stain specific for cell nuclei, especially DNA. It is used as a supravital stain and in fluorescence cytochemistry. It may cause mutations in microorganisms.Ionophores: Chemical agents that increase the permeability of biological or artificial lipid membranes to specific ions. Most ionophores are relatively small organic molecules that act as mobile carriers within membranes or coalesce to form ion permeable channels across membranes. Many are antibiotics, and many act as uncoupling agents by short-circuiting the proton gradient across mitochondrial membranes.Contraception, Immunologic: Contraceptive methods based on immunological processes and techniques, such as the use of CONTRACEPTIVE VACCINES.Vaccines, Contraceptive: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent conception.Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Urochordata: A subphylum of chordates intermediate between the invertebrates and the true vertebrates. It includes the Ascidians.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Tissue and Organ Harvesting: The procedure of removing TISSUES, organs, or specimens from DONORS for reuse, such as TRANSPLANTATION.alpha-Chlorohydrin: A chlorinated PROPANEDIOL with antifertility activity in males used as a chemosterilant in rodents.Mice, Inbred ICRCell Nucleus: Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Embryonic Development: Morphological and physiological development of EMBRYOS.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Follicle Stimulating Hormone: A major gonadotropin secreted by the adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR). Follicle-stimulating hormone stimulates GAMETOGENESIS and the supporting cells such as the ovarian GRANULOSA CELLS, the testicular SERTOLI CELLS, and LEYDIG CELLS. FSH consists of two noncovalently linked subunits, alpha and beta. Within a species, the alpha subunit is common in the three pituitary glycoprotein hormones (TSH, LH, and FSH), but the beta subunit is unique and confers its biological specificity.Disorders of Sex Development: In gonochoristic organisms, congenital conditions in which development of chromosomal, gonadal, or anatomical sex is atypical. Effects from exposure to abnormal levels of GONADAL HORMONES in the maternal environment, or disruption of the function of those hormones by ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS are included.Mesocricetus: A genus of the family Muridae having three species. The present domesticated strains were developed from individuals brought from Syria. They are widely used in biomedical research.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Vas Deferens: The excretory duct of the testes that carries SPERMATOZOA. It rises from the SCROTUM and joins the SEMINAL VESICLES to form the ejaculatory duct.Myoglobin: A conjugated protein which is the oxygen-transporting pigment of muscle. It is made up of one globin polypeptide chain and one heme group.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Sertoli Cells: Supporting cells projecting inward from the basement membrane of SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES. They surround and nourish the developing male germ cells and secrete ANDROGEN-BINDING PROTEIN and hormones such as ANTI-MULLERIAN HORMONE. The tight junctions of Sertoli cells with the SPERMATOGONIA and SPERMATOCYTES provide a BLOOD-TESTIS BARRIER.Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Poecilia: A genus of livebearing cyprinodont fish comprising the guppy and molly. Some species are virtually all female and depend on sperm from other species to stimulate egg development. Poecilia is used in carcinogenicity studies as well as neurologic and physiologic research.Spermatocidal Agents: Chemical substances that are destructive to spermatozoa used as topically administered vaginal contraceptives.Chromosome Aberrations: Abnormal number or structure of chromosomes. Chromosome aberrations may result in CHROMOSOME DISORDERS.Starfish: Echinoderms having bodies of usually five radially disposed arms coalescing at the center.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Chromosomes, Human, X: The human female sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and all female gametes in humans.Cytoplasm: The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)Suction: The removal of secretions, gas or fluid from hollow or tubular organs or cavities by means of a tube and a device that acts on negative pressure.Blastocyst: A post-MORULA preimplantation mammalian embryo that develops from a 32-cell stage into a fluid-filled hollow ball of over a hundred cells. A blastocyst has two distinctive tissues. The outer layer of trophoblasts gives rise to extra-embryonic tissues. The inner cell mass gives rise to the embryonic disc and eventual embryo proper.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Diploidy: The chromosomal constitution of cells, in which each type of CHROMOSOME is represented twice. Symbol: 2N or 2X.Chlortetracycline: A TETRACYCLINE with a 7-chloro substitution.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Genital Diseases, Male: Pathological processes involving the male reproductive tract (GENITALIA, MALE).Antelopes: Any of various ruminant mammals of the order Bovidae. They include numerous species in Africa and the American pronghorn.Germ Cells: The reproductive cells in multicellular organisms at various stages during GAMETOGENESIS.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Membrane Glycoproteins: Glycoproteins found on the membrane or surface of cells.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Competitive Behavior: The direct struggle between individuals for environmental necessities or for a common goal.Hypogonadism: Condition resulting from deficient gonadal functions, such as GAMETOGENESIS and the production of GONADAL STEROID HORMONES. It is characterized by delay in GROWTH, germ cell maturation, and development of secondary sex characteristics. Hypogonadism can be due to a deficiency of GONADOTROPINS (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism) or due to primary gonadal failure (hypergonadotropic hypogonadism).Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Paternity: Establishing the father relationship of a man and a child.Microsurgery: The performance of surgical procedures with the aid of a microscope.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Micromanipulation: The performance of dissections, injections, surgery, etc., by the use of micromanipulators (attachments to a microscope) that manipulate tiny instruments.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.Cell Size: The quantity of volume or surface area of CELLS.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Mice, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations, or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. All animals within an inbred strain trace back to a common ancestor in the twentieth generation.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Cell SeparationReceptors, Cell Surface: Cell surface proteins that bind signalling molecules external to the cell with high affinity and convert this extracellular event into one or more intracellular signals that alter the behavior of the target cell (From Alberts, Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2nd ed, pp693-5). Cell surface receptors, unlike enzymes, do not chemically alter their ligands.Karyotyping: Mapping of the KARYOTYPE of a cell.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Haploidy: The chromosomal constitution of cells, in which each type of CHROMOSOME is represented once. Symbol: N.Glycoproteins: Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Comet Assay: A genotoxicological technique for measuring DNA damage in an individual cell using single-cell gel electrophoresis. Cell DNA fragments assume a "comet with tail" formation on electrophoresis and are detected with an image analysis system. Alkaline assay conditions facilitate sensitive detection of single-strand damage.Sex Chromosome Aberrations: Abnormal number or structure of the SEX CHROMOSOMES. Some sex chromosome aberrations are associated with SEX CHROMOSOME DISORDERS and SEX CHROMOSOME DISORDERS OF SEX DEVELOPMENT.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Embryonic and Fetal Development: Morphological and physiological development of EMBRYOS or FETUSES.Embryo Implantation: Endometrial implantation of EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN at the BLASTOCYST stage.Egg Yolk: Cytoplasm stored in an egg that contains nutritional reserves for the developing embryo. It is rich in polysaccharides, lipids, and proteins.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect: A form of fluorescent antibody technique commonly used to detect serum antibodies and immune complexes in tissues and microorganisms in specimens from patients with infectious diseases. The technique involves formation of an antigen-antibody complex which is labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody. (From Bennington, Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)Gryllidae: The family Gryllidae consists of the common house cricket, Acheta domesticus, which is used in neurological and physiological studies. Other genera include Gryllotalpa (mole cricket); Gryllus (field cricket); and Oecanthus (tree cricket).Mating Preference, Animal: The selection or choice of sexual partner in animals. Often this reproductive preference is based on traits in the potential mate, such as coloration, size, or behavioral boldness. If the chosen ones are genetically different from the rejected ones, then NATURAL SELECTION is occurring.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Calcimycin: An ionophorous, polyether antibiotic from Streptomyces chartreusensis. It binds and transports CALCIUM and other divalent cations across membranes and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation while inhibiting ATPase of rat liver mitochondria. The substance is used mostly as a biochemical tool to study the role of divalent cations in various biological systems.Specimen Handling: Procedures for collecting, preserving, and transporting of specimens sufficiently stable to provide accurate and precise results suitable for clinical interpretation.Mammals: Warm-blooded vertebrate animals belonging to the class Mammalia, including all that possess hair and suckle their young.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Masturbation: Sexual stimulation or gratification of the self.Parthenogenesis: A unisexual reproduction without the fusion of a male and a female gamete (FERTILIZATION). In parthenogenesis, an individual is formed from an unfertilized OVUM that did not complete MEIOSIS. Parthenogenesis occurs in nature and can be artificially induced.Infertility, Female: Diminished or absent ability of a female to achieve conception.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Bisexuality: The sexual attraction or relationship between members of both the same and the opposite SEX.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Axoneme: A bundle of MICROTUBULES and MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEINS forming the core of each CILIUM or FLAGELLUM. In most eukaryotic cilia or flagella, an axoneme shaft has 20 microtubules arranged in nine doublets and two singlets.JapanPeanut Agglutinin: Lectin purified from peanuts (ARACHIS HYPOGAEA). It binds to poorly differentiated cells and terminally differentiated cells and is used in cell separation techniques.Ejaculatory Ducts: Paired ducts in the human male through which semen is ejaculated into the urethra.United StatesHomosexuality: The sexual attraction or relationship between members of the same SEX.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Sex Chromosomes: The homologous chromosomes that are dissimilar in the heterogametic sex. There are the X CHROMOSOME, the Y CHROMOSOME, and the W, Z chromosomes (in animals in which the female is the heterogametic sex (the silkworm moth Bombyx mori, for example)). In such cases the W chromosome is the female-determining and the male is ZZ. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)DNA Damage: Injuries to DNA that introduce deviations from its normal, intact structure and which may, if left unrepaired, result in a MUTATION or a block of DNA REPLICATION. These deviations may be caused by physical or chemical agents and occur by natural or unnatural, introduced circumstances. They include the introduction of illegitimate bases during replication or by deamination or other modification of bases; the loss of a base from the DNA backbone leaving an abasic site; single-strand breaks; double strand breaks; and intrastrand (PYRIMIDINE DIMERS) or interstrand crosslinking. Damage can often be repaired (DNA REPAIR). If the damage is extensive, it can induce APOPTOSIS.Paternal Age: Age of the biological father.X Chromosome: The female sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and all female gametes in human and other male-heterogametic species.Dyneins: A family of multisubunit cytoskeletal motor proteins that use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to power a variety of cellular functions. Dyneins fall into two major classes based upon structural and functional criteria.
"New male contraceptive targets sperm, not hormones". EurekAlert!. American Association for the Advancement of Science. 5 May ... Khazan, O. (March 2015). "Block That Sperm!". The Atlantic. The Atlantic Monthly Group. Retrieved 17 March 2016. "Male ... The implant may depend on the timed release of hormones to hinder ovulation or sperm development, the ability of copper to act ... "Male contraceptive study expands to 4 US cities". Psych Central. Psych Central. October 2006. Retrieved 17 March 2016. "Shug ...
This prevents the fertilization of eggs by sperm and thus the implantation of a fertilized egg. Tubal ligation is considered a ... and slightly less effective than permanent male sterilization through vasectomy.[5] These rates are significantly higher than ... After insertion, scar tissue forms around the coils, blocking off the fallopian tubes and preventing sperm from reaching the ... After the procedure, scar tissue forms around the silicone inserts, blocking off the fallopian tubes and preventing sperm from ...
... reduced sperm capacite journal and survival, and increased phagocytosis of sperm.30,31… The progestin in the LNg IUC enhances ... reduced sperm capacite journal and survival, and increased phagocytosis of sperm.30,31… The progestin in the LNg IUC enhances ... Very few, if any, sperm reach the ovum in the fallopian tube.. The progestin-releasing IUD adds the endometrial action of the ... Exposure to a foreign body causes a sterile inflammatory reaction in the intrauterine environment that is toxic to sperm and ...
Male: Vasectomy. Experimental. *Reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance (Vasalgel). Long-acting reversible contraception ...
... some men opt for cryopreservation of sperm before sterilization. It is advised that all men having a vasectomy consider ... The entry of the sperm into the scrotum can cause sperm granulomas to be formed by the body to contain and absorb the sperm ... During the procedure, the male vas deferens are cut and tied or sealed so as to prevent sperm from entering into the urethra ... The procedure is regarded as permanent because vasectomy reversal is costly and often does not restore the male's sperm count ...
Male: Vasectomy. Experimental. *Reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance (Vasalgel). Long-acting reversible contraception ...
A secondary mechanism of action is the progestogenic increase in cervical mucus viscosity which inhibits sperm penetration.[33] ...
... which keeps sperm from penetrating into the uterus and joining with an egg. The hormones in combination and progestogen-only ... Male: Vasectomy. Experimental. *Reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance (Vasalgel). Long-acting reversible contraception ...
Hormonal contraception works primarily by preventing ovulation, but it may also thicken the cervical mucus inhibiting sperm ... Transgender hormone therapy (male-to-female). *Estradiol-containing birth control pill. *Combined injectable birth control ...
... which prevents sperm from entering; and by thinning the lining of the uterus, which makes implantation of an embryo less likely ... Male: Vasectomy. Experimental. *Reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance (Vasalgel). Long-acting reversible contraception ...
Male: Vasectomy. Experimental. *Reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance (Vasalgel). Long-acting reversible contraception ...
"Men Have Biological Clocks, Too". Retrieved 2015-09-15. "A Social History of Sperm". Barlow, Jim. "UO sociologist wins major ... Male Infertility, Medicine, and Identity (Temple University Press 2014), based on ethnographic observations in infertility ...
ISBN 0-398-02808-7. Olsson, M.; Madsen, T.; Shine, R. (1997). "Is sperm really so cheap? Costs of reproduction in male adders, ... Males find females by following their scent trails, sometimes tracking them for hundreds of meters a day. If a female is found ... A 44-year-old man was left seriously injured aye he was bitten by an Adder at the Go-Ape adventure park in Dalby, Burgh ... Males chase away their rivals and engage in combat. Often, this also starts with the aforementioned flowing behavior before ...
Good-sperm models predict positive genetic associations between a male's sperm competitiveness and the general viability of his ... Keller L; Reeve H.K. (1995). "Why do females mate with multiple males? The sexually selected sperm hypothesis". Adv. Stud. ... Sexual conflict refers to the conflicting goals of breeding males and females. It describes the diverging interests of males ... they re-mate in order to fertilize their eggs with the better male's sperm. Dung beetles who have selected mates with better ...
Men who have parented large numbers of children through medical sperm donation are difficult to record. Numbers in italics are ... "One Sperm Donor, 150 Offspring". The New York Times. 6 September 2011. Retrieved 12 July 2016. The Primer, Helping Victims of ... "Sperm-donor father of 43 children passed on genetic disorder". Retrieved 12 July 2016. Donovan, Peggy (2000). Spain in Your ... "Brazilian man fathers 50 children". Telegraph. Retrieved 20 April 2016. "Dr. Donald L. Cline, MD". OpenDoctor.io. Retrieved 10 ...
Sperm - Male reproductive cell (a gamete). Ovum - Female reproductive cell (a gamete). Zygote - A cell that is the result of ... Sperm and ova are gametes. Gametes fuse with another gamete during fertilization (conception) in organisms that reproduce ...
Sharpe RM, Skakkebaek NE (May 1993). "Are oestrogens involved in falling sperm counts and disorders of the male reproductive ... Male reproductive system[edit]. The effect of estradiol (and estrogens in general) upon male reproduction is complex. Estradiol ... Though estradiol levels in men are much lower compared to those in women, estradiol has important roles in men as well. Apart ... to prevent apoptosis of male sperm cells.[15] While some studies in the early 1990s claimed a connection between globally ...
Most polysomic males produce normal sperm. However, polysomy can be transmissible through both the male and female parents ... During egg or sperm development the 21st chromosome does not separate during either the egg or sperm development. The end ... In the fruit fly, Drosophila, one X chromosome in the male is almost the same as two X chromosomes in the female in terms of ... Male grasshoppers (Atractomorpha similis) from Australia carry between one and ten extra copies of chromosome A9, with one ...
Males use stored sperm for breeding. The testes are small after emergence, reaching full size by midsummer. After this point, ... There is a distinct sexual dimorphism in this species with females being larger than males. The short-headed garter snake is ... sperm will be stored for later use in the spring. T. brachystoma is believed to be viviparous, with experiments showing a ...
The cAMP/PKA signaling pathway leads to sperm cells capacitation; however, adenilyl cyclase in sperm cells is different from ... Spermatozoon is the male gamete. After ejaculation this cell is not mature, so it can't fertilize the oocyte. To have the ... Oocyte activation depends on fertilization by sperm. It is initiated with sperm's attraction induced by prostaglandins produced ... Studies on men's health and fertility. New York: Humana Press. ISBN 978-1-61779-775-0. O'Flaherty, C; de Lamirande, E; Gagnon, ...
Trivedi, Bijal P. (April 21, 2004). "The End of Males? Mouse Made to Reproduce Without Sperm". National Geographic News. ... "The goal of our study was to discover why sperm and eggs were required for development in mammals," Kono said. Kaguya the mouse ...
The epigynum possessed a V-shaped scape (or ovipositor). The sperm receptacles (spermathecae) are globular. The legs were ... Nothing is known about males of the species. The single specimen was found in the island of Panay in the Philippines. Nothing ...
Sperm competition is another possible explanation. Sperm competition is strong, and sperm can improve their chances of ... Male-female competition could facilitate an arms race of adaptive evolution. However, in this situation you would expect to ...
8-PN adversely affects male sperm. The role 8-PN plays in fertility requires further research. The enzyme naringenin 8- ... "Environmental 'hormones' wreck sperm". BBC News. July 2, 2002. Retrieved 2013-06-26. Breen, L.; et al. (2009). "The effect of ...
"Semen and sperm quality". Retrieved December 7, 2006. Baker, R (1993). "Human sperm competition: Ejaculate adjustment by males ... It is the sperm in the semen that is the fertile component, and therefore semen quality involves both sperm quantity and sperm ... "We have heard that there are men on the earth who take the sperm of men and the flux of women, and mix them with lentils and ... In a study with Swedish and Danish men, a prolonged interval between ejaculations caused an increase of the sperm count in the ...
An androgen (from Greek andr-, the stem of the word meaning "man") is any natural or synthetic steroid hormone that regulates ... The androgens function as paracrine hormones required by the Sertoli cells to support sperm production. They are also required ... Throughout adulthood, androgens and FSH cooperatively act on Sertoli cells in the testes to support sperm production.[6] ... which will function to support sperm cell formation. A minor population of nonepithelial cells appear between the tubules by ...
... affecting spermatogenesis and sperm motility, and hence could be responsible for the absent spermatogenesis in males affected ... Male 41, XXY* mice as a model for Klinefelter syndrome: hyperactivation of leydig cells. Endocrinology. 2010;151:2898-910 ... is one of the most common sex-chromosome disorders as it affects up to 1 in every 600-1000 newborn males. Men with KS carry one ... Detection of Y chromosome microdeletions and mitochondrial DNA mutations in male infertility patients. Genet Mol Res. 2012;11: ...
Males practicing excessive self pleasure suffer from lower sensation in genitals, lower love making desire, lesser duration of ... You are advised to consume carrots for improving sperm motility. It also improves love making desire and internal strength to ... Males practicing hand practice do not have sufficient energy to perform love making acts. Fatigue, stress, anxiety and ... It improves length and girth of the male organ. With thicker and lengthy penis, you can improve contact on the vaginal walls ...
Men are typically instructed to submit a semen analysis 3 months postoperatively. If sperm are present on the semen analysis, a ... resulting in a fistula that facilitates sperm passage.6 In our case, we surmised that the patient had a sperm granuloma, which ... A 44-year-old man with no remarkable medical history elected to undergo a bilateral vasectomy by a high-volume urologic surgeon ... In 2002, an estimated 526,501 vasectomies were performed in the US.1 In 2004, nearly 43 million men worldwide underwent ...
It is estimated that about 600,000 men have a vasectomy each year in the United States, and 5 percent of those individuals opt ... During a vasectomy, the vas deferens are cut to initiate a change in semen (sperm-free). ... At Virginia Urology, our team of experts face a wide variety of questions related to mens health. One question that many of ... We will answer all of your questions about our procedures related to Mens Sexual Health, and help guide you as to which ...
Half a million men have vasectomies each year in the U.S. But what happens if they change their minds and want to start a new ... Chance of Return of Sperm to Ejaculate. Chance of Natural Pregnancy After Vasectomy Reversal ... But for those men whove had the snip find and themselves wanting to be a father again, its encouraging to know a reversal is ... One dead, one critical after man enters home and starts shooting * 8 11 images and facts that explain how bad Tuesdays ice ...
Which has been shown to actually reduce a mans sperm count and lead to infertility? We talked with experts in male fertility ... "If men are regularly hot-tubbing or using the sauna and if they have impaired sperm quality or sperm counts, that would be one ... but there is growing evidence that with time the quality of mens sperm declines," said Williams. "There can be impaired sperm ... Low sperm count is an uncomfortable subject for some men to discuss, which may be why so many urban legends have sprung up ...
The term is derived from the Greek word sperma meaning seed. Sperm were first observed under a microscope in 1677 by ... Sperm is the male reproductive cell in vertebrates. ... Sperm is released from the male in a fluid called semen. Semen ... Sperm is the male reproductive cell in vertebrates. The term is derived from the Greek word sperma meaning seed. Sperm were ... The gamete cells are the eggs or ova found in females and the sperm found in males. The termed used to describe these cells ...
... in monkeys suggests that boys left infertile after chemotherapy may one day reproduce naturally after an injection of sperm ... Some men choose to freeze sperm samples before therapy so they can use them for artificial insemination at a later date, but ... Men who lose the ability to produce sperm after chemotherapy might one day be able to regain their fertility. Thats because, ... Sperm production was re-established in nine of the 12 adult animals and started normally in three out of five prepubescent ...
... theres a lot men can do to take control over their sperms performance. There are numerous ways men can boost their sperm ... While we often think of sperm count as an indication of a mans virility, it really only measures male fertility - revealing ... In the west, an average or normal sperm count is around 20 to 40 million active spermatozoa per milliliter of cum. Wrap your ... think of it as what percentage of a guys sperm is actually capable of causing pregnancy. ...
By Kathryn DoyleThe sperm of men who smoke, compared to those who dont, have more damaged DNA, fewer active energy-generating ... The researchers tested the functional quality of sperm from 20 nonsmoking men with normal semen quality and from 20 men who ... "Sperm from these men are thus less capable of achieving fertilization, and, due to high rates of DNA fragmentation, are more ... The sperm of men who smoke, compared to those who dont, have more damaged DNA, fewer active energy-generating mitochondria and ...
A small number of single young men pay to store their sperm, just as single young women have stored their eggs, out of fear of ... Do young single men really need to bank their sperm? For all these reasons, Dr. Harry Fisch had advised his two sons to father ... A few dozen men like him have ponied up $450 a year to store their sperm at California Cryobank out of fear of advanced ... Hudson is one of a small but growing group of single young men whove chosen to store their sperm, just as single young women ...
... and now a new study finds that a womans eggs may be choosy about sperm, too. ... home/sexual health center/ sexual health a-z list/ a womans egg prefer one mans sperm over another article ... It turned out that follicular fluid from any one woman was better at attracting sperm from certain men, versus others. And the ... Based on the new findings, a womans eggs use those signals preferentially, to better attract sperm from certain men. ...
A new meta-analysis investigates changes in sperm count since 1973. In Western countries, it has declined significantly, ... Sperm created from stem cells offer hope in cases of male infertility A stem cell technique has generated viable sperm that led ... Men from Europe, North America, Australia, and New Zealand had a 52.4 percent decline in sperm concentration and a 59.3 percent ... "Given the importance of sperm counts for male fertility and human health, this study is an urgent wake-up call for researchers ...
San FranciscoSPERM samples are routinely taken from dead men at the request of their partners and families, according to a ... SPERM samples are routinely taken from dead men at the request of their. partners and families, according to a survey conducted ... The clinics were asked if they had ever received a request to remove sperm. from a recently deceased man. Those that had were ... Mannys sperm if Pam decided not to use the sample.. Kerr and Caplan will publish their findings next year. But they revealed. ...
Men with a lot of variation in the length of their sperm may also have troublesome swimmers and fertility problems, a new study ... Men with a lower variation in the length of sperm components produced sperm that were more likely to be motile. ... That sperm would vary wasnt entirely unexpected, but prior research had focused on the size of the sperm head or on sperms ... to figure out why males that produce large numbers of sperm also produce better sperm," Mossman told LiveScience. This suggests ...
PRWEB) February 27, 2003 -- CHICAGO  A newly opened laboratory in the heart of downtown Chicago now specializes in sperm ... CHICAGO  A newly opened laboratory in the heart of downtown Chicago now specializes in sperm processing for HIV-positive men ... Reproductive Lab Services offers HIV-positive men the full gamut of sperm processing procedures for fertility management, ...  Studies have shown that nearly 30% of men who test positive for HIV have strong desires to father children, states Mary ...
Men who are diagnosed with azoospermia (low or absent sperm) can undergo a procedure called TESE, which retrieves sperm ... There, the cells flourished and grew into healthy, normal sperm. Once the sperm were created the scientists removed the sperm ... "Creating fresh sperm, therefore, would be useful in only about 15% of males with azoospermia, where we do not find even one ... For years scientists have been looking to find a way to create viable sperm in order to solve infertility issues in men. ...
A safe and effective birth control pill for men is one step closer to becoming a reality, according to new research presented ... For the study, researchers carried out a trial with 83 men, aged 18 to 50. Each man was randomly assigned to one of three ... "There are ways of delivering male contraceptives with long-acting implants and injections, but men are interested in having an ... Nonetheless, Page remains confident that the drug appears safe for men, allowing them to maintain all important male ...
A French study showed that male infertility shoots up after the age of 40. ... Babies born to older men carry a higher risk of having genetic problems, says a study from the USA . ... Men With Younger Wives Live Longer But Women Should Marry Men The Same Age, Study Marriage is more beneficial for men than for ... A French study showed that male infertility shoots up after the age of 40. Not only does the lower quality of older mens sperm ...
Trak Fertility allows men to collect, count and track their sperm from the privacy of their own homes. The device uses ... Device lets men check sperm count at home Published January 04, 2017. Fox News ... 12 things that could be messing with your guys sperm. * Researchers in Spain create sperm from skin cells, potentially ending ... and the indicator specifies whether men have a low, moderate or optimal sperm count. ...
... or if they re passed on to a man s chil ... research shows that marijuana causes genetic changes in sperm, ... Could Pot Harm Mens Sperm?. WEDNESDAY, Dec. 19, 2018 -- New research shows that marijuana causes genetic changes in sperm, ... genetic changes in THC-altered sperm are passed on to children and if those genetic changes in sperm are reversed if a man ... The higher the concentration of THC in the mens urine, the more significant the genetic changes in their sperm, the ...
... on the legally and ethically fraught world of post-mortem sperm donation. ... What drives partners of men who have died to try and have their babies? Jenny Morber, ... Dead Mans Sperm. Dead Mans Sperm. What drives partners of men who have died to try and have their babies? Jenny Morber, on ... Of around 360 men with cancer or infertility diagnoses who banked sperm at a Texas sperm bank, almost 85 per cent consented to ...
... a breakthrough technology that could eventually help cure male infertility, Japanese scientists said Thursday. ... Sperm has been successfully grown in a test tube for the first time, ... The next step is to reproduce the technique in humans as the technology will give new hope to men with low sperm counts or ... Sperm has been successfully grown in a test tube for the first time, a breakthrough technology that could eventually help cure ...
The head of Britains nationalsperm bank urged men to prove their manhood and help ease ashortage after the centre signed up ... LONDON, Sept 1 (Reuters) - The head of Britains national sperm bank urged men to prove their manhood and help ease a shortage ... Denmarks biggest sperm bank, privately-owned Cryos, said it had more than 450 registered donors and was exporting sperm to ... Human sperm is on sale from some private companies in Britain for as much as 950 pounds per sample. It is also available for ...
A hormone-antioxidant combination therapy appears to improve sperm count and motility in infertile men, according to an ... The men in the treatment group also had a greater increase in sperm concentration and an improvement in sperm progression, the ... as a fertility medicine for women but sometimes used to boost sperm production in men with low sperm counts and poor sperm ... Male Infertility Treatment Boosts Sperm Count. Print this page MONDAY, April 6 -- A hormone-antioxidant combination therapy ...
  • Several semen analyses were performed during the following months, the results of which demonstrated progressively rising numbers of motile sperm and were indicative of vasal recanalization. (thepermanentejournal.org)
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