Malocclusion: Such malposition and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth as to interfere with the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Malocclusion, Angle Class II: Malocclusion in which the mandible is posterior to the maxilla as reflected by the relationship of the first permanent molar (distoclusion).Malocclusion, Angle Class III: Malocclusion in which the mandible is anterior to the maxilla as reflected by the first relationship of the first permanent molar (mesioclusion).Malocclusion, Angle Class I: Malocclusion in which the mandible and maxilla are anteroposteriorly normal as reflected by the relationship of the first permanent molar (i.e., in neutroclusion), but in which individual teeth are abnormally related to each other.Open Bite: A condition in which certain opposing teeth fail to establish occlusal contact when the jaws are closed.Diastema: An abnormal opening or fissure between two adjacent teeth.Overbite: A malocclusion in which maxillary incisor and canine teeth project over the mandiblar teeth excessively. The overlap is measured perpendicular to the occlusal plane and is also called vertical overlap. When the overlap is measured parallel to the occlusal plane it is referred to as overjet.Cephalometry: The measurement of the dimensions of the HEAD.Orthodontics, Corrective: The phase of orthodontics concerned with the correction of malocclusion with proper appliances and prevention of its sequelae (Jablonski's Illus. Dictionary of Dentistry).Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Dentition, Mixed: The complement of teeth in the jaws after the eruption of some of the permanent teeth but before all the deciduous teeth are absent. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Extraoral Traction Appliances: Extraoral devices for applying force to the dentition in order to avoid some of the problems in anchorage control met with in intermaxillary traction and to apply force in directions not otherwise possible.Orthodontic Appliances, Functional: Loose, usually removable intra-oral devices which alter the muscle forces against the teeth and craniofacial skeleton. These are dynamic appliances which depend on altered neuromuscular action to effect bony growth and occlusal development. They are usually used in mixed dentition to treat pediatric malocclusions. (ADA, 1992)Activator Appliances: Loose-fitting removable orthodontic appliances which redirect the pressures of the facial and masticatory muscles onto the teeth and their supporting structures to produce improvements in tooth arrangements and occlusal relations.Vertical Dimension: The length of the face determined by the distance of separation of jaws. Occlusal vertical dimension (OVD or VDO) or contact vertical dimension is the lower face height with the teeth in centric occlusion. Rest vertical dimension (VDR) is the lower face height measured from a chin point to a point just below the nose, with the mandible in rest position. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p250)Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Orthodontics, Interceptive: Recognition and elimination of potential irregularities and malpositions in the developing dentofacial complex.Maxillofacial Development: The process of growth and differentiation of the jaws and face.Dental Occlusion: The relationship of all the components of the masticatory system in normal function. It has special reference to the position and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth for the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556, p472)Orthodontic Appliance Design: The planning, calculation, and creation of an apparatus for the purpose of correcting the placement or straightening of teeth.Fingersucking: Sucking of the finger. This is one of the most common manipulations of the body found in young children.Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Esthetics, Dental: Skills, techniques, standards, and principles used to improve the art and symmetry of the teeth and face to improve the appearance as well as the function of the teeth, mouth, and face. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p108)Retrognathia: A physical misalignment of the upper (maxilla) and lower (mandibular) jaw bones in which either or both recede relative to the frontal plane of the forehead.Orthodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the prevention and correction of dental and oral anomalies (malocclusion).Dental Arch: The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.Palatal Expansion Technique: An orthodontic method used for correcting narrow or collapsed maxillary arches and functional cross-bite. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry),Chin: The anatomical frontal portion of the mandible, also known as the mentum, that contains the line of fusion of the two separate halves of the mandible (symphysis menti). This line of fusion divides inferiorly to enclose a triangular area called the mental protuberance. On each side, inferior to the second premolar tooth, is the mental foramen for the passage of blood vessels and a nerve.Mouth Breathing: Abnormal breathing through the mouth, usually associated with obstructive disorders of the nasal passages.Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)Dental Models: Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.Tongue Habits: Acquired responses regularly manifested by tongue movement or positioning.Dental Occlusion, Centric: Contact between opposing teeth during a person's habitual bite.Orthodontic Appliances: Devices used for influencing tooth position. Orthodontic appliances may be classified as fixed or removable, active or retaining, and intraoral or extraoral. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p19)Sucking Behavior: Any suction exerted by the mouth; response of the mammalian infant to draw milk from the breast. Includes sucking on inanimate objects. Not to be used for thumb sucking, which is indexed under fingersucking.Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need: A dental health survey developed to evaluate a patient's orthodontic treatment need and priority for orthodontic care. The index is based on an assessment of degree of MALOCCLUSION and the potential aesthetic and dental health benefit of the treatment under consideration.Tooth Movement: Orthodontic techniques used to correct the malposition of a single tooth.Dental Occlusion, Traumatic: An occlusion resulting in overstrain and injury to teeth, periodontal tissue, or other oral structures.Orthodontic Appliances, Removable: Dental devices such as RETAINERS, ORTHODONTIC used to improve gaps in teeth and structure of the jaws. These devices can be removed and reinserted at will.Serial Extraction: The selective extraction of deciduous teeth during the stage of mixed dentition in accordance with the shedding and eruption of the teeth. It is done over an extended period to allow autonomous adjustment to relieve crowding of the dental arches during the eruption of the lateral incisors, canines, and premolars, eventually involving the extraction of the first premolar teeth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Lip: Either of the two fleshy, full-blooded margins of the mouth.Jaw Relation Record: A registration of any positional relationship of the mandible in reference to the maxillae. These records may be any of the many vertical, horizontal, or orientation relations. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry)Facial Bones: The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. While some consider the facial bones to comprise the hyoid (HYOID BONE), palatine (HARD PALATE), and zygomatic (ZYGOMA) bones, MANDIBLE, and MAXILLA, others include also the lacrimal and nasal bones, inferior nasal concha, and vomer but exclude the hyoid bone. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p113)Prognathism: A condition marked by abnormal protrusion of the mandible. (Dorland, 27th ed)Maxillofacial Abnormalities: Congenital structural deformities, malformations, or other abnormalities of the maxilla and face or facial bones.Myofunctional Therapy: Training or retraining of the buccal, facial, labial, and lingual musculature in toothless conditions; DEGLUTITION DISORDERS; TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DISORDERS; MALOCCLUSION; and ARTICULATION DISORDERS.Facial Asymmetry: Congenital or acquired asymmetry of the face.Facial Muscles: Muscles of facial expression or mimetic muscles that include the numerous muscles supplied by the facial nerve that are attached to and move the skin of the face. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Skull Base: The inferior region of the skull consisting of an internal (cerebral), and an external (basilar) surface.Orthodontic Anchorage Procedures: Attachment of orthodontic devices and materials to the MOUTH area for support and to provide a counterforce to orthodontic forces.Sella Turcica: A bony prominence situated on the upper surface of the body of the sphenoid bone. It houses the PITUITARY GLAND.Bicuspid: One of the eight permanent teeth, two on either side in each jaw, between the canines (CUSPID) and the molars (MOLAR), serving for grinding and crushing food. The upper have two cusps (bicuspid) but the lower have one to three. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p822)Nasal Bone: Either one of the two small elongated rectangular bones that together form the bridge of the nose.Tooth Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the teeth.Bruxism: A disorder characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth.Mandibular Condyle: The posterior process on the ramus of the mandible composed of two parts: a superior part, the articular portion, and an inferior part, the condylar neck.Pacifiers: Devices that babies can suck on when they are not feeding. The extra sucking can be comforting to the babies and pacify them. Pacifiers usually are used as a substitute for the thumb in babies who suck on their thumb or fingers almost constantly.Smiling: A facial expression which may denote feelings of pleasure, affection, amusement, etc.Odontometry: Measurement of tooth characteristics.Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A variety of conditions affecting the anatomic and functional characteristics of the temporomandibular joint. Factors contributing to the complexity of temporomandibular diseases are its relation to dentition and mastication and the symptomatic effects in other areas which account for referred pain to the joint and the difficulties in applying traditional diagnostic procedures to temporomandibular joint pathology where tissue is rarely obtained and x-rays are often inadequate or nonspecific. Common diseases are developmental abnormalities, trauma, subluxation, luxation, arthritis, and neoplasia. (From Thoma's Oral Pathology, 6th ed, pp577-600)Centric Relation: The location of the maxillary and the mandibular condyles when they are in their most posterior and superior positions in their fossae of the temporomandibular joint.Orthodontic Wires: Wires of various dimensions and grades made of stainless steel or precious metal. They are used in orthodontic treatment.Peer Review, Health Care: The concurrent or retrospective review by practicing physicians or other health professionals of the quality and efficiency of patient care practices or services ordered or performed by other physicians or other health professionals (From The Facts On File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988).Tooth Eruption: The emergence of a tooth from within its follicle in the ALVEOLAR PROCESS of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE into the ORAL CAVITY. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Mastication: The act and process of chewing and grinding food in the mouth.Orthognathic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed to repair or correct the skeletal anomalies of the jaw and its associated dental and facial structures (e.g. CLEFT PALATE).Dental Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to dental or oral health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Masseter Muscle: A masticatory muscle whose action is closing the jaws.Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Orthodontic Retainers: Orthodontic appliances, fixed or removable, used to maintain teeth in corrected positions during the period of functional adaptation following corrective treatment. These appliances are also used to maintain the positions of the teeth and jaws gained by orthodontic procedures. (From Zwemer, Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p263)Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Cuspid: The third tooth to the left and to the right of the midline of either jaw, situated between the second INCISOR and the premolar teeth (BICUSPID). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p817)Osteotomy, Le Fort: Transverse sectioning and repositioning of the maxilla. There are three types: Le Fort I osteotomy for maxillary advancement or the treatment of maxillary fractures; Le Fort II osteotomy for the treatment of maxillary fractures; Le Fort III osteotomy for the treatment of maxillary fractures with fracture of one or more facial bones. Le Fort III is often used also to correct craniofacial dysostosis and related facial abnormalities. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1203 & p662)Anodontia: Congenital absence of the teeth; it may involve all (total anodontia) or only some of the teeth (partial anodontia, hypodontia), and both the deciduous and the permanent dentition, or only teeth of the permanent dentition. (Dorland, 27th ed)Mandibular Advancement: Moving a retruded mandible forward to a normal position. It is commonly performed for malocclusion and retrognathia. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Jaw Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the jaw.Dentition, Permanent: The 32 teeth of adulthood that either replace or are added to the complement of deciduous teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Stomatognathic System: The mouth, teeth, jaws, pharynx, and related structures as they relate to mastication, deglutition, and speech.Zygoma: Either of a pair of bones that form the prominent part of the CHEEK and contribute to the ORBIT on each side of the SKULL.Temporal Muscle: A masticatory muscle whose action is closing the jaws; its posterior portion retracts the mandible.Bite Force: The force applied by the masticatory muscles in dental occlusion.Habits: Acquired or learned responses which are regularly manifested.Occlusal Adjustment: Selective grinding of occlusal surfaces of the teeth in an effort to eliminate premature contacts and occlusal interferences; to establish optimal masticatory effectiveness, stable occlusal relationships, direction of main occlusal forces, and efficient multidirectional patterns, to improve functional relations and to induce physiologic stimulation of the masticatory system; to eliminate occlusal trauma; to eliminate abnormal muscle tension; to aid in the stabilization of orthodontic results; to treat periodontal and temporomandibular joint problems; and in restorative procedures. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Eruption, Ectopic: An abnormality in the direction of a TOOTH ERUPTION.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Patient Care Planning: Usually a written medical and nursing care program designed for a particular patient.Diagnosis, Oral: Examination of the mouth and teeth toward the identification and diagnosis of intraoral disease or manifestation of non-oral conditions.Tooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Facial Pain: Pain in the facial region including orofacial pain and craniofacial pain. Associated conditions include local inflammatory and neoplastic disorders and neuralgic syndromes involving the trigeminal, facial, and glossopharyngeal nerves. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent facial pain as the primary manifestation of disease are referred to as FACIAL PAIN SYNDROMES.Mesial Movement of Teeth: Migration of the teeth toward the midline or forward in the DENTAL ARCH. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Alveolar Process: The thickest and spongiest part of the maxilla and mandible hollowed out into deep cavities for the teeth.Palate: The structure that forms the roof of the mouth. It consists of the anterior hard palate (PALATE, HARD) and the posterior soft palate (PALATE, SOFT).Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Sialorrhea: Increased salivary flow.Palate, Hard: The anteriorly located rigid section of the PALATE.Tooth Attrition: The wearing away of a tooth as a result of tooth-to-tooth contact, as in mastication, occurring only on the occlusal, incisal, and proximal surfaces. It is chiefly associated with aging. It is differentiated from TOOTH ABRASION (the pathologic wearing away of the tooth substance by friction, as brushing, bruxism, clenching, and other mechanical causes) and from TOOTH EROSION (the loss of substance caused by chemical action without bacterial action). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p86)Radiography, Panoramic: Extraoral body-section radiography depicting an entire maxilla, or both maxilla and mandible, on a single film.Masticatory Muscles: Muscles arising in the zygomatic arch that close the jaw. Their nerve supply is masseteric from the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Temporomandibular Joint: An articulation between the condyle of the mandible and the articular tubercle of the temporal bone.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Nasal Cartilages: Hyaline cartilages in the nose. There are five major nasal cartilages including two lateral, two alar, and one septal.Deglutition: The act of taking solids and liquids into the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT through the mouth and throat.Tooth, Supernumerary: An extra tooth, erupted or unerupted, resembling or unlike the other teeth in the group to which it belongs. Its presence may cause malposition of adjacent teeth or prevent their eruption.Tooth, Impacted: A tooth that is prevented from erupting by a physical barrier, usually other teeth. Impaction may also result from orientation of the tooth in an other than vertical position in the periodontal structures.Jaw: Bony structure of the mouth that holds the teeth. It consists of the MANDIBLE and the MAXILLA.Space MaintenanceNail Biting: Common form of habitual body manipulation which is an expression of tension.Social Desirability: A personality trait rendering the individual acceptable in social or interpersonal relations. It is related to social acceptance, social approval, popularity, social status, leadership qualities, or any quality making him a socially desirable companion.Bottle Feeding: Use of nursing bottles for feeding. Applies to humans and animals.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Mandibular Osteotomy: Intraoral OSTEOTOMY of the lower jaw usually performed in order to correct MALOCCLUSION.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Age Determination by Teeth: A means of identifying the age of an animal or human through tooth examination.Orthodontic Space Closure: Therapeutic closure of spaces caused by the extraction of teeth, the congenital absence of teeth, or the excessive space between teeth.Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Oral Hygiene Index: A combination of the debris index and the dental calculus index to determine the status of oral hygiene.Photography, Dental: Photographic techniques used in ORTHODONTICS; DENTAL ESTHETICS; and patient education.Nose: A part of the upper respiratory tract. It contains the organ of SMELL. The term includes the external nose, the nasal cavity, and the PARANASAL SINUSES.Fiducial Markers: Materials used as reference points for imaging studies.Facial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the soft tissue or bony portions of the face.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Occlusal Splints: Rigid or flexible appliances that overlay the occlusal surfaces of the teeth. They are used to treat clenching and bruxism and their sequelae, and to provide temporary relief from muscle or temporomandibular joint pain.Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: Computed tomography modalities which use a cone or pyramid-shaped beam of radiation.Anatomic Landmarks: Reference points located by visual inspection, palpation, or computer assistance, that are useful in localizing structures on or within the human body.Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction Syndrome: A symptom complex consisting of pain, muscle tenderness, clicking in the joint, and limitation or alteration of mandibular movement. The symptoms are subjective and manifested primarily in the masticatory muscles rather than the temporomandibular joint itself. Etiologic factors are uncertain but include occlusal dysharmony and psychophysiologic factors.X-Ray Film: A film base coated with an emulsion designed for use with x-rays.Gingivitis: Inflammation of gum tissue (GINGIVA) without loss of connective tissue.DMF Index: "Decayed, missing and filled teeth," a routinely used statistical concept in dentistry.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Tooth Crown: The upper part of the tooth, which joins the lower part of the tooth (TOOTH ROOT) at the cervix (TOOTH CERVIX) at a line called the cementoenamel junction. The entire surface of the crown is covered with enamel which is thicker at the extremity and becomes progressively thinner toward the cervix. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p216)Age Determination by Skeleton: Establishment of the age of an individual by examination of their skeletal structure.Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Oral Surgical Procedures: Surgical procedures used to treat disease, injuries, and defects of the oral and maxillofacial region.Cleft Lip: Congenital defect in the upper lip where the maxillary prominence fails to merge with the merged medial nasal prominences. It is thought to be caused by faulty migration of the mesoderm in the head region.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Craniosynostoses: Premature closure of one or more CRANIAL SUTURES. It often results in plagiocephaly. Craniosynostoses that involve multiple sutures are sometimes associated with congenital syndromes such as ACROCEPHALOSYNDACTYLIA; and CRANIOFACIAL DYSOSTOSIS.Oral Hygiene: The practice of personal hygiene of the mouth. It includes the maintenance of oral cleanliness, tissue tone, and general preservation of oral health.Tooth Loss: The failure to retain teeth as a result of disease or injury.Transducers, Pressure: Transducers that are activated by pressure changes, e.g., blood pressure.BrazilAge Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Tooth Injuries: Traumatic or other damage to teeth including fractures (TOOTH FRACTURES) or displacements (TOOTH LUXATION).Craniofacial Abnormalities: Congenital structural deformities, malformations, or other abnormalities of the cranium and facial bones.Cleft Palate: Congenital fissure of the soft and/or hard palate, due to faulty fusion.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Dental Alloys: A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions for use in restorative or prosthetic dentistry.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Orthodontic Brackets: Small metal or ceramic attachments used to fasten an arch wire. These attachments are soldered or welded to an orthodontic band or cemented directly onto the teeth. Bowles brackets, edgewise brackets, multiphase brackets, ribbon arch brackets, twin-wire brackets, and universal brackets are all types of orthodontic brackets.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Tongue: A muscular organ in the mouth that is covered with pink tissue called mucosa, tiny bumps called papillae, and thousands of taste buds. The tongue is anchored to the mouth and is vital for chewing, swallowing, and for speech.Root Resorption: Resorption in which cementum or dentin is lost from the root of a tooth owing to cementoclastic or osteoclastic activity in conditions such as trauma of occlusion or neoplasms. (Dorland, 27th ed)

The identification of agreed criteria for referral following the dental inspection of children in the school setting. (1/688)

AIM: To clarify the function of the school based dental inspection. OBJECTIVE: For representatives of the Community Dental Service, General Dental Service and Hospital Dental Service to identify an agreed set of criteria for the referral of children following school dental inspection. DESIGN: Qualitative research methodology used to establish a consensus for the inclusion of referral criteria following dental screening. SETTING: Ellesmere Port, Cheshire, England. MATERIALS: A Delphi technique was used to establish a consensus amongst the study participants on the inclusion of nine possible criteria for referral following dental screening. All participants scored each criterion in the range 1-9, with a score of 1 indicating that referral of individuals with the condition should definitely not take place, and a score of 9 indicating referral should definitely take place. Referral criteria were accepted only if they achieved a group median score of 7 or more, with an interquartile range of three scale points, with the lower value being no less than 7. RESULTS: Four of the nine possible criteria met the agreed group standard for inclusion: 'Sepsis', 'Caries in the secondary dentition', 'Overjet > 10 mm', and 'Registered & caries in the permanent dentition'. CONCLUSION: It is possible to agree clear criteria for the referral of children following the school dental inspection.  (+info)

The problem of the class iii malocclusion. (2/688)

The etiology and treatment of Class III malocclusion has been discussed. The value of electromyographic assessment in the assessment and prediction of Class III malocclusion has been shown.  (+info)

Morphological changes in periodontal mechanoreceptors of mouse maxillary incisors after the experimental induction of anterior crossbite: a light and electron microscopic observation using immunohistochemistry for PGP 9.5. (3/688)

Ruffini nerve endings (mechanoreceptors) in the periodontal ligament (PDL) of mouse incisors were examined to elucidate whether experimentally-induced crossbites cause any changes or abnormalities in their morphology and distribution. Anterior guiding planes were attached to the mandibular incisors of 3-week-old C3H/HeSlc mice. At 3 days and 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks post-attachment of the appliance, the mice were sacrificed by perfusion fixation. Frozen sagittal cryostat sections of the decalcified maxillary incisors were processed for immunohistochemistry of protein gene product 9.5, followed by histochemical determination of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity to reveal sites of alveolar bone resorption. Despite the absence of bone resorption within the lingual PDL of control mice, distinct resorption sites were seen in the respective regions of the experimental animals. Unlike the controls, many Ruffini endings showing vague and swollen contours, with unusually long and pedunculated micro-projections were observed in the affected lingual PDL of the incisors in the experimental animals with short-term anterior crossbite induction. Club-shaped nerve terminations with few, if any, micro-projections were observed in the lingual PDL of experimental animals with long-term induction, as well as in aged control mouse incisors. Differences in the distribution of Ruffini endings were also observed. These results indicate that changing the direction of the force applied to the PDL results in rapid and prolonged changes in the morphology of Ruffini-like mechanoreceptors.  (+info)

Motivation for and satisfaction with orthodontic-surgical treatment: a retrospective study of 28 patients. (4/688)

Motivation for starting treatment and satisfaction with treatment results were evaluated on the basis of replies to a 14-item questionnaire and clinical examination of 28 orthognathic patients from 6 months to 2 years after treatment. The most common reasons for seeking professional help were problems in biting and chewing (68 per cent). Another major reason was dissatisfaction with facial appearance (36 per cent). Many patients also complained of temporomandibular joint symptoms (32 per cent) and headache (32 per cent). Women (8/19) were more often dissatisfied with their facial appearance than men (2/9), but the difference was not statistically significant. In agreement with earlier studies, the results of orthognathic treatment fulfilled the expectations of almost every patient. Nearly 100 per cent of the patients (27/28) were satisfied with treatment results, although 40 per cent experienced some degree of numbness in the lips and/or jaw 1 year post-operatively. The most satisfied patients were those who stated temporomandibular disorders as the main reason for seeking treatment and whose PAR-index had improved greatly. The majority of the patients experienced the orthodontic treatment as painful and as the most unpleasant part of the whole treatment, but all the patients were satisfied with the pre-treatment information they were given on orthodontics. Orthodontic-surgical therapy should be of a high professional standard technically, but the psychological aspects are equally important in the treatment protocol. The professionals should make efforts to understand the patient's motivations for and expectations of treatment. Patients should be well prepared for surgery and supported for a long time after to help them to adjust to post-surgical changes.  (+info)

The functional shift of the mandible in unilateral posterior crossbite and the adaptation of the temporomandibular joints: a pilot study. (5/688)

Changes in the functional shift of the mandibular midline and the condyles were studied during treatment of unilateral posterior crossbite in six children, aged 7-11 years. An expansion plate with covered occlusal surfaces was used as a reflex-releasing stabilizing splint during an initial diagnostic phase (I) in order to determine the structural (i.e. non-guided) position of the mandible. The same plate was used for expansion and retention (phase II), followed by a post-retention phase (III) without the appliance. Before and after each phase, the functional shift was determined kinesiographically and on transcranial radiographs by concurrent recordings with and without the splint. Transverse mandibular position was also recorded on cephalometric radiographs. Prior to phase I, the mandibular midline deviated more than 2 mm and, in occlusion (ICP), the condyles showed normally centred positions in the sagittal plane. With the splint, the condyle on the crossbite side was displaced 2.4 mm (P < 0.05) forwards compared with the ICP, while the position of the condyle on the non-crossbite side was unaltered. After phase III, the deviation of the midline had been eliminated. Sagittal condylar positions in the ICP still did not deviate from the normal, and the splint position was now obtained by symmetrical forward movement of both condyles (1.3 and 1.4 mm). These findings suggest that the TMJs adapted to displacements of the mandible by condylar growth or surface modelling of the fossa. The rest position remained directly caudal to the ICP during treatment. Thus, the splint position, rather than the rest position should be used to determine the therapeutic position of the mandible.  (+info)

A comparison of sagittal and vertical effects between bonded rapid and slow maxillary expansion procedures. (6/688)

The purpose of this study was to determine the vertical and sagittal effects of bonded rapid maxillary expansion (RME), and bonded slow maxillary expansion (SME) procedures, and to compare these effects between the groups. Subjects with maxillary bilateral crossbites were selected and two treatment groups with 12 patients in each were constructed. The Hyrax screw in the RME treatment group and the spring of the Minne-Expander in the SME treatment group were embedded in the posterior bite planes, which had a thickness of 1 mm. At the end of active treatment these appliances were worn for retention for an additional 3 months. Lateral cephalometric radiographs were taken at the beginning and end of treatment, and at the end of the retention period. The maxilla showed anterior displacement in both groups. The mandible significantly rotated downward and backward only in the RME group. The inter-incisal angle and overjet increased in both groups. No significant differences were observed for the net changes between the two groups.  (+info)

An appraisal of the Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) Index and a suggested new weighting system. (7/688)

The PAR Index was developed to measure treatment outcome in orthodontics. Validity was improved by weighting the scores of some components to reflect their relative importance. However, the index still has limitations, principally due to the high weight assigned to overjet. Difficulties also arise from the application of one weighting system to all malocclusions, since occlusal features vary in importance in different classes of malocclusion. The present study examined PAR Index validity using orthodontic consultant assessments as the 'Gold standard' and clinical ranking of occlusal features and statistical modelling to derive a new weighting system, separate for each malocclusion class. Discriminant and regression analyses were used to derive new criteria for measuring treatment outcome. As a result a new and more sensitive method of assessment is suggested which utilizes a combination of point and percentage reductions in PAR scores. This was found to have better correlations with the 'Gold standard' than the PAR nomogram.  (+info)

Assessment of clinical case presentations for the Membership in Orthodontics, Royal College of Surgeons of England 1995, 1996. (8/688)

The cases presented and treated at successive examinations by the candidates for the Membership Examination in Orthodontics in 1995 and 1996 at The Royal College of Surgeons of England, were of a very high standard and demonstrated a wide range of treatment modalities. All cases had fixed appliances, predominantly with pre-adjusted Edgewise appliances. IOTN confirmed that most cases were in great need of treatment, with PAR scores showing them to be treated to a high standard.  (+info)

  • Dentists who are specially trained to correct malocclusion are called orthodontists. (webmd.com)
  • This basic-level course discusses each of the malocclusions listed in the 2014 American Association of Orthodontists publication "Problems to Watch for in Growing Children" and makes suggestions for reliable and realistic therapeutic interventions. (westernschools.com)
  • Although intervention may modify a developing malocclusion, and at times eliminate it, malocclusion may still develop due to underlying problems that cannot be addressed at the time of treatment and/or future genetic and environmental pressures. (westernschools.com)
  • Most of the time, malocclusion is a cosmetic problem, which means that people don't like the way their teeth look. (webmd.com)
  • Large well conducted prospective cohort studies with contemporaneous recording of breastfeeding and other potential confounders such as non-nutritional sucking habits and the use of baby feeding bottles are needed to help resolve the debate of the impact of breastfeeding on malocclusion. (nationalelfservice.net)
  • Malocclusion is usually caused by problems with the shape or size of the jaw or teeth. (webmd.com)
  • Thus, although intervention may prevent a specific aspect of a malocclusion, this intervention is undertaken with the full knowledge that additional problems may occur and that future treatment may be necessary. (westernschools.com)
  • BACKGROUND: Malocclusion, though not life-threatening,is an important public health issue, which has a large impacton the individual, causing discomfort, social and functionallimitations.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate objectively orthodontic treatment needsin Nigerian schoolchildren and the impact of malocclusion ontheir quality of life.METHODS: This cross-sectional study involved schoolchildrenaged 12 to 16 years from four randomly selected secondaryschools in Lagos, Nigeria. (who.int)
  • OBJECTIVE To synthesize evidence on the impact of malocclusion and its associated treatment on people's quality of life across studies that used the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) questionnaire in the adult population. (semanticscholar.org)
  • A major disadvantage of classifying malocclusions according to Angle's system is that it only takes into consideration the two-dimensional viewing along a spatial axis in the sagittal plane in the terminal occlusion, even though occlusion problems are, in principle, three-dimensional. (wikipedia.org)
  • Malocclusion, or occlusion that has deviated from Class I molar relationship, can be a result of developmental, genetic and environmental factors. (bracesinfo.com)
  • Computed Tomography Evaluation of Craniomandibular Articulation in Class II Division 1 Malocclusion and Class I Normal Occlusion Subjects in North Indian Population , K. C. Prabhat, Sanjeev Kumar Verma, Sandhya Maheshwari, Ibne Ahmad, and Mohd. (hindawi.com)
  • However, if the deviation from the ideal occlusion is big, it is found embarrassing or the matter concerns symptomatic malocclusion, it is a good idea to have occlusion fixed. (oral.fi)
  • Presents an abstract of the study "3D finite element model and cervical lesion formation in normal occlusion and in malocclusion," by J. Borcic et al. (ebscohost.com)
  • Of the 3776 children 30.6% had normal occlusion, 47.4% class I malocclusion, 13.7% class II division 1 malocclusion (male/female ratio 3:2), 1.0% class II division 2 malocclusion (male/female ratio 3:1) and 2.1% class III malocclusion. (who.int)
  • Sur les 3776 enfants, 30,6 % présentaient une occlusion normale, 47,4 % une malocclusion de classe I, 13,7 % une malocclusion de classe II division 1 (rapport des sexes masculin/féminin de 3:2), 1,0 % une malocclusion de classe II division 2 (rapport des sexes masculin/féminin de 3:1) et 2,1 % une malocclusion de classe III. (who.int)
  • Class III malocclusion is an abnormal mesial relationship of the mandible to the maxilla. (bracesinfo.com)
  • Class IV: In this form of malocclusion, one side of the mandible is longer than the maxilla and the other is shorter than the maxilla. (embracepetinsurance.com)
  • The spectrum of complications for Class III malocclusion ranges in gravity from dentoalveolar problems with functional anterior shift of the mandible to true skeletal problems with serious maxillomandibular discrepancies, which makes its diagnosis highly challenging in growing children. (dovepress.com)
  • ABSTRACT This study assessed the malocclusion types, very severe crowding and need for serial extraction among a random sample of 7-9-year-old children in Shiraz, Islamic Republic of Iran. (who.int)
  • Long-term mouth breathing seems to be linked to malocclusion too, but how isn't exactly clear. (webmd.com)
  • Mouth breathing is the immediate culprit in the development of malocclusion. (medizines.net)
  • Breastfeeding provides a protective effect against some malocclusions, and there is a strong inverse correlation between the duration of breastfeeding and the duration of pacifier use. (aappublications.org)
  • The protective effects of predominant and exclusive breastfeeding against malocclusion are distinct: exclusive breastfeeding reduces the risk of malocclusions regardless of pacifier use, whereas the effect of predominant breastfeeding depends on the duration of the pacifier use. (aappublications.org)
  • In addition, children who are breastfed are less likely to use a pacifier, which is considered a risk factor for malocclusion. (empr.com)
  • Bad Oral Habits -- Thumb sucking, tongue thrusting and prolonged pacifier or bottle use can cause malocclusion in children. (dentistry.com)
  • Given that, by the very definition of their breed standard, many breeds of dogs inherently suffer abnormal dental alignment, preventing malocclusion may not be possible in the context of a specific breed of dog. (embracepetinsurance.com)
  • Incisor malocclusion is a life threatening condition that must be addressed. (mypetsdentist.com)
  • A common risk approach, promoting exclusive breastfeeding up to 6 months of age to prevent childhood diseases and disorders, should be an effective population strategy to prevent malocclusion. (aappublications.org)
  • MCH therapy followed by fixed appliances was shown to be an effective treatment for the correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion at postpubertal observation. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Ayoub, A.F. , Stirrups, D.R. and Moos, K.F. (1993) The stability of bimaxillary osteotomy after correction of skeletal Class II malocclusion. (gla.ac.uk)
  • Conclusions : La prévalence des malocclusions dentaires chez les enfants a été jugée non significative entre les groupes de différentes sévérité d'IAH. (umontreal.ca)
  • CONCLUSIONS : Notre étude ne suggère aucune association entre les malocclusions, le besoin évident de traitement et la date d'immigration chez des enfants (8 à 12 ans) défavorisé du primaire. (umontreal.ca)
  • Les malocclusions étaient significativement plus importantes chez les enfants originaires du Maghreb. (umontreal.ca)
  • Clinical and histochemical alterations of the periodontal ligament in gerbils after malocclusion induced/Alteraciones clinicas e histoquimicas del ligamento periodontal en gerbiles despues de maloclusion inducida. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • RESUMEN: El objetivo de este articulo es mostrar las alteraciones clinicas e histoquimicas del primer ligamento periodontal del lado derecho, despues de la extraccion del molar superior izquierdo en gerbiles (Meriones unguiculatus). (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Los resultados mostraron que la reaccion de TRAP es capaz de evidenciar la actividad osteoclastica en la hiperfuncion de la semimandibula derecha, explicando los cambios funcionales del ligamento periodontal despues de la extraccion dental, siendo observada una pequena recesion gingival y exposicion radicular de los dientes sin funcion, en los molares inferiores izquierdos. (thefreelibrary.com)