Speech: Communication through a system of conventional vocal symbols.Speech Perception: The process whereby an utterance is decoded into a representation in terms of linguistic units (sequences of phonetic segments which combine to form lexical and grammatical morphemes).Speech Disorders: Acquired or developmental conditions marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or generate spoken forms of language.Speech Intelligibility: Ability to make speech sounds that are recognizable.Speech Acoustics: The acoustic aspects of speech in terms of frequency, intensity, and time.Speech Production Measurement: Measurement of parameters of the speech product such as vocal tone, loudness, pitch, voice quality, articulation, resonance, phonation, phonetic structure and prosody.Speech Therapy: Treatment for individuals with speech defects and disorders that involves counseling and use of various exercises and aids to help the development of new speech habits.Audiometry, Speech: Measurement of the ability to hear speech under various conditions of intensity and noise interference using sound-field as well as earphones and bone oscillators.Phonetics: The science or study of speech sounds and their production, transmission, and reception, and their analysis, classification, and transcription. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Speech Articulation Tests: Tests of accuracy in pronouncing speech sounds, e.g., Iowa Pressure Articulation Test, Deep Test of Articulation, Templin-Darley Tests of Articulation, Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation, Screening Speech Articulation Test, Arizona Articulation Proficiency Scale.Speech Discrimination Tests: Tests of the ability to hear and understand speech as determined by scoring the number of words in a word list repeated correctly.Speech Recognition Software: Software capable of recognizing dictation and transcribing the spoken words into written text.Speech Reception Threshold Test: A test to determine the lowest sound intensity level at which fifty percent or more of the spondaic test words (words of two syllables having equal stress) are repeated correctly.Sound Spectrography: The graphic registration of the frequency and intensity of sounds, such as speech, infant crying, and animal vocalizations.Acoustic Stimulation: Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.Cochlear Implants: Electronic hearing devices typically used for patients with normal outer and middle ear function, but defective inner ear function. In the COCHLEA, the hair cells (HAIR CELLS, VESTIBULAR) may be absent or damaged but there are residual nerve fibers. The device electrically stimulates the COCHLEAR NERVE to create sound sensation.Noise: Any sound which is unwanted or interferes with HEARING other sounds.Speech, Esophageal: A method of speech used after laryngectomy, with sound produced by vibration of the column of air in the esophagus against the contracting cricopharyngeal sphincter. (Dorland, 27th ed)Dysarthria: Disorders of speech articulation caused by imperfect coordination of pharynx, larynx, tongue, or face muscles. This may result from CRANIAL NERVE DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; CEREBELLAR DISEASES; BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES; BRAIN STEM diseases; or diseases of the corticobulbar tracts (see PYRAMIDAL TRACTS). The cortical language centers are intact in this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p489)Speech, Alaryngeal: Methods of enabling a patient without a larynx or with a non-functional larynx to produce voice or speech. The methods may be pneumatic or electronic.Stuttering: A disturbance in the normal fluency and time patterning of speech that is inappropriate for the individual's age. This disturbance is characterized by frequent repetitions or prolongations of sounds or syllables. Various other types of speech dysfluencies may also be involved including interjections, broken words, audible or silent blocking, circumlocutions, words produced with an excess of physical tension, and monosyllabic whole word repetitions. Stuttering may occur as a developmental condition in childhood or as an acquired disorder which may be associated with BRAIN INFARCTIONS and other BRAIN DISEASES. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Voice: The sounds produced by humans by the passage of air through the LARYNX and over the VOCAL CORDS, and then modified by the resonance organs, the NASOPHARYNX, and the MOUTH.Articulation Disorders: Disorders of the quality of speech characterized by the substitution, omission, distortion, and addition of phonemes.Perceptual Masking: The interference of one perceptual stimulus with another causing a decrease or lessening in perceptual effectiveness.Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Apraxias: A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)Voice Quality: That component of SPEECH which gives the primary distinction to a given speaker's VOICE when pitch and loudness are excluded. It involves both phonatory and resonatory characteristics. Some of the descriptions of voice quality are harshness, breathiness and nasality.Communication Aids for Disabled: Equipment that provides mentally or physically disabled persons with a means of communication. The aids include display boards, typewriters, cathode ray tubes, computers, and speech synthesizers. The output of such aids includes written words, artificial speech, language signs, Morse code, and pictures.Auditory Perception: The process whereby auditory stimuli are selected, organized, and interpreted by the organism.Cochlear Implantation: Surgical insertion of an electronic hearing device (COCHLEAR IMPLANTS) with electrodes to the COCHLEAR NERVE in the inner ear to create sound sensation in patients with residual nerve fibers.Linguistics: The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Auditory Threshold: The audibility limit of discriminating sound intensity and pitch.Lipreading: The process by which an observer comprehends speech by watching the movements of the speaker's lips without hearing the speaker's voice.Language Development: The gradual expansion in complexity and meaning of symbols and sounds as perceived and interpreted by the individual through a maturational and learning process. Stages in development include babbling, cooing, word imitation with cognition, and use of short sentences.Deafness: A general term for the complete loss of the ability to hear from both ears.Psychoacoustics: The science pertaining to the interrelationship of psychologic phenomena and the individual's response to the physical properties of sound.Hearing Aids: Wearable sound-amplifying devices that are intended to compensate for impaired hearing. These generic devices include air-conduction hearing aids and bone-conduction hearing aids. (UMDNS, 1999)Language Development Disorders: Conditions characterized by language abilities (comprehension and expression of speech and writing) that are below the expected level for a given age, generally in the absence of an intellectual impairment. These conditions may be associated with DEAFNESS; BRAIN DISEASES; MENTAL DISORDERS; or environmental factors.Phonation: The process of producing vocal sounds by means of VOCAL CORDS vibrating in an expiratory blast of air.Auditory Cortex: The region of the cerebral cortex that receives the auditory radiation from the MEDIAL GENICULATE BODY.Vocabulary: The sum or the stock of words used by a language, a group, or an individual. (From Webster, 3d ed)Hearing: The ability or act of sensing and transducing ACOUSTIC STIMULATION to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. It is also called audition.Psycholinguistics: A discipline concerned with relations between messages and the characteristics of individuals who select and interpret them; it deals directly with the processes of encoding (phonetics) and decoding (psychoacoustics) as they relate states of messages to states of communicators.Correction of Hearing Impairment: Procedures for correcting HEARING DISORDERS.Child Language: The language and sounds expressed by a child at a particular maturational stage in development.Language Tests: Tests designed to assess language behavior and abilities. They include tests of vocabulary, comprehension, grammar and functional use of language, e.g., Development Sentence Scoring, Receptive-Expressive Emergent Language Scale, Parsons Language Sample, Utah Test of Language Development, Michigan Language Inventory and Verbal Language Development Scale, Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, Northwestern Syntax Screening Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Ammons Full-Range Picture Vocabulary Test, and Assessment of Children's Language Comprehension.Pitch Perception: A dimension of auditory sensation varying with cycles per second of the sound stimulus.Pattern Recognition, Physiological: The analysis of a critical number of sensory stimuli or facts (the pattern) by physiological processes such as vision (PATTERN RECOGNITION, VISUAL), touch, or hearing.Persons With Hearing Impairments: Persons with any degree of loss of hearing that has an impact on their activities of daily living or that requires special assistance or intervention.Lip: Either of the two fleshy, full-blooded margins of the mouth.Language Disorders: Conditions characterized by deficiencies of comprehension or expression of written and spoken forms of language. These include acquired and developmental disorders.Speech-Language Pathology: The study of speech or language disorders and their diagnosis and correction.Gestures: Movement of a part of the body for the purpose of communication.Audiometry, Pure-Tone: Measurement of hearing based on the use of pure tones of various frequencies and intensities as auditory stimuli.Comprehension: The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.Music: Sound that expresses emotion through rhythm, melody, and harmony.Aphasia, Broca: An aphasia characterized by impairment of expressive LANGUAGE (speech, writing, signs) and relative preservation of receptive language abilities (i.e., comprehension). This condition is caused by lesions of the motor association cortex in the FRONTAL LOBE (BROCA AREA and adjacent cortical and white matter regions).Evoked Potentials, Auditory: The electric response evoked in the CEREBRAL CORTEX by ACOUSTIC STIMULATION or stimulation of the AUDITORY PATHWAYS.Hearing Loss, Sensorineural: Hearing loss resulting from damage to the COCHLEA and the sensorineural elements which lie internally beyond the oval and round windows. These elements include the AUDITORY NERVE and its connections in the BRAINSTEM.Aphasia: A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia.Auditory Perceptual Disorders: Acquired or developmental cognitive disorders of AUDITORY PERCEPTION characterized by a reduced ability to perceive information contained in auditory stimuli despite intact auditory pathways. Affected individuals have difficulty with speech perception, sound localization, and comprehending the meaning of inflections of speech.Acoustics: The branch of physics that deals with sound and sound waves. In medicine it is often applied in procedures in speech and hearing studies. With regard to the environment, it refers to the characteristics of a room, auditorium, theatre, building, etc. that determines the audibility or fidelity of sounds in it. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Hearing Loss: A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Voice Disorders: Pathological processes that affect voice production, usually involving VOCAL CORDS and the LARYNGEAL MUCOSA. Voice disorders can be caused by organic (anatomical), or functional (emotional or psychological) factors leading to DYSPHONIA; APHONIA; and defects in VOICE QUALITY, loudness, and pitch.Velopharyngeal Insufficiency: Failure of the SOFT PALATE to reach the posterior pharyngeal wall to close the opening between the oral and nasal cavities. Incomplete velopharyngeal closure is primarily related to surgeries (ADENOIDECTOMY; CLEFT PALATE) or an incompetent PALATOPHARYNGEAL SPHINCTER. It is characterized by hypernasal speech.Auditory Pathways: NEURAL PATHWAYS and connections within the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, beginning at the hair cells of the ORGAN OF CORTI, continuing along the eighth cranial nerve, and terminating at the AUDITORY CORTEX.Semantics: The relationships between symbols and their meanings.Audiometry: The testing of the acuity of the sense of hearing to determine the thresholds of the lowest intensity levels at which an individual can hear a set of tones. The frequencies between 125 and 8000 Hz are used to test air conduction thresholds and the frequencies between 250 and 4000 Hz are used to test bone conduction thresholds.Jaw: Bony structure of the mouth that holds the teeth. It consists of the MANDIBLE and the MAXILLA.Larynx, Artificial: A device, activated electronically or by expired pulmonary air, which simulates laryngeal activity and enables a laryngectomized person to speak. Examples of the pneumatic mechanical device are the Tokyo and Van Hunen artificial larynges. Electronic devices include the Western Electric electrolarynx, Tait oral vibrator, Cooper-Rand electrolarynx and the Ticchioni pipe.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Language Therapy: Rehabilitation of persons with language disorders or training of children with language development disorders.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Hearing Tests: Part of an ear examination that measures the ability of sound to reach the brain.ReadingMultilingualism: The ability to speak, read, or write several languages or many languages with some facility. Bilingualism is the most common form. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Hearing Loss, Bilateral: Partial hearing loss in both ears.Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted: Computer-assisted processing of electric, ultrasonic, or electronic signals to interpret function and activity.Recognition (Psychology): The knowledge or perception that someone or something present has been previously encountered.Voice Training: A variety of techniques used to help individuals utilize their voice for various purposes and with minimal use of muscle energy.Hearing Disorders: Conditions that impair the transmission of auditory impulses and information from the level of the ear to the temporal cortices, including the sensorineural pathways.Loudness Perception: The perceived attribute of a sound which corresponds to the physical attribute of intensity.Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem: Electrical waves in the CEREBRAL CORTEX generated by BRAIN STEM structures in response to auditory click stimuli. These are found to be abnormal in many patients with CEREBELLOPONTINE ANGLE lesions, MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, or other DEMYELINATING DISEASES.Signal-To-Noise Ratio: The comparison of the quantity of meaningful data to the irrelevant or incorrect data.Facial Muscles: Muscles of facial expression or mimetic muscles that include the numerous muscles supplied by the facial nerve that are attached to and move the skin of the face. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Feedback, Sensory: A mechanism of communicating one's own sensory system information about a task, movement or skill.Dyslexia: A cognitive disorder characterized by an impaired ability to comprehend written and printed words or phrases despite intact vision. This condition may be developmental or acquired. Developmental dyslexia is marked by reading achievement that falls substantially below that expected given the individual's chronological age, measured intelligence, and age-appropriate education. The disturbance in reading significantly interferes with academic achievement or with activities of daily living that require reading skills. (From DSM-IV)Signal Detection, Psychological: Psychophysical technique that permits the estimation of the bias of the observer as well as detectability of the signal (i.e., stimulus) in any sensory modality. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Dysphonia: Difficulty and/or pain in PHONATION or speaking.Magnetoencephalography: The measurement of magnetic fields over the head generated by electric currents in the brain. As in any electrical conductor, electric fields in the brain are accompanied by orthogonal magnetic fields. The measurement of these fields provides information about the localization of brain activity which is complementary to that provided by ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY. Magnetoencephalography may be used alone or together with electroencephalography, for measurement of spontaneous or evoked activity, and for research or clinical purposes.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Tongue: A muscular organ in the mouth that is covered with pink tissue called mucosa, tiny bumps called papillae, and thousands of taste buds. The tongue is anchored to the mouth and is vital for chewing, swallowing, and for speech.Temporal Lobe: Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.Presbycusis: Gradual bilateral hearing loss associated with aging that is due to progressive degeneration of cochlear structures and central auditory pathways. Hearing loss usually begins with the high frequencies then progresses to sounds of middle and low frequencies.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Sound Localization: Ability to determine the specific location of a sound source.Vocal Cords: A pair of cone-shaped elastic mucous membrane projecting from the laryngeal wall and forming a narrow slit between them. Each contains a thickened free edge (vocal ligament) extending from the THYROID CARTILAGE to the ARYTENOID CARTILAGE, and a VOCAL MUSCLE that shortens or relaxes the vocal cord to control sound production.Pitch Discrimination: The ability to differentiate tones.Dominance, Cerebral: Dominance of one cerebral hemisphere over the other in cerebral functions.Communication Disorders: Disorders of verbal and nonverbal communication caused by receptive or expressive LANGUAGE DISORDERS, cognitive dysfunction (e.g., MENTAL RETARDATION), psychiatric conditions, and HEARING DISORDERS.Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Verbal Learning: Learning to respond verbally to a verbal stimulus cue.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Laryngectomy: Total or partial excision of the larynx.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Mouth: The oval-shaped oral cavity located at the apex of the digestive tract and consisting of two parts: the vestibule and the oral cavity proper.Manual Communication: Method of nonverbal communication utilizing hand movements as speech equivalents.Audiology: The study of hearing and hearing impairment.Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Sign Language: A system of hand gestures used for communication by the deaf or by people speaking different languages.Communication Methods, Total: Utilization of all available receptive and expressive modes for the purpose of achieving communication with the hearing impaired, such as gestures, postures, facial expression, types of voice, formal speech and non-speech systems, and simultaneous communication.Larynx: A tubular organ of VOICE production. It is located in the anterior neck, superior to the TRACHEA and inferior to the tongue and HYOID BONE.Imitative Behavior: The mimicking of the behavior of one individual by another.Echolalia: Involuntary ("parrot-like"), meaningless repetition of a recently heard word, phrase, or song. This condition may be associated with transcortical APHASIA; SCHIZOPHRENIA; or other disorders. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p485)Frontal Lobe: The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.Time Perception: The ability to estimate periods of time lapsed or duration of time.Palatal Obturators: Appliances that close a cleft or fissure of the palate.Aphasia, Conduction: A type of fluent aphasia characterized by an impaired ability to repeat one and two word phrases, despite retained comprehension. This condition is associated with dominant hemisphere lesions involving the arcuate fasciculus (a white matter projection between Broca's and Wernicke's areas) and adjacent structures. Like patients with Wernicke aphasia (APHASIA, WERNICKE), patients with conduction aphasia are fluent but commit paraphasic errors during attempts at written and oral forms of communication. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p482; Brain & Bannister, Clinical Neurology, 7th ed, p142; Kandel et al., Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p848)Cochlear Nerve: The cochlear part of the 8th cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE). The cochlear nerve fibers originate from neurons of the SPIRAL GANGLION and project peripherally to cochlear hair cells and centrally to the cochlear nuclei (COCHLEAR NUCLEUS) of the BRAIN STEM. They mediate the sense of hearing.Vocalization, Animal: Sounds used in animal communication.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Dichotic Listening Tests: Tests for central hearing disorders based on the competing message technique (binaural separation).
  • The claims have been repeatedly dismissed including by Republican judges who have ruled the suits lacked evidence.But local Republicans in some battleground states have followed Trump in making unsupported claims, prompting grave concerns over potential damage to American democracy.Trump himself continues to rail against the election in tweets and in interviews though his own administration has said the 2020 election was the most secure ever. (yahoo.com)
  • In between assorted claims that President Trump is a threat to Freedom of the Press, the New York Times decided to publish a case for abolishing Freedom of Speech. (frontpagemag.com)
  • As revealed in a transcript of an interview with the Wall Street Journal that was leaked earlier today, President Donald Trump claimed that when it came to his campaign-style speech to the Boy Scouts last week, he was given some very positive feedback by the organization. (mediaite.com)
  • With the paper noting that he had received some mixed reactions to the political speech, Trump responded that he had actually received a call from the leader of the Boy Scouts about how awesome it was. (mediaite.com)
  • When large sections of Melania Trump's speech at the Republican National Convention turned out to be lifted from Michelle Obama's 2008 convention speech, the Trump campaign tried to deflect criticism by throwing the speechwriter under the bus (after initially insisting Melania wrote the speech herself). (motherjones.com)
  • Of course, Trump layers onto this foundation crude rhetoric and dubious policy, but the opinion elite that is - judging by Twitter - working itself into a lather of outrage over the speech is going to miss its basic appeal. (nationalreview.com)
  • Donald Trump discussed foreign policy in a speech in Youngstown, Ohio, today. (go.com)
  • The United States is in the era of nation building, which Trump will end. (go.com)
  • Trump said, "If I become president, the era of nation building will be brought to a very swift and decisive end. (go.com)
  • Protesters in London urge incoming U.S. President Donald Trump to 'build bridges, not walls. (reuters.com)
  • A banner reading "Build bridges, not walls" was draped across London's Tower Bridge on Friday (January 20) as part of a series of events across the world aimed at expressing displeasure at the inauguration of Donald Trump as U.S. president. (reuters.com)
  • A group of 22 Republican senators signed a letter urging President Trump to make a "clean break" from the Paris Agreement on climate change. (yahoo.com)
  • Power to the people' is an easy slogan, but citizenship requires more from us than simply making our demands to politicians and then expecting them to go away and resolve the conflicting interests and viewpoints in a manner wholly to our liking. (thersa.org)
  • Featuring a number of well-known psychologists and behavioral economists like Dan Ariely and Daniel Goldstein, these speeches discuss research, specific studies and also offer tips for helping people make smarter decisions in the future. (trendhunter.com)
  • In Dan Ariely's speech, the behavioral economist advises people against following their intuition. (trendhunter.com)
  • Many people rely on "following their gut" when making important life decisions, but he describes this type of behavior as irrational and high-risk. (trendhunter.com)
  • He did, however, warn that forcing universities to cancel speeches lets people like Spencer claim to be "First Amendment martyrs. (courthousenews.com)
  • Committee Chair Chuck Grassley spoke hypothetically in his opening statement about a law that would allow people to sue universities or their officials if the university receives federal money and does not do enough to ensure free-speech protections on campus. (courthousenews.com)
  • McDonald's is thanking all the people who make all-day breakfast possible in a spot by Leo Burnett in Chicago set to air during the Oscars. (adweek.com)
  • People love wedding speeches - they look forward to them, listen to them, discuss them, remember them. (confetti.co.uk)
  • Composing an e-mail or an utterance for a speech synthesizer using a tongue stick or by blinking can be quite frustrating since most people can only manage about ten words a minute. (hackaday.com)
  • However, scientists recently reported in the journal Nature that they have successfully decoded brain signals into speech directly , which could open up an entirely new world for people who need assistance communicating. (hackaday.com)
  • Oddly, while the results were not quite as good, the process worked even if people read while moving their lips but not making actual sounds. (hackaday.com)
  • It's possible that this could limit its usefulness for people who already can't speak, which coupled with the poor quality of the speech means this work remains unlikey to change anyone's life in the immediate future. (hackaday.com)
  • However, it is a great first step to both helping people with speech problems and of course for the dystopian future with that eventual brain interface that will supplant the cell phone. (hackaday.com)
  • The reports of chief electoral officer, Gujarat, district election officer, Surat and returning officer, Udhna assembly constituency had also said that Vaghela has violated the Model Code of Conduct by inciting the communal feelings of the people through his speech made at a public meeting at BRC Gate ground, Surat on October 31. (hindustantimes.com)
  • In Ireland, a country hailed as a 'model', an explosion in unemployment is contained only by the emigration en masse of more than 300,000 young people. (etuc.org)
  • Happy Hands make Happy People! (pinterest.com)
  • Those wars that are fought to capture land and people confront us with the question of the new role of the international community in maintaining and creating conditions for peace, in respecting human rights and rights of minorities and nations. (coe.int)
  • People love learning from Mark since his methods are useful and practical, but most of all they help people learn or relearn the power of speech. (webwire.com)
  • To me, one of the most important parts of the Government's programme-this came out in the Queen's Speech-is providing a business environment where people are incentivised to create employment for others. (blogs.com)
  • If I do nothing else in Watford, and in my political career, I would like to be able to do this one thing: I would like to change the attitude to business among young people, together with a Government who are able to give them incentives to fill the empty shops and offices, so that we make business something that people want to do. (blogs.com)
  • Government can incentivise people, but it is the responsibility of us all to encourage people to go into job-creating schemes. (blogs.com)
  • I was delighted to hear in the Queen's Speech that the welfare reform Bill, much of which is based on our election manifesto, is to provide interesting schemes, such as a mentoring scheme for small businesses and sole traders to take in young people and give them a chance. (blogs.com)
  • Like Robin Hood, I have a desire to counter over-taxation, to protect the most vulnerable in society, and to make sure that oppressive government does not bring misery on the people. (blogs.com)
  • To conclude this part of my speech, let me say that no matter what anybody says, the fact remains - nobody can dispute it - that our people are growing together in this country, and hon. members on the other side know it. (sahistory.org.za)
  • Happily, researchers do know a lot about language - words, sentences and grammar - and speech - the vocal sounds that carry language to the next person's ear - in living people. (britannica.com)
  • These free learning and exercise resources empower people to continue to make communication improvements. (advertisingindustrynewswire.com)
  • The Chávez government can now block websites and punish broadcasters for encouraging people to engage in peaceful civil disobedience, or merely for transmitting news that makes people anxious," Vivanco said. (hrw.org)
  • Every day we had something new and fascinating to do, this ranged from doing wall sits with a comedian to grouping data about what makes people laugh and cry. (google.com)
  • We asked a random sample of people to tell us what personally made them laugh and what made them cry. (google.com)
  • Then we used these groups to create wordles that clearly show what groups made people laugh or cry the most. (google.com)
  • Emcee speeches include introductions of the people involved in the event, the order of the events, and introductions of the events as they happen. (answers.com)
  • For example, the built-in People app invokes the invite intent when the user selects "Add connection" for a specific social app that's listed in a person's contact details. (android.com)
  • Liulishuo has the world's largest speech corpus for Chinese people learning English, the most advanced speech recognition technology developed in-house and the. (simplyhired.com)
  • But seeing how frustrated she got when people couldn't understand her made us go forward with the testing. (thismamamakesstuff.com)
  • citation needed] The speech is often referred to as the "Pound Cake" speech because of the following lines, referencing a particular dessert, pound cake, for comedic effect, while contrasting common criminals with political activists who risked incarceration during the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s: But these people, the ones up here in the balcony fought so hard. (wikipedia.org)
  • WASHINGTON (CN) - Senators griped Tuesday about the state of free speech on college campuses but struggled where to draw the line as a matter of public safety. (courthousenews.com)
  • This question has taken on some urgency in the past few years, as professed defenders of social justice have clashed with professed defenders of free speech on college campuses. (frontpagemag.com)
  • The study suggests that PNFA is a coherent, well-defined syndrome and that varieties such as logopaenic progressive aphasia and progressive apraxia of speech may be seen as points in a space of continuous variation within progressive non-fluent aphasia. (manchester.ac.uk)
  • By comparing the vocal tract of humans and their close primate relatives, researchers can get a sense of which particular traits were necessary for the emergence of speech. (latimes.com)
  • These are concentrations of acoustic energy around key frequencies in human speech, and their distribution is defined in part by the shape of our vocal tract. (latimes.com)
  • That in turn means that the sound carries information about the vocal tract configuration that made it. (britannica.com)
  • After over a half-century of investigation and of developing both anatomical and acoustical modeling technology, speech scientists can generally model a vocal tract and calculate what sound it will make, or run the other way, analyzing a sound to calculate what vocal tract shape made it. (britannica.com)
  • A further importance is to theories of the evolution of human speech since alaryngeal speech shows that speech is not dependent entirely upon evolved anatomy as it can be created using vocal tract anatomy in an adaptive manner. (wikipedia.org)
  • which is what Rojadirecta effectively had to do in changing domain names, and the Supreme Court makes clear that this is still a First Amendment violation. (techdirt.com)
  • The judge does note that the First Amendment part can be challenged in the actual upcoming trial, but in the meantime, he's claiming that a clear violation of the First Amendment does not create "substantial hardship. (techdirt.com)
  • The letter tries to drag in Lanham Act violations to excuse its targeting of First Amendment-protected speech and its deliberate obtuseness about fair use. (techdirt.com)
  • He found this company, in Scotland, Cereproc, that helps build voices for patients with motor neuron disease, so that when they tragically lose their voices, their speech synthesisers will still sound like them and not a robot," Kelly said. (campaignlive.co.uk)
  • Cereproc had to isolate 41 phonemes for American English (the sounds that can be used to make any word) and stitching the small units of speech back together. (campaignlive.co.uk)
  • But far more than in his initial policy speech on gun control on Jan. 16 and in his inaugural address on Jan. 21, Obama used the platform provided by the State of the Union - and the presence in the House chamber of more than two dozen shooting survivors and family members from Newtown and other recent shootings - to push the debate forward and demand votes on those proposals. (rollcall.com)
  • Ticking off a list of recent mass shootings, Obama made an emotional appeal - saved for the final moments of his speech - to nudge congressional leaders into action. (rollcall.com)
  • The parents of Hadiya Pendleton - a 15-year-old girl shot to death in a Chicago park eight days after she marched in Obama's inaugural parade in Washington - attended the speech as the guests of first lady Michelle Obama. (rollcall.com)
  • WASHINGTON - Thirty-two years after President Ronald Reagan proclaimed that "government is the problem" and 17 years after President Bill Clinton offered a surrender of sorts on that issue by stating that the "era of big government is over," President Obama made a case Tuesday night for closing out the politics of austerity. (nytimes.com)
  • But by filling in the details of the philosophical framework he set out last month in his second inaugural address, Mr. Obama made clear that after his re-election in November, he does not intend to allow a relentless Republican drive for spending cuts to define his second term. (nytimes.com)
  • Obama has largely phased out the kind of large-scale nation-building efforts most closely associated with Bush's tenure, when hundreds of thousands of U.S. troops were deployed to rebuild Iraq and Afghanistan. (go.com)
  • In contrast, heterozygous Foxp2 (R552H)-KI mice, which showed modest impairment of USVs with different USV qualities and which did not exhibit nuclear aggregates, should provide insights into the common molecular mechanisms between the mouse USV and human speech learning and the relationship between the USV and motor neural systems. (pnas.org)
  • Use seasonal activities to build everyday tier 1 vocabulary for early language learners with speech-language impairment. (bslspeechlanguage.com)
  • I speak as one who is fascinated by the built environment and our architectural heritage - whether it be the small cottages of Ponsonby and Thorndon, the new city created for Brazil's capital, Kyoto's temples, or Stockholm's mediaeval centre. (scoop.co.nz)
  • Packed with practical advice, useful information and loads of sample material, this section of the Speech Centre is all you need for a perfect speech. (confetti.co.uk)
  • At the Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing (CVSSP), we're developing exciting and ground-breaking technologies. (surrey.ac.uk)
  • This is part of a wider campaign The Times has launched with publisher News UK's in-house agency Pulse, built around the promise of "bringing new perspectives to the news", Richard Oakley, editor of the Ireland edition of The Times said. (campaignlive.co.uk)
  • News, the 22-year-old writer who delivered 'The Hill We Climb' to celebrate the swearing-in of Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris, revealed later to CNN after her performance that she dealt with a speech impediment until last two or three years. (indiatimes.com)
  • The witnesses who testified before the committee, a mixture of students, administrators and lawyers, generally agreed that universities have an obligation to allow provocative speakers to come to campus, even if the content of their speech is offensive. (courthousenews.com)
  • It began with a novel data set Yahoo built itself, composed completely of hateful or otherwise offensive article comments previously noted by Yahoo editors (yes, human beings). (digitaltrends.com)
  • The protest in London was organised by the campaign group, also called "Bridges not Walls", in reference to Trump's pledge to build a wall on the Mexican border. (reuters.com)
  • Even before the speech, Republicans were mocking his "single dime" line and said he was failing to do enough to bring down a national debt that threatens to reach dangerous levels in coming decades. (nytimes.com)
  • Struggling to keep older speech and language students motivated? (pinterest.com)
  • The findings , described this week in the journal PLOS One, could have significant implications for our understanding of the development of human speech and the emergence of language. (latimes.com)
  • Our services include screenings, evaluations, treatment, and education geared towards the understanding of speech and language development and treatment for its disorders. (99designs.com)
  • Yet the universal language that Joyce created is really English with foreign touches and a strong Irish accent. (wordpress.com)
  • Rather than preserving the first baby steps toward language, they're fully formed, made up of words, sentences and grammar carried from one person to another by speech sounds, like any of the perhaps 6,000 languages spoken today . (britannica.com)
  • Spoken language in humans is an intricately woven string of syllables with consonants appended to the syllables' core vowels, so mastering vowels was a key to speech emergence. (britannica.com)
  • We first need to evaluate joint attention, which I describe as the child's solid foundation-the basis or beginning of building a language skills structure. (asha.org)
  • I share my building metaphor with parents to explain how this labeling still indicates more work to do before putting on the expressive language roof. (asha.org)
  • So, when parents ask when their child will start talking, I share my approach about putting the other necessary pieces of language in place first-and that once we build those skills, talking may follow. (asha.org)
  • Leader Live is an online publication of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association . (asha.org)
  • Previous studies have demonstrated that mutation in the forkhead domain of the forkhead box P2 (FOXP2) protein (R553H) causes speech-language disorders. (pnas.org)
  • The phenotype of the speech-language disorder segregates as an autosomal dominant trait. (pnas.org)
  • In addition, a nonsense mutation (R328X), another mutation related to the speech-language disorder, also confers compromised binding and localization ( 10 ). (pnas.org)
  • However, despite the extensively studied relationship in vitro between the mutation in FOXP2 and pathogenesis of the speech-language disorder, the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the disorder are still unresolved, underscoring the need for an animal model for the analysis of the speech learning and disorder at the molecular level. (pnas.org)
  • One way of appreciating the distinctive features of speech acts is in contrast with other well-established phenomena within the philosophy of language and linguistics. (stanford.edu)
  • We are building out our team and are looking for a Natural Language Processing Data Scientist. (simplyhired.com)
  • Create opportunities for your child to use receptive language. (massgeneral.org)
  • Do not delay a referral for speech and language services if your child is learning more than one language at home. (massgeneral.org)
  • Finally, we explore what this comparison reveals about the structural role platforms play in today's speech ecosystem and how it illuminates new solutions. (ssrn.com)
  • Created by Rothco, today's launch of the " JFK Unsilenced " campaign uses AI technology, to recreate The Dallas Trade Mart speech . (campaignlive.co.uk)
  • With these realities exposed, we contend that platforms must separate their powers and create institutions like the Supreme Court to provide transparent decisions and consistent rationales on how concepts related to newsworthiness and public figures are applied. (ssrn.com)
  • WASHINGTON, D.C., June 24, 2013 ( LifeSiteNews.com ) - The Supreme Court announced today that it will review a decision of the First Circuit upholding a Massachusetts law that severely restricts the free speech of pro-life advocates. (lifesitenews.com)
  • The Oregon Supreme Court has ruled that free speech must be protected even when somebody yells insulting or racist names. (oregonlive.com)
  • The Pound Cake speech was given by Bill Cosby in May 2004 during an NAACP awards ceremony in Washington, D.C., to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision. (wikipedia.org)
  • Use Grammar Tools to identify parts of speech with different colours-highlighting nouns, verbs, and adjectives. (microsoft.com)
  • Boffins at MIT have developed a silent speech interface called AlterEgo that allows wearers to communicate via text translated from neuromuscular signals - tiny face twitches - without a visible tell. (theregister.co.uk)
  • A user's intention to speak and internal speech is characterized by neuromuscular signals in internal speech articulators that are captured by the AlterEgo system to reconstruct this speech," the paper explains. (theregister.co.uk)
  • This differs from most other systems available, which are generally on the lookout for keywords, but may miss more sophisticated sorts of hate speech or abusive content. (digitaltrends.com)
  • The second is newer and less familiar: the content-moderation system in which platforms like Facebook implement the rules that govern online speech. (ssrn.com)
  • In this article, we offer the first empirical analysis of how judges and content moderators have used these two concepts to shape the boundaries of free speech. (ssrn.com)
  • Both courts and platforms must adapt to the new speech ecosystem that companies like Facebook have helped create, particularly the way that viral content has shifted our normative intuitions about who deserves harsher rules in disputes about harmful speech, be it in constitutional law or content moderation. (ssrn.com)
  • Ultimately, platforms cannot rely on global norms about free speech - which do not exist - and must instead make hard choices about which values they want to uphold through their content-moderation rules. (ssrn.com)
  • The key difference between our system and existing approaches is that our system performs robustly even when the user does not open their mouth, make any sound and without the need for any deliberate and coded muscle articulation that is often used when using surface EMG to detect silent speech," the researchers state in their paper. (theregister.co.uk)
  • Such speech has limited success in making some place of articulation and especially manner of articulation and voicing phonetic distinctions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The only two-level series that prepares students for success in both presentations and academic discussions, Speech Communication Made Simpletakes an interactive, accessible approach to building confidence as a speaker. (ecampus.com)
  • With its lighthearted and engaging approach, the text helps students acquire speech communication and listening skills that they can apply immediately and throughout their lives. (ecampus.com)
  • The goal of 'Whole Building' Design is to create a successful high-performance building by applying an integrated design and team approach to the project during the planning and programming phases. (wbdg.org)
  • You've got a number of different ways that you can approach this part of your speech. (theaccidentalcommunicator.com)
  • The second proposed resolution focuses on enhancing regional cooperation in building resilience to disasters, emphasizing the need for a collective approach to multi-sectoral capacity building, and strengthening ESCAP's mandate to further integrate disaster risk considerations into the emerging regional development framework. (unescap.org)
  • Scientists who studied baboons' wahoos, yaks, barks and other vocalizations have found evidence of five vowel-like sounds - a sign that the physical capacity for speech may have evolved over much longer timescales than previously thought. (latimes.com)
  • Scientists studying the evolution of speech are in a tricky bind because, unlike bones or shells, spoken words leave no fossil imprints in the geological record. (latimes.com)
  • The child's ability to respond to their name or common directions make up those walls. (asha.org)
  • European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen today mapped out in her first annual State of the Union address, a path for the European Union to overcome the fragility laid bare by the coronavirus crisis and build a union of vitality. (europa.eu)
  • Once the data was compiled, AI techniques such as Deep Neural Networks were applied to learn a model of JFK's audio, and how he uses intonation in his speech. (campaignlive.co.uk)
  • The voiceover points out that the officially allotted time for an Oscars acceptance speech is 45 seconds and then asks, 'Wouldn't that be a lot more bearable if that was paired with a montage of delicious breakfast food? (adweek.com)
  • Leo Burnett creative director Frank Oles offered Adweek his own tongue-in-cheek advice for making the perfect Oscars acceptance speech earlier this week. (adweek.com)
  • You are so confident speaking on the phone, you could be giving an award acceptance speech at the Oscars or a presentation on the latest research for the cure. (simplyhired.com)
  • Yes, there are going to be jackasses who no matter what you do, they will try to make you feel bad for your choices and laugh at compassion - they ain't worth your time (I happen to be related to one. (meetup.com)
  • The odd thing about laughter is that every person has their own little thing that makes them laugh. (google.com)
  • Giffords and her husband, former astronaut Mark Kelly, who also attended the speech, have emerged as leading advocates of more restrictive gun laws in the aftermath of Newtown. (rollcall.com)
  • The youngest inaugural poet took to Twitter soon after delivering her work at the ceremony and asked Lin-Manuel if he could catch the references she made to his musical. (indiatimes.com)
  • Our government will continue to strongly support the built environment agenda through policies and programmes, such as the Urban Design Protocol, the Sustainable Cities Programme, the New Zealand Housing Strategy, and the National Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy. (scoop.co.nz)
  • Building social, economic, and environmental resilience is key to creating a more inclusive and sustainable Asia-Pacific region - which is both the focus of our work, and the inspiration for our efforts. (unescap.org)
  • Writing speeches takes time and memorization takes time and lots of practice. (cio.com)
  • An Alma Mater speech for a Junior-Senior prom should include references to your time at the school, what life outside of the school is like, the importance. (reference.com)
  • Human speech is based on using vowels as the kernel of a sound and placing consonants around those vowels, and, for a long time, researchers assumed that nonhuman primates couldn't make vowel-like sounds. (latimes.com)
  • And for a long time, many researchers assumed that nonhuman primates couldn't make vowel-like sounds because their larynxes (or voice boxes) sat much higher in the neck than human larynxes do. (latimes.com)
  • The first of the 148 Conservative MPs of the 2010 intake to make his maiden speech was Richard Harrington, who rose for the first time in the Commons at 5.32pm yesterday, the very first day of the new Parliament. (blogs.com)
  • In the ending part of your speech, you are going to want to take the time to carefully explain how the issue that you covered during the middle part of your speech relates to your audience. (theaccidentalcommunicator.com)
  • The next time you are creating a speech, you can put the triangle speech creation technique to work for you . (theaccidentalcommunicator.com)
  • The payment, which occurred on July 23, five days after the speech, marks the one and only time McIver has been paid by the campaign. (motherjones.com)
  • Approved on December 20, this revised version of the existing broadcasting law extends existing restrictions on free speech to the internet for the first time. (hrw.org)
  • I believe it's time to educate you on understanding your own skin before making those purchases. (blogtalkradio.com)
  • [ 1 ] Since that time "speech act theory" has become influential not only within philosophy, but also in linguistics, psychology, legal theory, artificial intelligence, literary theory, and feminist thought among other scholarly disciplines. (stanford.edu)
  • To meet the threats of the 21st century, we are developing new technologies that will make our forces faster, lighter, more agile and more lethal. (slate.com)
  • The Commission's action came after considering Vaghela's November 20 reply where he recorded his "deepest regrets" and remorse for utterance of objectionable words in his speech. (hindustantimes.com)
  • Spurred by a string of recent incidents at universities across the country where speakers have been disinvited or shouted down because of loud protests from students and outside groups, the Senate Judiciary Committee focused morning how school administrators should best respond to controversial speech. (courthousenews.com)
  • Speech "engages anatomical traits that might leave fossil clues, as well as overt anatomical, physiological, and behavioral aspects for which parallels can be sought in living primates," the study authors wrote. (latimes.com)
  • It's certainly better to memorize a speech than to read a speech. (cio.com)
  • I've just read what I think is a really good speech by Tessa Jowell (so, after George Osborne yesterday, that's two genuinely interesting political speeches in two days - what is the world coming to? (thersa.org)
  • Read the full text of the speech here . (lifesitenews.com)
  • Read the full speech. (news24.com)
  • Keep up with FDIC announcements, read speeches and testimony on the latest banking issues, learn about policy changes for banks, and get the details on upcoming conferences and events. (fdic.gov)
  • We live in a country that respects human rights and the rule of law, a country building its present and future on the body of basic values that belong to the political grammar of the west. (coe.int)
  • Jasna Cowan, MS, CCC-SLP, is the founder and director of Speech Goals , a private practice in San Francisco. (asha.org)
  • In addition, an appreciation of speech acts has helped lay bare a normative structure implicit in linguistic practice, including even that part of this practice concerned with describing reality. (stanford.edu)
  • The individual formants found in a vowel can tell you the configuration of the mouth that made it - for example, whether the lips are rounded, how high the tongue is, and whether the tongue is pushed forward toward the teeth or back in the mouth. (latimes.com)
  • In using a female voice to utter the universal truth - that all things die and are born again - Joyce was making women's speech the universal tongue. (wordpress.com)
  • This is created by producing the air supply needed for phonation in the pharynx and creating a replacement for the glottis using the tongue and the upper alveolus, the palate, or the pharyngeal wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • The built environment describes not only built structures, but also the places and networks in which we interact, live, and play. (scoop.co.nz)
  • Make them a little uncomfortable because it's only in that discomfort that we actually create the conditions to reimagine our standards, our policies, and our leadership - to move toward real representation and meaningful influence over the structures of decision-making and power. (thenational.ae)
  • Luckily, there are physical structures we can study - the mouths that make those sounds. (latimes.com)