Schools: Educational institutions.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Foreign Medical Graduates: Physicians who hold degrees from medical schools in countries other than the ones in which they practice.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Education: Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.School Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with health and nursing care given to primary and secondary school students by a registered nurse.Education, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform individuals of recent advances in their particular field of interest. They do not lead to any formal advanced standing.Education, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Education, Pharmacy, Graduate: Educational programs for pharmacists who have a bachelor's degree or a Doctor of Pharmacy degree entering a specific field of pharmacy. They may lead to an advanced degree.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Education, Dental, Graduate: Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.Education, Nursing, Graduate: Those educational activities engaged in by holders of a bachelor's degree in nursing, which are primarily designed to prepare them for entrance into a specific field of nursing, and may lead to board certification or a more advanced degree.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Education, Distance: Education via communication media (correspondence, radio, television, computer networks) with little or no in-person face-to-face contact between students and teachers. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1997)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.United StatesTeaching: The educational process of instructing.Competency-Based Education: Educational programs designed to ensure that students attain prespecified levels of competence in a given field or training activity. Emphasis is on achievement or specified objectives.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.School Admission Criteria: Requirements for the selection of students for admission to academic institutions.Sex Education: Education which increases the knowledge of the functional, structural, and behavioral aspects of human reproduction.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Education, Special: Education of the individual who markedly deviates intellectually, physically, socially, or emotionally from those considered to be normal, thus requiring special instruction.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Education, Professional: Formal education and training in preparation for the practice of a profession.Education, Nursing, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform nurses of recent advances in their fields.Education, Pharmacy: Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Schools, Pharmacy: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of pharmacy.Accreditation: Certification as complying with a standard set by non-governmental organizations, applied for by institutions, programs, and facilities on a voluntary basis.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Education, Dental, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform dentists of recent advances in their fields.Osteopathic Medicine: A medical discipline that is based on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy, developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, recognizes the concept of "wellness" and the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Special attention is placed on the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.Training Support: Financial support for training including both student stipends and loans and training grants to institutions.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Physical Education and Training: Instructional programs in the care and development of the body, often in schools. The concept does not include prescribed exercises, which is EXERCISE THERAPY.Education, Pharmacy, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform graduate pharmacists of recent advances in their particular field.Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.Personnel Selection: The process of choosing employees for specific types of employment. The concept includes recruitment.Education, Veterinary: Use for general articles concerning veterinary medical education.Fellowships and Scholarships: Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Problem-Based Learning: Instructional use of examples or cases to teach using problem-solving skills and critical thinking.Medically Underserved Area: A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.Education, Premedical: Preparatory education meeting the requirements for admission to medical school.Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Computer-Assisted Instruction: A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Nutritional Sciences: The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease.Teaching Materials: Instructional materials used in teaching.Vocational Education: Education for specific trades or occupations.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate: A four-year program in nursing education in a college or university leading to a B.S.N. (Bachelor of Science in Nursing). Graduates are eligible for state examination for licensure as RN (Registered Nurse).Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Schools, Nursing: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of nursing.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Dentists: Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Education, Public Health Professional: Education and training in PUBLIC HEALTH for the practice of the profession.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Food Services: Functions, equipment, and facilities concerned with the preparation and distribution of ready-to-eat food.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Student Dropouts: Individuals who leave school, secondary or college, prior to completion of specified curriculum requirements.Students, Health Occupations: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Preceptorship: Practical experience in medical and health-related services that occurs as part of an educational program wherein the professionally-trained student works outside the academic environment under the supervision of an established professional in the particular field.Community Dentistry: The practice of dentistry concerned with preventive as well as diagnostic and treatment programs in a circumscribed population.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Schools, Nursery: Schools for children usually under five years of age.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Education of Hearing Disabled: The teaching or training of those individuals with hearing disability or impairment.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Achievement: Success in bringing an effort to the desired end; the degree or level of success attained in some specified area (esp. scholastic) or in general.Students, Pharmacy: Individuals enrolled in a school of pharmacy or a formal educational program leading to a degree in pharmacy.Educational Technology: Systematic identification, development, organization, or utilization of educational resources and the management of these processes. It is occasionally used also in a more limited sense to describe the use of equipment-oriented techniques or audiovisual aids in educational settings. (Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, December 1993, p132)Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Specialty Boards: Organizations which certify physicians and dentists as specialists in various fields of medical and dental practice.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Dental Hygienists: Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Societies: Organizations composed of members with common interests and whose professions may be similar.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Students, Nursing: Individuals enrolled in a school of nursing or a formal educational program leading to a degree in nursing.Schools, Health Occupations: Schools which offer training in the area of health.Schools, Veterinary: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of veterinary medicine.Dental Research: The study of laws, theories, and hypotheses through a systematic examination of pertinent facts and their interpretation in the field of dentistry. (From Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982, p674)Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Minority Groups: A subgroup having special characteristics within a larger group, often bound together by special ties which distinguish it from the larger group.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.CaliforniaAudiovisual Aids: Auditory and visual instructional materials.Mainstreaming (Education): Most frequently refers to the integration of a physically or mentally disabled child into the regular class of normal peers and provision of the appropriately determined educational program.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Career Mobility: The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.Physicians, Women: Women licensed to practice medicine.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Health Education, Dental: Education which increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of dental health on a personal or community basis.Credentialing: The recognition of professional or technical competence through registration, certification, licensure, admission to association membership, the award of a diploma or degree, etc.Professional Role: The expected function of a member of a particular profession.Cultural Diversity: Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Great BritainLicensure, Medical: The granting of a license to practice medicine.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Physiology: The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.Administrative Personnel: Individuals responsible for the development of policy and supervision of the execution of plans and functional operations.Internship, Nonmedical: Advanced programs of training to meet certain professional requirements in fields other than medicine or dentistry, e.g., pharmacology, nutrition, nursing, etc.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Pharmacists: Those persons legally qualified by education and training to engage in the practice of pharmacy.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Staff Development: The process by which the employer promotes staff performance and efficiency consistent with management goals and objectives.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.BrazilAnatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Clinical Clerkship: Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.Aspirations (Psychology): Strong desires to accomplish something. This usually pertains to greater values or high ideals.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Societies, Dental: Societies whose membership is limited to dentists.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.International Educational Exchange: The exchange of students or professional personnel between countries done under the auspices of an organization for the purpose of further education.Specialties, Dental: Various branches of dental practice limited to specialized areas.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.General Practice, Dental: Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.Community-Institutional Relations: The interactions between members of a community and representatives of the institutions within that community.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.IndiaAustralia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.American Medical Association: Professional society representing the field of medicine.Periodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the histology, physiology, and pathology of the tissues that support, attach, and surround the teeth, and of the treatment and prevention of disease affecting these tissues.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.Internal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Biology: One of the BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DISCIPLINES concerned with the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of animals, plants, and microorganisms.Inservice Training: On the job training programs for personnel carried out within an institution or agency. It includes orientation programs.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Child Nutrition Sciences: The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease of children, infants or adolescents.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.TexasProgrammed Instruction as Topic: Instruction in which learners progress at their own rate using workbooks, textbooks, or electromechanical devices that provide information in discrete steps, test learning at each step, and provide immediate feedback about achievement. (ERIC, Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1996).Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Early Intervention (Education): Procedures and programs that facilitate the development or skill acquisition in infants and young children who have disabilities, who are at risk for developing disabilities, or who are gifted. It includes programs that are designed to prevent handicapping conditions in infants and young children and family-centered programs designed to affect the functioning of infants and children with special needs. (From Journal of Early Intervention, Editorial, 1989, vol. 13, no. 1, p. 3; A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, prepared for the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, 1976)Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Emergency Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.
  • All of the children attend the same kind of school through the 4th grade of primary school, but beginning at the fifth school level various options are possible. (linz.at)
  • Pre-Admission to the BSN Program (begins Fall 2017): First Time Freshmen admitted to ETSU with a high school GPA of 3.5 or above AND and ACT composite score of 29 or higher, or an SAT composite of 1350 and maintain an ETSU overall GPA of 3.2 or higher will be guaranteed admission to the nursing major. (etsu.edu)
  • For 2017 information please contact nursing staff . (finlandia.edu)
  • 95 percent of 2017 Health Sciences graduates were employed, continuing their education or not seeking employment after graduation. (depaul.edu)
  • Inside those buildings-the Tsotsis Family Academic Center , which opened in Fall 2017, and the Health Sciences building opening in Fall 2020-are high-tech classrooms, skills and simulation labs for our nursing and physician assistant programs, seminar rooms, study spaces, and a 400-seat performance hall. (assumption.edu)
  • My wife and I have worked primarily as performing musicians for 'senior facilities' (nursing homes, assisted living homes, senior centers, etc) for the past almost 5 years and prior to that I spent several years as a private teacher of music lessons. (allnurses.com)
  • The Report to Congress on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Graduate Nurse Education Demonstration has just been released documenting health care workforce gains addressing the nation's shortage of primary care. (upenn.edu)
  • Recent graduates are now employed at University of Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi Baptist Medical Center, St Dominic's Hospital, and most major medical centers in the southeast. (mc.edu)
  • 2015) The complementary roles of the school nurse and school based health centers (Position Statement). (nasn.org)
  • Two degrees are available in the Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences-the B.S. in Education for those who plan to teach and the B.S. for those interested in research, entry level mathematical and statistical positions in government, business, and industry, graduate school or the health professions. (bmc.edu)
  • David Henderson, a 1980 graduate who is now an environmental engineer in Roanoke, Va., and Bryan Palmer (1987) were bit players for the Terps who earned engineering degrees. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Our main campus, situated in an urban neighborhood just minutes from downtown Seattle, draws over 31,000 UW undergraduates pursuing more than 180 majors. (princetonreview.com)
  • Grenon School of Business undergraduates and MBAs are in high demand locally and globally for their strong management capabilities, entrepreneurial spirit, strategic outlook, and commitment to ethical leadership. (assumption.edu)
  • The new Drexel University Partnership in Interprofessional Education (DUPIE) is under Kym's leadership and additionally includes ER and Anesthesia residents. (drexel.edu)
  • I have just completed my third year of doctoral studies at the University of Kansas School of Nursing. (n-e-f.org)
  • Young, inner-city Latino parents are at risk for acquiring HIV due to a combination of factors - childhood poverty, social oppression, community violence and social isolation," said Janna Lesser, Ph.D., RN, who led the study during her post-doctoral work at UCLA and is currently an associate professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio's School of Nursing. (ucla.edu)
  • Without bragging, let's just say that I recently saw an infographic on IQ distribution for people in the medical profession (it went on to say 'such as doctors', though it didn't specify nurses) and I am significantly above the 90th percentile line. (allnurses.com)
  • Although the nursing profession has yet to officially develop a specialty in "fitness nursing" or "sports nursing" on either the professional or academic level, a growing number of nurses are becoming involved in these areas. (minoritynurse.com)
  • We approach the nursing profession as a calling, a way to serve through ministry to others. (mc.edu)
  • I remember feeling like I was really getting into nursing and started to become really passionate about the profession. (plattsburgh.edu)
  • Nurse is a person who is holding four years university degree and executes works relating to nursing profession including taking care of patients, perform health and medical services, educational, research and managerial affairs. (barringtonfitness.com)
  • Graduates of the community health major are employed in entry-level positions conducting planning, administration, evaluation, research, and teaching in community health settings. (montana.edu)
  • Persons enrolling in this option should seriously consider earning a graduate degree in public health or some related area at some point in their career. (montana.edu)
  • Completion of the community health major establishes eligibility to sit for the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) examination. (montana.edu)
  • Necropsies conducted since March 2010 by scientists at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and UC Davis-led California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory found brain tumors in 10 raccoons, nine of which were from Northern California, the article reports. (eurekalert.org)
  • This work to investigate natural associations of cancer verifies the importance of our One Health approach to addressing complex biomedical problems, such as viral causes of cancer," said Michael Lairmore, dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine, of which the UC Davis One Health Institute is a part. (eurekalert.org)
  • Our graduates are recruited by hospitals and health care facilities and a majority have job offers prior to graduation. (park.edu)
  • UToledo public health graduates are making the world a healthier place. (utoledo.edu)
  • During our first two weeks in Goma, we distributed bed nets to homes, which became our project for a community health class at Crown. (cmalliance.org)
  • Health Sciences/Education 11. (indiana.edu)
  • Two undergraduate majors are available in the Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences: human performance and sport (HPS) and health. (nmhu.edu)
  • There are also three concentrations in health: health education, health promotion and wellness, and pre-professional allied health. (nmhu.edu)
  • Co-located with the Shands Jacksonville Hospital, the Jacksonville Health Science Center excels in education, research and patient care that expresses our abiding values of compassion, excellence, professionalism and innovation. (shands.org)
  • This demand has created an immigrant labor niche within the American health care system: foreign nurses now fill positions in large urban hospitals as well as in a growing number of rural hospitals and nursing homes ( Brush 2008 ). (jhu.edu)
  • Scholars have raised concerns about the impact of such migration flows on nurse migrants' countries of origin, given that the U.S. health care system, which employs the largest professional nurse workforce of any country in the world, exerts "a strong pull on global nurse resources" ( Aiken 2007, 1300 ). (jhu.edu)
  • For example, some nurses work for professional football teams each summer, evaluating the health and fitness of players who are either preparing for another season or trying to make the team for the first time. (minoritynurse.com)
  • and a teaching hospital/health system and its primary affiliated nursing school. (upenn.edu)
  • We promote the international society's vision of creating a global community of nurses who lead with knowledge, scholarship, service, and learning, improving global health. (mc.edu)
  • An M.Ed. with an emphasis in health education was offered for the first time in 1963-64. (uark.edu)
  • Established in 1942, APTR is dedicated to advancement of population health and disease prevention by contributing to the education of physicians and other health professionals. (cdc.gov)
  • SAG met in November 2004 to develop a framework for public health education. (who.int)
  • Summer Camp: Nurse Assistant Nurse Assistants work with under the supervision of our Camp Nurse to provide health care and medications for campers and staff, monitoring overall health and. (nursingjobs.org)
  • The Bioscience concentration focuses on the scientific elements of an individual's health, preparing you for a career in dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy or physical therapy. (depaul.edu)
  • We believe that the next generation of nurse researchers and clinicians need a well-rounded background in nutrition science, as well as the social sciences and public health. (upenn.edu)
  • George A. Weiss University Professor and Professor of Epidemiology and Nursing, and colleagues, identifies gaps and uncovers ways to help multidisciplinary teams collaborate more effectively to yield greater health impact. (upenn.edu)
  • For example, in 2010-2011, 50% of the UK graduates admitted to Physical Therapy were graduates from Kinesiology and Health Promotion. (uky.edu)
  • Schools in Kentucky have traditionally hired teachers who can teach both Physical Education and Health Education. (uky.edu)
  • Currently the Health Promotion major is teacher certification-only. (uky.edu)
  • In Kentucky, schools do not often hire teachers who teach only health education, but some jobs may be available. (uky.edu)
  • The Great Lakes Center for Occupational and Environmental Safety and Health is an Education and Research Center (ERC) funded by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. (cdc.gov)
  • The Administrative Core of the ERC is based at the UIC School of Public Health. (cdc.gov)
  • In the past, she has taught courses at the graduate and undergraduate level in Statistics, Population Health, and Nursing Theory. (waldenu.edu)
  • In the case of a sexually purchase generic valium online in usa transmitted disease such as syphilis health promotion activities would include avoiding microorganisms by where to buy diazepam 5mg online legitimate maintaining personal hygiene, routine check-up appointments with the doctor, general sex education, etc. (barringtonfitness.com)
  • Helps nurses learn strategic leadership in tandem with expertise in areas like rural health, public health and homeland security. (educationconnection.com)
  • Therefore, an important function of professional nurses is to provide health care information and culturally competent care in order to promote, maintain or restore health or assist with a peaceful death. (uwosh.edu)
  • Therefore, nurses interact with all elements of the environment to assist individuals and groups to optimize their health status. (uwosh.edu)
  • The report provides evidence of the continued need to support OSH training and education in the core and allied OSH disciplines. (cdc.gov)
  • Today the University of Limerick and UL Hospitals work closely together to provide undergraduate and postgraduate education and training across several campuses and in several disciplines. (hse.ie)
  • Depending on your major declaration, your academic course load will vary. (cappex.com)
  • The professors here truly care about your academic success and many will go above and beyond to help you understand something taught in class. (cappex.com)
  • The study , which provides the first detailed statewide look at foster youths and their academic challenges, was made possible by a new data-sharing agreement between the state education and social services agencies. (latimes.com)
  • It comes as school districts across California prepare to launch the nation's first effort to systematically address the yawning academic deficiencies among foster youths, using additional money provided by the state's new school financing law. (latimes.com)
  • Non-academic factors contribute substantially to how competitive a student is for Professional school admission. (uwosh.edu)
  • Put another way, the main costs involve paying for instruction in academic courses, and paying for a place to live and food to eat. (sckans.edu)
  • I seldom share this [academic] side with teammates," he said recently, scooping up his books after an 8 a.m. class in engineering dynamics. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Northwest Educational Service District, School Nurse Corps Administrator, July 2019-present: As a School Nurse Corps Administrator, I provide leadership, support and resources for the 35 school districts in the Northwest Educational Service District. (nasn.org)
  • Often, one particular major provides the "path of least resistance" for satisfying Professional school admissions requirements. (uwosh.edu)
  • Professional schools can, and do, change their admissions requirements at will, and are under no obligation to notify Pre-Professional advisers of their actions. (uwosh.edu)
  • Applicants must currently be licensed or eligible for licensure as a Registered Professional Nurse in New York State and must have completed a minimum of one year's work experience as a professional nurse. (gradschools.com)
  • A master of science in physician assistant studies , the latest addition to Assumption's exemplary graduate offerings, began accepting applications in May 2020. (assumption.edu)
  • 1. If a student earns a grade lower than a C (2.0) and s/he wishes the course to be considered in the bio major, then s/he would be allowed to retake the course to earn a higher grade and credit. (pmc.edu)
  • The modern student is teaching us that sitting in class is not the way they want to learn," he said. (drexel.edu)
  • Being a Mexican-American student in a primarily white school created many disadvantages for me. (warnerpacific.edu)
  • 38yo male, VERY non-traditional potential nursing student. (allnurses.com)
  • Other co-authors on the paper are postdoctoral researchers Hyun-seok Hong and Valentin Lulevich and graduate student Christopher Zimmer. (healthcanal.com)
  • Join the Baptist Nursing Fellowship, an organization of student nurses dedicated to helping those in need. (mc.edu)
  • Participate in the Mississippi Student Nurses' Association (MSNA), the professional organization for student nurses. (mc.edu)
  • Each fall, the MSNA convention - held in conjunction with the Mississippi Nurses' Association Convention - brings together student delegates from around the state. (mc.edu)
  • J. William Fulbright was the most famous student enrolled in the training school. (uark.edu)
  • One exception is in Engineering, in which a "Pre-Eng" student might study at UW Oshkosh for one to three years and then transfer to a School of Engineering, such as the one at UW Madison. (uwosh.edu)
  • In general, the Pre-Professional student is free to choose any major because the vast majority of Professional schools have no preference. (uwosh.edu)
  • However, that should not be the only reason a student declares that particular major. (uwosh.edu)
  • Mrs. Henrietta Farrelly donates $50,000 to Samuel Merritt Hospital to build Farrelly Home for Student Nurses. (samuelmerritt.edu)
  • The only foreign student in the house, I had just graduated from law school in Taiwan, where women made up 10 percent of my class. (whyy.org)
  • While earning her MSN in nursing education at Emmanuel, Briana Svensson benefited from the "countless differing viewpoints, fresh perspectives and wisdom gained from decades of collective professional experience" that changed her-as a student, a nurse and a person-for the better. (emmanuel.edu)
  • Kate and I were assigned to language study in addition to working a certain amount of time in the hospital per week and completing online classes at Crown. (cmalliance.org)
  • When I decided to start school to work on a Ph.D. there were many reasons. (n-e-f.org)
  • Not to mention, I could do 'travel nurse' work as mentioned before. (allnurses.com)
  • Some nurses are involved in sports medicine on a full-time basis while others work on a part-time, contract basis for sports teams. (minoritynurse.com)
  • Other nurses work professional baseball games, either sitting in the dugout to help injured players or treating injured fans at the first-aid stations. (minoritynurse.com)
  • Although people who live and work in the neighborhood also use the Grant Fitness Center to work out, the nurses work exclusively with hospital patients recovering from illness. (minoritynurse.com)
  • Patients work out in classes that typically number between eight and 10 people, although some classes have as many as 22. (minoritynurse.com)
  • The nurse-or two nurses for large classes-doesn't work with patients the way a personal trainer would, Omlor explains. (minoritynurse.com)
  • Nurses work with physical therapists and nutritionists to develop a plan to help each patient recover in the best possible manner. (minoritynurse.com)
  • Others are pursuing graduate work in nursing at the University of Mississippi, Vanderbilt University, University of Alabama-Birmingham, University of South Alabama, and more. (mc.edu)
  • Motor: A candidate must have adequate motor function to work effectively with nursing problems and issues and carry out related nursing care. (etbu.edu)
  • With experienced teachers secured, the material to work upon here, and the necessary appliances for instruction obtained, the friends of this institution are very much encouraged by what they see has already been accomplished. (uark.edu)