Animals, PoisonousDinosaurs: General name for two extinct orders of reptiles from the Mesozoic era: Saurischia and Ornithischia.Christianity: The religion stemming from the life, teachings, and death of Jesus Christ: the religion that believes in God as the Father Almighty who works redemptively through the Holy Spirit for men's salvation and that affirms Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior who proclaimed to man the gospel of salvation. (From Webster, 3d ed)Steel: A tough, malleable, iron-based alloy containing up to, but no more than, two percent carbon and often other metals. It is used in medicine and dentistry in implants and instrumentation.Empyema: Presence of pus in a hollow organ or body cavity.Religion: A set of beliefs concerning the nature, cause, and purpose of the universe, especially when considered as the creation of a superhuman agency. It usually involves devotional and ritual observances and often a moral code for the conduct of human affairs. (Random House Collegiate Dictionary, rev. ed.)Camping: Living outdoors as a recreational activity.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.IdahoSkeleton: The rigid framework of connected bones that gives form to the body, protects and supports its soft organs and tissues, and provides attachments for MUSCLES.Prescription Drug Misuse: Improper use of drugs or medications outside the intended purpose, scope, or guidelines for use. This is in contrast to MEDICATION ADHERENCE, and distinguished from DRUG ABUSE, which is a deliberate or willful action.Grateful Med: A microcomputer-based software package providing a user-friendly interface to the MEDLARS system of the National Library of Medicine.Medical Informatics Applications: Automated systems applied to the patient care process including diagnosis, therapy, and systems of communicating medical data within the health care setting.Genealogy and HeraldryColoradoUtahArea Health Education Centers: Education centers authorized by the Comprehensive Health Manpower Training Act, 1971, for the training of health personnel in areas where health needs are the greatest. May be used for centers other than those established by the United States act.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.United StatesBioterrorism: The use of biological agents in TERRORISM. This includes the malevolent use of BACTERIA; VIRUSES; or other BIOLOGICAL TOXINS against people, ANIMALS; or PLANTS.ArizonaBird Diseases: Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.Computer Systems: Systems composed of a computer or computers, peripheral equipment, such as disks, printers, and terminals, and telecommunications capabilities.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Medical Record Linkage: The creation and maintenance of medical and vital records in multiple institutions in a manner that will facilitate the combined use of the records of identified individuals.Expert Systems: Computer programs based on knowledge developed from consultation with experts on a problem, and the processing and/or formalizing of this knowledge using these programs in such a manner that the problems may be solved.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Information Systems: Integrated set of files, procedures, and equipment for the storage, manipulation, and retrieval of information.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Genetic Linkage: The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Metallurgy: The science, art, or technology dealing with processes involved in the separation of metals from their ores, the technique of making or compounding the alloys, the techniques of working or heat-treating metals, and the mining of metals. It includes industrial metallurgy as well as metallurgical techniques employed in the preparation and working of metals used in dentistry, with special reference to orthodontic and prosthodontic appliances. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p494)Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Haplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Medical History Taking: Acquiring information from a patient on past medical conditions and treatments.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Air Pollutants, Occupational: Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Gene Frequency: The proportion of one particular in the total of all ALLELES for one genetic locus in a breeding POPULATION.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Serotyping: Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Brookings looked at the cities with the fastest growth and made geographic conclusions, such as how many startups were in each city and the startup density for each city, by dividing the number of startups by the population. (idahobusinessreview.com)
  • On March 24, 2018, a group of teenagers led the largest recorded demonstration in Utah history. (gofundme.com)
  • Emergency workers stand next to a plane which had to make an emergency landing on Interstate 15 in Riverdale, Utah on Saturday May, 26, 2018. (canoe.com)
  • Date: Wed, 1 Aug 2018 17:48:10 +0200 Subject: [PATCH] validators_ut_check: Fix fail with new glibc Error message was slightly change from previous version of glibc which caused fails in validators unit tests. (opensuse.org)
  • Byte, a nationwide orthodontics company with an office at Thanksgiving Point in Lehi, is making a difference in the battle against coronavirus. (kjzz.com)
  • On Nov. 28, RAGS, the Lehi company that makes popular rompers for kids, put out a call to customers and followers on social media. (communityactionprovo.org)
  • Description There is a job opportunity in the Lehi, Utah area seeking talented and professional full-time candidates for their. (dice.com)
  • Former Gov. Bill Clements Makes Historic Gift to UT Southwestern With $100 Million 'Transformative' Co... ( DALLAS June 12 -- In a visionary act. (bio-medicine.org)
  • DALLAS, June 12 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- In a visionary act intended to have a transformative impact, former Texas Gov. William P. Clements Jr. has made an unexpected and unprecedented $100 million gift for UT Southwestern Medical Center. (bio-medicine.org)
  • This marks the largest single donation in the institution's history and was given through the Southwestern Medical Foundation, which supports the research, education and clinical mission of UT Southwestern. (bio-medicine.org)
  • To those who may have questioned the prospects for philanthropy in a time of economic uncertainty, Bill Clements has answered in a profound and extraordinarily selfless way," said Dr. Daniel K. Podolsky, president of UT Southwestern. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Mr. Clements said, "In supporting UT Southwestern, my single goal is to help encourage and advance scientific discovery and innovation, prepare the next generation of physicians for Texas and the nation, and ensure the delivery of world-class medical care, which I believe uniquely happens at this academic medical center, already recognized as one of the top institutions in this country. (bio-medicine.org)
  • He said he hoped the university would find ways to leverage his gift to attract even more contributions to UT Southwestern. (bio-medicine.org)
  • In 1998 Mr. Clements donated $1.25 million to UT Southwestern to create the Rita C. and William P. Clements Jr. Scholar in Medical Research to recognize newly appointed and promising faculty members. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Dr. Podolsky cited the landmark $100 million donation and Mr. Clements' previous gifts as testament to his confidence in the collaborative research, teaching and patient care mission of UT Southwestern, as well as Mr. Clements' long relationship with his personal physician, Dr. Albert D. Roberts, who formerly held the Walter Family Distinguished Chair in Internal Medicine at UT Southwestern, established in his honor in 2004. (bio-medicine.org)
  • I have great admiration for the medical school and the fabulous progress it has made during the past several years," said Mr. Clements, who served on the search committee that convinced the first president of UT Southwestern, the late Dr. Charles C. Sprague, to come to Dallas in 1967 from Tulane University School of Medicine to be dean of the medical school. (bio-medicine.org)
  • In making the largest gift in UT Southwestern history -- and arguably one of the largest single gifts in Dallas history -- he underscores the vital role of philanthropy in building strong institutions where medical breakthroughs actually happen. (bio-medicine.org)
  • And the breakthroughs at UT Southwestern -- from the labs to the classrooms to the clinics and hospitals -- are in fact life-changing. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The Board of Regents expresses its gratitude to Mr. Clements for this generous investment in the continued excellence of UT Southwestern and the health of our state. (bio-medicine.org)
  • In a study available online and appearing in a future issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a UT Southwestern Medical Center researcher and his collaborators in California show that the molecular makeup of the current H1N1 flu strain is strikingly different from previous H1N1 strains as well as the normal seasonal flu, especially in structural parts of the virus normally recognized by the immune system. (technologynetworks.com)
  • We hypothesize that older people are somewhat protected because the epitopes present in flu strains before 1957 may be similar to those found in the current H1N1 strain, or at least similar enough that the immune system of the previously infected person recognizes the pathogen and knows to attack," said Dr. Richard Scheuermann, professor of pathology and clinical sciences at UT Southwestern and a co-author of the paper. (technologynetworks.com)
  • Dr. Scheuermann said his team also analyzed the virus' genetic data using the NIH-sponsored Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org), which he oversees at UT Southwestern. (technologynetworks.com)
  • Normally, older adults are generally more susceptible to pathogens like influenza, however, for the pandemic H1N1 strain this does not seem to be the case," said Dr. Scheuermann, who is also a member of the Cancer Immunobiology Center at UT Southwestern. (technologynetworks.com)
  • A UT Southwestern study that used genetic data from more than 1,200 participants may help scientists improve treatments of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). (utsouthwestern.edu)
  • Dr. Greenberg leads a network of myelitis programs, including the Transverse Myelitis and Neuromyelitis Optica Program at UT Southwestern and the Pediatric CONQUER Program at Children's Medical Center. (utsouthwestern.edu)
  • Nearly 20 scholar-physicians are part of the Disease-Oriented Clinical Scholars (DOCS) Program at UT Southwestern Medical Center. (utsouthwestern.edu)
  • The Neuroradiology Program at UT Southwestern Medical Center offers both diagnostic and therapeutic neuroradiology. (utsouthwestern.edu)
  • Learn more about the neuroradiology services available at UT Southwestern Medical Center. (utsouthwestern.edu)
  • Investigations into cancer, neuroscience, heart disease and stroke, and many other fields keep UT Southwestern at the forefront of medical progress. (utsouthwestern.edu)
  • As one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, UT Southwestern trains the physicians, medical scientists, and health care professionals of the future. (utsouthwestern.edu)
  • The story of UT Southwestern is one of phenomenal growth, fueled by exceptional people with an extraordinary vision: to establish an academic medical center second to none. (utsouthwestern.edu)
  • Drs. Christopher Sleet and Jose Garcia-Rodriguez were told about the hand sanitizer deficiency at UT Southwestern Medical Center and wanted to find a way to help. (utsouthwestern.edu)
  • The story of UT Southwestern Medical Center is one of commitment to excellence, dedication to discovery, and service to the community. (utsouthwestern.edu)
  • Dr. Kirk A. Calhoun, President of The University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, speaks at the grand opening for the new School of Community and Rural Health building at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler is pictured on Thursday Sept. 19, 2019. (tylerpaper.com)
  • The new School of Community and Rural Health building at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler is pictured on Thursday Sept. 19, 2019. (tylerpaper.com)
  • Sephora is an international force in beauty, and its award-winning website and ever-growing presence on social-media make it the world's premier digital beauty destination. (aftercollege.com)
  • Wasatch has been developing and manufacturing several unique products for many of the World's most successful consumer product companies since 1998. (sbwire.com)
  • Indeed, the Democratic Republic of the Congo contains about 50 percent of the world's reserve of cobalt, a mineral used to make lithium ion batteries. (batterypoweronline.com)
  • Researchers at UT Dallas and Rutgers University have received a $1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to explore a key component in making hydrogen a widely used form of clean energy. (utdallas.edu)
  • The UT Dallas/Rutgers team is exploring a technology known as a metal organic frameworks. (utdallas.edu)
  • He is also head of the Materials Science and Engineering Department at UT Dallas and holder of the Texas Instruments Distinguished University Chair in Nanoelectronics. (utdallas.edu)
  • Several ways of storing hydrogen in materials have been developed, but the UT Dallas/Rutgers team thinks the microporous material of metal organic frameworks holds the greatest promise. (utdallas.edu)
  • The program led by UT Dallas aims to gain detailed information on the interaction of hydrogen molecules in metal organic frameworks. (utdallas.edu)
  • Dallas arts patron Edith O'Donnell has made a $17 million contribution to UT Dallas to create the new Edith O'Donnell Institute of Art History. (glasstire.com)
  • UT Dallas excels in science and engineering. (glasstire.com)
  • UT Dallas founders Erik Jonsson, Eugene McDermott and Cecil Green actively supported the arts. (glasstire.com)
  • Brettell, a professor of art and aesthetic studies who also holds the Margaret M. McDermott Distinguished Chair of Art and Aesthetic Studies in the School of Arts and Humanities said, "Mrs. O'Donnell has made it clear that what interested her about funding art history at UT Dallas was our strength in the sciences, technology, and management, thus creating the conditions that could foster a wholly new kind of art history. (glasstire.com)
  • With art historians on campus who study the intersections between art and cartography, art and biology, and art history in the context of big data, UT Dallas has demonstrated a willingness to think about art and about history in new ways. (glasstire.com)
  • UT Dallas Opens Spiffy New Art & Technology. (glasstire.com)
  • OGDEN, Utah - No one was injured Saturday when a small plane clipped a car from behind while making an emergency landing on a major freeway in Utah, authorities said. (canoe.com)
  • Utah Highway Patrol spokesman Andrew Battenfield says the single-engine plane flew under an overpass before landing near Ogden. (canoe.com)
  • When buying a new home in Ogden, Utah, a home inspection by an educated and experienced home inspector that offers thermal imaging technology is absolutely essential. (activerain.com)
  • On over half the homes we inspect in Ogden, Utah, numerous concerns are identified by thermal imaging that would have otherwise gone un-detected. (activerain.com)
  • A resolution honoring the memory of Special Agent Jared Francom of the Ogden, Utah Police Department. (opensecrets.org)
  • Image courtesy of Heather Olsen) Riverton artist Heather Olsen's "Getting Ready to Go Into Battle," oil on wood panel, 11 inches by 10 inches, made in response to the coronavirus pandemic. (sltrib.com)
  • We contacted several galleries and arts organizations (including the Utah Museum of Fine Arts and Artes de Mexico de Utah ) and asked them to reach out to artists they know to ask: What have you made in the last month or so in response to the coronavirus pandemic? (sltrib.com)
  • The antibody epitopes, which provide protection against disease, for the pandemic H1N1 strain are virtually all different from those present in recent seasonal strains, so young people have no built-in protective mechanisms. (technologynetworks.com)
  • Dawn Hills, center, a licensed veterinary technician, and Sabrina Wilson, right, a veterinary assistant, prepare a cat named Baby for his anesthesia at UT College of Vet Medicine on June 9, 2017. (knoxnews.com)
  • Utah State's bystander intervention program, "Upstanding - Stepping Up to Prevent Violence in Utah," was introduced in fall 2017. (usu.edu)
  • Use our search feature and map to compare locations, prices, and the hotel amenities for your Salt Lake City and County Building hotel reservations. (hotels.com)
  • Utah represents a unique episode in the settlement of the United States, a story of a religious group that trekked across three-fourths of the continent in search of a "promised land" where they could be free from persecution. (britannica.com)
  • Utah's new approval of firing squads carries no such legal caveat and represents the latest example of frustration over botched executions and the difficulty of obtaining lethal injection drugs as manufacturers opposed to capital punishment have made them off-limits to prisons. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • Although lower than the national average, Utah's manufacturing sector was initially much larger than the manufacturing sectors of other Intermountain states. (uen.org)
  • As late as the conclusion of World War II, Utah's manufacturing sector was still small compared to the national average. (uen.org)
  • While Utah grew faster than any other state this year, the University of Utah's report indicates that most of Utah's growth has occurred in suburban and exurb communities. (buildingsaltlake.com)
  • She started studying renewable energy at the UT College of Engineering in 2000 and earned a bachelor's degree, master's degree and PhD in electrical engineering. (batterypoweronline.com)
  • This development was never built, and Megaplex Theatres has taken over the closed 6-screen theater (Water Gardens Holladay 6) across the street. (bigscreen.com)
  • Yet, with just five electoral votes in Utah, there was not much political risk for Clinton in offending the state's political establishment. (cuttingedge.org)
  • Bryce Bird, director of the state's Division of Air Quality and Amanda Smith, executive director of the Utah Department of Environmental Quality explain the new air quality alert system on November 26, 2012. (kuer.org)
  • With Mormons making up nearly seven-tenths of the state's population, the beliefs and traditions of the Mormon church continue to exert profound influences on many facets of the state's life and institutions. (britannica.com)
  • From 1946 to 1962 manufacturing employment in Utah went from its lowest point in the state's history (as a percent of total employment) to its highest point. (uen.org)
  • Utah became the 45th member of the union on January 4, 1896. (britannica.com)
  • Nico and Nat Dicou are a queer power couple who got married on the first day of Marriage Equality on December 20, 2013 and transformed their downtown SLC property (our home was built in 1896! (abc4.com)
  • During October 2-4 2011, eight maximum security inmates at the Utah State Prison in Salt Lake County were diagnosed with foodborne botulism. (cdc.gov)
  • These records consist of a bound volume of payment requests and recommendations from the Joint City and County Building Committee to the Salt Lake County Clerk. (utah.gov)
  • Despite having about a half million more residents, Salt Lake County added fewer new residents than Utah with an estimated population growth of 79,217 people since 2010. (buildingsaltlake.com)
  • A team led by biophysicist Jeremy Smith of UT and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has taken a step toward discovering how proteins fold into unique, three-dimensional shapes. (nanotech-now.com)
  • Understanding the mechanism by which proteins fold up into unique three-dimensional architectures is a holy grail in molecular biology," explained Smith, who holds the first UT-ORNL Governor's Chair and is a member of the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Department at UT. (nanotech-now.com)
  • An investigation by Salt Lake Valley Heath Department, Utah Department of Health, and CDC identified pruno, an illicit alcoholic brew, as the vehicle. (cdc.gov)
  • Salt Lake Valley Heath Department and Utah Department of Health were notified of a patient with suspected botulism when an inmate at the Utah State Prison was hospitalized at a local hospital (hospital A) on October 2, 2011, with a 3-day history of dysphagia, double vision, progressive weakness, and vomiting. (cdc.gov)
  • We've developed a handheld probe that can diagnose cancer by touching the tissue,' explained Liva Eberlin, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry at UT who's helped lead the creation of the MasSpec pen. (kvue.com)
  • The Utah work is a key part of a U.S. Department of Defense contract worth up to $55 million to develop the new device for soldiers and potentially others whose arms were amputated. (bio-medicine.org)
  • He had squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and had part of his tongue removed," said Dr. Ha, chairman of the Department of Radiation Oncology at the UT Health Science Center San Antonio. (uthscsa.edu)
  • I came here to build the department," he said. (uthscsa.edu)
  • Stark was then a graduate student of the physics department at UT Austin, and has since completed his PhD and moved on to an appointment at Los Alamos National Laboratory. (azooptics.com)
  • Mara said he understands the public might not be pleased with the higher rates, but he said the department had to make sure the city offered competitive rates. (unionleader.com)
  • The association between botulism and pruno, an illicit alcoholic beverage often made by prisoners, is not well known, and cases of botulism from pruno might be under-recognized. (cdc.gov)
  • The election-year move effectively blocks development of one of America's largest known coal reserves, to the dismay of political leaders in Utah, the nation's most Republican state. (cuttingedge.org)
  • The Republican governor has said Utah is a capital punishment state and needs a backup execution method in case a shortage of the drugs persists. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • The Utah team is focusing on implanting electrode arrays in nerves in the residual limb. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The research team will build a wireless, wearable device, which will be embedded into a hat that will identify brain signals related to anger. (uta.edu)
  • When you join Honeywell, you become a member of our global team of thinkers, innovators, dreamers and doers who make the things that make the future.That means chang. (careerbuilder.com)
  • Lazzi is a member of a large team of researchers across the country that has created the first bionic eye. (exploreutahscience.org)
  • As one of the center's principal investigators, Mattson began building a team of researchers from academic and research institutions across the country with experience in high performance graph analysis, including Buluç, Gilbert and Kepner. (newswise.com)
  • This report documents an outbreak of severe illness with prolonged morbidity and great public expense that occurred in a prison from "pruno," alcohol made illicitly by inmates. The cost of the outbreak was around $500,000 and involved many hours of investigation as well as prompt treatment in the hospital. (cdc.gov)
  • 2016-08-17T17:58:06-04:00 https://images.c-span.org/Files/2d9/20160817175854002_hd.jpg In the case, Utah v. Strieff , the Court ruled 5-3 that incriminating evidence discovered through an illegal police stop can be used if the suspect has an outstanding warrant, even if the warrant is for a minor crime like a traffic violation or unpaid parking ticket. (c-span.org)
  • Seven weeks before the election, Clinton's action delighted environmentalists, but brought threats of political retaliation from Utah. (cuttingedge.org)
  • The threats were apparently made in retaliation for the raids that resulted in federal charges against 25 people and may have contributed to the subsequent suicide of San Juan County physician James Redd. (sjrnews.com)
  • That meant working on the infrastructure, bringing in new faculty and staff, building the research program, building the residency program - a particular point of pride - and running his own clinical work. (uthscsa.edu)
  • In 2006 Mr. Clements donated $10 million to complete a clinical and medical research facility now named the Bill and Rita Clements Advanced Medical Imaging Building, in honor of Mr. Clements and his wife. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Waiting to see Mimi Rivard, a nurse practitioner, was making Chase nervous: it would be the first time he would tell a medical professional that he was transgender. (harpers.org)
  • For more than 25 years, the Utah Chapter has led the fight against Alzheimer's disease by increasing the understanding of dementia and its impact on family and community, providing information and support for those affected, and promoting the advancement of research. (alz.org)
  • During and shortly after the World War II, the federal government spent billions of dollars nationally on manufacturing facilities and scientific research, and much was spent in Utah. (uen.org)
  • Nichols' studies of mind-altering chemicals did not consider their toxicity in humans, but that did not stop at least one entrepreneur from appropriating the research and creating dangerous drugs that are not yet banned by law. (livescience.com)
  • Nichols first learned his research was being used to create potentially fatal designer drugs - which create effects like those of illegal drugs while skirting the law - more than a decade ago. (livescience.com)
  • Now after nearly five years of collaboration between researchers in academia, industry and national research laboratories-including Aydın Buluç, a scientist in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (Berkeley Lab's) Computational Research Division (CRD)- GraphBLAS , a collection of standardized building blocks for graph algorithms in the language of linear algebra, is publicly available. (newswise.com)
  • This study examines how Latino-white spatial segregation is associated with the risk of obesity for Latinos and whites, whether neighborhood socioeconomic resources, the built environment, and subcultural orientation serve as the underlying mechanisms, and whether neighborhood context helps explain obesity disparities across ethnic and immigrant groups. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Among the demographic, socioeconomic, physical, and cultural aspects of neighborhood context examined in this study, perhaps the most modifiable environment features that could prevent weight gain and its associated problems would be the built environmental factors such as greenness, park access, and mixed land use. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • I think it will make the public more complacent," said Cherise Udell of Utah Moms for Clean Air, "People's alarm bells will not be going off that we have an air quality program. (kuer.org)
  • University of Tennessee, Knoxville gets $2.8M grant to make veterinary care more accessible Maddie's Fund, a group that promotes pet adoption, has given a $2.8 million grant to the University of Tennessee's Pet Health Equity program. (knoxnews.com)
  • The grant is an absolute godsend because it reflects Maddie's Fund's vision about new ways to achieve better outcomes for more pets and their people," said UT Pet Health Equity Program Director Michael Blackwell, former dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine. (knoxnews.com)
  • Join our Welcome Rewards Program for a chance to win a free night at one of our Salt Lake City and County Building hotels. (hotels.com)
  • The moment is right to build a program of the same quality and rigor in art history," said Mrs. O'Donnell. (glasstire.com)
  • Our Management/Sales Training Program is designed to provide you with all the skills needed to build a successful career in management and/or outside. (simplyhired.com)
  • Internal Evaluation of Utah State University's bystander intervention program shows participants have an increased awareness of the signs of problematic situations, and are more likely to stand up and intervene. (usu.edu)
  • SALT LAKE CITY (AP) -- Gov. Gary Herbert is joining officials from Boeing Co. at a news conference to announce the aircraft maker is expanding manufacturing operations in Utah. (yahoo.com)
  • This news article seems so bland, so innocuous, that most people outside Utah, or maybe the Southwest, gave it even more than a single thought. (cuttingedge.org)
  • At a press conference in Salt Lake City, Utah, representatives of the two companies showed off the heavy duty pickup truck sporting Rocky Mountain Power logos and an electric lightning storm logo shaped like the Rocky Mountains. (torquenews.com)
  • The Mormon pioneers' desire to be self-sufficient helped manufacturing get a better start in Utah than it did in other western territories and states. (uen.org)
  • The 60 electrodes don't make up for the millions and millions of photoreceptor cells that have been lost, but Humayun says the fuzzy obscured black and white images do make a difference to patients. (exploreutahscience.org)
  • Chapter board members and volunteers are students, educators, parents and community members who volunteer their time to support students and Gay-Straight Alliances, train educators and provide opportunities for everyone to make change in their local schools. (glsen.org)
  • Boeing has 575 employees in Utah and says it will add 100 more. (yahoo.com)
  • This year, as part of its Random Acts of Goodness, two Utah-based companies rallied employees and customers to donate boxes and boxes of toys, games and more to give to kids in need through Community Action Services and Food Bank. (communityactionprovo.org)
  • Simulations run on the Lonestar and Stampede supercomputers of the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) show that the laser goes through the target chamber without making a hole, like sunlight through a pane of glass. (azooptics.com)
  • Our sales system is unmatched in talent, process, commitment, and our Outside Residential Sales Representative position is a phenomenal way to make an impact on. (simplyhired.com)
  • Each discipline affects the other and adjustments have to be made to prevent overtraining and prevent injury. (cyclingutah.com)
  • Taking time to think about what we eat and working in more wholesome food options, becoming more physically active - taking time to play, regardless of age, are all pretty easy adjustments to make in our lives. (fox13now.com)
  • In late 2007, he saw the CTRC's radiation oncology center through its transition into the UT Health Science Center. (uthscsa.edu)
  • Dr. Chul Ha, on the input he receives about each patient's care plan from faculty and medical residents during the CTRC's patient quality assurance conferences, which he developed after coming to the UT Health Science Center San Antonio. (uthscsa.edu)
  • Smoke from distant wildfires has pushed air pollution levels well above federal health standards in Utah this week. (kuer.org)
  • This class will be held at the Oral Health Sciences Building, Rm. (utah.edu)
  • Dr. Gerald Ledlow, dean of the the UT Health Science Center at Tyler, speaks at the grand opening for the new School of Community and Rural Health building. (tylerpaper.com)