A group of often glycosylated macrocyclic compounds formed by chain extension of multiple PROPIONATES cyclized into a large (typically 12, 14, or 16)-membered lactone. Macrolides belong to the POLYKETIDES class of natural products, and many members exhibit ANTIBIOTIC properties.
A bacteriostatic antibiotic macrolide produced by Streptomyces erythreus. Erythromycin A is considered its major active component. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
A semi-synthetic macrolide antibiotic structurally related to ERYTHROMYCIN. It has been used in the treatment of Mycobacterium avium intracellulare infections, toxoplasmosis, and cryptosporidiosis.
Compounds based on ERYTHROMYCIN with the 3-cladinose replaced by a ketone. They bind the 23S part of 70S bacterial RIBOSOMES.
Semisynthetic derivative of erythromycin. It is concentrated by human phagocytes and is bioactive intracellularly. While the drug is active against a wide spectrum of pathogens, it is particularly effective in the treatment of respiratory and genital tract infections.
A macrolide antibiotic from Streptomyces narbonensis. The drug has antimicrobial activity against a wide spectrum of pathogens.
An antibiotic complex produced by Streptomyces kitasatoensis. The complex consists of a mixture of at least eight biologically active components, A1 and A3 to A9. Leucomycins have both antibacterial and antimycoplasmal activities.
Macrolide antibiotic obtained from cultures of Streptomyces fradiae. The drug is effective against many microorganisms in animals but not in humans.
A semisynthetic macrolide antibiotic derived from ERYTHROMYCIN that is active against a variety of microorganisms. It can inhibit PROTEIN SYNTHESIS in BACTERIA by reversibly binding to the 50S ribosomal subunits. This inhibits the translocation of aminoacyl transfer-RNA and prevents peptide chain elongation.
Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).
A macrolide antibiotic produced by Streptomyces ambofaciens. The drug is effective against gram-positive aerobic pathogens, N. gonorrhoeae, and staphylococci. It is used to treat infections caused by bacteria and Toxoplasma gondii.
A family of LINCOMYCIN-related glycosides that contain a pyrrolidine ring linked via an amide-bond to a pyranose moiety. Individual members of this family are defined by the arrangement of specific constituent groups on the lyncomycin molecule. Many lincosamides are ANTIBIOTICS produced by a variety STREPTOMYCES species.
A cyclic polypeptide antibiotic complex from Streptomyces virginiae, S. loidensis, S. mitakaensis, S. pristina-spiralis, S. ostreogriseus, and others. It consists of 2 major components, VIRGINIAMYCIN FACTOR M1 and virginiamycin Factor S1. It is used to treat infections with gram-positive organisms and as a growth promoter in cattle, swine, and poultry.
The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
A macrolide antibiotic that has a wide antimicrobial spectrum and is particularly effective in respiratory and genital infections.
Constituent of 50S subunit of prokaryotic ribosomes containing about 3200 nucleotides. 23S rRNA is involved in the initiation of polypeptide synthesis.
A gram-positive organism found in the upper respiratory tract, inflammatory exudates, and various body fluids of normal and/or diseased humans and, rarely, domestic animals.
An antibacterial agent that is a semisynthetic analog of LINCOMYCIN.
The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
A class of natural cyclic peptide antibiotics produced by certain subspecies of STREPTOMYCES. They include two structurally unrelated components, STREPTOGRAMIN GROUP A and STREPTOGRAMIN GROUP B, which generally act synergistically to inhibit bacterial growth.
An antibiotic produced by Streptomyces lincolnensis var. lincolnensis. It has been used in the treatment of staphylococcal, streptococcal, and Bacteroides fragilis infections.
Hydrocarbons with more than one double bond. They are a reduced form of POLYYNES.
A group of QUINOLONES with at least one fluorine atom and a piperazinyl group.
Short filamentous organism of the genus Mycoplasma, which binds firmly to the cells of the respiratory epithelium. It is one of the etiologic agents of non-viral primary atypical pneumonia in man.
A species of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria isolated from skin lesions, blood, inflammatory exudates, and the upper respiratory tract of humans. It is a group A hemolytic Streptococcus that can cause SCARLET FEVER and RHEUMATIC FEVER.
Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.
A specific streptogramin group B antibiotic produced by Streptomyces graminofaciens and other bacteria.
A genus of bacteria that form a nonfragmented aerial mycelium. Many species have been identified with some being pathogenic. This genus is responsible for producing a majority of the ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS of practical value.
Antibiotic macrolide produced by Streptomyces antibioticus.
The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs simultaneously. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
Cyclic AMIDES formed from aminocarboxylic acids by the elimination of water. Lactims are the enol forms of lactams.
Closely congeneric derivatives of the polycyclic naphthacenecarboxamide. (Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1117)
Invasion of the host RESPIRATORY SYSTEM by microorganisms, usually leading to pathological processes or diseases.
QUINOLONES containing a 4-oxo (a carbonyl in the para position to the nitrogen). They inhibit the A subunit of DNA GYRASE and are used as antimicrobials. Second generation 4-quinolones are also substituted with a 1-piperazinyl group at the 7-position and a fluorine at the 6-position.
Gram-negative aerobic cocci of low virulence that colonize the nasopharynx and occasionally cause MENINGITIS; BACTEREMIA; EMPYEMA; PERICARDITIS; and PNEUMONIA.
Infections with bacteria of the species STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE.
Inflammation of the BRONCHIOLES.
Interstitial pneumonia caused by extensive infection of the lungs (LUNG) and BRONCHI, particularly the lower lobes of the lungs, by MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE in humans. In SHEEP, it is caused by MYCOPLASMA OVIPNEUMONIAE. In CATTLE, it may be caused by MYCOPLASMA DISPAR.
A common inhabitant of the vagina and cervix and a potential human pathogen, causing infections of the male and female reproductive tracts. It has also been associated with respiratory disease and pharyngitis. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Narrowing of the pyloric canal with varied etiology. A common form is due to muscle hypertrophy (PYLORIC STENOSIS, HYPERTROPHIC) seen in infants.
Any infection acquired in the community, that is, contrasted with those acquired in a health care facility (CROSS INFECTION). An infection would be classified as community-acquired if the patient had not recently been in a health care facility or been in contact with someone who had been recently in a health care facility.
A species of HAEMOPHILUS found on the mucous membranes of humans and a variety of animals. The species is further divided into biotypes I through VIII.
Infections with bacteria of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS.
Macrolide antifungal antibiotic complex produced by Streptomyces noursei, S. aureus, and other Streptomyces species. The biologically active components of the complex are nystatin A1, A2, and A3.
A group of antibiotics that contain 6-aminopenicillanic acid with a side chain attached to the 6-amino group. The penicillin nucleus is the chief structural requirement for biological activity. The side-chain structure determines many of the antibacterial and pharmacological characteristics. (Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1065)
A genus of gram-positive bacteria whose spores are round to oval and covered by a sheath.
Naphthyridines are a class of heterocyclic organic compounds containing a naphthyridine nucleus, which is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon made up of two benzene rings fused to a pyridine ring, and they have been studied for their potential pharmacological properties, including as antimicrobial, antiviral, and anticancer agents.
A synthetic fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent that inhibits the supercoiling activity of bacterial DNA GYRASE, halting DNA REPLICATION.
A subclass of enzymes of the transferase class that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from one compound to another. (Dorland, 28th ed) EC 2.1.1.
The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.
The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.
Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by bacterial infections.
The L-isomer of Ofloxacin.
Nonsusceptibility of an organism to the action of penicillins.
'Azā compounds' are a class of organic molecules containing at least one nitrogen atom in a five-membered ring, often found in naturally occurring substances and pharmaceuticals, with the name derived from the Arabic word "azZa" meaning 'strong' referring to the ring's aromatic stability.
Narrowing of the pyloric canal due to HYPERTROPHY of the surrounding circular muscle. It is usually seen in infants or young children.
A group of derivatives of naphthyridine carboxylic acid, quinoline carboxylic acid, or NALIDIXIC ACID.
Amphoteric macrolide antifungal antibiotic from Streptomyces natalensis or S. chattanoogensis. It is used for a variety of fungal infections, mainly topically.
A species of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria that is numerous in the mouth and throat. It is a common cause of endocarditis and is also implicated in dental plaque formation.
Multicomponent ribonucleoprotein structures found in the CYTOPLASM of all cells, and in MITOCHONDRIA, and PLASTIDS. They function in PROTEIN BIOSYNTHESIS via GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Cyclic esters of hydroxy carboxylic acids, containing a 1-oxacycloalkan-2-one structure. Large cyclic lactones of over a dozen atoms are MACROLIDES.
A genus of bacteria found in the reproductive organs, intestinal tract, and oral cavity of animals and man. Some species are pathogenic.
A subcategory of CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE. The disease is characterized by hypersecretion of mucus accompanied by a chronic (more than 3 months in 2 consecutive years) productive cough. Infectious agents are a major cause of chronic bronchitis.
Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of veterinary medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.
Glycosylated compounds in which there is an amino substituent on the glycoside. Some of them are clinically important ANTIBIOTICS.
Bacteria which retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
A genus of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria whose organisms occur in pairs or chains. No endospores are produced. Many species exist as commensals or parasites on man or animals with some being highly pathogenic. A few species are saprophytes and occur in the natural environment.
A naphthacene antibiotic that inhibits AMINO ACYL TRNA binding during protein synthesis.
Monocyclic, bacterially produced or semisynthetic beta-lactam antibiotics. They lack the double ring construction of the traditional beta-lactam antibiotics and can be easily synthesized.
Derivatives of oxazolidin-2-one. They represent an important class of synthetic antibiotic agents.
A TETRACYCLINE analog, having a 7-dimethylamino and lacking the 5 methyl and hydroxyl groups, which is effective against tetracycline-resistant STAPHYLOCOCCUS infections.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
Inflammation of the throat (PHARYNX).
Potentially pathogenic bacteria found in nasal membranes, skin, hair follicles, and perineum of warm-blooded animals. They may cause a wide range of infections and intoxications.
The phylum of sponges which are sessile, suspension-feeding, multicellular animals that utilize flagellated cells called choanocytes to circulate water. Most are hermaphroditic. They are probably an early evolutionary side branch that gave rise to no other group of animals. Except for about 150 freshwater species, sponges are marine animals. They are a source of ALKALOIDS; STEROLS; and other complex molecules useful in medicine and biological research.
Mixture of antifungal heptaene macrolides from Streptomyces griseus or Actinomyces levoris used topically in candidiasis. The antibiotic complex is composed of candicidins A, B, C, and D, of which D is the major component.
Coccus-shaped bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.
A republic consisting of an island group in Melanesia, in the southwest Pacific Ocean. Its capital is Suva. It was discovered by Abel Tasman in 1643 and was visited by Captain Cook in 1774. It was used by escaped convicts from Australia as early as 1804. It was annexed by Great Britain in 1874 but achieved independence in 1970. The name Fiji is of uncertain origin. In its present form it may represent that of Viti, the main island in the group. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p396 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p186)

Lymphadenitis due to nontuberculous mycobacteria in children: presentation and response to therapy. (1/2885)

The most common manifestation of infection due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in children is cervical lymphadenitis in an otherwise healthy patient. We identified and reviewed 19 cases of proven or presumptive lymphadenitis due to NTM seen at our hospital over the course of 13 months. Nine patients underwent initial surgical excision of involved lymph nodes. Ten children did not have involved lymph nodes excised initially and were treated with macrolide-containing antibiotic regimens. Of these patients, five required subsequent surgical excision and five were cured with combination chemotherapy. Six patients underwent radiographic imaging of the head and neck that revealed asymmetrical adenopathy with ring-enhancing masses but minimal inflammatory stranding of the subcutaneous fat, a finding that may distinguish adenitis caused by NTM from staphylococcal and streptococcal adenitis. Our data suggest that if surgical excision is not considered feasible, antimicrobial therapy for adenitis due to NTM may be beneficial for some patients.  (+info)

Apicularens A and B, new cytostatic macrolides from Chondromyces species (myxobacteria): production, physico-chemical and biological properties. (2/2885)

A novel macrolide, apicularen A, was produced by several species of the genus Chondromyces. Initially it was discovered by bioassay-guided RP-HPLC-fractionation of culture extracts of Chondromyces robustus, strain Cm a13. Apicularen A showed no antimicrobial activity, but was highly cytotoxic for cultivated human and animal cells, with IC50 values ranging between 0.1 and 3 ng/ml. A cometabolite of apicularen A, the N-acetylglucosamine glycoside apicularen B, was distinctly less cytotoxic with IC50 values between 0.2 and 1.2 microg/ml, and showed weak activity against a few Gram-positive bacteria. Apicularen A is chemically closely related to the salicylihalamides A and B from the marine sponge Haliclona sp.  (+info)

Efflux-mediated aminoglycoside and macrolide resistance in Burkholderia pseudomallei. (3/2885)

Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is intrinsically resistant to a wide range of antimicrobial agents including beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, macrolides, and polymyxins. We used Tn5-OT182 to mutagenize B. pseudomallei to identify the genes involved in aminoglycoside resistance. We report here on the identification of AmrAB-OprA, a multidrug efflux system in B. pseudomallei which is specific for both aminoglycoside and macrolide antibiotics. We isolated two transposon mutants, RM101 and RM102, which had 8- to 128-fold increases in their susceptibilities to the aminoglycosides streptomycin, gentamicin, neomycin, tobramycin, kanamycin, and spectinomycin. In addition, both mutants, in contrast to the parent, were susceptible to the macrolides erythromycin and clarithromycin but not to the lincosamide clindamycin. Sequencing of the DNA flanking the transposon insertions revealed a putative operon consisting of a resistance, nodulation, division-type transporter, a membrane fusion protein, an outer membrane protein, and a divergently transcribed regulatorprotein. Consistent with the presence of an efflux system, both mutants accumulated [3H] dihydro streptomycin, whereas the parent strain did not. We constructed an amr deletion strain, B. pseudomallei DD503, which was hypersusceptible to aminoglycosides and macrolides and which was used successfully in allelic exchange experiments. These results suggest that an efflux system is a major contributor to the inherent high-level aminoglycoside and macrolide resistance found in B. pseudomallei.  (+info)

Ketolide treatment of Haemophilus influenzae experimental pneumonia. (4/2885)

The MICs of HMR 3004 and HMR 3647 at which 90% of beta-lactamase-producing Haemophilus influenzae isolates were inhibited were 4 and 2 micrograms/ml, respectively. Both HMR 3004 and HMR 3647 were active against beta-lactamase-producing H. influenzae in a murine model of experimental pneumonia. As assessed by pulmonary clearance of H. influenzae, HMR 3004 was more effective (P < 0.05) than was azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, erythromycin A, pristinamycin, or HMR 3647 in this model.  (+info)

The effect of streptomycin, oxytetracycline, tilmicosin and phenylbutazone on spermatogenesis in bulls. (5/2885)

To determine whether declining semen quality associated with health problems may be due to certain antibiotic or anti-inflammatory treatments, semen was collected 3 times per week for up to 42 d from 6 normal bulls after treatment with oxytetracycline, tilmicosin, dihydrostreptomycin, or phenylbutazone. No adverse effects on semen quality were observed.  (+info)

The in-vitro activity of HMR 3647, a new ketolide antimicrobial agent. (6/2885)

The in-vitro activity of HMR 3647, a novel ketolide, was investigated in comparison with those of erythromycin A, roxithromycin, clarithromycin (14-membered ring macrolides), amoxycillin-clavulanate and ciprofloxacin against 719 recent clinical Gram-positive, Gram-negative and anaerobic isolates and type cultures. HMR 3647 generally demonstrated greater activity than the other compounds with MIC90s of < or =0.5 mg/L, except for Staphylococcus epidermidis (MIC90 > 128 mg/L), Haemophilus influenzae (MIC90 = 2 mg/L), Enterococcus faecalis (MIC90 = 2 mg/L), Enterococcus faecium (MIC90 = 1 mg/L) and the anaerobes, Bacteroides fragilis (MIC90 = 2 mg/L) and Clostridium difficile (MIC90 = 1 mg/L). In general, an increase in the size of the inoculum from 10(4) to 10(6) cfu on selected strains had little effect on the MICs of HMR 3647. Additionally, the in-vitro activity of HMR 3647 was not affected by the presence of either 20 or 70% (v/v) human serum. The antichlamydial activity of HMR 3647 was generally greater than that of commonly used antichlamydial antimicrobials.  (+info)

Reduced capacitative calcium entry correlates with vesicle accumulation and apoptosis. (7/2885)

A preneoplastic variant of Syrian hamster embryo cells, sup(+), exhibits decreased endoplasmic reticulum calcium levels and subsequently undergoes apoptosis in low serum conditions (Preston, G. A., Barrett, J. C., Biermann, J. A., and Murphy, E. (1997) Cancer Res. 57, 537-542). This decrease in endoplasmic reticulum calcium appears to be due, at least in part, to reduced capacitative calcium entry at the plasma membrane. Thus we investigated whether inhibition of capacitative calcium entry per se could reduce endoplasmic reticulum calcium and induce apoptosis of cells. We find that treatment with either SKF96365 (30-100 microM) or cell-impermeant 1,2-bis(o-amino-5-bromophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N', N'-tetraacetic acid (5-10 mM) is able to induce apoptosis of cells in conditions where apoptosis does not normally occur. Because previous work has implicated vesicular trafficking as a mechanism of regulating capacitative calcium entry, we investigated whether disruption of vesicular trafficking could lead to decreased capacitative calcium entry and subsequent apoptosis of cells. Coincident with low serum-induced apoptosis, we observed an accumulation of vesicles within the cell, suggesting deregulated vesicle trafficking. Treatment of cells with bafilomycin (30-100 nM), an inhibitor of the endosomal proton ATPase, produced an accumulation of vesicles, decreased capacitative entry, and induced apoptosis. These data suggest that deregulation of vesicular transport results in reduced capacitative calcium entry which in turn results in apoptosis.  (+info)

A comparison of florfenicol and tilmicosin for the treatment of undifferentiated fever in feedlot calves in western Canada. (8/2885)

A field trial was performed under commercial feedlot conditions in western Canada to compare the efficacy of florfenicol and tilmicosin for the treatment of undifferentiated fever (UF) in calves that received metaphylactic tilmicosin upon arrival at the feedlot. One thousand and eighty recently weaned, auction market derived, crossbred beef calves suffering from UF were allocated to one of 2 experimental groups as follows: florfenicol, which was intramuscular (i.m.) florfenicol administered at the rate of 20 mg/kg body weight (BW) at the time of allocation (Day 0) and again 48 h later, or tilmicosin, which was subcutaneous (s.c.) tilmicosin administered once at the rate of 10 mg/kg BW on day 0. Five hundred and forty-four animals were allocated to the florfenicol group and 536 animals were allocated to the tilmicosin group. The chronicity, wastage, overall mortality, and bovine respiratory disease (BRD) mortality rates were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the florfenicol group than in the tilmicosin group. There were no significant (P > or = 0.05) differences in first UF relapse, second UF relapse, hemophilosis mortality, or miscellaneous mortality rates between the florfenicol and tilmicosin groups. Average daily gain (ADG) from arrival at the feedlot to the time of implanting and ADG from allocation to the time of implanting were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the florfenicol group as compared with the tilmicosin group. There were no significant (P > or = 0.05) differences in arrival weight, allocation weight, implanting weight, or ADG from arrival to allocation between the experimental groups. In the economic analysis, there was an advantage of $18.83 CDN per animal in the florfenicol group. The results of this study indicate that florfenicol is superior to tilmicosin for the treatment of UF because of lower chronicity, wastage, overall mortality, and BRD mortality rates. However, interpretation of these observations must take into consideration the fact that these calves received meta-phylactic tilmicosin upon arrival at the feedlot, which is a standard, cost-effective, management procedure utilized by feedlots in western Canada.  (+info)

Macrolides are a class of antibiotics derived from natural products obtained from various species of Streptomyces bacteria. They have a large ring structure consisting of 12, 14, or 15 atoms, to which one or more sugar molecules are attached. Macrolides inhibit bacterial protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit, thereby preventing peptide bond formation. Common examples of macrolides include erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin. They are primarily used to treat respiratory, skin, and soft tissue infections caused by susceptible gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

Erythromycin is a type of antibiotic known as a macrolide, which is used to treat various types of bacterial infections. It works by inhibiting the bacteria's ability to produce proteins, which are necessary for the bacteria to survive and multiply. Erythromycin is often used to treat respiratory tract infections, skin infections, and sexually transmitted diseases. It may also be used to prevent endocarditis (inflammation of the lining of the heart) in people at risk of this condition.

Erythromycin is generally considered safe for most people, but it can cause side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It may also interact with other medications, so it's important to tell your doctor about all the drugs you are taking before starting erythromycin.

Like all antibiotics, erythromycin should only be used to treat bacterial infections, as it is not effective against viral infections such as the common cold or flu. Overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which makes it harder to treat infections in the future.

Anti-bacterial agents, also known as antibiotics, are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by bacteria. These agents work by either killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth and reproduction. There are several different classes of anti-bacterial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and tetracyclines, among others. Each class of antibiotic has a specific mechanism of action and is used to treat certain types of bacterial infections. It's important to note that anti-bacterial agents are not effective against viral infections, such as the common cold or flu. Misuse and overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which is a significant global health concern.

Azithromycin is a widely used antibiotic drug that belongs to the class of macrolides. It works by inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis, which leads to the death of susceptible bacteria. This medication is active against a broad range of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, atypical bacteria, and some parasites.

Azithromycin is commonly prescribed to treat various bacterial infections, such as:

1. Respiratory tract infections, including pneumonia, bronchitis, and sinusitis
2. Skin and soft tissue infections
3. Sexually transmitted diseases, like chlamydia
4. Otitis media (middle ear infection)
5. Traveler's diarrhea

The drug is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, suspension, and intravenous solutions. The typical dosage for adults ranges from 250 mg to 500 mg per day, depending on the type and severity of the infection being treated.

Like other antibiotics, azithromycin should be used judiciously to prevent antibiotic resistance. It is essential to complete the full course of treatment as prescribed by a healthcare professional, even if symptoms improve before finishing the medication.

Ketolides are a class of antibiotics, which are chemically modified versions of macrolide antibiotics. They have an extended spectrum of activity and improved stability against bacterial resistance mechanisms compared to older macrolides. Ketolides inhibit protein synthesis in bacteria by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit.

The main ketolide antibiotics include telithromycin, cethromycin, and solithromycin. They are primarily used for treating respiratory tract infections caused by susceptible strains of bacteria, including drug-resistant pneumococci and atypical pathogens like Legionella pneumophila, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Chlamydia pneumoniae.

It is important to note that ketolides have potential side effects, such as gastrointestinal disturbances, liver enzyme elevations, and cardiac arrhythmias, which should be considered when prescribing them.

Roxithromycin is a macrolide antibiotic that is used to treat various types of bacterial infections, including respiratory tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, and sexually transmitted diseases. It works by inhibiting the growth of bacteria by interfering with their protein synthesis.

Roxithromycin has a broad spectrum of activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Moraxella catarrhalis, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

The drug is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and oral suspension, and is usually taken twice a day for 5-10 days, depending on the type and severity of the infection being treated. Common side effects of roxithromycin include nausea, diarrhea, abdominal pain, headache, and skin rash.

It's important to note that roxithromycin should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as with any medication, to ensure its safe and effective use.

Josamycin is an antibiotic that belongs to the group known as macrolides. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria. Josamycin is used to treat infections caused by bacteria, including respiratory tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, and ear infections. It may also be used to prevent endocarditis (inflammation of the lining of the heart) in people at risk of developing this condition who are undergoing dental or surgical procedures.

Josamycin is not commonly used in the United States, and it is not approved for use in children. It is available in generic form as a tablet or oral suspension.

Like all antibiotics, josamycin should be used only to treat bacterial infections. It will not work against viral infections (such as the common cold or flu). Using antibiotics when they are not needed increases the risk of bacteria becoming resistant to them, which makes it harder to treat infections in the future.

Leucomycins are a type of antibiotic produced by the bacterium Streptomyces kitasatoensis. They are known to be effective against a wide range of gram-positive bacteria, including some that are resistant to other antibiotics. Leucomycins belong to a class of antibiotics called aminoglycosides, which work by binding to the bacterial ribosome and inhibiting protein synthesis.

Leucomycin A, one of the components of leucomycins, has been studied for its potential anti-tumor properties. However, its use as a therapeutic agent is limited due to its toxicity and potential for causing hearing loss and kidney damage. Therefore, it is mainly used in research settings to study bacterial physiology and antibiotic resistance mechanisms.

Tylosin is defined as a macrolide antibiotic produced by the bacterium Streptomyces fradiae. It is primarily used in veterinary medicine to treat various bacterial infections in animals, such as respiratory and digestive tract infections caused by susceptible organisms.

Tylosin works by binding to the 50S subunit of the bacterial ribosome, inhibiting protein synthesis and thereby preventing bacterial growth. It has a broad spectrum of activity against gram-positive bacteria, including some strains that are resistant to other antibiotics. However, tylosin is not commonly used in human medicine due to its potential for causing hearing damage and other side effects.

In addition to its use as an antibiotic, tylosin has also been used as a growth promoter in animal feed to improve feed efficiency and weight gain. However, this practice has been banned in some countries due to concerns about the development of antibiotic resistance and the potential risks to human health.

Clarithromycin is a antibiotic medication used to treat various types of bacterial infections, including respiratory, skin, and soft tissue infections. It is a member of the macrolide antibiotic family, which works by inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis. Clarithromycin is available by prescription and is often used in combination with other medications to treat conditions such as Helicobacter pylori infection and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection.

The medical definition of clarithromycin is:

"A antibiotic medication used to treat various types of bacterial infections, belonging to the macrolide antibiotic family. It works by inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis and is available by prescription."

Microbial sensitivity tests, also known as antibiotic susceptibility tests (ASTs) or bacterial susceptibility tests, are laboratory procedures used to determine the effectiveness of various antimicrobial agents against specific microorganisms isolated from a patient's infection. These tests help healthcare providers identify which antibiotics will be most effective in treating an infection and which ones should be avoided due to resistance. The results of these tests can guide appropriate antibiotic therapy, minimize the potential for antibiotic resistance, improve clinical outcomes, and reduce unnecessary side effects or toxicity from ineffective antimicrobials.

There are several methods for performing microbial sensitivity tests, including:

1. Disk diffusion method (Kirby-Bauer test): A standardized paper disk containing a predetermined amount of an antibiotic is placed on an agar plate that has been inoculated with the isolated microorganism. After incubation, the zone of inhibition around the disk is measured to determine the susceptibility or resistance of the organism to that particular antibiotic.
2. Broth dilution method: A series of tubes or wells containing decreasing concentrations of an antimicrobial agent are inoculated with a standardized microbial suspension. After incubation, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) is determined by observing the lowest concentration of the antibiotic that prevents visible growth of the organism.
3. Automated systems: These use sophisticated technology to perform both disk diffusion and broth dilution methods automatically, providing rapid and accurate results for a wide range of microorganisms and antimicrobial agents.

The interpretation of microbial sensitivity test results should be done cautiously, considering factors such as the site of infection, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the antibiotic, potential toxicity, and local resistance patterns. Regular monitoring of susceptibility patterns and ongoing antimicrobial stewardship programs are essential to ensure optimal use of these tests and to minimize the development of antibiotic resistance.

Spiramycin is an antibiotic belonging to the class of macrolides. It is primarily used in the treatment and prevention of various bacterial infections, particularly those caused by susceptible strains of streptococci, pneumococci, and some other gram-positive bacteria. Spiramycin works by inhibiting protein synthesis in bacteria.

The medical definition of Spiramycin is:

A macrolide antibiotic with a broad spectrum of activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, including streptococci, pneumococci, staphylococci, and some anaerobes. It is used in the treatment of respiratory tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, and other bacterial infections. Spiramycin is also used as an alternative treatment for toxoplasmosis during pregnancy due to its low placental transfer.

It's important to note that antibiotics should only be taken under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as misuse or overuse can lead to antibiotic resistance.

Lincosamides are a class of antibiotics that are structurally related to limcosamine and consist of lincomycin and its derivatives such as clindamycin. They bind to the 50S ribosomal subunit and inhibit bacterial protein synthesis. These antibiotics have a bacteriostatic effect and are primarily used to treat anaerobic infections, as well as some Gram-positive bacterial infections. Common side effects include gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea and nausea. Additionally, lincosamides can cause pseudomembranous colitis, a potentially serious condition caused by the overgrowth of Clostridium difficile bacteria in the gut.

Virginiamycin is not a medical condition or disease, but rather an antibiotic used in veterinary medicine to promote growth and prevent or treat certain bacterial infections in animals, particularly in livestock such as cattle, swine, and poultry. It is a mixture of two components, virginiamycin M1 and virginiamycin S1, which have antibacterial properties against gram-positive bacteria.

Virginiamycin belongs to the streptogramin class of antibiotics and works by binding to the bacterial ribosome, inhibiting protein synthesis and ultimately killing the bacteria. It is not approved for use in humans, except under certain circumstances as part of an investigational new drug (IND) protocol or in specific medical devices.

It's important to note that the use of antibiotics in livestock can contribute to the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which can have negative impacts on human health. Therefore, responsible and judicious use of antibiotics is essential to minimize this risk.

Bacterial drug resistance is a type of antimicrobial resistance that occurs when bacteria evolve the ability to survive and reproduce in the presence of drugs (such as antibiotics) that would normally kill them or inhibit their growth. This can happen due to various mechanisms, including genetic mutations or the acquisition of resistance genes from other bacteria.

As a result, bacterial infections may become more difficult to treat, requiring higher doses of medication, alternative drugs, or longer treatment courses. In some cases, drug-resistant infections can lead to serious health complications, increased healthcare costs, and higher mortality rates.

Examples of bacterial drug resistance include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE), and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Preventing the spread of bacterial drug resistance is crucial for maintaining effective treatments for infectious diseases.

Miacamycin is not a medical term itself, but Miocamycin is a specific type of antibiotic. It belongs to the class of macrolide antibiotics, which are used to treat various bacterial infections. The drug works by inhibiting the growth of bacteria, and it is often used to treat respiratory tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, and certain sexually transmitted diseases.

Miacamycin may also be referred to as its generic name, miamictin, or its brand name, Viactiv Miacalcin. It's important to note that the use of antibiotics should always be under the guidance and supervision of a healthcare professional, as misuse can lead to antibiotic resistance.

23S Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is a type of rRNA that is a component of the large ribosomal subunit in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. In prokaryotes, the large ribosomal subunit contains 50S, which consists of 23S rRNA, 5S rRNA, and around 33 proteins. The 23S rRNA plays a crucial role in the decoding of mRNA during protein synthesis and also participates in the formation of the peptidyl transferase center, where peptide bonds are formed between amino acids.

The 23S rRNA is a long RNA molecule that contains both coding and non-coding regions. It has a complex secondary structure, which includes several domains and subdomains, as well as numerous stem-loop structures. These structures are important for the proper functioning of the ribosome during protein synthesis.

In addition to its role in protein synthesis, 23S rRNA has been used as a target for antibiotics that inhibit bacterial growth. For example, certain antibiotics bind to specific regions of the 23S rRNA and interfere with the function of the ribosome, thereby preventing bacterial protein synthesis and growth. However, because eukaryotic cells do not have a 23S rRNA equivalent, these antibiotics are generally not toxic to human cells.

Streptococcus pneumoniae, also known as the pneumococcus, is a gram-positive, alpha-hemolytic bacterium frequently found in the upper respiratory tract of healthy individuals. It is a leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia and can also cause other infectious diseases such as otitis media (ear infection), sinusitis, meningitis, and bacteremia (bloodstream infection). The bacteria are encapsulated, and there are over 90 serotypes based on variations in the capsular polysaccharide. Some serotypes are more virulent or invasive than others, and the polysaccharide composition is crucial for vaccine development. S. pneumoniae infection can be treated with antibiotics, but the emergence of drug-resistant strains has become a significant global health concern.

Clindamycin is a antibiotic medication used to treat a variety of bacterial infections. It is a type of antibiotic known as a lincosamide, which works by binding to the bacterial ribosome and inhibiting protein synthesis. This leads to the death of the bacteria and helps to clear the infection.

Clindamycin is effective against a wide range of gram-positive and some anaerobic bacteria, making it a useful antibiotic for treating many different types of infections, including skin and soft tissue infections, bone and joint infections, respiratory infections, and dental infections. It is also sometimes used to treat certain types of bacterial vaginal infections.

Like all antibiotics, clindamycin should be used only under the direction of a healthcare provider, as misuse can lead to antibiotic resistance. Additionally, clindamycin can cause side effects such as diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, and it may increase the risk of developing a serious intestinal infection called Clostridioides difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully when taking this medication.

Microbial drug resistance is a significant medical issue that refers to the ability of microorganisms (such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites) to withstand or survive exposure to drugs or medications designed to kill them or limit their growth. This phenomenon has become a major global health concern, particularly in the context of bacterial infections, where it is also known as antibiotic resistance.

Drug resistance arises due to genetic changes in microorganisms that enable them to modify or bypass the effects of antimicrobial agents. These genetic alterations can be caused by mutations or the acquisition of resistance genes through horizontal gene transfer. The resistant microbes then replicate and multiply, forming populations that are increasingly difficult to eradicate with conventional treatments.

The consequences of drug-resistant infections include increased morbidity, mortality, healthcare costs, and the potential for widespread outbreaks. Factors contributing to the emergence and spread of microbial drug resistance include the overuse or misuse of antimicrobials, poor infection control practices, and inadequate surveillance systems.

To address this challenge, it is crucial to promote prudent antibiotic use, strengthen infection prevention and control measures, develop new antimicrobial agents, and invest in research to better understand the mechanisms underlying drug resistance.

Streptogramins are a class of antibiotics produced by various species of Streptomyces bacteria. They are composed of two components, Group A and Group B, that work synergistically to inhibit bacterial protein synthesis. The combination of these two groups is often referred to as a "streptogramin pair."

Streptogramin A binds to the peptidyl transferase center of the 50S ribosomal subunit and prevents the addition of new amino acids to the growing peptide chain. Streptogramin B, on the other hand, binds to a different site on the 50S subunit and causes conformational changes that enhance the activity of streptogramin A.

Together, these antibiotics inhibit bacterial protein synthesis and disrupt bacterial growth, making them effective against a range of Gram-positive bacteria, including some drug-resistant strains. Examples of streptogramins include dalfopristin, quinupristin, and pristinamycin. They are often used in combination with other antibiotics to treat serious infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE).

Lincomycin is defined as an antibiotic produced by Streptomyces lincolnensis. It is primarily bacteriostatic, inhibiting protein synthesis in sensitive bacteria by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit. Lincomycin is used clinically to treat a variety of infections caused by susceptible gram-positive organisms, including some anaerobes. It has activity against many strains of streptococci, pneumococci, and staphylococci, but not enterococci. Common side effects include gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Polyenes are a group of antibiotics that contain a long, unsaturated hydrocarbon chain with alternating double and single bonds. They are characterized by their ability to bind to ergosterol, a steroid found in fungal cell membranes, forming pores that increase the permeability of the membrane and lead to fungal cell death.

The most well-known polyene antibiotic is amphotericin B, which is used to treat serious systemic fungal infections such as candidiasis, aspergillosis, and cryptococcosis. Other polyenes include nystatin and natamycin, which are primarily used to treat topical fungal infections of the skin or mucous membranes.

While polyenes are effective antifungal agents, they can also cause significant side effects, particularly when used systemically. These may include kidney damage, infusion reactions, and electrolyte imbalances. Therefore, their use is typically reserved for severe fungal infections that are unresponsive to other treatments.

Fluoroquinolones are a class of antibiotics that are widely used to treat various types of bacterial infections. They work by interfering with the bacteria's ability to replicate its DNA, which ultimately leads to the death of the bacterial cells. Fluoroquinolones are known for their broad-spectrum activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

Some common fluoroquinolones include ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and ofloxacin. These antibiotics are often used to treat respiratory infections, urinary tract infections, skin infections, and gastrointestinal infections, among others.

While fluoroquinolones are generally well-tolerated, they can cause serious side effects in some people, including tendonitis, nerve damage, and changes in mood or behavior. As with all antibiotics, it's important to use fluoroquinolones only when necessary and under the guidance of a healthcare provider.

"Mycoplasma pneumoniae" is a type of bacteria that lacks a cell wall and can cause respiratory infections, particularly bronchitis and atypical pneumonia. It is one of the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia. Infection with "M. pneumoniae" typically results in mild symptoms, such as cough, fever, and fatigue, although more severe complications can occur in some cases. The bacteria can also cause various extrapulmonary manifestations, including skin rashes, joint pain, and neurological symptoms. Diagnosis of "M. pneumoniae" infection is typically made through serological tests or PCR assays. Treatment usually involves antibiotics such as macrolides or tetracyclines.

Streptococcus pyogenes is a Gram-positive, beta-hemolytic streptococcus bacterium that causes various suppurative (pus-forming) and nonsuppurative infections in humans. It is also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS) due to its ability to produce the M protein, which confers type-specific antigenicity and allows for serological classification into more than 200 distinct Lancefield groups.

S. pyogenes is responsible for a wide range of clinical manifestations, including pharyngitis (strep throat), impetigo, cellulitis, erysipelas, scarlet fever, rheumatic fever, and acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis. In rare cases, it can lead to invasive diseases such as necrotizing fasciitis (flesh-eating disease) and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS).

The bacterium is typically transmitted through respiratory droplets or direct contact with infected skin lesions. Effective prevention strategies include good hygiene practices, such as frequent handwashing and avoiding sharing personal items, as well as prompt recognition and treatment of infections to prevent spread.

Anti-infective agents are a class of medications that are used to treat infections caused by various microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. These agents work by either killing the microorganism or inhibiting its growth, thereby helping to control the infection and alleviate symptoms.

There are several types of anti-infective agents, including:

1. Antibiotics: These are medications that are used to treat bacterial infections. They work by either killing bacteria (bactericidal) or inhibiting their growth (bacteriostatic).
2. Antivirals: These are medications that are used to treat viral infections. They work by interfering with the replication of the virus, preventing it from spreading and causing further damage.
3. Antifungals: These are medications that are used to treat fungal infections. They work by disrupting the cell membrane of the fungus, killing it or inhibiting its growth.
4. Antiparasitics: These are medications that are used to treat parasitic infections. They work by either killing the parasite or inhibiting its growth and reproduction.

It is important to note that anti-infective agents are not effective against all types of infections, and it is essential to use them appropriately to avoid the development of drug-resistant strains of microorganisms.

Streptogramin B is not a medical condition or disease, but rather it refers to a type of antibiotic. Streptogramins are a class of antibiotics produced by certain strains of bacteria that inhibit protein synthesis in susceptible organisms. They are composed of two components, streptogramin A and streptogramin B, which work synergistically to bind to the bacterial ribosome and disrupt its function.

Specifically, streptogramin B binds to the peptidyl transferase center of the 50S ribosomal subunit, preventing the formation of peptide bonds between amino acids during protein synthesis. This leads to the inhibition of bacterial growth and replication.

Streptogramins are primarily used to treat infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria that are resistant to other antibiotics, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE). They are often administered in combination with streptogramin A to enhance their activity and reduce the risk of bacterial resistance.

It's important to note that the use of streptogramins is limited due to their potential for causing adverse effects, such as allergic reactions, and their high cost. Additionally, the development of bacterial resistance to streptogramins can occur, which further limits their utility in clinical practice.

Streptomyces is a genus of Gram-positive, aerobic, saprophytic bacteria that are widely distributed in soil, water, and decaying organic matter. They are known for their complex morphology, forming branching filaments called hyphae that can differentiate into long chains of spores.

Streptomyces species are particularly notable for their ability to produce a wide variety of bioactive secondary metabolites, including antibiotics, antifungals, and other therapeutic compounds. In fact, many important antibiotics such as streptomycin, neomycin, tetracycline, and erythromycin are derived from Streptomyces species.

Because of their industrial importance in the production of antibiotics and other bioactive compounds, Streptomyces have been extensively studied and are considered model organisms for the study of bacterial genetics, biochemistry, and ecology.

Oleandomycin is an antibiotic that belongs to the class of macrolides. It is primarily used in veterinary medicine for treating bacterial infections in animals. The drug works by inhibiting protein synthesis in bacteria, which interferes with their growth and multiplication. Oleandomycin is not commonly used in human medicine due to its potential for causing liver toxicity.

Here's a more detailed medical definition of Oleandomycin:

Oleandomycin is a macrolide antibiotic derived from Streptomyces antibioticus. It has a molecular formula of C32H47NO13 and a molecular weight of 659.7 g/mol. The drug is administered orally and has a broad spectrum of activity against gram-positive bacteria, including streptococci, staphylococci, and pneumococci. Oleandomycin inhibits bacterial protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit, which interferes with peptide bond formation.

While oleandomycin has been used in human medicine in the past, it is not commonly used today due to its potential for causing liver toxicity. It is primarily used in veterinary medicine for treating bacterial infections in animals. Oleandomycin may be used as an alternative antibiotic in cases where other macrolides are not effective or well-tolerated.

It's important to note that the use of any antibiotics, including oleandomycin, should be done under the guidance and supervision of a licensed healthcare provider. Misuse or overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which is a significant public health concern.

Multiple bacterial drug resistance (MDR) is a medical term that refers to the resistance of multiple strains of bacteria to several antibiotics or antimicrobial agents. This means that these bacteria have developed mechanisms that enable them to survive and multiply despite being exposed to drugs that were previously effective in treating infections caused by them.

MDR is a significant public health concern because it limits the treatment options available for bacterial infections, making them more difficult and expensive to treat. In some cases, MDR bacteria may cause severe or life-threatening infections that are resistant to all available antibiotics, leaving doctors with few or no effective therapeutic options.

MDR can arise due to various mechanisms, including the production of enzymes that inactivate antibiotics, changes in bacterial cell membrane permeability that prevent antibiotics from entering the bacteria, and the development of efflux pumps that expel antibiotics out of the bacteria. The misuse or overuse of antibiotics is a significant contributor to the emergence and spread of MDR bacteria.

Preventing and controlling the spread of MDR bacteria requires a multifaceted approach, including the judicious use of antibiotics, infection control measures, surveillance, and research into new antimicrobial agents.

A lactam is a cyclic amide compound containing a carbonyl group (a double-bonded carbon atom) and a nitrogen atom. The name "lactam" is derived from the fact that these compounds are structurally similar to lactones, which are cyclic esters, but with an amide bond instead of an ester bond.

Lactams can be found in various natural and synthetic compounds, including some antibiotics such as penicillin and cephalosporins. These antibiotics contain a four-membered lactam ring (known as a β-lactam) that is essential for their biological activity. The β-lactam ring makes these compounds highly reactive, allowing them to inhibit bacterial cell wall synthesis and thus kill the bacteria.

In summary, lactams are cyclic amide compounds with a carbonyl group and a nitrogen atom in the ring structure. They can be found in various natural and synthetic compounds, including some antibiotics such as penicillin and cephalosporins.

Tetracyclines are a class of antibiotics that are widely used in medicine for their bacteriostatic properties, meaning they inhibit the growth of bacteria without necessarily killing them. They have a broad spectrum of activity and are effective against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as some other microorganisms such as rickettsiae, chlamydiae, and mycoplasmas.

Tetracyclines work by binding to the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome, thereby inhibiting protein synthesis and preventing the bacteria from multiplying. They are commonly used to treat a variety of infections, including respiratory tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, urinary tract infections, sexually transmitted diseases, and anthrax exposure.

Some examples of tetracyclines include tetracycline, doxycycline, minocycline, and oxytetracycline. It is important to note that the use of tetracyclines during tooth development (pregnancy and up to the age of 8 years) can cause permanent discoloration of teeth, and they should be avoided in this population unless there are no other treatment options available. Additionally, tetracyclines can also cause photosensitivity, so patients should be advised to avoid excessive sun exposure while taking these medications.

Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are infections that affect the respiratory system, which includes the nose, throat (pharynx), voice box (larynx), windpipe (trachea), bronchi, and lungs. These infections can be caused by viruses, bacteria, or, less commonly, fungi.

RTIs are classified into two categories based on their location: upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). URTIs include infections of the nose, sinuses, throat, and larynx, such as the common cold, flu, laryngitis, and sinusitis. LRTIs involve the lower airways, including the bronchi and lungs, and can be more severe. Examples of LRTIs are pneumonia, bronchitis, and bronchiolitis.

Symptoms of RTIs depend on the location and cause of the infection but may include cough, congestion, runny nose, sore throat, difficulty breathing, wheezing, fever, fatigue, and chest pain. Treatment for RTIs varies depending on the severity and underlying cause of the infection. For viral infections, treatment typically involves supportive care to manage symptoms, while antibiotics may be prescribed for bacterial infections.

4-Quinolones are a class of antibacterial agents that are chemically characterized by a 4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline ring. They include drugs such as ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin, among others. These antibiotics work by inhibiting the bacterial DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV enzymes, which are essential for bacterial DNA replication, transcription, repair, and recombination. This leads to bacterial cell death.

4-Quinolones have a broad spectrum of activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and are used to treat a variety of infections, including urinary tract infections, pneumonia, skin and soft tissue infections, and intra-abdominal infections. However, the use of 4-quinolones is associated with an increased risk of tendinitis and tendon rupture, as well as other serious adverse effects such as peripheral neuropathy, QT interval prolongation, and aortic aneurysm and dissection. Therefore, their use should be restricted to situations where the benefits outweigh the risks.

Pneumococcal infections are illnesses caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae, also known as pneumococcus. This bacterium can infect different parts of the body, including the lungs (pneumonia), blood (bacteremia or sepsis), and the covering of the brain and spinal cord (meningitis). Pneumococcal infections can also cause ear infections and sinus infections. The bacteria spread through close contact with an infected person, who may spread the bacteria by coughing or sneezing. People with weakened immune systems, children under 2 years of age, adults over 65, and those with certain medical conditions are at increased risk for developing pneumococcal infections.

Bronchiolitis is a common respiratory infection in infants and young children, typically caused by a viral infection. It is characterized by inflammation and congestion of the bronchioles (the smallest airways in the lungs), which can lead to difficulty breathing and wheezing.

The most common virus that causes bronchiolitis is respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), but other viruses such as rhinovirus, influenza, and parainfluenza can also cause the condition. Symptoms of bronchiolitis may include cough, wheezing, rapid breathing, difficulty feeding, and fatigue.

In severe cases, bronchiolitis can lead to respiratory distress and require hospitalization. Treatment typically involves supportive care, such as providing fluids and oxygen therapy, and in some cases, medications to help open the airways may be used. Prevention measures include good hand hygiene and avoiding close contact with individuals who are sick.

Mycoplasma pneumonia is a type of atypical pneumonia, which is caused by the bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae. This organism is not a true bacterium, but rather the smallest free-living organisms known. They lack a cell wall and have a unique mode of reproduction.

Mycoplasma pneumonia infection typically occurs in small outbreaks or sporadically, often in crowded settings such as schools, colleges, and military barracks. It can also be acquired in the community. The illness is often mild and self-limiting, but it can also cause severe pneumonia and extra-pulmonary manifestations.

The symptoms of Mycoplasma pneumonia are typically less severe than those caused by typical bacterial pneumonia and may include a persistent cough that may be dry or produce small amounts of mucus, fatigue, fever, headache, sore throat, and chest pain. The infection can also cause extrapulmonary manifestations such as skin rashes, joint pain, and neurological symptoms.

Diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumonia is often challenging because the organism is difficult to culture, and serological tests may take several weeks to become positive. PCR-based tests are now available and can provide a rapid diagnosis.

Treatment typically involves antibiotics such as macrolides (e.g., azithromycin), tetracyclines (e.g., doxycycline), or fluoroquinolones (e.g., levofloxacin). However, because Mycoplasma pneumonia is often self-limiting, antibiotic treatment may not shorten the duration of illness but can help prevent complications and reduce transmission.

Mycoplasma hominis is a species of bacteria that lack a cell wall and are among the smallest free-living organisms. They are commonly found as part of the normal flora in the genitourinary tract of humans, particularly in the urethra, cervix, and vagina. However, they can also cause various infections, especially in individuals with compromised immune systems or in the presence of other risk factors.

M. hominis has been associated with several types of infections, including:

1. Genital tract infections: M. hominis can cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), cervicitis, urethritis, and endometritis in women. In men, it may lead to urethritis and prostatitis.
2. Postpartum and post-abortion fever: M. hominis can contribute to febrile morbidity following delivery or abortion.
3. Respiratory tract infections: While rare, M. hominis has been implicated in some cases of respiratory tract infections, particularly in immunocompromised individuals.
4. Joint and soft tissue infections: M. hominis can cause septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and other soft tissue infections, especially in patients with underlying joint diseases or compromised immune systems.
5. Central nervous system (CNS) infections: Although uncommon, M. hominis has been associated with CNS infections such as meningitis and brain abscesses, primarily in immunocompromised individuals.
6. Bloodstream infections: Bacteremia due to M. hominis is rare but can occur in immunocompromised patients or those with indwelling catheters.

Diagnosis of M. hominis infections typically involves the detection of the organism through various laboratory methods, such as culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), or serological tests. Treatment usually consists of antibiotics that target mycoplasmas, such as macrolides (e.g., azithromycin) or tetracyclines (e.g., doxycycline). However, resistance to certain antibiotics has been reported in some M. hominis strains.

Pyloric stenosis is a condition that results in the narrowing or complete obstruction of the pylorus, which is the opening from the stomach into the small intestine. This narrowing is usually caused by hypertrophy (thickening) of the muscles in the pylorus, making it difficult for food to pass from the stomach into the duodenum.

The most common form of this condition is infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, which typically affects infants between 3-6 weeks of age. In this case, the pyloric muscle becomes abnormally thick and narrows the opening, making it difficult for stomach contents to empty into the small intestine. This can lead to symptoms such as vomiting (often projectile), dehydration, and poor weight gain.

The diagnosis of pyloric stenosis is often made through physical examination, ultrasound, or other imaging studies. Treatment typically involves surgery to correct the narrowed opening, known as a pyloromyotomy. This procedure involves making an incision in the pylorus to relieve the obstruction and allow normal stomach emptying.

In some cases, pyloric stenosis can also occur in adults, although this is much less common than in infants. Adult pyloric stenosis can be caused by various factors, including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, or previous surgeries. The symptoms and treatment approach for adult pyloric stenosis may differ from those seen in infants.

Community-acquired infections are those that are acquired outside of a healthcare setting, such as in one's own home or community. These infections are typically contracted through close contact with an infected person, contaminated food or water, or animals. Examples of community-acquired infections include the common cold, flu, strep throat, and many types of viral and bacterial gastrointestinal infections.

These infections are different from healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), which are infections that patients acquire while they are receiving treatment for another condition in a healthcare setting, such as a hospital or long-term care facility. HAIs can be caused by a variety of factors, including contact with contaminated surfaces or equipment, invasive medical procedures, and the use of certain medications.

It is important to note that community-acquired infections can also occur in healthcare settings if proper infection control measures are not in place. Healthcare providers must take steps to prevent the spread of these infections, such as washing their hands regularly, using personal protective equipment (PPE), and implementing isolation precautions for patients with known or suspected infectious diseases.

Haemophilus influenzae is a gram-negative, coccobacillary bacterium that can cause a variety of infectious diseases in humans. It is part of the normal respiratory flora but can become pathogenic under certain circumstances. The bacteria are named after their initial discovery in 1892 by Richard Pfeiffer during an influenza pandemic, although they are not the causative agent of influenza.

There are six main serotypes (a-f) based on the polysaccharide capsule surrounding the bacterium, with type b (Hib) being the most virulent and invasive. Hib can cause severe invasive diseases such as meningitis, pneumonia, epiglottitis, and sepsis, particularly in children under 5 years of age. The introduction of the Hib conjugate vaccine has significantly reduced the incidence of these invasive diseases.

Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) strains lack a capsule and are responsible for non-invasive respiratory tract infections, such as otitis media, sinusitis, and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). NTHi can also cause invasive diseases but at lower frequency compared to Hib.

Proper diagnosis and antibiotic susceptibility testing are crucial for effective treatment, as Haemophilus influenzae strains may display resistance to certain antibiotics.

Streptococcal infections are a type of infection caused by group A Streptococcus bacteria (Streptococcus pyogenes). These bacteria can cause a variety of illnesses, ranging from mild skin infections to serious and potentially life-threatening conditions such as sepsis, pneumonia, and necrotizing fasciitis (flesh-eating disease).

Some common types of streptococcal infections include:

* Streptococcal pharyngitis (strep throat) - an infection of the throat and tonsils that can cause sore throat, fever, and swollen lymph nodes.
* Impetigo - a highly contagious skin infection that causes sores or blisters on the skin.
* Cellulitis - a bacterial infection of the deeper layers of the skin and underlying tissue that can cause redness, swelling, pain, and warmth in the affected area.
* Scarlet fever - a streptococcal infection that causes a bright red rash on the body, high fever, and sore throat.
* Necrotizing fasciitis - a rare but serious bacterial infection that can cause tissue death and destruction of the muscles and fascia (the tissue that covers the muscles).

Treatment for streptococcal infections typically involves antibiotics to kill the bacteria causing the infection. It is important to seek medical attention if you suspect a streptococcal infection, as prompt treatment can help prevent serious complications.

Nystatin is an antifungal medication used to treat various fungal infections such as candidiasis, which can affect the skin, mouth, throat, and vagina. It works by binding to ergosterol, a component of fungal cell membranes, creating pores that increase permeability and ultimately lead to fungal cell death.

The medical definition of Nystatin is:

A polyene antifungal agent derived from Streptomyces noursei, used primarily for topical treatment of mucocutaneous candidiasis. It has little systemic absorption and is therefore not useful for treating systemic fungal infections. Common side effects include local irritation and burning sensations at the application site.

Penicillins are a group of antibiotics derived from the Penicillium fungus. They are widely used to treat various bacterial infections due to their bactericidal activity, which means they kill bacteria by interfering with the synthesis of their cell walls. The first penicillin, benzylpenicillin (also known as penicillin G), was discovered in 1928 by Sir Alexander Fleming. Since then, numerous semi-synthetic penicillins have been developed to expand the spectrum of activity and stability against bacterial enzymes that can inactivate these drugs.

Penicillins are classified into several groups based on their chemical structure and spectrum of activity:

1. Natural Penicillins (e.g., benzylpenicillin, phenoxymethylpenicillin): These have a narrow spectrum of activity, mainly targeting Gram-positive bacteria such as streptococci and staphylococci. However, they are susceptible to degradation by beta-lactamase enzymes produced by some bacteria.
2. Penicillinase-resistant Penicillins (e.g., methicillin, oxacillin, nafcillin): These penicillins resist degradation by certain bacterial beta-lactamases and are primarily used to treat infections caused by staphylococci, including methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA).
3. Aminopenicillins (e.g., ampicillin, amoxicillin): These penicillins have an extended spectrum of activity compared to natural penicillins, including some Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae. However, they are still susceptible to degradation by many beta-lactamases.
4. Antipseudomonal Penicillins (e.g., carbenicillin, ticarcillin): These penicillins have activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other Gram-negative bacteria with increased resistance to other antibiotics. They are often combined with beta-lactamase inhibitors such as clavulanate or tazobactam to protect them from degradation.
5. Extended-spectrum Penicillins (e.g., piperacillin): These penicillins have a broad spectrum of activity, including many Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. They are often combined with beta-lactamase inhibitors to protect them from degradation.

Penicillins are generally well-tolerated antibiotics; however, they can cause allergic reactions in some individuals, ranging from mild skin rashes to life-threatening anaphylaxis. Cross-reactivity between different penicillin classes and other beta-lactam antibiotics (e.g., cephalosporins) is possible but varies depending on the specific drugs involved.

"Saccharopolyspora" is a genus of Gram-positive, aerobic bacteria that forms branched hyphae and spores. These bacteria are known for their ability to produce various bioactive compounds, including antibiotics and enzymes. They are commonly found in soil, water, and decaying vegetation. One species of this genus, Saccharopolyspora erythraea (formerly known as Actinomyces erythreus), is the source of the antibiotic erythromycin.

It's important to note that "Saccharopolyspora" is a taxonomic category used in bacterial classification, and individual species within this genus may have different characteristics and medical relevance. Some species of Saccharopolyspora can cause infections in humans, particularly in immunocompromised individuals, but these are relatively rare.

If you're looking for information on a specific species of Saccharopolyspora or its medical relevance, I would need more context to provide a more detailed answer.

Naphthyridines are a class of heterocyclic organic compounds that contain a naphthyridine core structure, which is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon made up of two benzene rings fused to a tetrahydropyridine ring. They have a variety of pharmacological activities and are used in the development of various therapeutic agents, including antibiotics, antivirals, and anticancer drugs.

In medical terms, naphthyridines do not have a specific clinical definition or application, but they are rather a chemical class that is utilized in the design and synthesis of drugs with potential therapeutic benefits. The unique structure and properties of naphthyridines make them attractive candidates for drug development, particularly in areas where new treatments are needed to overcome drug resistance or improve efficacy.

It's worth noting that while naphthyridines have shown promise in preclinical studies, further research is needed to fully understand their safety and effectiveness in humans before they can be approved as therapeutic agents.

Ofloxacin is an antibacterial drug, specifically a fluoroquinolone. It works by inhibiting the bacterial DNA gyrase, which is essential for the bacteria to replicate. This results in the death of the bacteria and helps to stop the infection. Ofloxacin is used to treat a variety of bacterial infections, including respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, skin infections, and sexually transmitted diseases. It is available in various forms, such as tablets, capsules, and eye drops. As with any medication, it should be used only under the direction of a healthcare professional, and its use may be associated with certain risks and side effects.

Methyltransferases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group (-CH3) from a donor molecule to an acceptor molecule, which is often a protein, DNA, or RNA. This transfer of a methyl group can modify the chemical and physical properties of the acceptor molecule, playing a crucial role in various cellular processes such as gene expression, signal transduction, and DNA repair.

In biochemistry, methyltransferases are classified based on the type of donor molecule they use for the transfer of the methyl group. The most common methyl donor is S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a universal methyl group donor found in many organisms. Methyltransferases that utilize SAM as a cofactor are called SAM-dependent methyltransferases.

Abnormal regulation or function of methyltransferases has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the structure, function, and regulation of these enzymes is essential for developing targeted therapies to treat these conditions.

Molecular structure, in the context of biochemistry and molecular biology, refers to the arrangement and organization of atoms and chemical bonds within a molecule. It describes the three-dimensional layout of the constituent elements, including their spatial relationships, bond lengths, and angles. Understanding molecular structure is crucial for elucidating the functions and reactivities of biological macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Various experimental techniques, like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), are employed to determine molecular structures at atomic resolution, providing valuable insights into their biological roles and potential therapeutic targets.

Drug utilization refers to the use of medications by patients or healthcare professionals in a real-world setting. It involves analyzing and evaluating patterns of medication use, including prescribing practices, adherence to treatment guidelines, potential duplications or interactions, and outcomes associated with drug therapy. The goal of drug utilization is to optimize medication use, improve patient safety, and minimize costs while achieving the best possible health outcomes. It can be studied through various methods such as prescription claims data analysis, surveys, and clinical audits.

Bacterial pneumonia is a type of lung infection that's caused by bacteria. It can affect people of any age, but it's more common in older adults, young children, and people with certain health conditions or weakened immune systems. The symptoms of bacterial pneumonia can vary, but they often include cough, chest pain, fever, chills, and difficulty breathing.

The most common type of bacteria that causes pneumonia is Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus). Other types of bacteria that can cause pneumonia include Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

Bacterial pneumonia is usually treated with antibiotics, which are medications that kill bacteria. The specific type of antibiotic used will depend on the type of bacteria causing the infection. It's important to take all of the prescribed medication as directed, even if you start feeling better, to ensure that the infection is completely cleared and to prevent the development of antibiotic resistance.

In severe cases of bacterial pneumonia, hospitalization may be necessary for close monitoring and treatment with intravenous antibiotics and other supportive care.

Levofloxacin is an antibiotic medication that belongs to the fluoroquinolone class. It works by interfering with the bacterial DNA replication, transcription, and repair processes, leading to bacterial cell death. Levofloxacin is used to treat a variety of infections caused by susceptible bacteria, including respiratory, skin, urinary tract, and gastrointestinal infections. It is available in various forms, such as tablets, oral solution, and injection, for different routes of administration.

The medical definition of Levofloxacin can be stated as:

Levofloxacin is a synthetic antibacterial drug with the chemical name (-)-(S)-9-fluoro-2,3-dihydro-3-methoxy-10-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)-9-oxoanthracene-1-carboxylic acid l-alanyl-l-proline methylester monohydrate. It is the levo isomer of ofloxacin and is used to treat a wide range of bacterial infections by inhibiting bacterial DNA gyrase, thereby preventing DNA replication and transcription. Levofloxacin is available as tablets, oral solution, and injection for oral and parenteral administration.

Penicillin resistance is the ability of certain bacteria to withstand the antibacterial effects of penicillin, a type of antibiotic. This occurs when these bacteria have developed mechanisms that prevent penicillin from binding to and inhibiting the function of their cell wall biosynthesis proteins, particularly the enzyme transpeptidase.

One common mechanism of penicillin resistance is the production of beta-lactamases, enzymes that can hydrolyze and inactivate the beta-lactam ring structure present in penicillin and other related antibiotics. Another mechanism involves alterations in the bacterial cell wall that prevent penicillin from binding to its target proteins.

Penicillin resistance is a significant concern in clinical settings, as it can limit treatment options for bacterial infections and may necessitate the use of more potent or toxic antibiotics. It is important to note that misuse or overuse of antibiotics can contribute to the development and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, including those resistant to penicillin.

'Aza compounds' is a general term used in chemistry to describe organic compounds containing a nitrogen atom (denoted by the symbol 'N' or 'aza') that has replaced a carbon atom in a hydrocarbon structure. The term 'aza' comes from the Greek word for nitrogen, 'azote.'

In medicinal chemistry and pharmacology, aza compounds are of particular interest because the presence of the nitrogen atom can significantly affect the chemical and biological properties of the compound. For example, aza compounds may exhibit enhanced bioavailability, metabolic stability, or receptor binding affinity compared to their non-aza counterparts.

Some common examples of aza compounds in medicine include:

1. Aza-aromatic compounds: These are aromatic compounds that contain one or more nitrogen atoms in the ring structure. Examples include pyridine, quinoline, and isoquinoline derivatives, which have been used as anti-malarial, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer agents.
2. Aza-heterocyclic compounds: These are non-aromatic compounds that contain one or more nitrogen atoms in a cyclic structure. Examples include azepine, diazepine, and triazole derivatives, which have been used as anxiolytic, anti-viral, and anti-fungal agents.
3. Aza-peptides: These are peptide compounds that contain one or more nitrogen atoms in the backbone structure. Examples include azapeptides and azabicyclopeptides, which have been used as enzyme inhibitors and neuroprotective agents.
4. Aza-sugars: These are sugar derivatives that contain one or more nitrogen atoms in the ring structure. Examples include azasugars and iminosugars, which have been used as glycosidase inhibitors and anti-viral agents.

Overall, aza compounds represent an important class of medicinal agents with diverse chemical structures and biological activities.

Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is a condition that affects the muscular valve between the stomach and the small intestine (pylorus). It is characterized by an abnormal thickening (hypertrophy) of the pylorus muscle, which can cause narrowing (stenosis) of the pyloric canal. This makes it difficult for food to pass from the stomach into the small intestine, leading to symptoms such as vomiting, dehydration, and poor weight gain in infants. The condition is typically diagnosed through physical examination, medical history, and imaging tests like ultrasound or X-rays. Treatment usually involves surgery to correct the narrowed pylorus and alleviate symptoms.

Quinolones are a class of antibacterial agents that are widely used in medicine to treat various types of infections caused by susceptible bacteria. These synthetic drugs contain a chemical structure related to quinoline and have broad-spectrum activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Quinolones work by inhibiting the bacterial DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV enzymes, which are essential for bacterial DNA replication, transcription, and repair.

The first quinolone antibiotic was nalidixic acid, discovered in 1962. Since then, several generations of quinolones have been developed, with each generation having improved antibacterial activity and a broader spectrum of action compared to the previous one. The various generations of quinolones include:

1. First-generation quinolones (e.g., nalidixic acid): Primarily used for treating urinary tract infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria.
2. Second-generation quinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, norfloxacin): These drugs have improved activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and are used to treat a wider range of infections, including respiratory, gastrointestinal, and skin infections.
3. Third-generation quinolones (e.g., levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, grepafloxacin): These drugs have enhanced activity against Gram-positive bacteria, including some anaerobes and atypical organisms like Legionella and Mycoplasma species.
4. Fourth-generation quinolones (e.g., moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin): These drugs have the broadest spectrum of activity, including enhanced activity against Gram-positive bacteria, anaerobes, and some methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains.

Quinolones are generally well-tolerated, but like all medications, they can have side effects. Common adverse reactions include gastrointestinal symptoms (nausea, vomiting, diarrhea), headache, and dizziness. Serious side effects, such as tendinitis, tendon rupture, peripheral neuropathy, and QT interval prolongation, are less common but can occur, particularly in older patients or those with underlying medical conditions. The use of quinolones should be avoided or used cautiously in these populations.

Quinolone resistance has become an increasing concern due to the widespread use of these antibiotics. Bacteria can develop resistance through various mechanisms, including chromosomal mutations and the acquisition of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes. The overuse and misuse of quinolones contribute to the emergence and spread of resistant strains, which can limit treatment options for severe infections caused by these bacteria. Therefore, it is essential to use quinolones judiciously and only when clinically indicated, to help preserve their effectiveness and prevent further resistance development.

Natamycin is an antifungal medication used to treat and prevent fungal infections. It is a polyene macrolide antibiotic produced by the bacterium Streptomyces natalensis. In medical contexts, it is often used as a topical treatment for eye, skin, and mucous membrane infections caused by susceptible fungi. Natamycin works by binding to ergosterol, a component of fungal cell membranes, which disrupts the membrane's structure and function, ultimately leading to fungal cell death.

In addition to its medical uses, natamycin is also used as a food preservative to prevent mold growth in certain dairy products, such as cheese, and in some countries, it is approved for use in the production of certain types of sausages and fermented meat products.

Streptococcus oralis is a type of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic coccus (round-shaped bacterium) that belongs to the viridans group of streptococci. It is commonly found in the human oral cavity, particularly on the surface of the teeth and gums.

S. oralis is generally considered to be a commensal organism, meaning that it can exist harmlessly in the mouth without causing any negative effects. However, under certain circumstances, such as when the immune system is weakened or when there is damage to the oral tissues, S. oralis can cause infections. These infections may include dental caries (cavities), periodontal disease, and endocarditis (inflammation of the inner lining of the heart).

Like other streptococci, S. oralis is able to form biofilms, which are complex communities of bacteria that adhere to surfaces and can be difficult to remove. This ability to form biofilms may contribute to its ability to cause infections.

It's important to note that while S. oralis is a normal part of the oral microbiome, good oral hygiene practices such as brushing and flossing regularly can help prevent an overgrowth of this bacterium and reduce the risk of infection.

Ribosomes are complex macromolecular structures composed of ribonucleic acid (RNA) and proteins that play a crucial role in protein synthesis within cells. They serve as the site for translation, where messenger RNA (mRNA) is translated into a specific sequence of amino acids to create a polypeptide chain, which eventually folds into a functional protein.

Ribosomes consist of two subunits: a smaller subunit and a larger subunit. These subunits are composed of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) molecules and proteins. In eukaryotic cells, the smaller subunit is denoted as the 40S subunit, while the larger subunit is referred to as the 60S subunit. In prokaryotic cells, these subunits are named the 30S and 50S subunits, respectively. The ribosome's overall structure resembles a "doughnut" or a "cotton reel," with grooves and binding sites for various factors involved in protein synthesis.

Ribosomes can be found floating freely within the cytoplasm of cells or attached to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, forming part of the rough ER. Membrane-bound ribosomes are responsible for synthesizing proteins that will be transported across the ER and ultimately secreted from the cell or inserted into the membrane. In contrast, cytoplasmic ribosomes synthesize proteins destined for use within the cytoplasm or organelles.

In summary, ribosomes are essential components of cells that facilitate protein synthesis by translating mRNA into functional polypeptide chains. They can be found in various cellular locations and exist as either free-floating entities or membrane-bound structures.

Lactones are not a medical term per se, but they are important in the field of pharmaceuticals and medicinal chemistry. Lactones are cyclic esters derived from hydroxy acids. They can be found naturally in various plants, fruits, and some insects. In medicine, lactones have been used in the synthesis of drugs, including certain antibiotics and antifungal agents. For instance, the penicillin family of antibiotics contains a beta-lactone ring in their structure, which is essential for their antibacterial activity.

'Campylobacter' is a genus of gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in the intestinal tracts of animals, including birds and mammals. These bacteria are a leading cause of bacterial foodborne illness worldwide, with Campylobacter jejuni being the most frequently identified species associated with human infection.

Campylobacter infection, also known as campylobacteriosis, typically causes symptoms such as diarrhea (often bloody), abdominal cramps, fever, and vomiting. The infection is usually acquired through the consumption of contaminated food or water, particularly undercooked poultry, raw milk, and contaminated produce. It can also be transmitted through contact with infected animals or their feces.

While most cases of campylobacteriosis are self-limiting and resolve within a week without specific treatment, severe or prolonged infections may require antibiotic therapy. In rare cases, Campylobacter infection can lead to serious complications such as bacteremia (bacterial bloodstream infection), meningitis, or Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurological disorder that can cause muscle weakness and paralysis.

Preventive measures include proper food handling and cooking techniques, thorough handwashing, and avoiding cross-contamination between raw and cooked foods.

Chronic bronchitis is a long-term inflammation of the airways (bronchi) in the lungs. It is characterized by a persistent cough that produces excessive mucus or sputum. The cough and mucus production must be present for at least three months in two consecutive years to meet the diagnostic criteria for chronic bronchitis.

The inflammation of the airways can lead to narrowing, obstructing the flow of air into and out of the lungs, resulting in shortness of breath and wheezing. Chronic bronchitis is often associated with exposure to irritants such as tobacco smoke, dust, or chemical fumes over an extended period.

It is a significant component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which also includes emphysema. While there is no cure for chronic bronchitis, treatments can help alleviate symptoms and slow the progression of the disease. These may include bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and pulmonary rehabilitation. Quitting smoking is crucial in managing this condition.

Veterinary legislation refers to the laws, regulations, and policies that govern the practice of veterinary medicine, animal health and welfare, and related activities. These rules are designed to protect animals, humans, and the environment from harm, ensure the humane treatment of animals, and maintain a high standard of veterinary care.

Veterinary legislation covers various aspects, including:

1. Licensing and registration of veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and other animal health professionals.
2. Standards for veterinary education, training, and continuing education.
3. Regulation of veterinary drugs, devices, and biologicals, including their manufacture, distribution, and use.
4. Control and prevention of zoonotic diseases (diseases transmissible between animals and humans).
5. Animal welfare standards for housing, transportation, breeding, and slaughter.
6. Reporting and management of animal disease outbreaks and public health emergencies.
7. Importation and exportation of live animals and animal products.
8. Research involving animals.
9. Establishment of penalties for violations of veterinary legislation.

These laws and regulations are typically enacted and enforced by governmental bodies at the national, regional, or local level. Compliance with veterinary legislation is essential to maintain public trust in the veterinary profession, ensure animal health and welfare, and protect human health.

Aminoglycosides are a class of antibiotics that are derived from bacteria and are used to treat various types of infections caused by gram-negative and some gram-positive bacteria. These antibiotics work by binding to the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome, which inhibits protein synthesis and ultimately leads to bacterial cell death.

Some examples of aminoglycosides include gentamicin, tobramycin, neomycin, and streptomycin. These antibiotics are often used in combination with other antibiotics to treat severe infections, such as sepsis, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections.

Aminoglycosides can have serious side effects, including kidney damage and hearing loss, so they are typically reserved for use in serious infections that cannot be treated with other antibiotics. They are also used topically to treat skin infections and prevent wound infections after surgery.

It's important to note that aminoglycosides should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as improper use can lead to antibiotic resistance and further health complications.

Gram-positive bacteria are a type of bacteria that stain dark purple or blue when subjected to the Gram staining method, which is a common technique used in microbiology to classify and identify different types of bacteria based on their structural differences. This staining method was developed by Hans Christian Gram in 1884.

The key characteristic that distinguishes Gram-positive bacteria from other types, such as Gram-negative bacteria, is the presence of a thick layer of peptidoglycan in their cell walls, which retains the crystal violet stain used in the Gram staining process. Additionally, Gram-positive bacteria lack an outer membrane found in Gram-negative bacteria.

Examples of Gram-positive bacteria include Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Bacillus subtilis. Some Gram-positive bacteria can cause various human diseases, while others are beneficial or harmless.

A bacterial gene is a segment of DNA (or RNA in some viruses) that contains the genetic information necessary for the synthesis of a functional bacterial protein or RNA molecule. These genes are responsible for encoding various characteristics and functions of bacteria such as metabolism, reproduction, and resistance to antibiotics. They can be transmitted between bacteria through horizontal gene transfer mechanisms like conjugation, transformation, and transduction. Bacterial genes are often organized into operons, which are clusters of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule.

It's important to note that the term "bacterial gene" is used to describe genetic elements found in bacteria, but not all genetic elements in bacteria are considered genes. For example, some DNA sequences may not encode functional products and are therefore not considered genes. Additionally, some bacterial genes may be plasmid-borne or phage-borne, rather than being located on the bacterial chromosome.

Streptococcus is a genus of Gram-positive, spherical bacteria that typically form pairs or chains when clustered together. These bacteria are facultative anaerobes, meaning they can grow in the presence or absence of oxygen. They are non-motile and do not produce spores.

Streptococcus species are commonly found on the skin and mucous membranes of humans and animals. Some strains are part of the normal flora of the body, while others can cause a variety of infections, ranging from mild skin infections to severe and life-threatening diseases such as sepsis, meningitis, and toxic shock syndrome.

The pathogenicity of Streptococcus species depends on various virulence factors, including the production of enzymes and toxins that damage tissues and evade the host's immune response. One of the most well-known Streptococcus species is Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A streptococcus (GAS), which is responsible for a wide range of clinical manifestations, including pharyngitis (strep throat), impetigo, cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis, and rheumatic fever.

It's important to note that the classification of Streptococcus species has evolved over time, with many former members now classified as different genera within the family Streptococcaceae. The current classification system is based on a combination of phenotypic characteristics (such as hemolysis patterns and sugar fermentation) and genotypic methods (such as 16S rRNA sequencing and multilocus sequence typing).

Tetracycline is a broad-spectrum antibiotic, which is used to treat various bacterial infections. It works by preventing the growth and multiplication of bacteria. It is a part of the tetracycline class of antibiotics, which also includes doxycycline, minocycline, and others.

Tetracycline is effective against a wide range of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, as well as some atypical organisms such as rickettsia, chlamydia, mycoplasma, and spirochetes. It is commonly used to treat respiratory infections, skin infections, urinary tract infections, sexually transmitted diseases, and other bacterial infections.

Tetracycline is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquid solutions. It should be taken orally with a full glass of water, and it is recommended to take it on an empty stomach, at least one hour before or two hours after meals. The drug can cause tooth discoloration in children under the age of 8, so it is generally not recommended for use in this population.

Like all antibiotics, tetracycline should be used only to treat bacterial infections and not viral infections, such as the common cold or flu. Overuse or misuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which makes it harder to treat infections in the future.

Monobactams are a type of antibiotics that contain a single bacterial cell wall-binding component, known as a monocyclic beta-lactam. Aztreonam is an example of a monobactam that is used clinically to treat various infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, including some strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Monobactams work by inhibiting the enzyme responsible for building the bacterial cell wall, leading to bacterial death. They are not affected by beta-lactamases, which are enzymes produced by some bacteria that can inactivate other types of beta-lactam antibiotics, such as penicillins and cephalosporins.

Oxazolidinones are a class of synthetic antibiotics that work by inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis. They bind to the 23S ribosomal RNA of the 50S subunit, preventing the formation of the initiation complex and thus inhibiting the start of protein synthesis.

The most well-known drug in this class is linezolid (Zyvox), which is used to treat serious infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE).

Oxazolidinones are typically reserved for use in patients with serious infections who have failed other antibiotic treatments, due to concerns about the development of resistance and potential side effects such as myelosuppression and peripheral neuropathy.

Minocycline is an antibiotic medication that belongs to the tetracycline class. Medically, it is defined as a semisynthetic derivative of tetracycline and has a broader spectrum of activity compared to other tetracyclines. It is bacteriostatic, meaning it inhibits bacterial growth rather than killing them outright.

Minocycline is commonly used to treat various infections caused by susceptible bacteria, including acne, respiratory infections, urinary tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, and sexually transmitted diseases. Additionally, it has been found to have anti-inflammatory properties and is being investigated for its potential use in treating neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

As with all antibiotics, minocycline should be taken under the guidance of a healthcare professional, and its usage should be based on the results of bacterial culture and sensitivity testing to ensure its effectiveness against the specific bacteria causing the infection.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

Pharyngitis is the medical term for inflammation of the pharynx, which is the back portion of the throat. This condition is often characterized by symptoms such as sore throat, difficulty swallowing, and scratchiness in the throat. Pharyngitis can be caused by a variety of factors, including viral infections (such as the common cold), bacterial infections (such as strep throat), and irritants (such as smoke or chemical fumes). Treatment for pharyngitis depends on the underlying cause of the condition, but may include medications to relieve symptoms or antibiotics to treat a bacterial infection.

Staphylococcus aureus is a type of gram-positive, round (coccal) bacterium that is commonly found on the skin and mucous membranes of warm-blooded animals and humans. It is a facultative anaerobe, which means it can grow in the presence or absence of oxygen.

Staphylococcus aureus is known to cause a wide range of infections, from mild skin infections such as pimples, impetigo, and furuncles (boils) to more severe and potentially life-threatening infections such as pneumonia, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and sepsis. It can also cause food poisoning and toxic shock syndrome.

The bacterium is often resistant to multiple antibiotics, including methicillin, which has led to the emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains that are difficult to treat. Proper hand hygiene and infection control practices are critical in preventing the spread of Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA.

Porifera, also known as sponges, is a phylum of multicellular aquatic organisms characterized by having pores in their bodies. These pores allow water to circulate through the body, bringing in food and oxygen while expelling waste products. Sponges do not have true tissues or organs; instead, they are composed of specialized cells that perform specific functions. They are generally sessile (non-mobile) and live attached to rocks, coral reefs, or other underwater structures. Some species can be quite large, while others are microscopic in size. Sponges have a long fossil record dating back over 500 million years and play important roles in marine ecosystems as filter feeders and habitat providers for many other marine organisms.

Candicidin is an antifungal medication used to treat various fungal infections. It is a mixture of several related compounds called polypeptides, which are produced by the bacterium Streptomyces griseus. Candicidin works by disrupting the cell membrane of fungi, leading to their death.

Candicidin is not commonly used in human medicine due to its potential toxicity and narrow spectrum of activity. It is primarily used in veterinary medicine to treat conditions such as mastitis (inflammation of the mammary gland) in cows caused by fungal infections.

It's important to note that the use of candicidin should be under the guidance and supervision of a healthcare professional, and it should only be used when other antifungal medications are not effective or are contraindicated.

"Gram-Positive Cocci" is a term used in microbiology, which refers to a specific type of bacteria that appear round (cocci) in shape and stain purple when subjected to the Gram staining method. The Gram staining technique is a fundamental laboratory method used to differentiate bacterial species based on their cell wall composition.

Gram-positive bacteria have a thick peptidoglycan layer in their cell walls, which retains the crystal violet stain used in the Gram staining process, resulting in a purple color. Some common examples of Gram-Positive Cocci include Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. These bacteria can cause various infections, ranging from skin and soft tissue infections to severe systemic illnesses. It is essential to identify the type and nature of bacterial pathogens accurately for appropriate antimicrobial therapy and effective patient management.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Fiji" is not a medical term. It is a country in the South Pacific Ocean, officially known as the Republic of Fiji, consisting of more than 300 islands. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

  • Macrolide antibiotics bind reversibly to the P site on the 50S subunit of the bacterial ribosome. (wikipedia.org)
  • The macrolide antibiotics erythromycin, clarithromycin, and roxithromycin have proven to be an effective long-term treatment for the idiopathic, Asian-prevalent lung disease diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB). (wikipedia.org)
  • does not extensively inhibit CYP3A4 Clarithromycin Dirithromycin - discontinued but was US FDA approved Erythromycin Non-US FDA-approved: Carbomycin A Josamycin Kitasamycin Midecamycin/midecamycin acetate Oleandomycin Solithromycin Spiramycin - approved in the EU, and in other countries Troleandomycin - used in Italy and Turkey Tylosin/tylocine - used in animals Roxithromycin Ketolides are a class of antibiotics that are structurally related to the macrolides. (wikipedia.org)
  • Macrolides and ketolides are two families of antibiotics that share the same mechanism of action. (nih.gov)
  • Macrolide antibiotics have been reported to be effective in the treatment of the aforementioned diseases, for reasons unrelated to their antibacterial action. (nih.gov)
  • Introduction - Digoxin is commonly prescribed to elderly patients with heart failure and atrial fibrillation, and macrolide antibiotics markedly increase the risk of digoxin toxicity. (ices.on.ca)
  • Objective - The aim was to determine whether, in older patients receiving digoxin, macrolide antibiotics are associated with sudden death. (ices.on.ca)
  • Conclusion - This finding reinforces the cardiovascular safety of macrolide antibiotics in a high-risk population. (ices.on.ca)
  • Macrolide antibiotics are used as first-line agents in the treatment of acute bacterial infections, such as community-acquired pneumonia 1 . (ersjournals.com)
  • The effects of tylosin-related macrolide antibiotics were examined in cell-free protein synthesis (using a coupled transcription-translation system derived from Streptomyces lividans) and against whole cells of that organism. (lancs.ac.uk)
  • Macrolide antibiotics are effective drugs in chronic bronchiolitis and chronic rhinosinusitis with mucus hypersecretion. (karger.com)
  • Steel HC, Theron AJ, Cockeran R, Anderson R, Feldman C: Pathogen- and host-directed anti-inflammatory activities of macrolide antibiotics. (karger.com)
  • Morikawa K, Zhang J, Nonaka M, Morikawa S: Modulatory effect of macrolide antibiotics on the Th1- and Th2-type cytokine production. (karger.com)
  • Every year, many people get Campylobacter jejuni infections that are resistant to the macrolide class of antibiotics. (health.gov)
  • Careful use of macrolide antibiotics and strategies that reduce antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter in animals raised for food are critical for preventing macrolide antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter jejuni infections in humans. (health.gov)
  • Many respiratory tract infections are treated with macrolide antibiotics. (uwo.ca)
  • This population-based retrospective cohort study examined the 30-day risk of a hospital encounter with ventricular arrhythmia and all-cause mortality in 503,612 matched pairs of older adults who received a new outpatient prescription for an oral macrolide antibiotic and those prescribed referent antibiotics from 2002 to 2013 in Ontario. (uwo.ca)
  • Macrolide antibiotics compared with referent antibiotics were not associated with a higher 30-day risk of ventricular arrhythmia (0.03% vs. 0.03%, relative risk [RR] 1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.83- 1.36), and were associated with a lower risk of 30-day all-cause mortality (0.62% vs. 0.76%, RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.78-0.86). (uwo.ca)
  • The effects of various macrolide antibiotics [triacetyloleandomycin (TAO), clarithromycin, azithromycin, roxithromycin, erythromycin base] and the new ketolide HMR3004 on CYP3A expression were evaluated in human and rat hepatocytes. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Macrolide antibiotics are a relatively new class of antibiotics from the macrolide class. (zxc.wiki)
  • The oldest representative of the macrolide antibiotics is erythromycin , in 1954 oleandomycin was isolated from culture filtrates of Streptomyces antibioticus. (zxc.wiki)
  • Macrolide antibiotics include not only β-lactam antibiotics to well-tolerated antibiotics. (zxc.wiki)
  • However, macrolide antibiotics are not suitable for the treatment of urinary tract infections because they have a deficit in their effectiveness against Enterobacteriaceae such as E. coli, which are the most common pathogens causing urinary tract infections. (zxc.wiki)
  • The target of the macrolide antibiotics is the 50-S subunit of the bacterial 70-S ribosomes. (zxc.wiki)
  • In addition, macrolide antibiotics have anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating effects. (zxc.wiki)
  • Resistance to the macrolide antibiotics in Mycoplasma pneumoniae becomes non-negligible in terms of both the right therapy and diagnostic services. (lynxgen.com)
  • Macrolides are a group of antibiotics whose activity stems from the presence of a macrolide lactone ring. (picmonic.com)
  • Global Macrolide Antibiotics Market Size, Overview. (vevioz.com)
  • Global Macrolide Antibiotics Market is anticipated to reach a value of over USD xx billion by 2028 and register a CAGR of xx% for the forecast period 2022-2028. (vevioz.com)
  • Its biological activity is due to interference with peptidyltransferase activity at the 50S ribosomal subunit, which is near the site of action of macrolide antibiotics and for which there can be competition (Yunis, 1988). (veteriankey.com)
  • Some practitioners add macrolide antibiotics to cover organisms, such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae, against which beta-lactams are ineffective. (medscape.com)
  • The prevailing "plug-in-the-bottle" model suggests that macrolide antibiotics inhibit translation by binding inside the ribosome tunnel and indiscriminately arresting the elongation of every nascent polypeptide after the synthesis of six to eight amino acids. (dgohara.me)
  • Unconfirmed epidemiologic evidence indicates that the risk of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis might be increased by maternal use of macrolide antibiotics during the first two weeks of breastfeeding, but others have questioned this relationship. (drugs.com)
  • This also takes into account the risk of antibiotic resistance selection and environmental interaction between other macrolide antibiotics. (janusinfo.se)
  • The anti-inflammatory properties of macrolides are related to structure, with immunomodulatory effects seen with 14- (erythromycin, clarithromycin and roxithromycin) and 15- (azithromycin) but not 16-member (josamycin) macrolides 16 . (ersjournals.com)
  • With the macrolide clarithromycin , harmful effects on the fetus have been observed in animal studies. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Commonly used macrolides include erythromycin, azithromycin and clarithromycin. (picmonic.com)
  • Macrolides, especially erythromycin and clarithromycin, also have an effect on QT prolongation, which can lead to torsade de pointes if untreated. (picmonic.com)
  • Macrolides, especially erythromycin and clarithromycin, adversely perpetuate the QT interval and can progress to a potentially fatal torsade de pointes if untreated. (picmonic.com)
  • Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate macrolide prescriptions with respect to the interaction potential of either clarithromycin or azithromycin, as well as the indication and duration of therapy by clinical pharmacists. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusion Involvement of clinical pharmacists helps to optimize macrolide prescription with respect to the interaction potential of either clarithromycin or azithromycin as well as the indication and duration of therapy. (bmj.com)
  • Most of the macrolide prescriptions were for erythromycin, but only 1.7% were for clarithromycin. (drugs.com)
  • Only 6 of the 55 infants exposed to a macrolide were exposed to clarithromycin. (drugs.com)
  • Clarithromycin, a new macrolide antibiotic. (drugs.com)
  • The first macrolide discovered was erythromycin, which was first used in 1952. (wikipedia.org)
  • The chance finding that erythromycin treatment radically improved the clinical outcome of a patient with diffuse panbronchiolitis rekindled interest in the use of macrolides as a potential treatment in other inflammatory airway disorders, e.g. cystic fibrosis 8 . (ersjournals.com)
  • In rat hepatocytes, no induction of CYP3A1 expression was observed following exposure to macrolides, even to erythromycin base and TAO (well known in vivo CYP3A1 inducers), whereas dexamethasone and phenobarbital were confirmed to induce this enzyme. (aspetjournals.org)
  • The first widely used macrolide, erythromycin, has a relatively broad spectrum of activity. (naplexstudyguide.com)
  • Side effects are more pronounced with earlier macrolides, like erythromycin. (naplexstudyguide.com)
  • GI disturbances like diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain are common with macrolide use like erythromycin because it is a motilin agonist, encouraging hypermotility and the unpleasant collateral damage. (picmonic.com)
  • Patients with known hypersensitivity to azithromycin, erythromycin, any macrolide or ketolide drug. (nih.gov)
  • May interact in the environment with other macrolide antiobiotics, such as azithromycin, erythromycin and roxithromycin. (janusinfo.se)
  • Some macrolides have antibiotic or antifungal activity and are used as pharmaceutical drugs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antibiotic macrolides are used to treat infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • The antimicrobial and antibiotic effects of macrolides, however, are not believed to be involved in their beneficial effects toward treating DPB. (wikipedia.org)
  • Trac, Mai H., "Risk of Arrhythmia and Mortality from Macrolide Antibiotic Prescription: A Population-Based Cohort Study" (2015). (uwo.ca)
  • Macrolides belong to the POLYKETIDES class of natural products, and many members exhibit ANTIBIOTIC properties. (childrensmercy.org)
  • Macrolides are an antibiotic group with anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. (healthline.com)
  • Azithromycin, a semisynthetic antibiotic belonging to the macrolide subgroup of azalides, is used to treat STDs due to chlamydia and gonorrhea, community-acquired pneumonia, pelvic inflammatory disease, pediatric otitis media and pharyngitis, and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in patients with advanced HIV disease. (pharmacycode.com)
  • Our study questions routine use of empirical macrolide combination therapy in children hospitalized with pneumonia and represents an important potential target for antibiotic stewardship," the researchers conclude. (medscape.com)
  • A cohort study of infants diagnosed with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis found that affected infants were 2.3 to 3 times more likely to have a mother taking a macrolide antibiotic during the 90 days after delivery. (drugs.com)
  • A study comparing the breastfed infants of mothers taking amoxicillin to those taking a macrolide antibiotic found no instances of pyloric stenosis. (drugs.com)
  • Failure of moxifloxacin treatment in Mycoplasma genitalium infections due to macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance. (cdc.gov)
  • 7. Dumke R, Thurmer A, Jacobs E. Emergence of Mycoplasma genitalium strains showing mutations associated with macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance in the region Dresden, Germany. (cdc.gov)
  • To assess the performance of automated molecular diagnostics system, GENECUBE Mycoplasma, in the detection of macrolide resistance mutations.Methodology related. (lynxgen.com)
  • GENECUBE Mycoplasma is a reliable test for the identification of significant clinical macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. (lynxgen.com)
  • Macrolide-Resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae in the United States as Determined from a National Surveillance Program. (childrensmercy.org)
  • Macrolide-Resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae, United States. (childrensmercy.org)
  • VIASURE Macrolide resistance-associated mutations (23S rRNA) Real Time PCR Detection Kit is a real time PCR assay designed for the qualitative detection and differentiation of specific point mutations (conferred by base substitutions in 23S rRNA) implicated in macrolide resistance of Mycoplasma genitalium, from genital swab samples of individuals with confirmed Mycoplasma genitalium infection with molecular assays. (certest.es)
  • This is evident, as the treatment dosage is much too low to fight infection, and in DPB cases with the occurrence of the macrolide-resistant bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, macrolide therapy still produces substantial anti-inflammatory results. (wikipedia.org)
  • This has resulted in research activities aimed at gaining a better understanding of the immunomodulatory actions of macrolides and the synthesis of various novel anti-inflammatory macrolides without antimicrobial activity. (nih.gov)
  • In my opinion, there is no reason to use macrolides in the empirical treatment of pneumonia in children - except for when it is used because of its probable anti-inflammatory aspects, e.g., in asthma, and even this is not clearly evidence-based," she said. (medscape.com)
  • Macrolides, tetracyclines, and fluoroquinolones are used to treat M. pneumoniae infections, and macrolides are recommended in children, due to the potential adverse effects of tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. (annals.edu.sg)
  • QT prolongation is more likely if macrolides are administered alongside other drugs that also prolong the QT interval - such as SSRIs, antipsychotics, quinine, and fluoroquinolones. (naplexstudyguide.com)
  • Over the last ten years in Spain, the percentage of macrolide-resistant pneumococci and Streptococcus pyogenes strains has increased substantially. (nih.gov)
  • The presence of erm type I or erm type II resistance genes in S. lividans markedly affected the resistance phenotype and studies involving ribosomes from such strains revealed differences in macrolide activity that were not otherwise apparent. (lancs.ac.uk)
  • Of the remaining 139 patients, 125 (90%) had M. pneumoniae strains that had wild-type sequence and were presumed to be macrolide-susceptible, and 14 (10%) patients had strains with mutations conferring macrolide resistance. (annals.edu.sg)
  • The A2063G point mutation accounted for all 14 M. pneumoniae strains with macrolide resistance. (annals.edu.sg)
  • Azithromycin has been used to treat sore throats (caused by Streptococcus A infection with Streptococcus pyogenes ) in penicillin- sensitive patients, but macrolide-resistant strains of Streptococci A are not uncommon. (zxc.wiki)
  • Myers AL, Jackson MA, Selvarangan R, Goering RV, Harrison C. Genetic commonality of macrolide-resistant group A beta hemolytic streptococcus pharyngeal strains. (childrensmercy.org)
  • The majority of the strains from heterosexuals (97%, 76/78) were macrolide -resistant, considerably higher than those from MSM (59%, 20/34). (bvsalud.org)
  • Rates and types of minor adverse reactions in breastfed infants exposed to a macrolide or amoxicillin in breastmilk were comparable. (szoptatasportal.hu)
  • However, most of the infants exposed to a macrolide in breastmilk were exposed to roxithromycin. (drugs.com)
  • However, bacterial resistance to macrolides is relatively common, often caused by mutations within the ribosome that prevent the macrolide from binding. (naplexstudyguide.com)
  • Dificid (fidaxomicin) is a macrolide antibacterial drug used to reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and to treat Clostridium difficile -associated diarrhea (CDAD) in adults over the age of 18. (rxlist.com)
  • DIFICID (fidaxomicin) is a macrolide antibacterial drug for oral administration. (rxlist.com)
  • Macrolides are bacteriostatic in that they suppress or inhibit bacterial growth rather than killing bacteria completely. (wikipedia.org)
  • They have some features in common - for example they inhibit protein synthesis in bacteria (with macrolides, lincosamides, and chloramphenicol acting at a similar site), and have some similar pharmacokinetic features. (veteriankey.com)
  • This paper suggests that the benefits of macrolides for CAP are not as extensive as previously thought, so for a fairly well-appearing child who may have a viral upper respiratory infection, I think it's okay to hold off. (medscape.com)
  • The increased risk of hearing loss in macrolide users compared to ICS users in older bronchiectasis patients should be balanced against known benefits of macrolides. (elsevierpure.com)
  • The antimicrobial spectrum of macrolides is slightly wider than that of penicillin, and, therefore, macrolides are a common substitute for patients with a penicillin allergy. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to direct antibacterial actions, 14- and 15-member-ring macrolides have immune modulating effects that appear to be the reason for clinical benefit in diffuse panbronchiolitis. (ersjournals.com)
  • Antibacterial macrolides are widely prescribed drugs for an even wider variety of infections. (naplexstudyguide.com)
  • As we have alluded to, antibacterial macrolides are protein synthesis inhibitors. (naplexstudyguide.com)
  • Return to our NAPLEX blog soon for more great content on macrolides and every other antibacterial drug class you are expected to know. (naplexstudyguide.com)
  • DIFICID is a macrolide antibacterial drug indicated in adults (≥18 years of age) for treatment of Clostridium difficile -associated diarrhea (CDAD). (rxlist.com)
  • Macrolides are a class of mostly natural products with a large macrocyclic lactone ring to which one or more deoxy sugars, usually cladinose and desosamine, may be attached. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conditional logistic regression was used to measure the association between macrolide exposure and outcomes. (uwo.ca)
  • The pathogenesis of hepatotoxicity with macrolide exposure involves both a direct cytotoxic effect as well an immunoallergic reaction. (picmonic.com)
  • The pathogenesis of hepatotoxicity with macrolide exposure involves both a direct cytotoxic effect as well an immuno-allergic reaction. (picmonic.com)
  • Infantile exposure to macrolides has been associated with hypertrophic pyloric stenosis causing projectile vomiting, dehydration, electrolyte abnormalities, and in rare cases death possibly via macrolide interaction with gastric motilin receptors. (szoptatasportal.hu)
  • Large population-based cohorts have suggested that exposure to macrolides via breastmilk may be associated with pyloric stenosis. (szoptatasportal.hu)
  • Macrolide exposure during breastfeeding was not associated with pyloric stenosis, although larger prospective studies are required to confirm our observation. (szoptatasportal.hu)
  • A retrospective database study in Denmark of 15 years of data found a 3.5-fold increased risk of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in the infants of mothers who took a macrolide during the first 13 days postpartum, but not with later exposure. (drugs.com)
  • B. by mutation , and results in a cross resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins (an MLS-resistant phenotype). (zxc.wiki)
  • Bacteria can become resistant to macrolides via alteration of the 23S rRNA binding site, usually by post-transcriptional methylation. (picmonic.com)
  • Macrolides work by preventing bacteria from producing proteins they need to grow and multiply. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Molecular typing was performed by analyzing Treponema pallidum arp, tpr, and tp0548 genes , with partial sequencing of the 23S rRNA genes for macrolide resistance. (bvsalud.org)
  • Over 2000 naturally occurring, structurally heterogeneous and complex macrolides with 8 to 62 ring members (as of 2002) are known. (zxc.wiki)
  • Interestingly, the addition of structurally related macrolides had dramatically different effects on stalling efficiency. (dgohara.me)
  • Rapamycin is also a macrolide and was originally developed as an antifungal, but is now used as an immunosuppressant drug and is being investigated as a potential longevity therapeutic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Macrolides are protein synthesis inhibitors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like aminoglycosides , macrolides work as protein synthesis inhibitors. (naplexstudyguide.com)
  • Macrolides are potent inhibitors of the cytochrome P450 system, especially CYP3A4. (picmonic.com)
  • Macrolides are potent inhibitors of the cytochrome P450 system, especially CYP3A4, potentially causing elevations of other drugs metabolized by the P450 system. (picmonic.com)
  • In addition to many of the usual risks from antimicrobial therapy, macrolides also have clinically significant effects on cardiac conduction 21 and may be important promoters of antimicrobial resistance 22 . (ersjournals.com)
  • A literature search was conducted for studies of the clinical effectiveness of macrolides in other chronic lung conditions. (ersjournals.com)
  • 7 , in a 2-yr double-blind placebo-controlled study, showed that the combination of macrolide and methylprednisolone produced no significant clinical benefit in steroid-dependent asthma but, instead, resulted in an increase in steroid-induced side-effects, e.g. accelerated loss of bone density and increased sugar levels. (ersjournals.com)
  • 4 Studies in Asia have reported increased disease severity in persons infected with MRMP, 5 while others have not detected differences in the clinical course in persons with MRMP versus those with macrolide-susceptible M. pneumoniae (MSMP) infections. (annals.edu.sg)
  • Demographic and clinical data were collected and matched to the results of genotypic macrolide-resistance testing. (annals.edu.sg)
  • We calculated a propensity score (PS) for ICS use using demographic, clinical and utilisation characteristics and compared risks of macrolides versus ICS for each outcome using PS decile-adjusted Cox regression models. (elsevierpure.com)
  • This test is intended for use as an aid in the diagnosis of potential resistance to macrolides, in combination with clinical and epidemiological risk factors. (certest.es)
  • The macrolides include musk lactones. (zxc.wiki)
  • Taking macrolides with statins can, for example, increase the risk of myopathies. (naplexstudyguide.com)
  • One particular combination that should be avoided due to this interaction is macrolides with statins, used for lowering cholesterol, which can lead to debilitating myopathy. (picmonic.com)
  • Macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae (MRMP) isolates were first observed in 2001. (annals.edu.sg)
  • Sytem molecular diagnostics can automatically identify the macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae.Aim. (lynxgen.com)
  • That said, there are certainly high-risk situations - impending respiratory failure in the ICU as the extreme example - in which it may be reasonable to include a macrolide in empiric therapy. (medscape.com)
  • Dr. Derek J. Williams from Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, and colleagues compared the effectiveness of beta-lactam monotherapy with beta-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy in a prospective study of 1,418 children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). (medscape.com)
  • We evaluated secondary safety outcomes in a comparative effectiveness study of chronic inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and macrolide monotherapy in bronchiectasis patients. (elsevierpure.com)
  • The role of macrolides in the treatment of diffuse panbronchiolitis is well established. (ersjournals.com)
  • In contrast to earlier predictions, we found that the macrolide does not preferentially induce ribosome stalling near the 5′ end of mRNAs, but rather acts at specific stalling sites that are scattered throughout the entire coding region. (dgohara.me)
  • Tolerance to macrolides is good and they have few associated adverse effects. (nih.gov)
  • Adverse reactions occurred in 12.7% of the infants exposed to macrolides which was similar to the rate in amoxicillin-exposed infants. (drugs.com)
  • Of the 873 children with available follow-up data, 88.1% had recovered from their initial illness, including 86.9% of those who received beta-lactam monotherapy and 91.1% of those who received macrolide combination therapy (a nonsignificant difference). (medscape.com)
  • Dr. Lilliam Ambroggio, from Cincinnati Children's Hospital in Ohio, had earlier found lower odds of treatment failure in children whose pneumonia was treated with macrolide combination therapy than for those treated with beta-lactam monotherapy. (medscape.com)
  • 28 days) ICS or macrolide monotherapy. (elsevierpure.com)
  • The mechanism of action of macrolides is inhibition of bacterial protein biosynthesis, and they are thought to do this by preventing peptidyltransferase from adding the growing peptide attached to tRNA to the next amino acid (similarly to chloramphenicol) as well as inhibiting bacterial ribosomal translation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Macrolides and ketolides are metabolized in the liver through CYP3A4 and they can partially block the activity of the enzyme, interfering with the metabolism of other drugs that use the same metabolic pathway. (nih.gov)
  • Therefore, macrolides can cause elevations of other drugs metabolized by the P450 system. (picmonic.com)
  • Macrolides belong to the polyketide class of natural products. (wikipedia.org)
  • In one study, patients concurrently treated with the macrolide troleandomycin were able to significantly reduce their total steroid dose without a significant decrease in asthma control 5 . (ersjournals.com)
  • As macrolides are metabolized via hepatic routes, patients with liver disease may experience more pronounced side effects. (naplexstudyguide.com)
  • Results Of 285 043 Medicare patients with bronchiectasis, we identified 6500 (2%) macrolide and 83589 (29%) ICS new users. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Two meta-analyses failed to demonstrate a relationship between maternal macrolide use during breastfeeding and infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. (drugs.com)
  • Risk of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis after maternal postnatal use of macrolides. (drugs.com)
  • As part of the pathophysiology involving hepatotoxicity secondary to macrolide use: a direct cytotoxic effect and an immuno-allergic reaction occur producing a peripheral eosinophilia accompanied with a skin rash. (picmonic.com)
  • Macrolide-induced hepatotoxicity aroused by an immuno-allergic reaction is typically accompanied by the release of eosinophils from their mostly tissue-based habitat, resulting in peripheral eosinophilia. (picmonic.com)
  • We discuss the indications that macrolides are licensed to treat, how they work, what side effects they're linked to, and what drug interactions you need to bear in mind. (naplexstudyguide.com)
  • Given that macrolides interact with many CYP enzymes, there are important drug interactions to consider. (naplexstudyguide.com)
  • These results confirmed the interspecies variability of CYP3A regulation in hepatocytes and raised the question of its mechanism of induction by macrolides in human liver. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Cholestasis, the impairment of bile flow or production, is a well recognized presentation of macrolide-induced liver disease. (picmonic.com)
  • It can be used in horses less than one year old, but care must be taken that other horses (such as a foal's mare) do not come in contact with the macrolide treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • What is less clear is the evidence for a role of macrolides in the treatment of other chronic inflammatory airway diseases, e.g. cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, asthma, obliterative bronchiolitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic rhinosinusitis. (ersjournals.com)
  • thus, the results of genotypic macrolide resistance were not known at the time of treatment. (annals.edu.sg)
  • Macrolides should be taken during pregnancy only when the benefits of treatment outweigh the risks. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Macrolides are used in the treatment of a wide range of infections - both Gram-positive and Gram-negative infections. (naplexstudyguide.com)
  • Thus," she concluded, "macrolides may not be necessary as empirical therapy unless treatment failure occurs with beta-lactam therapy. (medscape.com)
  • Macrolides are second-line agents for treatment of Lyme disease. (medscape.com)
  • Macrolides are actively concentrated within leukocytes, and thus are transported into the site of infection. (wikipedia.org)

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