Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system.
Tubular vessels that are involved in the transport of LYMPH and LYMPHOCYTES.
The formation of LYMPHATIC VESSELS.
A system of organs and tissues that process and transport immune cells and LYMPH.
A vascular endothelial growth factor that specifically binds to VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR-2 and VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR-3. In addition to being an angiogenic factor it can act on LYMPHATIC VESSELS to stimulate LYMPHANGIOGENESIS. It is similar in structure to VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR D in that they both contain N- and C-terminal extensions that were not found in other VEGF family members.
Unbroken cellular lining (intima) of the lymph vessels (e.g., the high endothelial lymphatic venules). It is more permeable than vascular endothelium, lacking selective absorption and functioning mainly to remove plasma proteins that have filtered through the capillaries into the tissue spaces.
A vascular endothelial cell growth factor receptor whose expression is restricted primarily to adult lymphatic endothelium. VEGFR-3 preferentially binds the vascular endothelial growth factor C and vascular endothelial growth factor D and may be involved in the control of lymphangiogenesis.
A vascular endothelial growth factor that specifically binds to VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR-2 and VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR-3. In addition to being an angiogenic factor it can act on LYMPHATIC VESSELS to stimulate LYMPHANGIOGENESIS. It is similar in structure to VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR C in that they both contain N- and C-terminal extensions that were not found in other VEGF family members.
The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.
They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.
Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.
Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.
Surgical excision of one or more lymph nodes. Its most common use is in cancer surgery. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p966)
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.
Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions.
Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.
Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.
Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.
A sarcoma derived from deep fibrous tissue, characterized by bundles of immature proliferating fibroblasts with variable collagen formation, which tends to invade locally and metastasize by the bloodstream. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Highly specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that line the HEART; BLOOD VESSELS; and lymph vessels, forming the ENDOTHELIUM. They are polygonal in shape and joined together by TIGHT JUNCTIONS. The tight junctions allow for variable permeability to specific macromolecules that are transported across the endothelial layer.
Experimentally induced tumor that produces MELANIN in animals to provide a model for studying human MELANOMA.
Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.
Radiographic study of the lymphatic system following injection of dye or contrast medium.
A 200-230-kDa tyrosine kinase receptor for vascular endothelial growth factors found primarily in endothelial and hematopoietic cells and their precursors. VEGFR-2 is important for vascular and hematopoietic development, and mediates almost all endothelial cell responses to VEGF.
Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.
Parasitic infestation of the human lymphatic system by WUCHERERIA BANCROFTI or BRUGIA MALAYI. It is also called lymphatic filariasis.
Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).
The interstitial fluid that is in the LYMPHATIC SYSTEM.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
Congenital or acquired structural abnormalities of the lymphatic system (LYMPHOID TISSUE) including the lymph vessels.
The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.
Edema due to obstruction of lymph vessels or disorders of the lymph nodes.
The original member of the family of endothelial cell growth factors referred to as VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTORS. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A was originally isolated from tumor cells and referred to as "tumor angiogenesis factor" and "vascular permeability factor". Although expressed at high levels in certain tumor-derived cells it is produced by a wide variety of cell types. In addition to stimulating vascular growth and vascular permeability it may play a role in stimulating VASODILATION via NITRIC OXIDE-dependent pathways. Alternative splicing of the mRNA for vascular endothelial growth factor A results in several isoforms of the protein being produced.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
A malignant neoplasm derived from cells that are capable of forming melanin, which may occur in the skin of any part of the body, in the eye, or, rarely, in the mucous membranes of the genitalia, anus, oral cavity, or other sites. It occurs mostly in adults and may originate de novo or from a pigmented nevus or malignant lentigo. Melanomas frequently metastasize widely, and the regional lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and brain are likely to be involved. The incidence of malignant skin melanomas is rising rapidly in all parts of the world. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, p2445)
Diseases of LYMPH; LYMPH NODES; or LYMPHATIC VESSELS.
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.
A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.
Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.
A white threadlike worm which causes elephantiasis, lymphangitis, and chyluria by interfering with the lymphatic circulation. The microfilaria are found in the circulating blood and are carried by mosquitoes.
Neoplasms of the intracranial components of the central nervous system, including the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. Brain neoplasms are subdivided into primary (originating from brain tissue) and secondary (i.e., metastatic) forms. Primary neoplasms are subdivided into benign and malignant forms. In general, brain tumors may also be classified by age of onset, histologic type, or presenting location in the brain.
Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.
A layer of the peritoneum which attaches the abdominal viscera to the ABDOMINAL WALL and conveys their blood vessels and nerves.
The largest lymphatic vessel that passes through the chest and drains into the SUBCLAVIAN VEIN.
Pharmacological agents destructive to nematodes in the superfamily Filarioidea.
Neoplasms composed of lymphoid tissue, a lattice work of reticular tissue the interspaces of which contain lymphocytes. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in lymphatic vessels.
Radionuclide imaging of the LYMPHATIC SYSTEM.
A diagnostic procedure used to determine whether LYMPHATIC METASTASIS has occurred. The sentinel lymph node is the first lymph node to receive drainage from a neoplasm.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
A benign tumor resulting from a congenital malformation of the lymphatic system. Lymphangioendothelioma is a type of lymphangioma in which endothelial cells are the dominant component.
The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.
An anthelmintic used primarily as the citrate in the treatment of filariasis, particularly infestations with Wucheria bancrofti or Loa loa.
Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.
Spinal neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors that develop within the spinal column, which can be benign or malignant, and originate from cells within the spinal structure or spread to the spine from other parts of the body (metastatic).
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Inbred BALB/c mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been selectively bred to be genetically identical to each other, making them useful for scientific research and experiments due to their consistent genetic background and predictable responses to various stimuli or treatments.
A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.
A transient dilatation of the lymphatic vessels.
All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
Transplantation between animals of different species.
Area of the human body underneath the SHOULDER JOINT, also known as the armpit or underarm.
Mice homozygous for the mutant autosomal recessive gene "scid" which is located on the centromeric end of chromosome 16. These mice lack mature, functional lymphocytes and are thus highly susceptible to lethal opportunistic infections if not chronically treated with antibiotics. The lack of B- and T-cell immunity resembles severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) syndrome in human infants. SCID mice are useful as animal models since they are receptive to implantation of a human immune system producing SCID-human (SCID-hu) hematochimeric mice.
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
Experimentally induced mammary neoplasms in animals to provide a model for studying human BREAST NEOPLASMS.
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.
Tumors or cancer of the COLON.
Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.
Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.
Tumors or cancers of the KIDNEY.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.
Exfoliate neoplastic cells circulating in the blood and associated with metastasizing tumors.
A family of nucleotide diphosphate kinases that play a role in a variety of cellular signaling pathways that effect CELL DIFFERENTIATION; CELL PROLIFERATION; and APOPTOSIS. They are considered multifunctional proteins that interact with a variety of cellular proteins and have functions that are unrelated to their enzyme activity.
Cell adhesion molecules present on virtually all monocytes, platelets, and granulocytes. CD31 is highly expressed on endothelial cells and concentrated at the junctions between them.
The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.
Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.
Excision of all or part of the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.
Phenotypic changes of EPITHELIAL CELLS to MESENCHYME type, which increase cell mobility critical in many developmental processes such as NEURAL TUBE development. NEOPLASM METASTASIS and DISEASE PROGRESSION may also induce this transition.
A sarcoma originating in bone-forming cells, affecting the ends of long bones. It is the most common and most malignant of sarcomas of the bones, and occurs chiefly among 10- to 25-year-old youths. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)
The total amount (cell number, weight, size or volume) of tumor cells or tissue in the body.
Surgery to remove one or more NEOPLASM METASTASES.
Lymphangitis is a medical condition characterized by the inflammation and infection of the lymphatic vessels, often presenting as red, tender streaks along the path of the affected lymphatic channel.
Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.
Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.
A species of parasitic nematode causing Malayan filariasis and having a distribution centering roughly on the Malay peninsula. The life cycle of B. malayi is similar to that of WUCHERERIA BANCROFTI, except that in most areas the principal mosquito vectors belong to the genus Mansonia.
In vivo methods of screening investigative anticancer drugs, biologic response modifiers or radiotherapies. Human tumor tissue or cells are transplanted into mice or rats followed by tumor treatment regimens. A variety of outcomes are monitored to assess antitumor effectiveness.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Tumors or cancer of the MAMMARY GLAND in animals (MAMMARY GLANDS, ANIMAL).
A CC-type chemokine with specificity for CCR7 RECEPTORS. It has activity towards DENDRITIC CELLS and T-LYMPHOCYTES.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
A heterogeneous group of sporadic or hereditary carcinoma derived from cells of the KIDNEYS. There are several subtypes including the clear cells, the papillary, the chromophobe, the collecting duct, the spindle cells (sarcomatoid), or mixed cell-type carcinoma.
The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.
Calcium-dependent cell adhesion proteins. They are important in the formation of ADHERENS JUNCTIONS between cells. Cadherins are classified by their distinct immunological and tissue specificities, either by letters (E- for epithelial, N- for neural, and P- for placental cadherins) or by numbers (cadherin-12 or N-cadherin 2 for brain-cadherin). Cadherins promote cell adhesion via a homophilic mechanism as in the construction of tissues and of the whole animal body.
Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.
A malignant neoplasm characterized by the formation of numerous, irregular, finger-like projections of fibrous stroma that is covered with a surface layer of neoplastic epithelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)
An invasive (infiltrating) CARCINOMA of the mammary ductal system (MAMMARY GLANDS) in the human BREAST.
Tumors or cancer of the SPLEEN.
Tumors or cancer located in muscle tissue or specific muscles. They are differentiated from NEOPLASMS, MUSCLE TISSUE which are neoplasms composed of skeletal, cardiac, or smooth muscle tissue, such as MYOSARCOMA or LEIOMYOMA.
Any of the tubular vessels conveying the blood (arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, and veins).
Compounds that are used in medicine as sources of radiation for radiotherapy and for diagnostic purposes. They have numerous uses in research and industry. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1161)
Tumors or cancer of the ESOPHAGUS.
Accumulation of serous fluid between the layers of membrane (tunica vaginalis) covering the TESTIS in the SCROTUM.
Tumors or cancer of the RECTUM.
The prelarval stage of Filarioidea in the blood and other tissues of mammals and birds. They are removed from these hosts by blood-sucking insects in which they metamorphose into mature larvae.
A carcinoma discovered by Dr. Margaret R. Lewis of the Wistar Institute in 1951. This tumor originated spontaneously as a carcinoma of the lung of a C57BL mouse. The tumor does not appear to be grossly hemorrhagic and the majority of the tumor tissue is a semifirm homogeneous mass. (From Cancer Chemother Rep 2 1972 Nov;(3)1:325) It is also called 3LL and LLC and is used as a transplantable malignancy.
A primary malignant neoplasm of epithelial liver cells. It ranges from a well-differentiated tumor with EPITHELIAL CELLS indistinguishable from normal HEPATOCYTES to a poorly differentiated neoplasm. The cells may be uniform or markedly pleomorphic, or form GIANT CELLS. Several classification schemes have been suggested.
A radiological stereotactic technique developed for cutting or destroying tissue by high doses of radiation in place of surgical incisions. It was originally developed for neurosurgery on structures in the brain and its use gradually spread to radiation surgery on extracranial structures as well. The usual rigid needles or probes of stereotactic surgery are replaced with beams of ionizing radiation directed toward a target so as to achieve local tissue destruction.
An endopeptidase that is structurally similar to MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE 2. It degrades GELATIN types I and V; COLLAGEN TYPE IV; and COLLAGEN TYPE V.
The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.
Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.
An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Tumors or cancer of the PERITONEUM.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
Newly arising secondary tumors so small they are difficult to detect by physical examination or routine imaging techniques.
Organic compounds which contain P-C-P bonds, where P stands for phosphonates or phosphonic acids. These compounds affect calcium metabolism. They inhibit ectopic calcification and slow down bone resorption and bone turnover. Technetium complexes of diphosphonates have been used successfully as bone scanning agents.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
Dissection in the neck to remove all disease tissues including cervical LYMPH NODES and to leave an adequate margin of normal tissue. This type of surgery is usually used in tumors or cervical metastases in the head and neck. The prototype of neck dissection is the radical neck dissection described by Crile in 1906.
Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.
A glycoprotein that is secreted into the luminal surface of the epithelia in the gastrointestinal tract. It is found in the feces and pancreaticobiliary secretions and is used to monitor the response to colon cancer treatment.
A benzimidazole broad-spectrum anthelmintic structurally related to MEBENDAZOLE that is effective against many diseases. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p38)
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
Excision of the whole (total gastrectomy) or part (subtotal gastrectomy, partial gastrectomy, gastric resection) of the stomach. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The local implantation of tumor cells by contamination of instruments and surgical equipment during and after surgical resection, resulting in local growth of the cells and tumor formation.
Proteins that are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. Deficiencies or abnormalities in these proteins may lead to unregulated cell growth and tumor development.
Any visual display of structural or functional patterns of organs or tissues for diagnostic evaluation. It includes measuring physiologic and metabolic responses to physical and chemical stimuli, as well as ultramicroscopy.
A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
A tricarbocyanine dye that is used diagnostically in liver function tests and to determine blood volume and cardiac output.
Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.
An opaque, milky-white fluid consisting mainly of emulsified fats that passes through the lacteals of the small intestines into the lymphatic system.
A filarial worm of Southeast Asia, producing filariasis and elephantiasis in various mammals including man. It was formerly included in the genus WUCHERERIA.
Acidic sulfated integral membrane glycoproteins expressed in several alternatively spliced and variable glycosylated forms on a wide variety of cell types including mature T-cells, B-cells, medullary thymocytes, granulocytes, macrophages, erythrocytes, and fibroblasts. CD44 antigens are the principle cell surface receptors for hyaluronate and this interaction mediates binding of lymphocytes to high endothelial venules. (From Abbas et al., Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 2d ed, p156)
Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)
The milieu surrounding neoplasms consisting of cells, vessels, soluble factors, and molecules, that can influence and be influenced by, the neoplasm's growth.
Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
A secreted endopeptidase homologous with INTERSTITIAL COLLAGENASE, but which possesses an additional fibronectin-like domain.
Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.
An adenocarcinoma of the thyroid gland, in which the cells are arranged in the form of follicles. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
A connective tissue neoplasm formed by proliferation of mesodermal cells; it is usually highly malignant.
The exposure of the head to roentgen rays or other forms of radioactivity for therapeutic or preventive purposes.
Chemicals and substances that impart color including soluble dyes and insoluble pigments. They are used in INKS; PAINTS; and as INDICATORS AND REAGENTS.
A widely expressed transmembrane glycoprotein that functions as a METASTASIS suppressor protein. It is underexpressed in a variety of human NEOPLASMS.
A broad category of proteins involved in the formation, transport and dissolution of TRANSPORT VESICLES. They play a role in the intracellular transport of molecules contained within membrane vesicles. Vesicular transport proteins are distinguished from MEMBRANE TRANSPORT PROTEINS, which move molecules across membranes, by the mode in which the molecules are transported.
Abdominal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors occurring within the abdominal cavity, which can be benign or malignant, and affect various organs such as the pancreas, liver, kidneys, or intestines.
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
Infections with nematodes of the superfamily FILARIOIDEA. The presence of living worms in the body is mainly asymptomatic but the death of adult worms leads to granulomatous inflammation and permanent fibrosis. Organisms of the genus Elaeophora infect wild elk and domestic sheep causing ischemic necrosis of the brain, blindness, and dermatosis of the face.
Glycoproteins found on the membrane or surface of cells.
Neoplasms of the bony part of the skull.
The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.

Comparative efficacy of positron emission tomography with FDG and computed tomographic scanning in preoperative staging of non-small cell lung cancer. (1/7997)

OBJECTIVE: To determine the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of positron emission tomography with 2-fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (PET-FDG) in the preoperative staging (N and M staging) of patients with lung cancer. The authors wanted to compare the efficacy of PET scanning with currently used computed tomography (CT) scanning. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Results of whole-body PET-FDG imaging and CT scans were compared with histologic findings for the presence or absence of lymph node disease or metastatic sites. Sampling of mediastinal lymph nodes was performed using mediastinoscopy or thoracotomy. RESULTS: PET-FDG imaging was significantly more sensitive, specific, and accurate for detecting N disease than CT. PET changed N staging in 35% and M staging in 11% of patients. CT scans helped in accurate anatomic localization of 6/57 PET lymph node abnormalities. CONCLUSION: PET-FDG is a reliable method for preoperative staging of patients with lung cancer and would help to optimize management of these patients. Accurate lymph node staging of lung cancer may be ideally performed by simultaneous review of PET and CT scans.  (+info)

Detection of occult lymph node metastases in esophageal cancer by minimally invasive staging combined with molecular diagnostic techniques. (2/7997)

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Lymph node metastases are the most important prognostic factor in patients with esophageal cancer. Histologic examination misses micrometastases in up to 20% of lymph nodes evaluated. In addition, non-invasive imaging modalities are not sensitive enough to detect small lymph nodes metastases. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of messenger RNA (mRNA) for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) to increase the detection of micrometastases in lymph nodes from patients with esophageal cancer. METHODS: RT-PCR of CEA mRNA was performed in lymph nodes from patients with malignant and benign esophageal disease. Each specimen was examined histopathologically and by RT-PCR and the results were compared. RESULTS: Metastases were present in 29 of 60 (48%) lymph nodes sample by minimally invasive staging from 13 patients with esophageal cancer when examined histopathologically. RT-PCR identified nodal metastases in 46 of these 60 (77%) samples. RT-PCR detected CEA mRNA in all 29 histologically positive samples and in 17 histologically negative lymph nodes. All lymph nodes from patients with benign disease (n = 15) were negative both histopathologically and by RT-PCR. The stage of two patients was reclassified based on the RT-PCR results, which identified lymph node spread undetected histopathologically. Both of these patients developed recurrent disease after resection of the primary tumor. CONCLUSIONS: RT-PCR is more sensitive than histologic examination in the detection of lymph node metastases in esophageal cancer and can lead to diagnosis of a more advanced stage in some patients. The combination of minimally invasive surgical techniques in combination with new molecular diagnostic techniques may improve our ability to stage cancer patients.  (+info)

Estrogen replacement therapy and breast cancer survival in a large screening study. (3/7997)

BACKGROUND: Hormone replacement therapy has been associated in some studies with reductions in breast cancer mortality among women who develop this disease. It is unclear whether this association reflects the biologic activity of the hormones or the earlier detection of tumors among hormone users. We examined breast cancer mortality among women who were diagnosed with axillary lymph node-negative and node-positive breast cancer according to the currency of estrogen use at diagnosis. METHODS: Vital status through June 1995 was determined for 2614 patients with postmenopausal breast cancer diagnosed during the period from 1973 to January 1981. We estimated adjusted hazard-rate ratios (adjusting for tumor size, age, race, Quetelet [body mass] index, and number of positive lymph nodes in women with node-positive disease) and unadjusted cumulative probabilities of breast cancer death over time since diagnosis. RESULTS: Among patients with node-negative disease, rate ratios for breast cancer mortality associated with current use compared with nonuse at diagnosis were 0.5 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.3-0.8) until 144 months after diagnosis and 2.2 (95% CI = 0.9-5.2) thereafter. Mortality was not statistically significantly lower in past users. The cumulative probabilities of breast cancer mortality at the end of follow-up were 0.14, 0.14, and 0.09 in nonusers, past users, and current users, respectively. Among women with node-positive disease, the rate ratios associated with current and past use were both 0.5 until 48 months after diagnosis (95% CI = 0.3-0.8 for current users; 95% CI = 0.3-0.9 for past users) and were 1.1 (95% CI = 0.7-1.7) and 1.8 (95% CI = 1.2-2.7), respectively, thereafter. The cumulative probabilities of breast cancer mortality were 0.32, 0.39, and 0.27 in nonusers, past users, and current users, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with breast cancer who were using replacement estrogens at the time of diagnosis experienced reductions in breast cancer mortality, which waned with the time since diagnosis.  (+info)

Immunologic proliferation marker Ki-S2 as prognostic indicator for lymph node-negative breast cancer. (4/7997)

BACKGROUND: Proper treatment of lymph node-negative breast cancer depends on an accurate prognosis. To improve prognostic models for this disease, we evaluated whether an immunohistochemical marker for proliferating cells, Ki-S2 (a monoclonal antibody that binds to a 100-kd nuclear protein expressed in S, G2, and M phases of the cell cycle), is an accurate indicator of prognosis. METHODS: We studied 371 Swedish women with lymph node-negative breast cancer; the median follow-up time was 95 months. The fraction of tumor cells in S phase was assessed by flow cytometry, and tumor cell proliferation was measured immunohistochemically with the monoclonal antibodies Ki-S2 and Ki-S5 (directed against the nuclear antigen Ki-67). A combined prognostic index was calculated on the basis of the S-phase fraction, progesterone receptor content, and tumor size. RESULTS: In multivariate analyses that did or did not (263 and 332 observations, respectively) include the S-phase fraction and the combined prognostic index, the Ki-S2 labeling index (percentage of antibody-stained tumor cell nuclei) emerged as the most statistically significant predictor of overall survival, disease-specific survival, and disease-free survival (all two-sided P<.0001). In the risk group defined by a Ki-S2 labeling index of 10% or less, life expectancy was not statistically significantly different from that of age-matched women without breast cancer, whereas the group with a high Ki-S2 labeling index had an increased risk of mortality of up to 20-fold. CONCLUSIONS: Cellular proliferation is a major determinant of the biologic behavior of breast cancer. Prognosis is apparently best indicated by the percentage of cells in S through M phases of the cell cycle. Measurement of the Ki-S2 labeling index of a tumor sample may improve a clinician's ability to make an accurate prognosis and to identify patients with a low risk of recurrence who may not need adjuvant therapy.  (+info)

Sentinel lymph node biopsy and axillary dissection in breast cancer: results in a large series. (5/7997)

BACKGROUND: Axillary lymph node dissection is an established component of the surgical treatment of breast cancer, and is an important procedure in cancer staging; however, it is associated with unpleasant side effects. We have investigated a radioactive tracer-guided procedure that facilitates identification, removal, and pathologic examination of the sentinel lymph node (i.e., the lymph node first receiving lymphatic fluid from the area of the breast containing the tumor) to predict the status of the axilla and to assess the safety of foregoing axillary dissection if the sentinel lymph node shows no involvement. METHODS: We injected 5-10 MBq of 99mTc-labeled colloidal particles of human albumin peritumorally in 376 consecutive patients with breast cancer who were enrolled at the European Institute of Oncology during the period from March 1996 through March 1998. The sentinel lymph node in each case was visualized by lymphoscintigraphy, and its general location was marked on the overlying skin. During breast surgery, the sentinel lymph node was identified for removal by monitoring the acoustic signal from a hand-held gamma ray-detecting probe. Total axillary dissection was then carried out. The pathologic status of the sentinel lymph node was compared with that of the whole axilla. RESULTS: The sentinel lymph node was identified in 371 (98.7%) of the 376 patients and accurately predicted the state of the axilla in 359 (95.5%) of the patients, with 12 false-negative findings (6.7%; 95% confidence interval = 3.5%-11.4%) among a total of 180 patients with positive axillary lymph nodes. CONCLUSIONS: Sentinel lymph node biopsy using a gamma ray-detecting probe allows staging of the axilla with high accuracy in patients with primary breast cancer. A randomized trial is necessary to determine whether axillary dissection may be avoided in those patients with an uninvolved sentinel lymph node.  (+info)

Trimodality therapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer: prediction of recurrence by assessment of p185neu. (6/7997)

In a trimodality treatment approach for stage III non-small cell lung cancer the prognostic impact of pretherapeutic p185neu assessment was evaluated. Fifty-four patients were admitted to chemotherapy followed by twice-daily radiation with concomittant low-dose chemotherapy and subsequent surgery. Immunohistochemical assessment of p185neu expression was performed in paraffin-embedded mediastinal lymph node metastases, by mediastinoscopy biopsy prior to therapy. Paraffin-embedded biopsies of mediastinal lymph node metastases were available in 33 cases. Seven out of eight patients with positive p185neu staining developed distant metastases, in contrast to seven out of 25 negative cases. Expression of p185neu in mediastinal lymph node metastases was a significant predictor for progression-free survival (p=0.047) and resulted mainly from significant differences in metastases-free survival (p185neu-positive versus p185neu-negative: median, 11 versus 19 months; 2- and 3-yr rates, 13% and 0% versus 40% and 32%; p=0.04). On the basis of these preliminary results it was concluded that further evaluation of p185neu expression in trials on neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapy is warranted. When the prognostic impact of p185neu in such trials with larger patient numbers is confirmed, this may contribute to the identification of stratification variables for future treatment approaches of non-small cell lung cancer.  (+info)

The expression of beta-catenin in non-small-cell lung cancer: a clinicopathological study. (7/7997)

AIMS: To investigate the expression of beta-catenin in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its clinical significance. METHODS: 101 patients were surgically treated for NSCLC by lobectomy or pneumectomy with systematic lymph node dissection. Follow up was available in all patients, ranging from 24 to 110 months. Immunostaining of tissue sections from primary tumours and (when present) their lymph node metastases was performed and evaluated using a monoclonal antibody against beta-catenin. Correlations were investigated between beta-catenin immunostaining in primary tumours and E-cadherin immunostaining (data available from a previous study), lymph node stage, and survival. RESULTS: There were significant correlations between scores for beta-catenin immunostaining and E-cadherin immunostaining in primary tumours (p = 0.007), and between the beta-catenin immunostaining score in primary tumours and in their lymph node metastases (p = 0.006). An inverse correlation was found between the beta-catenin immunostaining score in primary tumours and lymph node stage N0, N1, or N2 (p = 0.03). According to the Kaplan-Meier survival estimate, the level of beta-catenin expression in primary tumours was a statistically significant prognostic factor (p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Reduced beta-catenin expression in surgically treated NSCLC is clearly associated with lymph node metastasis and an infavourable prognosis. The existence of a functional relation between E-cadherin and beta-catenin is supported by the results of this clinicopathological study.  (+info)

Expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) correlates with poor response to tamoxifen therapy in recurrent breast cancer. (8/7997)

Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a serine protease which may play a role in a variety of cancer types, including breast cancer. In the present study, we evaluated whether the level of PSA in breast tumour cytosol could be associated with prognosis in primary breast cancer, or with response to tamoxifen therapy in recurrent disease. PSA levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in breast tumour cytosols, and were correlated with prognosis in 1516 patients with primary breast cancer and with response to first-line tamoxifen therapy in 434 patients with recurrent disease. Relating the levels of PSA with classical prognostic factors, low levels were more often found in larger tumours, tumours of older and post-menopausal patients, and in steroid hormone receptor-negative tumours. There was no significant association between the levels of PSA with grade of differentiation or the number of involved lymph nodes. In patients with primary breast cancer, PSA was not significantly related to the rate of relapse, and a positive association of PSA with an improved survival could be attributed to its relationship to age. In patients with recurrent breast cancer, a high level of PSA was significantly related to a poor response to tamoxifen therapy, and a short progression-free and overall survival after start of treatment for recurrent disease. In Cox multivariate analyses for response to therapy and for (progression-free) survival, corrected for age/menopausal status, disease-free interval, site of relapse and steroid hormone receptor status, PSA was an independent variable of poor prognosis. It is concluded that the level of PSA in cytosols of primary breast tumours might be a marker to select breast cancer patients who may benefit from systemic tamoxifen therapy.  (+info)

Lymphatic metastasis is the spread of cancer cells from a primary tumor to distant lymph nodes through the lymphatic system. It occurs when malignant cells break away from the original tumor, enter the lymphatic vessels, and travel to nearby or remote lymph nodes. Once there, these cancer cells can multiply and form new tumors, leading to further progression of the disease. Lymphatic metastasis is a common way for many types of cancer to spread and can have significant implications for prognosis and treatment strategies.

Lymphatic vessels are thin-walled, valved structures that collect and transport lymph, a fluid derived from the interstitial fluid surrounding the cells, throughout the lymphatic system. They play a crucial role in immune function and maintaining fluid balance in the body. The primary function of lymphatic vessels is to return excess interstitial fluid, proteins, waste products, and immune cells to the bloodstream via the subclavian veins near the heart.

There are two types of lymphatic vessels:

1. Lymphatic capillaries: These are the smallest lymphatic vessels, found in most body tissues except for the central nervous system (CNS). They have blind ends and are highly permeable to allow the entry of interstitial fluid, proteins, and other large molecules.
2. Larger lymphatic vessels: These include precollecting vessels, collecting vessels, and lymphatic trunks. Precollecting vessels have valves that prevent backflow of lymph and merge to form larger collecting vessels. Collecting vessels contain smooth muscle in their walls, which helps to propel the lymph forward. They also have valves at regular intervals to ensure unidirectional flow towards the heart. Lymphatic trunks are large vessels that collect lymph from various regions of the body and eventually drain into the two main lymphatic ducts: the thoracic duct and the right lymphatic duct.

Overall, lymphatic vessels play a vital role in maintaining fluid balance, immune surveillance, and waste removal in the human body.

Lymphangiogenesis is the formation of new lymphatic vessels from pre-existing ones. It is a complex biological process that involves the growth, differentiation, and remodeling of lymphatic endothelial cells, which line the interior surface of lymphatic vessels. Lymphangiogenesis plays crucial roles in various physiological processes, including tissue drainage, immune surveillance, and lipid absorption. However, it can also contribute to pathological conditions such as cancer metastasis, inflammation, and fibrosis when it is dysregulated.

The process of lymphangiogenesis is regulated by a variety of growth factors, receptors, and signaling molecules, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C, VEGF-D, and their receptor VEGFR-3, as well as other factors such as angiopoietins, integrins, and matrix metalloproteinases. Understanding the mechanisms of lymphangiogenesis has important implications for developing novel therapies for a range of diseases associated with abnormal lymphatic vessel growth and function.

The lymphatic system is a complex network of organs, tissues, vessels, and cells that work together to defend the body against infectious diseases and also play a crucial role in the immune system. It is made up of:

1. Lymphoid Organs: These include the spleen, thymus, lymph nodes, tonsils, adenoids, and Peyer's patches (in the intestines). They produce and mature immune cells.

2. Lymphatic Vessels: These are thin tubes that carry clear fluid called lymph towards the heart.

3. Lymph: This is a clear-to-white fluid that contains white blood cells, mainly lymphocytes, which help fight infections.

4. Other tissues and cells: These include bone marrow where immune cells are produced, and lymphocytes (T cells and B cells) which are types of white blood cells that help protect the body from infection and disease.

The primary function of the lymphatic system is to transport lymph throughout the body, collecting waste products, bacteria, viruses, and other foreign substances from the tissues, and filtering them out through the lymph nodes. The lymphatic system also helps in the absorption of fats and fat-soluble vitamins from food in the digestive tract.

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor C (VEGF-C) is a protein that belongs to the family of vascular endothelial growth factors. It plays a crucial role in angiogenesis, which is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones. Specifically, VEGF-C is a key regulator of lymphangiogenesis, which is the development of new lymphatic vessels.

VEGF-C stimulates the growth and proliferation of lymphatic endothelial cells, leading to an increase in the number and size of lymphatic vessels. This process is important for maintaining fluid balance in tissues and for the immune system's response to infection and inflammation.

Abnormal regulation of VEGF-C has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, where it can promote tumor growth and metastasis by enhancing the formation of new blood vessels that supply nutrients and oxygen to the tumor. Inhibitors of VEGF-C have been developed as potential therapeutic agents for cancer treatment.

The endothelium is a thin layer of cells that lines the interior surface of blood vessels and lymphatic vessels. The lymphatic endothelium, specifically, is the type of endothelial cell that forms the walls of lymphatic vessels. These vessels are an important part of the immune system and play a crucial role in transporting fluid, waste products, and immune cells throughout the body.

The lymphatic endothelium helps to regulate the movement of fluids and cells between the tissues and the bloodstream. It also contains specialized structures called valves that help to ensure the unidirectional flow of lymph fluid towards the heart. Dysfunction of the lymphatic endothelium has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including lymphedema, inflammation, and cancer metastasis.

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) is a type of receptor tyrosine kinase that is primarily expressed in lymphatic endothelial cells. It is a crucial regulator of lymphangiogenesis, which is the formation of new lymphatic vessels from pre-existing ones. VEGFR-3 binds to its ligands, including VEGF-C and VEGF-D, leading to the activation of downstream signaling pathways that promote cell survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation of lymphatic endothelial cells.

VEGFR-3 also plays a role in angiogenesis, which is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones. However, its functions in angiogenesis are less well understood compared to its roles in lymphangiogenesis. Dysregulation of VEGFR-3 signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, inflammation, and lymphatic disorders.

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor D (VEGFD) is a protein that belongs to the family of vascular endothelial growth factors. It plays an essential role in the process of angiogenesis, which is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones. Specifically, VEGFD stimulates the growth and proliferation of lymphatic endothelial cells, thereby promoting the development and maintenance of the lymphatic system.

VEGFD binds to its specific receptor, VEGFR-3, which is primarily expressed on the surface of lymphatic endothelial cells. This binding triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling events that ultimately lead to the activation of various genes involved in cell proliferation, migration, and survival.

Dysregulation of VEGFD and its receptor has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including lymphatic malformations, cancer, and inflammatory diseases. In these contexts, the overexpression or aberrant activation of VEGFD can contribute to excessive angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, leading to tissue edema, tumor growth, and metastasis. Therefore, targeting the VEGFD signaling pathway has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for various diseases.

Neoplasm metastasis is the spread of cancer cells from the primary site (where the original or primary tumor formed) to other places in the body. This happens when cancer cells break away from the original (primary) tumor and enter the bloodstream or lymphatic system. The cancer cells can then travel to other parts of the body and form new tumors, called secondary tumors or metastases.

Metastasis is a key feature of malignant neoplasms (cancers), and it is one of the main ways that cancer can cause harm in the body. The metastatic tumors may continue to grow and may cause damage to the organs and tissues where they are located. They can also release additional cancer cells into the bloodstream or lymphatic system, leading to further spread of the cancer.

The metastatic tumors are named based on the location where they are found, as well as the type of primary cancer. For example, if a patient has a primary lung cancer that has metastasized to the liver, the metastatic tumor would be called a liver metastasis from lung cancer.

It is important to note that the presence of metastases can significantly affect a person's prognosis and treatment options. In general, metastatic cancer is more difficult to treat than cancer that has not spread beyond its original site. However, there are many factors that can influence a person's prognosis and response to treatment, so it is important for each individual to discuss their specific situation with their healthcare team.

Lymph nodes are small, bean-shaped organs that are part of the immune system. They are found throughout the body, especially in the neck, armpits, groin, and abdomen. Lymph nodes filter lymph fluid, which carries waste and unwanted substances such as bacteria, viruses, and cancer cells. They contain white blood cells called lymphocytes that help fight infections and diseases by attacking and destroying the harmful substances found in the lymph fluid. When an infection or disease is present, lymph nodes may swell due to the increased number of immune cells and fluid accumulation as they work to fight off the invaders.

Neoplasm invasiveness is a term used in pathology and oncology to describe the aggressive behavior of cancer cells as they invade surrounding tissues and organs. This process involves the loss of cell-to-cell adhesion, increased motility and migration, and the ability of cancer cells to degrade the extracellular matrix (ECM) through the production of enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs).

Invasive neoplasms are cancers that have spread beyond the original site where they first developed and have infiltrated adjacent tissues or structures. This is in contrast to non-invasive or in situ neoplasms, which are confined to the epithelial layer where they originated and have not yet invaded the underlying basement membrane.

The invasiveness of a neoplasm is an important prognostic factor in cancer diagnosis and treatment, as it can indicate the likelihood of metastasis and the potential effectiveness of various therapies. In general, more invasive cancers are associated with worse outcomes and require more aggressive treatment approaches.

Stomach neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the stomach that can be benign or malignant. They include a wide range of conditions such as:

1. Gastric adenomas: These are benign tumors that develop from glandular cells in the stomach lining.
2. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs): These are rare tumors that can be found in the stomach and other parts of the digestive tract. They originate from the stem cells in the wall of the digestive tract.
3. Leiomyomas: These are benign tumors that develop from smooth muscle cells in the stomach wall.
4. Lipomas: These are benign tumors that develop from fat cells in the stomach wall.
5. Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs): These are tumors that develop from the neuroendocrine cells in the stomach lining. They can be benign or malignant.
6. Gastric carcinomas: These are malignant tumors that develop from the glandular cells in the stomach lining. They are the most common type of stomach neoplasm and include adenocarcinomas, signet ring cell carcinomas, and others.
7. Lymphomas: These are malignant tumors that develop from the immune cells in the stomach wall.

Stomach neoplasms can cause various symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, weight loss, and difficulty swallowing. The diagnosis of stomach neoplasms usually involves a combination of imaging tests, endoscopy, and biopsy. Treatment options depend on the type and stage of the neoplasm and may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or targeted therapy.

A cell line that is derived from tumor cells and has been adapted to grow in culture. These cell lines are often used in research to study the characteristics of cancer cells, including their growth patterns, genetic changes, and responses to various treatments. They can be established from many different types of tumors, such as carcinomas, sarcomas, and leukemias. Once established, these cell lines can be grown and maintained indefinitely in the laboratory, allowing researchers to conduct experiments and studies that would not be feasible using primary tumor cells. It is important to note that tumor cell lines may not always accurately represent the behavior of the original tumor, as they can undergo genetic changes during their time in culture.

Adenocarcinoma is a type of cancer that arises from glandular epithelial cells. These cells line the inside of many internal organs, including the breasts, prostate, colon, and lungs. Adenocarcinomas can occur in any of these organs, as well as in other locations where glands are present.

The term "adenocarcinoma" is used to describe a cancer that has features of glandular tissue, such as mucus-secreting cells or cells that produce hormones. These cancers often form glandular structures within the tumor mass and may produce mucus or other substances.

Adenocarcinomas are typically slow-growing and tend to spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body through the lymphatic system or bloodstream. They can be treated with surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or a combination of these treatments. The prognosis for adenocarcinoma depends on several factors, including the location and stage of the cancer, as well as the patient's overall health and age.

Lymph node excision is a surgical procedure in which one or more lymph nodes are removed from the body for the purpose of examination. This procedure is often conducted to help diagnose or stage various types of cancer, as malignant cells may spread to the lymphatic system and eventually accumulate within nearby lymph nodes.

During a lymph node excision, an incision is made in the skin overlying the affected lymph node(s). The surgeon carefully dissects the tissue surrounding the lymph node(s) to isolate them from adjacent structures before removing them. In some cases, a sentinel lymph node biopsy may be performed instead, where only the sentinel lymph node (the first lymph node to which cancer cells are likely to spread) is removed and examined.

The excised lymph nodes are then sent to a laboratory for histopathological examination, which involves staining and microscopic evaluation of the tissue to determine whether it contains any malignant cells. The results of this examination can help guide further treatment decisions and provide valuable prognostic information.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

Neoplasm staging is a systematic process used in medicine to describe the extent of spread of a cancer, including the size and location of the original (primary) tumor and whether it has metastasized (spread) to other parts of the body. The most widely accepted system for this purpose is the TNM classification system developed by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC).

In this system, T stands for tumor, and it describes the size and extent of the primary tumor. N stands for nodes, and it indicates whether the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes. M stands for metastasis, and it shows whether the cancer has spread to distant parts of the body.

Each letter is followed by a number that provides more details about the extent of the disease. For example, a T1N0M0 cancer means that the primary tumor is small and has not spread to nearby lymph nodes or distant sites. The higher the numbers, the more advanced the cancer.

Staging helps doctors determine the most appropriate treatment for each patient and estimate the patient's prognosis. It is an essential tool for communication among members of the healthcare team and for comparing outcomes of treatments in clinical trials.

Lung neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the lung tissue. These tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant lung neoplasms are further classified into two main types: small cell lung carcinoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma. Lung neoplasms can cause symptoms such as cough, chest pain, shortness of breath, and weight loss. They are often caused by smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke, but can also occur due to genetic factors, radiation exposure, and other environmental carcinogens. Early detection and treatment of lung neoplasms is crucial for improving outcomes and survival rates.

Prognosis is a medical term that refers to the prediction of the likely outcome or course of a disease, including the chances of recovery or recurrence, based on the patient's symptoms, medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests. It is an important aspect of clinical decision-making and patient communication, as it helps doctors and patients make informed decisions about treatment options, set realistic expectations, and plan for future care.

Prognosis can be expressed in various ways, such as percentages, categories (e.g., good, fair, poor), or survival rates, depending on the nature of the disease and the available evidence. However, it is important to note that prognosis is not an exact science and may vary depending on individual factors, such as age, overall health status, and response to treatment. Therefore, it should be used as a guide rather than a definitive forecast.

Pathologic neovascularization is the abnormal growth of new blood vessels in previously avascular tissue or excessive growth within existing vasculature, which occurs as a result of hypoxia, inflammation, or angiogenic stimuli. These newly formed vessels are often disorganized, fragile, and lack proper vessel hierarchy, leading to impaired blood flow and increased vascular permeability. Pathologic neovascularization can be observed in various diseases such as cancer, diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and chronic inflammation. This process contributes to disease progression by promoting tumor growth, metastasis, and edema formation, ultimately leading to tissue damage and organ dysfunction.

Liver neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the liver that can be benign or malignant. Benign liver neoplasms are non-cancerous tumors that do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant liver neoplasms are cancerous tumors that can invade and destroy surrounding tissue and spread to other organs.

Liver neoplasms can be primary, meaning they originate in the liver, or secondary, meaning they have metastasized (spread) to the liver from another part of the body. Primary liver neoplasms can be further classified into different types based on their cell of origin and behavior, including hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, and hepatic hemangioma.

The diagnosis of liver neoplasms typically involves a combination of imaging studies, such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI, and biopsy to confirm the type and stage of the tumor. Treatment options depend on the type and extent of the neoplasm and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or liver transplantation.

Tumor markers are substances that can be found in the body and their presence can indicate the presence of certain types of cancer or other conditions. Biological tumor markers refer to those substances that are produced by cancer cells or by other cells in response to cancer or certain benign (non-cancerous) conditions. These markers can be found in various bodily fluids such as blood, urine, or tissue samples.

Examples of biological tumor markers include:

1. Proteins: Some tumor markers are proteins that are produced by cancer cells or by other cells in response to the presence of cancer. For example, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a protein produced by normal prostate cells and in higher amounts by prostate cancer cells.
2. Genetic material: Tumor markers can also include genetic material such as DNA, RNA, or microRNA that are shed by cancer cells into bodily fluids. For example, circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is genetic material from cancer cells that can be found in the bloodstream.
3. Metabolites: Tumor markers can also include metabolic products produced by cancer cells or by other cells in response to cancer. For example, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is an enzyme that is released into the bloodstream when cancer cells break down glucose for energy.

It's important to note that tumor markers are not specific to cancer and can be elevated in non-cancerous conditions as well. Therefore, they should not be used alone to diagnose cancer but rather as a tool in conjunction with other diagnostic tests and clinical evaluations.

Neoplastic gene expression regulation refers to the processes that control the production of proteins and other molecules from genes in neoplastic cells, or cells that are part of a tumor or cancer. In a normal cell, gene expression is tightly regulated to ensure that the right genes are turned on or off at the right time. However, in cancer cells, this regulation can be disrupted, leading to the overexpression or underexpression of certain genes.

Neoplastic gene expression regulation can be affected by a variety of factors, including genetic mutations, epigenetic changes, and signals from the tumor microenvironment. These changes can lead to the activation of oncogenes (genes that promote cancer growth and development) or the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (genes that prevent cancer).

Understanding neoplastic gene expression regulation is important for developing new therapies for cancer, as targeting specific genes or pathways involved in this process can help to inhibit cancer growth and progression.

"Nude mice" is a term used in the field of laboratory research to describe a strain of mice that have been genetically engineered to lack a functional immune system. Specifically, nude mice lack a thymus gland and have a mutation in the FOXN1 gene, which results in a failure to develop a mature T-cell population. This means that they are unable to mount an effective immune response against foreign substances or organisms.

The name "nude" refers to the fact that these mice also have a lack of functional hair follicles, resulting in a hairless or partially hairless phenotype. This feature is actually a secondary consequence of the same genetic mutation that causes their immune deficiency.

Nude mice are commonly used in research because their weakened immune system makes them an ideal host for transplanted tumors, tissues, and cells from other species, including humans. This allows researchers to study the behavior of these foreign substances in a living organism without the complication of an immune response. However, it's important to note that because nude mice lack a functional immune system, they must be kept in sterile conditions and are more susceptible to infection than normal mice.

Fibrosarcoma is a type of soft tissue cancer that develops in the fibrous (or connective) tissue found throughout the body, including tendons, ligaments, and muscles. It is characterized by the malignant proliferation of fibroblasts, which are the cells responsible for producing collagen, a structural protein found in connective tissue.

The tumor typically presents as a painless, firm mass that grows slowly over time. Fibrosarcomas can occur at any age but are more common in adults between 30 and 60 years old. The exact cause of fibrosarcoma is not well understood, but it has been linked to radiation exposure, certain chemicals, and genetic factors.

There are several subtypes of fibrosarcoma, including adult-type fibrosarcoma, infantile fibrosarcoma, and dedifferentiated fibrosarcoma. Treatment usually involves surgical removal of the tumor, often followed by radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy to reduce the risk of recurrence. The prognosis for patients with fibrosarcoma depends on several factors, including the size and location of the tumor, the patient's age and overall health, and the presence or absence of metastasis (spread of cancer to other parts of the body).

Squamous cell carcinoma is a type of skin cancer that begins in the squamous cells, which are flat, thin cells that form the outer layer of the skin (epidermis). It commonly occurs on sun-exposed areas such as the face, ears, lips, and backs of the hands. Squamous cell carcinoma can also develop in other areas of the body including the mouth, lungs, and cervix.

This type of cancer usually develops slowly and may appear as a rough or scaly patch of skin, a red, firm nodule, or a sore or ulcer that doesn't heal. While squamous cell carcinoma is not as aggressive as some other types of cancer, it can metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body if left untreated, making early detection and treatment important.

Risk factors for developing squamous cell carcinoma include prolonged exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning beds, fair skin, a history of sunburns, a weakened immune system, and older age. Prevention measures include protecting your skin from the sun by wearing protective clothing, using a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30, avoiding tanning beds, and getting regular skin examinations.

Carcinoma is a type of cancer that develops from epithelial cells, which are the cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body. These cells cover organs, glands, and other structures within the body. Carcinomas can occur in various parts of the body, including the skin, lungs, breasts, prostate, colon, and pancreas. They are often characterized by the uncontrolled growth and division of abnormal cells that can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body through a process called metastasis. Carcinomas can be further classified based on their appearance under a microscope, such as adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma.

Endothelial cells are the type of cells that line the inner surface of blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and heart chambers. They play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by controlling vasomotor tone, coagulation, platelet activation, and inflammation. Endothelial cells also regulate the transport of molecules between the blood and surrounding tissues, and contribute to the maintenance of the structural integrity of the vasculature. They are flat, elongated cells with a unique morphology that allows them to form a continuous, nonthrombogenic lining inside the vessels. Endothelial cells can be isolated from various tissues and cultured in vitro for research purposes.

I cannot provide a specific medical definition for "Melanoma, Experimental," as it is not a standardized medical term. However, I can give you information about melanoma and experimental treatments related to this disease.

Melanoma is a type of cancer that develops from pigment-producing cells known as melanocytes. It usually occurs in the skin but can rarely occur in other parts of the body, such as the eyes or internal organs. Melanoma is characterized by the uncontrolled growth and multiplication of melanocytes, forming malignant tumors.

Experimental treatments for melanoma refer to novel therapeutic strategies that are currently being researched and tested in clinical trials. These experimental treatments may include:

1. Targeted therapies: Drugs that target specific genetic mutations or molecular pathways involved in melanoma growth and progression. Examples include BRAF and MEK inhibitors, such as vemurafenib, dabrafenib, and trametinib.
2. Immunotherapies: Treatments designed to enhance the immune system's ability to recognize and destroy cancer cells. These may include checkpoint inhibitors (e.g., ipilimumab, nivolumab, pembrolizumab), adoptive cell therapies (e.g., CAR T-cell therapy), and therapeutic vaccines.
3. Oncolytic viruses: Genetically modified viruses that can selectively infect and kill cancer cells while leaving healthy cells unharmed. Talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC) is an example of an oncolytic virus approved for the treatment of advanced melanoma.
4. Combination therapies: The use of multiple experimental treatments in combination to improve efficacy and reduce the risk of resistance. For instance, combining targeted therapies with immunotherapies or different types of immunotherapies.
5. Personalized medicine approaches: Using genetic testing and biomarker analysis to identify the most effective treatment for an individual patient based on their specific tumor characteristics.

It is essential to consult with healthcare professionals and refer to clinical trial databases, such as ClinicalTrials.gov, for up-to-date information on experimental treatments for melanoma.

Breast neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the breast tissue that can be benign or malignant. Benign breast neoplasms are non-cancerous tumors or growths, while malignant breast neoplasms are cancerous tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body.

Breast neoplasms can arise from different types of cells in the breast, including milk ducts, milk sacs (lobules), or connective tissue. The most common type of breast cancer is ductal carcinoma, which starts in the milk ducts and can spread to other parts of the breast and nearby structures.

Breast neoplasms are usually detected through screening methods such as mammography, ultrasound, or MRI, or through self-examination or clinical examination. Treatment options for breast neoplasms depend on several factors, including the type and stage of the tumor, the patient's age and overall health, and personal preferences. Treatment may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, or targeted therapy.

Lymphography is not a commonly used term in current medical practice. However, historically, it referred to a radiographic imaging technique that involved the injection of a contrast material into the lymphatic system to visualize the lymph nodes and lymph vessels. This procedure was used primarily for diagnostic purposes, particularly in the evaluation of cancerous conditions like lymphoma or melanoma.

The process typically involved injecting a radiopaque substance into the interstitial tissue, which would then be taken up by the lymphatic vessels and transported to the regional lymph nodes. X-ray imaging was used to track the progression of the contrast material, creating detailed images of the lymphatic system.

Due to advancements in medical imaging technology, lymphography has largely been replaced by other non-invasive imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET) scans. These modern methods provide high-resolution images of the body's internal structures without requiring invasive procedures or the use of contrast materials.

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) is a tyrosine kinase receptor that is primarily expressed on vascular endothelial cells. It is a crucial regulator of angiogenesis, the process of new blood vessel formation from pre-existing vessels. VEGFR-2 is activated by binding to its ligand, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A (VEGF-A), leading to receptor dimerization and autophosphorylation. This activation triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling events that promote endothelial cell proliferation, migration, survival, and vascular permeability, all essential steps in the angiogenic process.

VEGFR-2 plays a significant role in physiological and pathological conditions associated with angiogenesis, such as embryonic development, wound healing, tumor growth, and retinopathies. Inhibition of VEGFR-2 signaling has been an attractive target for anti-angiogenic therapies in various diseases, including cancer and age-related macular degeneration.

Colorectal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the colon or rectum, which can be benign or malignant. These growths can arise from the inner lining (mucosa) of the colon or rectum and can take various forms such as polyps, adenomas, or carcinomas.

Benign neoplasms, such as hyperplastic polyps and inflammatory polyps, are not cancerous but may need to be removed to prevent the development of malignant tumors. Adenomas, on the other hand, are precancerous lesions that can develop into colorectal cancer if left untreated.

Colorectal cancer is a malignant neoplasm that arises from the uncontrolled growth and division of cells in the colon or rectum. It is one of the most common types of cancer worldwide and can spread to other parts of the body through the bloodstream or lymphatic system.

Regular screening for colorectal neoplasms is recommended for individuals over the age of 50, as early detection and removal of precancerous lesions can significantly reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Elephantiasis, filarial is a medical condition characterized by the severe swelling of limbs or other parts of the body due to the blockage of lymphatic vessels by parasitic worms. It is caused by infection with threadlike nematode filarial worms, such as Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia timori. These worms are transmitted to humans through mosquito bites.

The blockage of lymphatic vessels leads to the accumulation of lymph fluid in the affected area, causing progressive swelling, thickening, and hardening of the skin and underlying tissues. In advanced cases, the skin may become rough, nodular, and fissured, resembling the hide of an elephant, hence the name "elephantiasis."

The condition is usually chronic and can cause significant disability and social stigma. While there is no cure for filarial elephantiasis, various treatments are available to alleviate symptoms, prevent transmission, and halt the progression of the disease. These include antibiotics to kill the worms, surgery to remove the lymphatic obstruction, and various supportive measures to manage the swelling and prevent secondary infections.

Pancreatic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the pancreas that can be benign or malignant. The pancreas is a gland located behind the stomach that produces hormones and digestive enzymes. Pancreatic neoplasms can interfere with the normal functioning of the pancreas, leading to various health complications.

Benign pancreatic neoplasms are non-cancerous growths that do not spread to other parts of the body. They are usually removed through surgery to prevent any potential complications, such as blocking the bile duct or causing pain.

Malignant pancreatic neoplasms, also known as pancreatic cancer, are cancerous growths that can invade and destroy surrounding tissues and organs. They can also spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body, such as the liver, lungs, or bones. Pancreatic cancer is often aggressive and difficult to treat, with a poor prognosis.

There are several types of pancreatic neoplasms, including adenocarcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors, solid pseudopapillary neoplasms, and cystic neoplasms. The specific type of neoplasm is determined through various diagnostic tests, such as imaging studies, biopsies, and blood tests. Treatment options depend on the type, stage, and location of the neoplasm, as well as the patient's overall health and preferences.

Lymph is a colorless, transparent fluid that circulates throughout the lymphatic system, which is a part of the immune and circulatory systems. It consists of white blood cells called lymphocytes, proteins, lipids, glucose, electrolytes, hormones, and waste products. Lymph plays an essential role in maintaining fluid balance, absorbing fats from the digestive tract, and defending the body against infection by transporting immune cells to various tissues and organs. It is collected from tissues through lymph capillaries and flows through increasingly larger lymphatic vessels, ultimately returning to the bloodstream via the subclavian veins in the chest region.

Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to amplify and detect specific DNA sequences. This technique is particularly useful for the detection and quantification of RNA viruses, as well as for the analysis of gene expression.

The process involves two main steps: reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the first step, reverse transcriptase enzyme is used to convert RNA into complementary DNA (cDNA) by reading the template provided by the RNA molecule. This cDNA then serves as a template for the PCR amplification step.

In the second step, the PCR reaction uses two primers that flank the target DNA sequence and a thermostable polymerase enzyme to repeatedly copy the targeted cDNA sequence. The reaction mixture is heated and cooled in cycles, allowing the primers to anneal to the template, and the polymerase to extend the new strand. This results in exponential amplification of the target DNA sequence, making it possible to detect even small amounts of RNA or cDNA.

RT-PCR is a sensitive and specific technique that has many applications in medical research and diagnostics, including the detection of viruses such as HIV, hepatitis C virus, and SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). It can also be used to study gene expression, identify genetic mutations, and diagnose genetic disorders.

Lymphatic abnormalities refer to conditions or defects that affect the lymphatic system, which is a part of the immune and circulatory systems. The lymphatic system includes a network of vessels, tissues, and organs that help rid the body of waste and toxins, fight infections, and maintain fluid balance.

Lymphatic abnormalities can occur due to genetic mutations, infections, inflammation, or cancer. These abnormalities may affect various components of the lymphatic system, including:

1. Lymph vessels: Abnormalities in lymph vessels can lead to a buildup of lymph fluid in certain parts of the body, causing swelling known as lymphedema.
2. Lymph nodes: Enlarged or abnormally shaped lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy) may indicate an infection, inflammation, or cancer.
3. Spleen: An enlarged spleen (splenomegaly) can be a sign of various conditions, such as infections, blood disorders, or cancer.
4. Thymus: Abnormalities in the thymus gland, which is part of the immune system, can lead to immunodeficiency disorders.
5. Tonsils and adenoids: Enlarged tonsils and adenoids can cause breathing and swallowing difficulties, especially in children.
6. Aggregated lymphatic tissue: Abnormalities in aggregated lymphatic tissue, such as Peyer's patches in the small intestine or the appendix, can increase the risk of infections and autoimmune disorders.

Lymphatic abnormalities can present with various symptoms, including swelling, pain, recurrent infections, and fatigue. Treatment depends on the underlying cause and may involve medications, surgery, or lifestyle changes.

Medical survival rate is a statistical measure used to determine the percentage of patients who are still alive for a specific period of time after their diagnosis or treatment for a certain condition or disease. It is often expressed as a five-year survival rate, which refers to the proportion of people who are alive five years after their diagnosis. Survival rates can be affected by many factors, including the stage of the disease at diagnosis, the patient's age and overall health, the effectiveness of treatment, and other health conditions that the patient may have. It is important to note that survival rates are statistical estimates and do not necessarily predict an individual patient's prognosis.

Lymphedema is a chronic condition characterized by swelling in one or more parts of the body, usually an arm or leg, due to the accumulation of lymph fluid. This occurs when the lymphatic system is unable to properly drain the fluid, often as a result of damage or removal of lymph nodes, or because of a genetic abnormality that affects lymphatic vessel development.

The swelling can range from mild to severe and may cause discomfort, tightness, or a feeling of heaviness in the affected limb. In some cases, lymphedema can also lead to skin changes, recurrent infections, and reduced mobility. The condition is currently not curable but can be managed effectively with various treatments such as compression garments, manual lymphatic drainage, exercise, and skincare routines.

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A (VEGFA) is a specific isoform of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family. It is a well-characterized signaling protein that plays a crucial role in angiogenesis, the process of new blood vessel formation from pre-existing vessels. VEGFA stimulates the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells, which line the interior surface of blood vessels, thereby contributing to the growth and development of new vasculature. This protein is essential for physiological processes such as embryonic development and wound healing, but it has also been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy. The regulation of VEGFA expression and activity is critical to maintaining proper vascular function and homeostasis.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Melanoma is defined as a type of cancer that develops from the pigment-containing cells known as melanocytes. It typically occurs in the skin but can rarely occur in other parts of the body, including the eyes and internal organs. Melanoma is characterized by the uncontrolled growth and multiplication of melanocytes, which can form malignant tumors that invade and destroy surrounding tissue.

Melanoma is often caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning beds, but it can also occur in areas of the body not exposed to the sun. It is more likely to develop in people with fair skin, light hair, and blue or green eyes, but it can affect anyone, regardless of their skin type.

Melanoma can be treated effectively if detected early, but if left untreated, it can spread to other parts of the body and become life-threatening. Treatment options for melanoma include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy, depending on the stage and location of the cancer. Regular skin examinations and self-checks are recommended to detect any changes or abnormalities in moles or other pigmented lesions that may indicate melanoma.

Lymphatic diseases refer to a group of conditions that affect the lymphatic system, which is an important part of the immune and circulatory systems. The lymphatic system consists of a network of vessels, organs, and tissues that help to transport lymph fluid throughout the body, fight infection, and remove waste products.

Lymphatic diseases can be caused by various factors, including genetics, infections, cancer, and autoimmune disorders. Some common types of lymphatic diseases include:

1. Lymphedema: A condition that causes swelling in the arms or legs due to a blockage or damage in the lymphatic vessels.
2. Lymphoma: A type of cancer that affects the lymphatic system, including Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
3. Infections: Certain bacterial and viral infections can affect the lymphatic system, such as tuberculosis, cat-scratch disease, and HIV/AIDS.
4. Autoimmune disorders: Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and scleroderma can cause inflammation and damage to the lymphatic system.
5. Congenital abnormalities: Some people are born with abnormalities in their lymphatic system, such as malformations or missing lymph nodes.

Symptoms of lymphatic diseases may vary depending on the specific condition and its severity. Treatment options may include medication, physical therapy, surgery, or radiation therapy. It is important to seek medical attention if you experience symptoms of a lymphatic disease, as early diagnosis and treatment can improve outcomes.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

The Chi-square distribution is a continuous probability distribution that is often used in statistical hypothesis testing. It is the distribution of a sum of squares of k independent standard normal random variables. The resulting quantity follows a chi-square distribution with k degrees of freedom, denoted as χ²(k).

The probability density function (pdf) of the Chi-square distribution with k degrees of freedom is given by:

f(x; k) = (1/ (2^(k/2) * Γ(k/2))) \* x^((k/2)-1) \* e^(-x/2), for x > 0 and 0, otherwise.

Where Γ(k/2) is the gamma function evaluated at k/2. The mean and variance of a Chi-square distribution with k degrees of freedom are k and 2k, respectively.

The Chi-square distribution has various applications in statistical inference, including testing goodness-of-fit, homogeneity of variances, and independence in contingency tables.

I am not aware of a specific medical definition for the term "China." Generally, it is used to refer to:

1. The People's Republic of China (PRC), which is a country in East Asia. It is the most populous country in the world and the fourth largest by geographical area. Its capital city is Beijing.
2. In a historical context, "China" was used to refer to various dynasties and empires that existed in East Asia over thousands of years. The term "Middle Kingdom" or "Zhongguo" (中国) has been used by the Chinese people to refer to their country for centuries.
3. In a more general sense, "China" can also be used to describe products or goods that originate from or are associated with the People's Republic of China.

If you have a specific context in which you encountered the term "China" related to medicine, please provide it so I can give a more accurate response.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Cell movement, also known as cell motility, refers to the ability of cells to move independently and change their location within tissue or inside the body. This process is essential for various biological functions, including embryonic development, wound healing, immune responses, and cancer metastasis.

There are several types of cell movement, including:

1. **Crawling or mesenchymal migration:** Cells move by extending and retracting protrusions called pseudopodia or filopodia, which contain actin filaments. This type of movement is common in fibroblasts, immune cells, and cancer cells during tissue invasion and metastasis.
2. **Amoeboid migration:** Cells move by changing their shape and squeezing through tight spaces without forming protrusions. This type of movement is often observed in white blood cells (leukocytes) as they migrate through the body to fight infections.
3. **Pseudopodial extension:** Cells extend pseudopodia, which are temporary cytoplasmic projections containing actin filaments. These protrusions help the cell explore its environment and move forward.
4. **Bacterial flagellar motion:** Bacteria use a whip-like structure called a flagellum to propel themselves through their environment. The rotation of the flagellum is driven by a molecular motor in the bacterial cell membrane.
5. **Ciliary and ependymal movement:** Ciliated cells, such as those lining the respiratory tract and fallopian tubes, have hair-like structures called cilia that beat in coordinated waves to move fluids or mucus across the cell surface.

Cell movement is regulated by a complex interplay of signaling pathways, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and adhesion molecules, which enable cells to respond to environmental cues and navigate through tissues.

Neoplasm transplantation is not a recognized or established medical procedure in the field of oncology. The term "neoplasm" refers to an abnormal growth of cells, which can be benign or malignant (cancerous). "Transplantation" typically refers to the surgical transfer of living cells, tissues, or organs from one part of the body to another or between individuals.

The concept of neoplasm transplantation may imply the transfer of cancerous cells or tissues from a donor to a recipient, which is not a standard practice due to ethical considerations and the potential harm it could cause to the recipient. In some rare instances, researchers might use laboratory animals to study the transmission and growth of human cancer cells, but this is done for scientific research purposes only and under strict regulatory guidelines.

In summary, there is no medical definition for 'Neoplasm Transplantation' as it does not represent a standard or ethical medical practice.

Wuchereria bancrofti is a parasitic roundworm that causes lymphatic filariasis, also known as elephantiasis. It is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected mosquitoes. The worms infect the lymphatic system and can lead to chronic swelling of body parts such as the limbs, breasts, and genitals, as well as other symptoms including fever, chills, and skin rashes. Wuchereria bancrofti is a significant public health problem in many tropical and subtropical regions around the world.

Brain neoplasms, also known as brain tumors, are abnormal growths of cells within the brain. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign brain tumors typically grow slowly and do not spread to other parts of the body. However, they can still cause serious problems if they press on sensitive areas of the brain. Malignant brain tumors, on the other hand, are cancerous and can grow quickly, invading surrounding brain tissue and spreading to other parts of the brain or spinal cord.

Brain neoplasms can arise from various types of cells within the brain, including glial cells (which provide support and insulation for nerve cells), neurons (nerve cells that transmit signals in the brain), and meninges (the membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord). They can also result from the spread of cancer cells from other parts of the body, known as metastatic brain tumors.

Symptoms of brain neoplasms may vary depending on their size, location, and growth rate. Common symptoms include headaches, seizures, weakness or paralysis in the limbs, difficulty with balance and coordination, changes in speech or vision, confusion, memory loss, and changes in behavior or personality.

Treatment for brain neoplasms depends on several factors, including the type, size, location, and grade of the tumor, as well as the patient's age and overall health. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or a combination of these approaches. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence and manage any long-term effects of treatment.

Skin neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the skin that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They result from uncontrolled multiplication of skin cells, which can form various types of lesions. These growths may appear as lumps, bumps, sores, patches, or discolored areas on the skin.

Benign skin neoplasms include conditions such as moles, warts, and seborrheic keratoses, while malignant skin neoplasms are primarily classified into melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma. These three types of cancerous skin growths are collectively known as non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs). Melanoma is the most aggressive and dangerous form of skin cancer, while NMSCs tend to be less invasive but more common.

It's essential to monitor any changes in existing skin lesions or the appearance of new growths and consult a healthcare professional for proper evaluation and treatment if needed.

The mesentery is a continuous fold of the peritoneum, the double-layered serous membrane that lines the abdominal cavity, which attaches the stomach, small intestine, large intestine (colon), and rectum to the posterior wall of the abdomen. It provides blood vessels, nerves, and lymphatic vessels to these organs.

Traditionally, the mesentery was thought to consist of separate and distinct sections along the length of the intestines. However, recent research has shown that the mesentery is a continuous organ, with a single continuous tethering point to the posterior abdominal wall. This new understanding of the anatomy of the mesentery has implications for the study of various gastrointestinal diseases and disorders.

The thoracic duct is the largest lymphatic vessel in the human body. It is a part of the lymphatic system, which helps to regulate fluid balance and immune function. The thoracic duct originates from the cisterna chyli, a dilated sac located in the abdomen near the aorta.

The thoracic duct collects lymph from the lower extremities, abdomen, pelvis, and left side of the thorax (chest). It ascends through the diaphragm and enters the chest, where it passes through the mediastinum (the central part of the chest between the lungs) and eventually drains into the left subclavian vein.

The thoracic duct plays a crucial role in transporting lymphatic fluid, which contains white blood cells, fats, proteins, and other substances, back into the circulatory system. Any obstruction or damage to the thoracic duct can lead to lymph accumulation in the surrounding tissues, causing swelling and other symptoms.

Filaricides are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by filarial worms, which are parasitic roundworms that can infect humans and animals. These medications work by killing or inhibiting the development of the larval stages of the worms, thereby helping to eliminate the infection and prevent further transmission.

Filaricides are often used to treat diseases such as onchocerciasis (river blindness), lymphatic filariasis (elephantiasis), and loiasis (African eye worm). Examples of filaricides include ivermectin, diethylcarbamazine, and albendazole. It is important to note that these medications should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as they can have serious side effects if not used properly.

Lymphatic vessel tumors, also known as lymphangiomas, are benign (non-cancerous) tumors that develop from the lymphatic vessels. These tumors are made up of abnormal masses of dilated lymphatic vessels and can occur anywhere in the body, but they most commonly affect the head, neck, and axilla (armpit).

Lymphangiomas can be classified into three types based on their size and depth:

1. Capillary lymphangioma: This is a superficial type of lymphangioma that affects the skin and mucous membranes. It appears as a cluster of small, thin-walled vessels that are filled with clear fluid.
2. Cavernous lymphangioma: This is a deeper type of lymphangioma that affects the subcutaneous tissue. It appears as a mass of dilated lymphatic vessels that are filled with clear or milky fluid.
3. Cystic hygroma: This is a large, sac-like lymphangioma that affects the neck and armpit regions. It contains multiple cysts filled with clear or milky fluid.

Lymphangiomas are usually present at birth or develop during childhood. They may cause symptoms such as swelling, pain, infection, and difficulty swallowing or breathing if they affect the head and neck region. Treatment options for lymphatic vessel tumors include surgical excision, sclerotherapy (injection of a chemical agent to shrink the vessels), and laser therapy.

Lymphoscintigraphy is a medical imaging technique that uses radioactive tracers to examine the lymphatic system, specifically the lymph nodes and vessels. In this procedure, a small amount of radioactive material is injected into the area of interest, usually an extremity or the site of a surgical incision. The tracer then travels through the lymphatic channels and accumulates in the regional lymph nodes. A specialized camera called a gamma camera detects the radiation emitted by the tracer and creates images that reveal the function and anatomy of the lymphatic system.

Lymphoscintigraphy is often used to diagnose and assess conditions affecting the lymphatic system, such as lymphedema, cancer metastasis to lymph nodes, or unusual lymphatic flow patterns. It can help identify sentinel lymph nodes (the first node(s) to receive drainage from a tumor) in patients with melanoma and breast cancer, which is crucial for surgical planning and staging purposes.

In summary, lymphoscintigraphy is a non-invasive imaging technique that utilizes radioactive tracers to visualize the lymphatic system's structure and function, providing valuable information for diagnostic and therapeutic decision-making in various clinical scenarios.

A sentinel lymph node biopsy is a surgical procedure used in cancer staging to determine if the cancer has spread beyond the primary tumor to the lymphatic system. This procedure involves identifying and removing the sentinel lymph node(s), which are the first few lymph nodes to which cancer cells are most likely to spread from the primary tumor site.

The sentinel lymph node(s) are identified by injecting a tracer substance (usually a radioactive material and/or a blue dye) near the tumor site. The tracer substance is taken up by the lymphatic vessels and transported to the sentinel lymph node(s), allowing the surgeon to locate and remove them.

The removed sentinel lymph node(s) are then examined under a microscope for the presence of cancer cells. If no cancer cells are found, it is unlikely that the cancer has spread to other lymph nodes or distant sites in the body. However, if cancer cells are present, further lymph node dissection and/or additional treatment may be necessary.

Sentinel lymph node biopsy is commonly used in the staging of melanoma, breast cancer, and some types of head and neck cancer.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Lymphangioma is a benign (noncancerous) tumor or malformation that occurs due to the abnormal development of the lymphatic system, a part of the immune system that helps fight infection and eliminate waste products. Lymphangiomas are typically composed of dilated lymphatic vessels filled with clear fluid called lymph. These masses can occur in various parts of the body but are most commonly found in the head, neck, and axilla (armpit) regions.

There are three main types of lymphangiomas:

1. Capillary lymphangioma: Also known as "lymphangiectasia" or "lymphangiomatosis," this is the most superficial and least aggressive type, often presenting as small vesicles or blisters on the skin.
2. Cavernous lymphangioma: This type consists of larger, more dilated lymphatic spaces and can involve deeper tissues. It usually appears as a soft, compressible mass beneath the skin.
3. Cystic hygroma: A subtype of cavernous lymphangioma, cystic hygromas are typically found in the neck or axilla regions and present as large, fluid-filled sacs or cysts.

Lymphangiomas can cause various symptoms depending on their size and location, including swelling, pain, infection, difficulty swallowing, or breathing problems if they compress vital structures such as airways or blood vessels. Treatment options may include surgical excision, sclerotherapy (injection of a substance to shrink the lesion), or observation, depending on the individual case and patient's preferences.

Local neoplasm recurrence is the return or regrowth of a tumor in the same location where it was originally removed or treated. This means that cancer cells have survived the initial treatment and started to grow again in the same area. It's essential to monitor and detect any local recurrence as early as possible, as it can affect the prognosis and may require additional treatment.

Diethylcarbamazine (DECT or DEC) is an anti-parasitic medication used to treat infections caused by roundworms, including lymphatic filariasis (elephantiasis) and river blindness (onchocerciasis). It works by killing the parasitic worms, thus helping to prevent the progression of these diseases.

Diethylcarbamazine is typically available as a prescription oral medication in the form of tablets or capsules. The dosage and duration of treatment will depend on the type and severity of the infection being treated. It's important to note that DEC should only be taken under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as it may have side effects and potential drug interactions.

Medical Citation:
"Diethylcarbamazine." National Center for Biotechnology Information. PubChem Compound Database. U.S. National Library of Medicine. . Accessed on April 18, 2023.

Prostatic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the prostate gland, which can be benign or malignant. The term "neoplasm" simply means new or abnormal tissue growth. When it comes to the prostate, neoplasms are often referred to as tumors.

Benign prostatic neoplasms, such as prostate adenomas, are non-cancerous overgrowths of prostate tissue. They usually grow slowly and do not spread to other parts of the body. While they can cause uncomfortable symptoms like difficulty urinating, they are generally not life-threatening.

Malignant prostatic neoplasms, on the other hand, are cancerous growths. The most common type of prostate cancer is adenocarcinoma, which arises from the glandular cells in the prostate. Prostate cancer often grows slowly and may not cause any symptoms for many years. However, some types of prostate cancer can be aggressive and spread quickly to other parts of the body, such as the bones or lymph nodes.

It's important to note that while prostate neoplasms can be concerning, early detection and treatment can significantly improve outcomes for many men. Regular check-ups with a healthcare provider are key to monitoring prostate health and catching any potential issues early on.

X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging method that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional (tomographic) images (virtual "slices") of the body. These cross-sectional images can then be used to display detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body.

The term "computed tomography" is used instead of "CT scan" or "CAT scan" because the machines take a series of X-ray measurements from different angles around the body and then use a computer to process these data to create detailed images of internal structures within the body.

CT scanning is a noninvasive, painless medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. CT imaging provides detailed information about many types of tissue including lung, bone, soft tissue and blood vessels. CT examinations can be performed on every part of the body for a variety of reasons including diagnosis, surgical planning, and monitoring of therapeutic responses.

In computed tomography (CT), an X-ray source and detector rotate around the patient, measuring the X-ray attenuation at many different angles. A computer uses this data to construct a cross-sectional image by the process of reconstruction. This technique is called "tomography". The term "computed" refers to the use of a computer to reconstruct the images.

CT has become an important tool in medical imaging and diagnosis, allowing radiologists and other physicians to view detailed internal images of the body. It can help identify many different medical conditions including cancer, heart disease, lung nodules, liver tumors, and internal injuries from trauma. CT is also commonly used for guiding biopsies and other minimally invasive procedures.

In summary, X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging technique that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional images of the body. It provides detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body, allowing physicians to diagnose and treat medical conditions.

Disease progression is the worsening or advancement of a medical condition over time. It refers to the natural course of a disease, including its development, the severity of symptoms and complications, and the impact on the patient's overall health and quality of life. Understanding disease progression is important for developing appropriate treatment plans, monitoring response to therapy, and predicting outcomes.

The rate of disease progression can vary widely depending on the type of medical condition, individual patient factors, and the effectiveness of treatment. Some diseases may progress rapidly over a short period of time, while others may progress more slowly over many years. In some cases, disease progression may be slowed or even halted with appropriate medical interventions, while in other cases, the progression may be inevitable and irreversible.

In clinical practice, healthcare providers closely monitor disease progression through regular assessments, imaging studies, and laboratory tests. This information is used to guide treatment decisions and adjust care plans as needed to optimize patient outcomes and improve quality of life.

Spinal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors found within the spinal column, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These tumors can originate in the spine itself, called primary spinal neoplasms, or they can spread to the spine from other parts of the body, known as secondary or metastatic spinal neoplasms. Spinal neoplasms can cause various symptoms, such as back pain, neurological deficits, and even paralysis, depending on their location and size. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial to prevent or minimize long-term complications and improve the patient's prognosis.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

BALB/c is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The strain was developed at the Institute of Cancer Research in London by Henry Baldwin and his colleagues in the 1920s, and it has since become one of the most commonly used inbred strains in the world.

BALB/c mice are characterized by their black coat color, which is determined by a recessive allele at the tyrosinase locus. They are also known for their docile and friendly temperament, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory.

One of the key features of BALB/c mice that makes them useful for research is their susceptibility to certain types of tumors and immune responses. For example, they are highly susceptible to developing mammary tumors, which can be induced by chemical carcinogens or viral infection. They also have a strong Th2-biased immune response, which makes them useful models for studying allergic diseases and asthma.

BALB/c mice are also commonly used in studies of genetics, neuroscience, behavior, and infectious diseases. Because they are an inbred strain, they have a uniform genetic background, which makes it easier to control for genetic factors in experiments. Additionally, because they have been bred in the laboratory for many generations, they are highly standardized and reproducible, making them ideal subjects for scientific research.

Survival analysis is a branch of statistics that deals with the analysis of time to event data. It is used to estimate the time it takes for a certain event of interest to occur, such as death, disease recurrence, or treatment failure. The event of interest is called the "failure" event, and survival analysis estimates the probability of not experiencing the failure event until a certain point in time, also known as the "survival" probability.

Survival analysis can provide important information about the effectiveness of treatments, the prognosis of patients, and the identification of risk factors associated with the event of interest. It can handle censored data, which is common in medical research where some participants may drop out or be lost to follow-up before the event of interest occurs.

Survival analysis typically involves estimating the survival function, which describes the probability of surviving beyond a certain time point, as well as hazard functions, which describe the instantaneous rate of failure at a given time point. Other important concepts in survival analysis include median survival times, restricted mean survival times, and various statistical tests to compare survival curves between groups.

Lymphangiectasis is a medical condition characterized by the dilation and abnormal expansion of lymphatic vessels, which are responsible for transporting lymph fluid throughout the body. These dilated lymphatic vessels can be found in various tissues and organs, including the intestines, lungs, or other parts of the body.

In the case of intestinal lymphangiectasis (also known as Waldmann's disease), the lymphatic vessels in the small intestine become enlarged, leading to impaired absorption of nutrients and lymph fluid. This can result in protein-losing enteropathy, malnutrition, diarrhea, and edema (swelling) due to the loss of proteins and lymphatic fluids into the gastrointestinal tract.

Pulmonary lymphangiectasis is a rare congenital disorder where the lymphatic vessels in the lungs are abnormally developed and dilated, causing respiratory distress, recurrent lung infections, and chylous effusions (accumulation of milky lymph fluid in the pleural space surrounding the lungs).

Treatment for lymphangiectasis depends on the underlying cause and severity of the condition. It may involve dietary modifications, medications to manage symptoms, or surgical interventions in some cases.

Cell proliferation is the process by which cells increase in number, typically through the process of cell division. In the context of biology and medicine, it refers to the reproduction of cells that makes up living tissue, allowing growth, maintenance, and repair. It involves several stages including the transition from a phase of quiescence (G0 phase) to an active phase (G1 phase), DNA replication in the S phase, and mitosis or M phase, where the cell divides into two daughter cells.

Abnormal or uncontrolled cell proliferation is a characteristic feature of many diseases, including cancer, where deregulated cell cycle control leads to excessive and unregulated growth of cells, forming tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant sites in the body.

Heterologous transplantation is a type of transplantation where an organ or tissue is transferred from one species to another. This is in contrast to allogeneic transplantation, where the donor and recipient are of the same species, or autologous transplantation, where the donor and recipient are the same individual.

In heterologous transplantation, the immune systems of the donor and recipient are significantly different, which can lead to a strong immune response against the transplanted organ or tissue. This is known as a graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), where the immune cells in the transplanted tissue attack the recipient's body.

Heterologous transplantation is not commonly performed in clinical medicine due to the high risk of rejection and GVHD. However, it may be used in research settings to study the biology of transplantation and to develop new therapies for transplant rejection.

The term "axilla" is used in anatomical context to refer to the armpit region, specifically the space located lateral to the upper part of the chest wall and medial to the upper arm. This area contains a number of important structures such as blood vessels, nerves, and lymph nodes, which play a critical role in the health and functioning of the upper limb. Understanding the anatomy of the axilla is essential for medical professionals performing various procedures, including surgeries and injections, in this region.

SCID mice is an acronym for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency mice. These are genetically modified mice that lack a functional immune system due to the mutation or knockout of several key genes required for immunity. This makes them ideal for studying the human immune system, infectious diseases, and cancer, as well as testing new therapies and treatments in a controlled environment without the risk of interference from the mouse's own immune system. SCID mice are often used in xenotransplantation studies, where human cells or tissues are transplanted into the mouse to study their behavior and interactions with the human immune system.

Neoplasms are abnormal growths of cells or tissues in the body that serve no physiological function. They can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms are aggressive, invasive, and can metastasize to distant sites.

Neoplasms occur when there is a dysregulation in the normal process of cell division and differentiation, leading to uncontrolled growth and accumulation of cells. This can result from genetic mutations or other factors such as viral infections, environmental exposures, or hormonal imbalances.

Neoplasms can develop in any organ or tissue of the body and can cause various symptoms depending on their size, location, and type. Treatment options for neoplasms include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy, among others.

'Mammary neoplasms, experimental' is not a recognized medical term. However, I can provide definitions for the individual terms:

1. Mammary: Pertaining to the breast or mammary glands in females, which are responsible for milk production.
2. Neoplasms: Abnormal growths of tissue, also known as tumors or masses, that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).
3. Experimental: Relating to a scientific experiment or study, typically conducted in a controlled setting to test hypotheses and gather data.

In the context of medical research, 'experimental mammary neoplasms' may refer to artificially induced breast tumors in laboratory animals (such as rats or mice) for the purpose of studying the development, progression, treatment, and prevention of breast cancer. These studies can help researchers better understand the biology of breast cancer and develop new therapies and strategies for its diagnosis and management.

'Tumor cells, cultured' refers to the process of removing cancerous cells from a tumor and growing them in controlled laboratory conditions. This is typically done by isolating the tumor cells from a patient's tissue sample, then placing them in a nutrient-rich environment that promotes their growth and multiplication.

The resulting cultured tumor cells can be used for various research purposes, including the study of cancer biology, drug development, and toxicity testing. They provide a valuable tool for researchers to better understand the behavior and characteristics of cancer cells outside of the human body, which can lead to the development of more effective cancer treatments.

It is important to note that cultured tumor cells may not always behave exactly the same way as they do in the human body, so findings from cell culture studies must be validated through further research, such as animal models or clinical trials.

Colonic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the large intestine, also known as the colon. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). The two most common types of colonic neoplasms are adenomas and carcinomas.

Adenomas are benign tumors that can develop into cancer over time if left untreated. They are often found during routine colonoscopies and can be removed during the procedure.

Carcinomas, on the other hand, are malignant tumors that invade surrounding tissues and can spread to other parts of the body. Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and colonic neoplasms are a significant risk factor for developing this type of cancer.

Regular screenings for colonic neoplasms are recommended for individuals over the age of 50 or those with a family history of colorectal cancer or other risk factors. Early detection and removal of colonic neoplasms can significantly reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Antineoplastic agents are a class of drugs used to treat malignant neoplasms or cancer. These agents work by inhibiting the growth and proliferation of cancer cells, either by killing them or preventing their division and replication. Antineoplastic agents can be classified based on their mechanism of action, such as alkylating agents, antimetabolites, topoisomerase inhibitors, mitotic inhibitors, and targeted therapy agents.

Alkylating agents work by adding alkyl groups to DNA, which can cause cross-linking of DNA strands and ultimately lead to cell death. Antimetabolites interfere with the metabolic processes necessary for DNA synthesis and replication, while topoisomerase inhibitors prevent the relaxation of supercoiled DNA during replication. Mitotic inhibitors disrupt the normal functioning of the mitotic spindle, which is essential for cell division. Targeted therapy agents are designed to target specific molecular abnormalities in cancer cells, such as mutated oncogenes or dysregulated signaling pathways.

It's important to note that antineoplastic agents can also affect normal cells and tissues, leading to various side effects such as nausea, vomiting, hair loss, and myelosuppression (suppression of bone marrow function). Therefore, the use of these drugs requires careful monitoring and management of their potential adverse effects.

A fatal outcome is a term used in medical context to describe a situation where a disease, injury, or illness results in the death of an individual. It is the most severe and unfortunate possible outcome of any medical condition, and is often used as a measure of the severity and prognosis of various diseases and injuries. In clinical trials and research, fatal outcome may be used as an endpoint to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of different treatments or interventions.

Kidney neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the kidney tissues that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can originate from various types of kidney cells, including the renal tubules, glomeruli, and the renal pelvis.

Malignant kidney neoplasms are also known as kidney cancers, with renal cell carcinoma being the most common type. Benign kidney neoplasms include renal adenomas, oncocytomas, and angiomyolipomas. While benign neoplasms are generally not life-threatening, they can still cause problems if they grow large enough to compromise kidney function or if they undergo malignant transformation.

Early detection and appropriate management of kidney neoplasms are crucial for improving patient outcomes and overall prognosis. Regular medical check-ups, imaging studies, and urinalysis can help in the early identification of these growths, allowing for timely intervention and treatment.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Thyroid neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the thyroid gland, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can vary in size and may cause a noticeable lump or nodule in the neck. Thyroid neoplasms can also affect the function of the thyroid gland, leading to hormonal imbalances and related symptoms. The exact causes of thyroid neoplasms are not fully understood, but risk factors include radiation exposure, family history, and certain genetic conditions. It is important to note that most thyroid nodules are benign, but a proper medical evaluation is necessary to determine the nature of the growth and develop an appropriate treatment plan.

Circulating neoplastic cells (CNCs) are defined as malignant cancer cells that have detached from the primary tumor site and are found circulating in the peripheral blood. These cells have undergone genetic and epigenetic changes, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and division, and can form new tumors at distant sites in the body, a process known as metastasis.

The presence of CNCs has been shown to be a prognostic factor for poor outcomes in various types of cancer, including breast, colon, and prostate cancer. The detection and characterization of CNCs can provide valuable information about the tumor's biology, aggressiveness, and response to therapy, allowing for more personalized treatment approaches.

However, the detection of CNCs is challenging due to their rarity in the bloodstream, with only a few cells present among billions of normal blood cells. Therefore, highly sensitive methods such as flow cytometry, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and next-generation sequencing are used for their identification and quantification.

NM23 nucleoside diphosphate kinases are a group of proteins that play a role in regulating cellular functions, including signal transduction, cell proliferation, and differentiation. They are named after the NM23 gene that encodes them, which was initially identified as a potential metastasis suppressor.

NM23 nucleoside diphosphate kinases have the ability to transfer phosphate groups between nucleoside diphosphates (NDPs) and nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs), thereby maintaining the balance of these molecules in cells. This enzymatic activity is important for various cellular processes, such as DNA replication, repair, and transcription.

There are several isoforms of NM23 nucleoside diphosphate kinases, including NM23-H1, NM23-H2, and NM23-H4, which differ in their tissue distribution and functions. While the role of NM23 as a metastasis suppressor has been debated, recent studies suggest that it may be involved in regulating cell motility and invasion through its effects on actin dynamics and microtubule organization.

Overall, NM23 nucleoside diphosphate kinases are important regulators of cellular homeostasis and have been implicated in various physiological and pathological processes, including cancer metastasis, inflammation, and neurodegenerative diseases.

CD31 (also known as PECAM-1 or Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1) is a type of protein that is found on the surface of certain cells in the body, including platelets, endothelial cells (which line the blood vessels), and some immune cells.

CD31 functions as a cell adhesion molecule, meaning it helps cells stick together and interact with each other. It plays important roles in various physiological processes, such as the regulation of leukocyte migration, angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels), hemostasis (the process that stops bleeding), and thrombosis (the formation of a blood clot inside a blood vessel).

As an antigen, CD31 is used in immunological techniques to identify and characterize cells expressing this protein. Antigens are substances that can be recognized by the immune system and stimulate an immune response. In the case of CD31, antibodies specific to this protein can be used to detect its presence on the surface of cells, providing valuable information for research and diagnostic purposes.

Combined modality therapy (CMT) is a medical treatment approach that utilizes more than one method or type of therapy simultaneously or in close succession, with the goal of enhancing the overall effectiveness of the treatment. In the context of cancer care, CMT often refers to the combination of two or more primary treatment modalities, such as surgery, radiation therapy, and systemic therapies (chemotherapy, immunotherapy, targeted therapy, etc.).

The rationale behind using combined modality therapy is that each treatment method can target cancer cells in different ways, potentially increasing the likelihood of eliminating all cancer cells and reducing the risk of recurrence. The specific combination and sequence of treatments will depend on various factors, including the type and stage of cancer, patient's overall health, and individual preferences.

For example, a common CMT approach for locally advanced rectal cancer may involve preoperative (neoadjuvant) chemoradiation therapy, followed by surgery to remove the tumor, and then postoperative (adjuvant) chemotherapy. This combined approach allows for the reduction of the tumor size before surgery, increases the likelihood of complete tumor removal, and targets any remaining microscopic cancer cells with systemic chemotherapy.

It is essential to consult with a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals to determine the most appropriate CMT plan for each individual patient, considering both the potential benefits and risks associated with each treatment method.

A neoplasm is a tumor or growth that is formed by an abnormal and excessive proliferation of cells, which can be benign or malignant. Neoplasm proteins are therefore any proteins that are expressed or produced in these neoplastic cells. These proteins can play various roles in the development, progression, and maintenance of neoplasms.

Some neoplasm proteins may contribute to the uncontrolled cell growth and division seen in cancer, such as oncogenic proteins that promote cell cycle progression or inhibit apoptosis (programmed cell death). Others may help the neoplastic cells evade the immune system, allowing them to proliferate undetected. Still others may be involved in angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels that supply the tumor with nutrients and oxygen.

Neoplasm proteins can also serve as biomarkers for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, or treatment response. For example, the presence or level of certain neoplasm proteins in biological samples such as blood or tissue may indicate the presence of a specific type of cancer, help predict the likelihood of cancer recurrence, or suggest whether a particular therapy will be effective.

Overall, understanding the roles and behaviors of neoplasm proteins can provide valuable insights into the biology of cancer and inform the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

Hepatectomy is a surgical procedure that involves the removal of part or all of the liver. This procedure can be performed for various reasons, such as removing cancerous or non-cancerous tumors, treating liver trauma, or donating a portion of the liver to another person in need of a transplant (live donor hepatectomy). The extent of the hepatectomy depends on the medical condition and overall health of the patient. It is a complex procedure that requires significant expertise and experience from the surgical team due to the liver's unique anatomy, blood supply, and regenerative capabilities.

Cell adhesion refers to the binding of cells to extracellular matrices or to other cells, a process that is fundamental to the development, function, and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Cell adhesion is mediated by various cell surface receptors, such as integrins, cadherins, and immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecules (Ig-CAMs), which interact with specific ligands in the extracellular environment. These interactions lead to the formation of specialized junctions, such as tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes, that help to maintain tissue architecture and regulate various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. Disruptions in cell adhesion can contribute to a variety of diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and degenerative disorders.

Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a biological process that involves the transformation of epithelial cells into mesenchymal cells. This process is characterized by distinct changes in cell shape, behavior, and molecular markers.

Epithelial cells are typically tightly packed together and have a polarized structure with distinct apical and basal surfaces. In contrast, mesenchymal cells are elongated, spindle-shaped cells that can migrate and invade surrounding tissues.

During EMT, epithelial cells lose their polarity and cell-to-cell adhesion molecules, such as E-cadherin, and acquire mesenchymal markers, such as vimentin and N-cadherin. This transition enables the cells to become more motile and invasive, which is critical for embryonic development, wound healing, and cancer metastasis.

EMT is a complex process that involves various signaling pathways, including TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, and Hedgehog, among others. Dysregulation of EMT has been implicated in several diseases, particularly cancer, where it contributes to tumor progression, metastasis, and drug resistance.

Osteosarcoma is defined as a type of cancerous tumor that arises from the cells that form bones (osteoblasts). It's the most common primary bone cancer, and it typically develops in the long bones of the body, such as the arms or legs, near the growth plates. Osteosarcoma can metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body, including the lungs, making it a highly malignant form of cancer. Symptoms may include bone pain, swelling, and fractures. Treatment usually involves a combination of surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation therapy.

The Kaplan-Meier estimate is a statistical method used to calculate the survival probability over time in a population. It is commonly used in medical research to analyze time-to-event data, such as the time until a patient experiences a specific event like disease progression or death. The Kaplan-Meier estimate takes into account censored data, which occurs when some individuals are lost to follow-up before experiencing the event of interest.

The method involves constructing a survival curve that shows the proportion of subjects still surviving at different time points. At each time point, the survival probability is calculated as the product of the conditional probabilities of surviving from one time point to the next. The Kaplan-Meier estimate provides an unbiased and consistent estimator of the survival function, even when censoring is present.

In summary, the Kaplan-Meier estimate is a crucial tool in medical research for analyzing time-to-event data and estimating survival probabilities over time while accounting for censored observations.

Tumor burden is a term used to describe the total amount of cancer in the body. It can refer to the number of tumors, the size of the tumors, or the amount of cancer cells in the body. In research and clinical trials, tumor burden is often measured to assess the effectiveness of treatments or to monitor disease progression. High tumor burden can cause various symptoms and complications, depending on the type and location of the cancer. It can also affect a person's prognosis and treatment options.

A metastasectomy is a surgical procedure to remove metastatic tumors, which are cancerous growths that have spread from the primary site of the cancer to other locations in the body. This procedure is typically performed when there is a reasonable expectation that all of the metastatic lesions can be removed, and it is often used in conjunction with other treatments such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

The goal of a metastasectomy is to improve the patient's prognosis by reducing the overall burden of cancer in their body. This may help to alleviate symptoms caused by the metastatic tumors, improve quality of life, and potentially increase survival time. However, the decision to perform a metastasectomy must be carefully weighed against the risks of surgery and other factors such as the patient's overall health and the extent of their cancer.

Lymphangitis is a medical condition characterized by the inflammation and infection of the lymphatic vessels, which are the tubular structures that transport lymph fluid from various tissues to the bloodstream. This condition typically occurs as a complication of a bacterial or fungal skin infection that spreads to the nearby lymphatic vessels.

The inflammation in lymphangitis can cause symptoms such as red streaks along the affected lymphatic vessels, swelling, warmth, and pain. Fever, chills, and fatigue may also accompany these localized symptoms. In severe cases, lymphangitis can lead to more widespread infection, sepsis, or abscess formation if left untreated.

The diagnosis of lymphangitis typically involves a physical examination and laboratory tests such as blood cultures or skin lesion cultures to identify the causative organism. Treatment usually consists of antibiotics or antifungal medications to eradicate the infection, along with supportive care such as warm compresses, elevation, and pain management. In some cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to drain any abscesses that have formed.

Immunoenzyme techniques are a group of laboratory methods used in immunology and clinical chemistry that combine the specificity of antibody-antigen reactions with the sensitivity and amplification capabilities of enzyme reactions. These techniques are primarily used for the detection, quantitation, or identification of various analytes (such as proteins, hormones, drugs, viruses, or bacteria) in biological samples.

In immunoenzyme techniques, an enzyme is linked to an antibody or antigen, creating a conjugate. This conjugate then interacts with the target analyte in the sample, forming an immune complex. The presence and amount of this immune complex can be visualized or measured by detecting the enzymatic activity associated with it.

There are several types of immunoenzyme techniques, including:

1. Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA): A widely used method for detecting and quantifying various analytes in a sample. In ELISA, an enzyme is attached to either the capture antibody or the detection antibody. After the immune complex formation, a substrate is added that reacts with the enzyme, producing a colored product that can be measured spectrophotometrically.
2. Immunoblotting (Western blot): A method used for detecting specific proteins in a complex mixture, such as a protein extract from cells or tissues. In this technique, proteins are separated by gel electrophoresis and transferred to a membrane, where they are probed with an enzyme-conjugated antibody directed against the target protein.
3. Immunohistochemistry (IHC): A method used for detecting specific antigens in tissue sections or cells. In IHC, an enzyme-conjugated primary or secondary antibody is applied to the sample, and the presence of the antigen is visualized using a chromogenic substrate that produces a colored product at the site of the antigen-antibody interaction.
4. Immunofluorescence (IF): A method used for detecting specific antigens in cells or tissues by employing fluorophore-conjugated antibodies. The presence of the antigen is visualized using a fluorescence microscope.
5. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA): A method used for detecting and quantifying specific antigens or antibodies in liquid samples, such as serum or culture supernatants. In ELISA, an enzyme-conjugated detection antibody is added after the immune complex formation, and a substrate is added that reacts with the enzyme to produce a colored product that can be measured spectrophotometrically.

These techniques are widely used in research and diagnostic laboratories for various applications, including protein characterization, disease diagnosis, and monitoring treatment responses.

Disease-free survival (DFS) is a term used in medical research and clinical practice, particularly in the field of oncology. It refers to the length of time after primary treatment for a cancer during which no evidence of the disease can be found. This means that the patient shows no signs or symptoms of the cancer, and any imaging studies or other tests do not reveal any tumors or other indications of the disease.

DFS is often used as an important endpoint in clinical trials to evaluate the effectiveness of different treatments for cancer. By measuring the length of time until the cancer recurs or a new cancer develops, researchers can get a better sense of how well a particular treatment is working and whether it is improving patient outcomes.

It's important to note that DFS is not the same as overall survival (OS), which refers to the length of time from primary treatment until death from any cause. While DFS can provide valuable information about the effectiveness of cancer treatments, it does not necessarily reflect the impact of those treatments on patients' overall survival.

'Brugia malayi' is a species of parasitic nematode (roundworm) that can infect humans and cause the tropical disease known as lymphatic filariasis. The adult worms typically reside in the lymphatic vessels, where they can cause inflammation, obstruction, and damage to the lymphatic system.

The life cycle of 'Brugia malayi' involves several stages, including microfilariae (immature worms) that are transmitted to a human host through the bite of an infected mosquito vector. Once inside the human body, the microfilariae migrate to the lymphatic vessels and mature into adult worms over a period of several months.

The symptoms of lymphatic filariasis can range from mild to severe, depending on the extent of the infection and the individual's immune response. In some cases, the disease can lead to chronic swelling and deformity of the affected limbs or genitalia, a condition known as elephantiasis.

Preventive measures for lymphatic filariasis include avoiding mosquito bites through the use of insect repellent, long-sleeved clothing, and bed nets, as well as mass drug administration programs to eliminate the parasite from affected communities.

A xenograft model antitumor assay is a type of preclinical cancer research study that involves transplanting human tumor cells or tissues into an immunodeficient mouse. This model allows researchers to study the effects of various treatments, such as drugs or immune therapies, on human tumors in a living organism.

In this assay, human tumor cells or tissues are implanted into the mouse, typically under the skin or in another organ, where they grow and form a tumor. Once the tumor has established, the mouse is treated with the experimental therapy, and the tumor's growth is monitored over time. The response of the tumor to the treatment is then assessed by measuring changes in tumor size or weight, as well as other parameters such as survival rate and metastasis.

Xenograft model antitumor assays are useful for evaluating the efficacy and safety of new cancer therapies before they are tested in human clinical trials. They provide valuable information on how the tumors respond to treatment, drug pharmacokinetics, and toxicity, which can help researchers optimize dosing regimens and identify potential side effects. However, it is important to note that xenograft models have limitations, such as differences in tumor biology between mice and humans, and may not always predict how well a therapy will work in human patients.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

Mammary neoplasms in animals refer to abnormal growths or tumors that occur in the mammary glands. These tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign tumors are slow growing and rarely spread to other parts of the body, while malignant tumors are aggressive, can invade surrounding tissues, and may metastasize to distant organs.

Mammary neoplasms are more common in female animals, particularly those that have not been spayed. The risk factors for developing mammary neoplasms include age, reproductive status, hormonal influences, and genetic predisposition. Certain breeds of dogs, such as poodles, cocker spaniels, and dachshunds, are more prone to developing mammary tumors.

Clinical signs of mammary neoplasms may include the presence of a firm, discrete mass in the mammary gland, changes in the overlying skin such as ulceration or discoloration, and evidence of pain or discomfort in the affected area. Diagnosis is typically made through a combination of physical examination, imaging studies (such as mammography or ultrasound), and biopsy with histopathological evaluation.

Treatment options for mammary neoplasms depend on the type, size, location, and stage of the tumor, as well as the animal's overall health status. Surgical removal is often the primary treatment modality, and may be curative for benign tumors or early-stage malignant tumors. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy may also be used in cases where the tumor has spread to other parts of the body. Regular veterinary check-ups and monitoring are essential to ensure early detection and treatment of any recurrence or new mammary neoplasms.

Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (CCL21), also known as secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine (SLC) or exodus-2, is a type of chemokine that belongs to the CC subfamily. Chemokines are small signaling proteins that play crucial roles in regulating immune responses and inflammation by recruiting various leukocytes to sites of infection or injury through specific receptor binding.

CCL21 is primarily expressed in high endothelial venules (HEVs) within lymphoid tissues, such as lymph nodes, spleen, and Peyer's patches. It functions as a chemoattractant for immune cells like dendritic cells, T cells, and B cells, guiding them to enter the HEVs and migrate into the lymphoid organs. This process is essential for initiating adaptive immune responses against pathogens or antigens.

CCL21 exerts its effects by binding to chemokine receptors CCR7 and atypical chemokine receptor ACKR3 (also known as CXCR7). The interaction between CCL21 and these receptors triggers intracellular signaling cascades, leading to cell migration and activation. Dysregulation of CCL21 expression or function has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including autoimmune diseases, cancer, and inflammatory disorders.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

Carcinoma, renal cell (also known as renal cell carcinoma or RCC) is a type of cancer that originates in the lining of the tubules of the kidney. These tubules are small structures within the kidney that help filter waste and fluids from the blood to form urine.

Renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults, accounting for about 80-85% of all cases. It can affect people of any age, but it is more commonly diagnosed in those over the age of 50.

There are several subtypes of renal cell carcinoma, including clear cell, papillary, chromophobe, and collecting duct carcinomas, among others. Each subtype has a different appearance under the microscope and may have a different prognosis and response to treatment.

Symptoms of renal cell carcinoma can vary but may include blood in the urine, flank pain, a lump or mass in the abdomen, unexplained weight loss, fatigue, and fever. Treatment options for renal cell carcinoma depend on the stage and grade of the cancer, as well as the patient's overall health and preferences. Treatment may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, or targeted therapy.

In medical terms, the "neck" is defined as the portion of the body that extends from the skull/head to the thorax or chest region. It contains 7 cervical vertebrae, muscles, nerves, blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and glands (such as the thyroid gland). The neck is responsible for supporting the head, allowing its movement in various directions, and housing vital structures that enable functions like respiration and circulation.

Cadherins are a type of cell adhesion molecule that play a crucial role in the development and maintenance of intercellular junctions. They are transmembrane proteins that mediate calcium-dependent homophilic binding between adjacent cells, meaning that they bind to identical cadherin molecules on neighboring cells.

There are several types of cadherins, including classical cadherins, desmosomal cadherins, and protocadherins, each with distinct functions and localization in tissues. Classical cadherins, also known as type I cadherins, are the most well-studied and are essential for the formation of adherens junctions, which help to maintain cell-to-cell contact and tissue architecture.

Desmosomal cadherins, on the other hand, are critical for the formation and maintenance of desmosomes, which are specialized intercellular junctions that provide mechanical strength and stability to tissues. Protocadherins are a diverse family of cadherin-related proteins that have been implicated in various developmental processes, including neuronal connectivity and tissue patterning.

Mutations in cadherin genes have been associated with several human diseases, including cancer, neurological disorders, and heart defects. Therefore, understanding the structure, function, and regulation of cadherins is essential for elucidating their roles in health and disease.

Experimental neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that are induced and studied in a controlled laboratory setting, typically in animals or cell cultures. These studies are conducted to understand the fundamental mechanisms of cancer development, progression, and potential treatment strategies. By manipulating various factors such as genetic mutations, environmental exposures, and pharmacological interventions, researchers can gain valuable insights into the complex processes underlying neoplasm formation and identify novel targets for cancer therapy. It is important to note that experimental neoplasms may not always accurately represent human cancers, and further research is needed to translate these findings into clinically relevant applications.

Carcinoma, papillary is a type of cancer that begins in the cells that line the glandular structures or the lining of organs. In a papillary carcinoma, the cancerous cells grow and form small finger-like projections, called papillae, within the tumor. This type of cancer most commonly occurs in the thyroid gland, but can also be found in other organs such as the lung, breast, and kidney. Papillary carcinoma of the thyroid gland is usually slow-growing and has a good prognosis, especially when it is diagnosed at an early stage.

Carcinoma, ductal, breast is a type of breast cancer that begins in the milk ducts (the tubes that carry milk from the lobules of the breast to the nipple). It is called "ductal" because it starts in the cells that line the milk ducts. Ductal carcinoma can be further classified as either non-invasive or invasive, based on whether the cancer cells are confined to the ducts or have spread beyond them into the surrounding breast tissue.

Non-invasive ductal carcinoma (also known as intraductal carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ) is a condition where abnormal cells have been found in the lining of the milk ducts, but they have not spread outside of the ducts. These cells have the potential to become invasive and spread to other parts of the breast or body if left untreated.

Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) is a type of breast cancer that starts in a milk duct and then grows into the surrounding breast tissue. From there, it can spread to other parts of the body through the bloodstream and lymphatic system. IDC is the most common form of breast cancer, accounting for about 80% of all cases.

Symptoms of ductal carcinoma may include a lump or thickening in the breast, changes in the size or shape of the breast, dimpling or puckering of the skin on the breast, nipple discharge (especially if it is clear or bloody), and/or redness or scaling of the nipple or breast skin. However, many cases of ductal carcinoma are detected through mammography before any symptoms develop.

Treatment for ductal carcinoma depends on several factors, including the stage and grade of the cancer, as well as the patient's overall health and personal preferences. Treatment options may include surgery (such as a lumpectomy or mastectomy), radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and/or targeted therapies.

Splenic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the spleen, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can arise from various cell types present within the spleen, including hematopoietic cells (red and white blood cells, platelets), stromal cells (supporting tissue), or lymphoid cells (part of the immune system).

There are several types of splenic neoplasms:

1. Hematologic malignancies: These are cancers that affect the blood and bone marrow, such as leukemias, lymphomas, and multiple myeloma. They often involve the spleen, causing enlargement (splenomegaly) and neoplastic infiltration of splenic tissue.
2. Primary splenic tumors: These are rare and include benign lesions like hemangiomas, lymphangiomas, and hamartomas, as well as malignant tumors such as angiosarcoma, littoral cell angiosarcoma, and primary splenic lymphoma.
3. Metastatic splenic tumors: These occur when cancer cells from other primary sites spread (metastasize) to the spleen. Common sources of metastasis include lung, breast, colon, and ovarian cancers, as well as melanomas and sarcomas.

Symptoms of splenic neoplasms may vary depending on the type and extent of the disease but often include abdominal pain or discomfort, fatigue, weight loss, and anemia. Diagnosis typically involves imaging studies (such as ultrasound, CT, or MRI scans) and sometimes requires a biopsy for confirmation. Treatment options depend on the type of neoplasm and may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, or immunotherapy.

Muscle neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the muscle tissue. They can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign muscle neoplasms are typically slow-growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant muscle neoplasms, also known as soft tissue sarcomas, can grow quickly, invade nearby tissues, and metastasize (spread) to distant parts of the body.

Soft tissue sarcomas can arise from any of the muscles in the body, including the skeletal muscles (voluntary muscles that attach to bones and help with movement), smooth muscles (involuntary muscles found in the walls of blood vessels, digestive tract, and other organs), or cardiac muscle (the specialized muscle found in the heart).

There are many different types of soft tissue sarcomas, each with its own set of characteristics and prognosis. Treatment for muscle neoplasms typically involves a combination of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, depending on the type, size, location, and stage of the tumor.

Blood vessels are the part of the circulatory system that transport blood throughout the body. They form a network of tubes that carry blood to and from the heart, lungs, and other organs. The main types of blood vessels are arteries, veins, and capillaries. Arteries carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to the rest of the body, while veins return deoxygenated blood back to the heart. Capillaries connect arteries and veins and facilitate the exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste materials between the blood and the body's tissues.

Radiopharmaceuticals are defined as pharmaceutical preparations that contain radioactive isotopes and are used for diagnosis or therapy in nuclear medicine. These compounds are designed to interact specifically with certain biological targets, such as cells, tissues, or organs, and emit radiation that can be detected and measured to provide diagnostic information or used to destroy abnormal cells or tissue in therapeutic applications.

The radioactive isotopes used in radiopharmaceuticals have carefully controlled half-lives, which determine how long they remain radioactive and how long the pharmaceutical preparation remains effective. The choice of radioisotope depends on the intended use of the radiopharmaceutical, as well as factors such as its energy, range of emission, and chemical properties.

Radiopharmaceuticals are used in a wide range of medical applications, including imaging, cancer therapy, and treatment of other diseases and conditions. Examples of radiopharmaceuticals include technetium-99m for imaging the heart, lungs, and bones; iodine-131 for treating thyroid cancer; and samarium-153 for palliative treatment of bone metastases.

The use of radiopharmaceuticals requires specialized training and expertise in nuclear medicine, as well as strict adherence to safety protocols to minimize radiation exposure to patients and healthcare workers.

Esophageal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the tissue of the esophagus, which is the muscular tube that connects the throat to the stomach. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant esophageal neoplasms are typically classified as either squamous cell carcinomas or adenocarcinomas, depending on the type of cell from which they originate.

Esophageal cancer is a serious and often life-threatening condition that can cause symptoms such as difficulty swallowing, chest pain, weight loss, and coughing. Risk factors for esophageal neoplasms include smoking, heavy alcohol consumption, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and Barrett's esophagus. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

A testicular hydrocele is a type of fluid-filled sac that forms around the testicle (testis), typically in the scrotum. This sac, known as the tunica vaginalis, normally contains a small amount of fluid that helps to lubricate and protect the testicle. However, when an excessive amount of fluid accumulates in this sac, it results in the formation of a hydrocele.

Testicular hydroceles can be congenital (present at birth) or acquired later in life due to various reasons such as injury, inflammation, or infection in the scrotal area. They are usually painless but may cause discomfort or a feeling of heaviness in the scrotum, especially when they become large. In some cases, hydroceles may resolve on their own without treatment, while others may require surgical intervention to drain the fluid and repair the underlying issue.

It is essential to differentiate between hydroceles and other conditions with similar symptoms, such as hernias or tumors, which may require more urgent medical attention. A healthcare professional can perform a physical examination and possibly recommend further testing, like an ultrasound, to confirm the diagnosis of a testicular hydrocele.

Rectal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the tissues of the rectum, which can be benign or malignant. They are characterized by uncontrolled cell division and can invade nearby tissues or spread to other parts of the body (metastasis). The most common type of rectal neoplasm is rectal cancer, which often begins as a small polyp or growth in the lining of the rectum. Other types of rectal neoplasms include adenomas, carcinoids, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Regular screenings are recommended for early detection and treatment of rectal neoplasms.

Microfilaria is the larval form of certain parasitic roundworms (nematodes) belonging to the family Onchocercidae. These worms include species that cause filariasis, which are diseases transmitted through the bite of infected mosquitoes or blackflies. The microfilariae are found in the blood or tissue fluids of the host and can measure from 200 to 300 microns in length. They have a distinct sheath and a characteristic tail taper, which helps in their identification under a microscope. Different filarial species have specific microfilariae characteristics, such as size, shape, and lifestyle patterns (nocturnal or diurnal periodicity). The presence of microfilariae in the host's blood or tissue fluids is indicative of an ongoing infection with the respective filarial parasite.

"Carcinoma, Lewis lung" is a term used to describe a specific type of lung cancer that was first discovered in strain C57BL/6J mice by Dr. Margaret R. Lewis in 1951. It is a spontaneously occurring undifferentiated carcinoma that originates from the lung epithelium and is highly invasive and metastatic, making it a popular model for studying cancer biology and testing potential therapies.

The Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells are typically characterized by their rapid growth rate, ability to form tumors when implanted into syngeneic mice, and high levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which promotes angiogenesis and tumor growth.

It is important to note that while the LLC model has been useful for studying certain aspects of lung cancer, it may not fully recapitulate the complexity and heterogeneity of human lung cancers. Therefore, findings from LLC studies should be validated in more clinically relevant models before being translated into human therapies.

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of primary liver cancer in adults. It originates from the hepatocytes, which are the main functional cells of the liver. This type of cancer is often associated with chronic liver diseases such as cirrhosis caused by hepatitis B or C virus infection, alcohol abuse, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and aflatoxin exposure.

The symptoms of HCC can vary but may include unexplained weight loss, lack of appetite, abdominal pain or swelling, jaundice, and fatigue. The diagnosis of HCC typically involves imaging tests such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI, as well as blood tests to measure alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels. Treatment options for Hepatocellular carcinoma depend on the stage and extent of the cancer, as well as the patient's overall health and liver function. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or liver transplantation.

Radiosurgery is a non-invasive surgical procedure that uses precisely focused beams of radiation to treat various medical conditions, primarily in the field of neurosurgery and oncology. It allows for the destruction of targeted tissue while minimizing damage to surrounding healthy structures. Unlike traditional surgery, radiosurgery does not require any incisions, as it delivers radiation through the skin to reach the intended target.

The term "stereotactic" is often associated with radiosurgery, which refers to the use of a three-dimensional coordinate system to precisely locate and target the affected area. This technique enables high doses of radiation to be delivered accurately and efficiently, maximizing therapeutic effectiveness while minimizing side effects.

Radiosurgery can be used to treat various conditions such as brain tumors (both malignant and benign), arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), trigeminal neuralgia, acoustic neuromas, pituitary adenomas, and spinal cord tumors. Common radiosurgery platforms include the Gamma Knife, CyberKnife, and linear accelerator-based systems like Novalis Tx or TrueBeam.

It is essential to note that although it is called "surgery," radiosurgery does not involve any physical incisions or removal of tissue. Instead, it relies on the destructive effects of high-dose radiation to ablate or damage targeted cells over time, leading to their eventual death and resolution of symptoms or tumor control.

Medical Definition:

Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), also known as gelatinase B or 92 kDa type IV collagenase, is a member of the matrix metalloproteinase family. These enzymes are involved in degrading and remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM) components, playing crucial roles in various physiological and pathological processes such as wound healing, tissue repair, and tumor metastasis.

MMP-9 is secreted as an inactive zymogen and activated upon removal of its propeptide domain. It can degrade several ECM proteins, including type IV collagen, elastin, fibronectin, and gelatin. MMP-9 has been implicated in numerous diseases, such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, neurological disorders, and cardiovascular diseases. Its expression is regulated at the transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels, and its activity can be controlled by endogenous inhibitors called tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs).

Gene expression profiling is a laboratory technique used to measure the activity (expression) of thousands of genes at once. This technique allows researchers and clinicians to identify which genes are turned on or off in a particular cell, tissue, or organism under specific conditions, such as during health, disease, development, or in response to various treatments.

The process typically involves isolating RNA from the cells or tissues of interest, converting it into complementary DNA (cDNA), and then using microarray or high-throughput sequencing technologies to determine which genes are expressed and at what levels. The resulting data can be used to identify patterns of gene expression that are associated with specific biological states or processes, providing valuable insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of diseases and potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

In recent years, gene expression profiling has become an essential tool in various fields, including cancer research, drug discovery, and personalized medicine, where it is used to identify biomarkers of disease, predict patient outcomes, and guide treatment decisions.

Monoclonal antibodies are a type of antibody that are identical because they are produced by a single clone of cells. They are laboratory-produced molecules that act like human antibodies in the immune system. They can be designed to attach to specific proteins found on the surface of cancer cells, making them useful for targeting and treating cancer. Monoclonal antibodies can also be used as a therapy for other diseases, such as autoimmune disorders and inflammatory conditions.

Monoclonal antibodies are produced by fusing a single type of immune cell, called a B cell, with a tumor cell to create a hybrid cell, or hybridoma. This hybrid cell is then able to replicate indefinitely, producing a large number of identical copies of the original antibody. These antibodies can be further modified and engineered to enhance their ability to bind to specific targets, increase their stability, and improve their effectiveness as therapeutic agents.

Monoclonal antibodies have several mechanisms of action in cancer therapy. They can directly kill cancer cells by binding to them and triggering an immune response. They can also block the signals that promote cancer growth and survival. Additionally, monoclonal antibodies can be used to deliver drugs or radiation directly to cancer cells, increasing the effectiveness of these treatments while minimizing their side effects on healthy tissues.

Monoclonal antibodies have become an important tool in modern medicine, with several approved for use in cancer therapy and other diseases. They are continuing to be studied and developed as a promising approach to treating a wide range of medical conditions.

Positron-Emission Tomography (PET) is a type of nuclear medicine imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material, called a radiotracer, to produce detailed, three-dimensional images. This technique measures metabolic activity within the body, such as sugar metabolism, to help distinguish between healthy and diseased tissue, identify cancerous cells, or examine the function of organs.

During a PET scan, the patient is injected with a radiotracer, typically a sugar-based compound labeled with a positron-emitting radioisotope, such as fluorine-18 (^18^F). The radiotracer accumulates in cells that are metabolically active, like cancer cells. As the radiotracer decays, it emits positrons, which then collide with electrons in nearby tissue, producing gamma rays. A special camera, called a PET scanner, detects these gamma rays and uses this information to create detailed images of the body's internal structures and processes.

PET is often used in conjunction with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to provide both functional and anatomical information, allowing for more accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. Common applications include detecting cancer recurrence, staging and monitoring cancer, evaluating heart function, and assessing brain function in conditions like dementia and epilepsy.

Sensitivity and specificity are statistical measures used to describe the performance of a diagnostic test or screening tool in identifying true positive and true negative results.

* Sensitivity refers to the proportion of people who have a particular condition (true positives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true positive rate" or "recall." A highly sensitive test will identify most or all of the people with the condition, but may also produce more false positives.
* Specificity refers to the proportion of people who do not have a particular condition (true negatives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true negative rate." A highly specific test will identify most or all of the people without the condition, but may also produce more false negatives.

In medical testing, both sensitivity and specificity are important considerations when evaluating a diagnostic test. High sensitivity is desirable for screening tests that aim to identify as many cases of a condition as possible, while high specificity is desirable for confirmatory tests that aim to rule out the condition in people who do not have it.

It's worth noting that sensitivity and specificity are often influenced by factors such as the prevalence of the condition in the population being tested, the threshold used to define a positive result, and the reliability and validity of the test itself. Therefore, it's important to consider these factors when interpreting the results of a diagnostic test.

Peritoneal neoplasms refer to tumors or cancerous growths that develop in the peritoneum, which is the thin, transparent membrane that lines the inner wall of the abdomen and covers the organs within it. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant peritoneal neoplasms are often associated with advanced stages of gastrointestinal, ovarian, or uterine cancers and can spread (metastasize) to other parts of the abdomen.

Peritoneal neoplasms can cause various symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, and weight loss. Diagnosis typically involves imaging tests like CT scans or MRIs, followed by a biopsy to confirm the presence of cancerous cells. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or a combination of these approaches, depending on the type, stage, and location of the neoplasm.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

A neoplasm micrometastasis is a small focus of cancer cells that has spread (metastasized) from the primary tumor to a distant site and is too small to be detected by standard diagnostic methods, such as imaging studies or clinical examination. It is typically identified through the use of immunohistochemical stains or molecular techniques during microscopic examination of tissue samples.

Micrometastases are often found in patients with early-stage cancer and can indicate a higher risk of recurrence or metastasis. However, not all micrometastases will progress to clinical metastases, and their significance is still an area of ongoing research.

Diphosphonates are a class of medications that are used to treat bone diseases, such as osteoporosis and Paget's disease. They work by binding to the surface of bones and inhibiting the activity of bone-resorbing cells called osteoclasts. This helps to slow down the breakdown and loss of bone tissue, which can help to reduce the risk of fractures.

Diphosphonates are typically taken orally in the form of tablets, but some forms may be given by injection. Commonly prescribed diphosphonates include alendronate (Fosamax), risedronate (Actonel), and ibandronate (Boniva). Side effects of diphosphonates can include gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, heartburn, and abdominal pain. In rare cases, they may also cause esophageal ulcers or osteonecrosis of the jaw.

It is important to follow the instructions for taking diphosphonates carefully, as they must be taken on an empty stomach with a full glass of water and the patient must remain upright for at least 30 minutes after taking the medication to reduce the risk of esophageal irritation. Regular monitoring of bone density and kidney function is also recommended while taking these medications.

The Predictive Value of Tests, specifically the Positive Predictive Value (PPV) and Negative Predictive Value (NPV), are measures used in diagnostic tests to determine the probability that a positive or negative test result is correct.

Positive Predictive Value (PPV) is the proportion of patients with a positive test result who actually have the disease. It is calculated as the number of true positives divided by the total number of positive results (true positives + false positives). A higher PPV indicates that a positive test result is more likely to be a true positive, and therefore the disease is more likely to be present.

Negative Predictive Value (NPV) is the proportion of patients with a negative test result who do not have the disease. It is calculated as the number of true negatives divided by the total number of negative results (true negatives + false negatives). A higher NPV indicates that a negative test result is more likely to be a true negative, and therefore the disease is less likely to be present.

The predictive value of tests depends on the prevalence of the disease in the population being tested, as well as the sensitivity and specificity of the test. A test with high sensitivity and specificity will generally have higher predictive values than a test with low sensitivity and specificity. However, even a highly sensitive and specific test can have low predictive values if the prevalence of the disease is low in the population being tested.

Neck dissection is a surgical procedure that involves the removal of lymph nodes and other tissues from the neck. It is typically performed as part of cancer treatment, particularly in cases of head and neck cancer, to help determine the stage of the cancer, prevent the spread of cancer, or treat existing metastases. There are several types of neck dissections, including radical, modified radical, and selective neck dissection, which vary based on the extent of tissue removal. The specific type of neck dissection performed depends on the location and extent of the cancer.

Glycoproteins are complex proteins that contain oligosaccharide chains (glycans) covalently attached to their polypeptide backbone. These glycans are linked to the protein through asparagine residues (N-linked) or serine/threonine residues (O-linked). Glycoproteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell recognition, cell-cell interactions, cell adhesion, and signal transduction. They are widely distributed in nature and can be found on the outer surface of cell membranes, in extracellular fluids, and as components of the extracellular matrix. The structure and composition of glycoproteins can vary significantly depending on their function and location within an organism.

Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a protein that is normally produced in small amounts during fetal development. In adults, low levels of CEA can be found in the blood, but elevated levels are typically associated with various types of cancer, particularly colon, rectal, and breast cancer.

Measurement of CEA levels in the blood is sometimes used as a tumor marker to monitor response to treatment, detect recurrence, or screen for secondary cancers in patients with a history of certain types of cancer. However, it's important to note that CEA is not a specific or sensitive indicator of cancer and can be elevated in various benign conditions such as inflammation, smoking, and some gastrointestinal diseases. Therefore, the test should be interpreted in conjunction with other clinical and diagnostic findings.

Albendazole is an antiparasitic medication used to treat a variety of parasitic infections, including neurocysticercosis (a tapeworm infection that affects the brain), hydatid disease (a parasitic infection that can affect various organs), and other types of worm infestations such as pinworm, roundworm, hookworm, and whipworm infections.

Albendazole works by inhibiting the polymerization of beta-tubulin, a protein found in the microtubules of parasitic cells, which disrupts the parasite's ability to maintain its shape and move. This leads to the death of the parasite and elimination of the infection.

Albendazole is available in oral form and is typically taken two to three times a day with meals for several days or weeks, depending on the type and severity of the infection being treated. Common side effects of albendazole include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and headache. Rare but serious side effects may include liver damage, bone marrow suppression, and neurological problems.

It is important to note that albendazole should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare provider, as it can have serious side effects and interactions with other medications. Additionally, it is not effective against all types of parasitic infections, so proper diagnosis is essential before starting treatment.

Medical Definition:

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic imaging technique that uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed cross-sectional or three-dimensional images of the internal structures of the body. The patient lies within a large, cylindrical magnet, and the scanner detects changes in the direction of the magnetic field caused by protons in the body. These changes are then converted into detailed images that help medical professionals to diagnose and monitor various medical conditions, such as tumors, injuries, or diseases affecting the brain, spinal cord, heart, blood vessels, joints, and other internal organs. MRI does not use radiation like computed tomography (CT) scans.

A Gastrectomy is a surgical procedure involving the removal of all or part of the stomach. This procedure can be total (complete resection of the stomach), partial (removal of a portion of the stomach), or sleeve (removal of a portion of the stomach to create a narrow sleeve-shaped pouch).

Gastrectomies are typically performed to treat conditions such as gastric cancer, benign tumors, severe peptic ulcers, and in some cases, for weight loss in individuals with morbid obesity. The type of gastrectomy performed depends on the patient's medical condition and the extent of the disease.

Following a gastrectomy, patients may require adjustments to their diet and lifestyle, as well as potential supplementation of vitamins and minerals that would normally be absorbed in the stomach. In some cases, further reconstructive surgery might be necessary to reestablish gastrointestinal continuity.

Neoplasm seeding, also known as tumor seeding or iatrogenic implantation, is a rare complication that can occur during surgical procedures. It refers to the accidental spread of cancer cells from the primary tumor site to other locations in the body, usually along the path of a surgical incision or via bodily fluids. This can result in new tumor growths (metastases) at these sites, which may complicate treatment and worsen the patient's prognosis.

Neoplasm seeding is more commonly associated with certain types of surgeries, such as those involving the liver, pancreas, or other organs with highly vascular tumors. It can also occur during biopsy procedures, where a needle is used to remove tissue samples for diagnostic purposes. While neoplasm seeding is a known risk of these procedures, it is relatively uncommon and often outweighed by the benefits of timely and effective treatment.

Tumor suppressor proteins are a type of regulatory protein that helps control the cell cycle and prevent cells from dividing and growing in an uncontrolled manner. They work to inhibit tumor growth by preventing the formation of tumors or slowing down their progression. These proteins can repair damaged DNA, regulate gene expression, and initiate programmed cell death (apoptosis) if the damage is too severe for repair.

Mutations in tumor suppressor genes, which provide the code for these proteins, can lead to a decrease or loss of function in the resulting protein. This can result in uncontrolled cell growth and division, leading to the formation of tumors and cancer. Examples of tumor suppressor proteins include p53, Rb (retinoblastoma), and BRCA1/2.

Diagnostic imaging is a medical specialty that uses various technologies to produce visual representations of the internal structures and functioning of the body. These images are used to diagnose injury, disease, or other abnormalities and to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. Common modalities of diagnostic imaging include:

1. Radiography (X-ray): Uses ionizing radiation to produce detailed images of bones, teeth, and some organs.
2. Computed Tomography (CT) Scan: Combines X-ray technology with computer processing to create cross-sectional images of the body.
3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to generate detailed images of soft tissues, organs, and bones.
4. Ultrasound: Employs high-frequency sound waves to produce real-time images of internal structures, often used for obstetrics and gynecology.
5. Nuclear Medicine: Involves the administration of radioactive tracers to assess organ function or detect abnormalities within the body.
6. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scan: Uses a small amount of radioactive material to produce detailed images of metabolic activity in the body, often used for cancer detection and monitoring treatment response.
7. Fluoroscopy: Utilizes continuous X-ray imaging to observe moving structures or processes within the body, such as swallowing studies or angiography.

Diagnostic imaging plays a crucial role in modern medicine, allowing healthcare providers to make informed decisions about patient care and treatment plans.

Up-regulation is a term used in molecular biology and medicine to describe an increase in the expression or activity of a gene, protein, or receptor in response to a stimulus. This can occur through various mechanisms such as increased transcription, translation, or reduced degradation of the molecule. Up-regulation can have important functional consequences, for example, enhancing the sensitivity or response of a cell to a hormone, neurotransmitter, or drug. It is a normal physiological process that can also be induced by disease or pharmacological interventions.

Indocyanine green (ICG) is a sterile, water-soluble, tricarbocyanine dye that is used as a diagnostic agent in medical imaging. It is primarily used in ophthalmology for fluorescein angiography to examine blood flow in the retina and choroid, and in cardiac surgery to assess cardiac output and perfusion. When injected into the body, ICG binds to plasma proteins and fluoresces when exposed to near-infrared light, allowing for visualization of various tissues and structures. It is excreted primarily by the liver and has a half-life of approximately 3-4 minutes in the bloodstream.

A biopsy is a medical procedure in which a small sample of tissue is taken from the body to be examined under a microscope for the presence of disease. This can help doctors diagnose and monitor various medical conditions, such as cancer, infections, or autoimmune disorders. The type of biopsy performed will depend on the location and nature of the suspected condition. Some common types of biopsies include:

1. Incisional biopsy: In this procedure, a surgeon removes a piece of tissue from an abnormal area using a scalpel or other surgical instrument. This type of biopsy is often used when the lesion is too large to be removed entirely during the initial biopsy.

2. Excisional biopsy: An excisional biopsy involves removing the entire abnormal area, along with a margin of healthy tissue surrounding it. This technique is typically employed for smaller lesions or when cancer is suspected.

3. Needle biopsy: A needle biopsy uses a thin, hollow needle to extract cells or fluid from the body. There are two main types of needle biopsies: fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and core needle biopsy. FNA extracts loose cells, while a core needle biopsy removes a small piece of tissue.

4. Punch biopsy: In a punch biopsy, a round, sharp tool is used to remove a small cylindrical sample of skin tissue. This type of biopsy is often used for evaluating rashes or other skin abnormalities.

5. Shave biopsy: During a shave biopsy, a thin slice of tissue is removed from the surface of the skin using a sharp razor-like instrument. This technique is typically used for superficial lesions or growths on the skin.

After the biopsy sample has been collected, it is sent to a laboratory where a pathologist will examine the tissue under a microscope and provide a diagnosis based on their findings. The results of the biopsy can help guide further treatment decisions and determine the best course of action for managing the patient's condition.

Chyle is a milky, slightly opaque fluid that is present in the lymphatic system. It is formed in the small intestine during the digestion of food, particularly fats. Chyle consists of emulsified fat droplets (chylomicrons), proteins, electrolytes, and lymphocytes suspended in a watery solution. It is transported through the lacteals in the villi of the small intestine into the cisterna chyli and then to the thoracic duct, where it empties into the left subclavian vein. From there, it mixes with blood and circulates throughout the body. Chyle formation plays a crucial role in fat absorption and transportation in the human body.

'Brugia' is a genus of parasitic nematode worms that are known to cause lymphatic filariasis, a tropical disease affecting the lymphatic system. There are three main species of Brugia that infect humans: Brugia malayi, Brugia timori, and Brugia garinii. These parasites are transmitted to humans through the bite of infected mosquitoes.

Brugia malayi is found primarily in Southeast Asia, while Brugia timori is restricted to the island of Timor in Indonesia. Brugia garinii, on the other hand, is more widely distributed and can be found in parts of Africa and Asia.

The infection caused by these parasites can lead to a range of symptoms, including fever, swelling of the lymph nodes, and elephantiasis, a condition characterized by severe swelling of the limbs or genitals. Preventive measures such as avoiding mosquito bites and mass drug administration programs are in place to control the spread of lymphatic filariasis caused by Brugia species.

CD44 is a type of protein found on the surface of some cells in the human body. It is a cell adhesion molecule and is involved in various biological processes such as cell-cell interaction, lymphocyte activation, and migration of cells. CD44 also acts as a receptor for hyaluronic acid, a component of the extracellular matrix.

As an antigen, CD44 can be recognized by certain immune cells, including T cells and B cells, and can play a role in the immune response. There are several isoforms of CD44 that exist due to alternative splicing of its mRNA, leading to differences in its structure and function.

CD44 has been studied in the context of cancer, where it can contribute to tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. In some cases, high levels of CD44 have been associated with poor prognosis in certain types of cancer. However, CD44 also has potential roles in tumor suppression and immune surveillance, making its overall role in cancer complex and context-dependent.

Head and neck neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the head and neck region, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These tumors can develop in various sites, including the oral cavity, nasopharynx, oropharynx, larynx, hypopharynx, paranasal sinuses, salivary glands, and thyroid gland.

Benign neoplasms are slow-growing and generally do not spread to other parts of the body. However, they can still cause problems if they grow large enough to press on surrounding tissues or structures. Malignant neoplasms, on the other hand, can invade nearby tissues and organs and may also metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body.

Head and neck neoplasms can have various symptoms depending on their location and size. Common symptoms include difficulty swallowing, speaking, or breathing; pain in the mouth, throat, or ears; persistent coughing or hoarseness; and swelling or lumps in the neck or face. Early detection and treatment of head and neck neoplasms are crucial for improving outcomes and reducing the risk of complications.

The tumor microenvironment (TME) is a complex and dynamic setting that consists of various cellular and non-cellular components, which interact with each other and contribute to the growth, progression, and dissemination of cancer. The TME includes:

1. Cancer cells: These are the malignant cells that grow uncontrollably, invade surrounding tissues, and can spread to distant organs.
2. Stromal cells: These are non-cancerous cells present within the tumor, including fibroblasts, immune cells, adipocytes, and endothelial cells. They play a crucial role in supporting the growth of cancer cells by providing structural and nutritional support, modulating the immune response, and promoting angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels).
3. Extracellular matrix (ECM): This is the non-cellular component of the TME, consisting of a network of proteins, glycoproteins, and polysaccharides that provide structural support and regulate cell behavior. The ECM can be remodeled by both cancer and stromal cells, leading to changes in tissue stiffness, architecture, and signaling pathways.
4. Soluble factors: These include various cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and metabolites that are secreted by both cancer and stromal cells. They can act as signaling molecules, influencing cell behavior, survival, proliferation, and migration.
5. Blood vessels: The formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) within the TME is essential for providing nutrients and oxygen to support the growth of cancer cells. The vasculature in the TME is often disorganized, leading to hypoxic (low oxygen) regions and altered drug delivery.
6. Immune cells: The TME contains various immune cell populations, such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), dendritic cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and different subsets of T lymphocytes. These cells can either promote or inhibit the growth and progression of cancer, depending on their phenotype and activation status.
7. Niche: A specific microenvironment within the TME that supports the survival and function of cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating cells. The niche is often characterized by unique cellular components, signaling molecules, and physical properties that contribute to the maintenance and propagation of CSCs.

Understanding the complex interactions between these various components in the TME can provide valuable insights into cancer biology and help inform the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

Transgenic mice are genetically modified rodents that have incorporated foreign DNA (exogenous DNA) into their own genome. This is typically done through the use of recombinant DNA technology, where a specific gene or genetic sequence of interest is isolated and then introduced into the mouse embryo. The resulting transgenic mice can then express the protein encoded by the foreign gene, allowing researchers to study its function in a living organism.

The process of creating transgenic mice usually involves microinjecting the exogenous DNA into the pronucleus of a fertilized egg, which is then implanted into a surrogate mother. The offspring that result from this procedure are screened for the presence of the foreign DNA, and those that carry the desired genetic modification are used to establish a transgenic mouse line.

Transgenic mice have been widely used in biomedical research to model human diseases, study gene function, and test new therapies. They provide a valuable tool for understanding complex biological processes and developing new treatments for a variety of medical conditions.

Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), also known as gelatinase A, is an enzyme that belongs to the matrix metalloproteinase family. MMPs are involved in the breakdown of extracellular matrix components, and MMP-2 is responsible for degrading type IV collagen, a major component of the basement membrane. This enzyme plays a crucial role in various physiological processes, including tissue remodeling, wound healing, and angiogenesis. However, its dysregulation has been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as cancer, arthritis, and cardiovascular diseases. MMP-2 is synthesized as an inactive proenzyme and requires activation by other proteases or chemical modifications before it can exert its proteolytic activity.

Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a type of short, double-stranded RNA molecule that plays a role in the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. The RNAi pathway is a natural cellular process that regulates gene expression by targeting and destroying specific messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules, thereby preventing the translation of those mRNAs into proteins.

SiRNAs are typically 20-25 base pairs in length and are generated from longer double-stranded RNA precursors called hairpin RNAs or dsRNAs by an enzyme called Dicer. Once generated, siRNAs associate with a protein complex called the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which uses one strand of the siRNA (the guide strand) to recognize and bind to complementary sequences in the target mRNA. The RISC then cleaves the target mRNA, leading to its degradation and the inhibition of protein synthesis.

SiRNAs have emerged as a powerful tool for studying gene function and have shown promise as therapeutic agents for a variety of diseases, including viral infections, cancer, and genetic disorders. However, their use as therapeutics is still in the early stages of development, and there are challenges associated with delivering siRNAs to specific cells and tissues in the body.

Adenocarcinoma, follicular is a type of cancer that develops in the follicular cells of the thyroid gland. The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped endocrine gland located in the neck that produces hormones responsible for regulating various bodily functions such as metabolism and growth.

Follicular adenocarcinoma arises from the follicular cells, which are responsible for producing thyroid hormones. This type of cancer is typically slow-growing and may not cause any symptoms in its early stages. However, as it progresses, it can lead to a variety of symptoms such as a lump or nodule in the neck, difficulty swallowing, hoarseness, or pain in the neck or throat.

Follicular adenocarcinoma is usually treated with surgical removal of the thyroid gland (thyroidectomy), followed by radioactive iodine therapy to destroy any remaining cancer cells. In some cases, additional treatments such as radiation therapy or chemotherapy may be necessary. The prognosis for follicular adenocarcinoma is generally good, with a five-year survival rate of around 90%. However, this can vary depending on the stage and aggressiveness of the cancer at the time of diagnosis.

Sarcoma is a type of cancer that develops from certain types of connective tissue (such as muscle, fat, fibrous tissue, blood vessels, or nerves) found throughout the body. It can occur in any part of the body, but it most commonly occurs in the arms, legs, chest, and abdomen.

Sarcomas are classified into two main groups: bone sarcomas and soft tissue sarcomas. Bone sarcomas develop in the bones, while soft tissue sarcomas develop in the soft tissues of the body, such as muscles, tendons, ligaments, fat, blood vessels, and nerves.

Sarcomas can be further classified into many subtypes based on their specific characteristics, such as the type of tissue they originate from, their genetic makeup, and their appearance under a microscope. The different subtypes of sarcoma have varying symptoms, prognoses, and treatment options.

Overall, sarcomas are relatively rare cancers, accounting for less than 1% of all cancer diagnoses in the United States each year. However, they can be aggressive and may require intensive treatment, such as surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

Cranial irradiation is a medical treatment that involves the use of radiation therapy to target the brain. It is often used to treat various conditions affecting the brain, such as brain tumors, leukemia, and certain neurological disorders. The radiation is directed at the skull and can be focused on specific areas of the brain or delivered more broadly, depending on the nature and location of the condition being treated.

The goal of cranial irradiation may be to destroy cancer cells, reduce the size of tumors, prevent the spread of cancer, or provide symptomatic relief for patients with advanced disease. However, it is important to note that cranial irradiation can have side effects, including hair loss, fatigue, memory problems, and cognitive changes, among others. These side effects can vary in severity and duration depending on the individual patient and the specific treatment regimen.

Coloring agents, also known as food dyes or color additives, are substances that are added to foods, medications, and cosmetics to improve their appearance by giving them a specific color. These agents can be made from both synthetic and natural sources. They must be approved by regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) before they can be used in products intended for human consumption.

Coloring agents are used for various reasons, including:

* To replace color lost during food processing or preparation
* To make foods more visually appealing
* To help consumers easily identify certain types of food
* To indicate the flavor of a product (e.g., fruit-flavored candies)

It's important to note that while coloring agents can enhance the appearance of products, they do not affect their taste or nutritional value. Some people may have allergic reactions to certain coloring agents, so it's essential to check product labels if you have any known allergies. Additionally, excessive consumption of some synthetic coloring agents has been linked to health concerns, so moderation is key.

CD82 is a type of protein found on the surface of certain cells in the human body. It is classified as a transmembrane protein, which means that it spans the cell membrane and has both extracellular and intracellular domains. CD82 is also known as tetraspanin-29 or TSPAN29, and it belongs to the tetraspanin family of proteins, which are involved in various cellular processes such as cell adhesion, motility, and signaling.

CD82 has been identified as a tumor suppressor protein, and its expression is often reduced or lost in various types of cancer, including breast, lung, prostate, and colon cancer. This loss of CD82 expression has been associated with increased tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis.

In terms of its role as an antigen, CD82 can be recognized by the immune system and may elicit an immune response in certain contexts. For example, CD82-specific antibodies have been detected in some patients with autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting that CD82 may be a target of autoimmunity. Additionally, CD82 has been shown to interact with various viral proteins and may play a role in the immune response to viral infections.

Overall, while CD82 is not typically classified as an antigen in the same way that proteins from pathogens or transplanted tissues are, it can be recognized by the immune system and has been implicated in various immunological processes.

Vesicular transport proteins are specialized proteins that play a crucial role in the intracellular trafficking and transportation of various biomolecules, such as proteins and lipids, within eukaryotic cells. These proteins facilitate the formation, movement, and fusion of membrane-bound vesicles, which are small, spherical structures that carry cargo between different cellular compartments or organelles.

There are several types of vesicular transport proteins involved in this process:

1. Coat Proteins (COPs): These proteins form a coat around the vesicle membrane and help shape it into its spherical form during the budding process. They also participate in selecting and sorting cargo for transportation. Two main types of COPs exist: COPI, which is involved in transport between the Golgi apparatus and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and COPII, which mediates transport from the ER to the Golgi apparatus.

2. SNARE Proteins: These proteins are responsible for the specific recognition and docking of vesicles with their target membranes. They form complexes that bring the vesicle and target membranes close together, allowing for fusion and the release of cargo into the target organelle. There are two types of SNARE proteins: v-SNAREs (vesicle SNAREs) and t-SNAREs (target SNAREs), which interact to form a stable complex during membrane fusion.

3. Rab GTPases: These proteins act as molecular switches that regulate the recruitment of coat proteins, motor proteins, and SNAREs during vesicle transport. They cycle between an active GTP-bound state and an inactive GDP-bound state, controlling the various stages of vesicular trafficking, such as budding, transport, tethering, and fusion.

4. Tethering Proteins: These proteins help to bridge the gap between vesicles and their target membranes before SNARE-mediated fusion occurs. They play a role in ensuring specificity during vesicle docking and may also contribute to regulating the timing of membrane fusion events.

5. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor Attachment Protein Receptors (SNAREs): These proteins are involved in intracellular transport, particularly in the trafficking of vesicles between organelles. They consist of a family of coiled-coil domain-containing proteins that form complexes to mediate membrane fusion events.

Overall, these various classes of proteins work together to ensure the specificity and efficiency of vesicular transport in eukaryotic cells. Dysregulation or mutation of these proteins can lead to various diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders and cancer.

Abdominal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the abdomen that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can occur in any of the organs within the abdominal cavity, including the stomach, small intestine, large intestine, liver, pancreas, spleen, and kidneys.

Abdominal neoplasms can cause various symptoms depending on their size, location, and type. Some common symptoms include abdominal pain or discomfort, bloating, changes in bowel habits, unexplained weight loss, fatigue, and fever. In some cases, abdominal neoplasms may not cause any symptoms until they have grown quite large or spread to other parts of the body.

The diagnosis of abdominal neoplasms typically involves a combination of physical exam, medical history, imaging studies such as CT scans or MRIs, and sometimes biopsy to confirm the type of tumor. Treatment options depend on the type, stage, and location of the neoplasm but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Multivariate analysis is a statistical method used to examine the relationship between multiple independent variables and a dependent variable. It allows for the simultaneous examination of the effects of two or more independent variables on an outcome, while controlling for the effects of other variables in the model. This technique can be used to identify patterns, associations, and interactions among multiple variables, and is commonly used in medical research to understand complex health outcomes and disease processes. Examples of multivariate analysis methods include multiple regression, factor analysis, cluster analysis, and discriminant analysis.

Filariasis is a parasitic disease caused by infection with roundworms of the Filarioidea type. The infection is spread through the bite of infected mosquitoes and can lead to various symptoms depending on the type of filarial worm, including lymphatic dysfunction (elephantiasis), eye damage (onchocerciasis or river blindness), and tropical pulmonary eosinophilia. The disease is prevalent in tropical areas with poor sanitation and lack of access to clean water. Preventive measures include wearing protective clothing, using insect repellents, and sleeping under mosquito nets. Treatment typically involves the use of antiparasitic drugs such as diethylcarbamazine or ivermectin.

Membrane glycoproteins are proteins that contain oligosaccharide chains (glycans) covalently attached to their polypeptide backbone. They are integral components of biological membranes, spanning the lipid bilayer and playing crucial roles in various cellular processes.

The glycosylation of these proteins occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus during protein folding and trafficking. The attached glycans can vary in structure, length, and composition, which contributes to the diversity of membrane glycoproteins.

Membrane glycoproteins can be classified into two main types based on their orientation within the lipid bilayer:

1. Type I (N-linked): These glycoproteins have a single transmembrane domain and an extracellular N-terminus, where the oligosaccharides are predominantly attached via asparagine residues (Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequon).
2. Type II (C-linked): These glycoproteins possess two transmembrane domains and an intracellular C-terminus, with the oligosaccharides linked to tryptophan residues via a mannose moiety.

Membrane glycoproteins are involved in various cellular functions, such as:

* Cell adhesion and recognition
* Receptor-mediated signal transduction
* Enzymatic catalysis
* Transport of molecules across membranes
* Cell-cell communication
* Immunological responses

Some examples of membrane glycoproteins include cell surface receptors (e.g., growth factor receptors, cytokine receptors), adhesion molecules (e.g., integrins, cadherins), and transporters (e.g., ion channels, ABC transporters).

Skull neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop within the skull. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They can originate from various types of cells, such as bone cells, nerve cells, or soft tissues. Skull neoplasms can cause various symptoms depending on their size and location, including headaches, seizures, vision problems, hearing loss, and neurological deficits. Treatment options include surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. It is important to note that a neoplasm in the skull can also refer to metastatic cancer, which has spread from another part of the body to the skull.

Antineoplastic combined chemotherapy protocols refer to a treatment plan for cancer that involves the use of more than one antineoplastic (chemotherapy) drug given in a specific sequence and schedule. The combination of drugs is used because they may work better together to destroy cancer cells compared to using a single agent alone. This approach can also help to reduce the likelihood of cancer cells becoming resistant to the treatment.

The choice of drugs, dose, duration, and frequency are determined by various factors such as the type and stage of cancer, patient's overall health, and potential side effects. Combination chemotherapy protocols can be used in various settings, including as a primary treatment, adjuvant therapy (given after surgery or radiation to kill any remaining cancer cells), neoadjuvant therapy (given before surgery or radiation to shrink the tumor), or palliative care (to alleviate symptoms and prolong survival).

It is important to note that while combined chemotherapy protocols can be effective in treating certain types of cancer, they can also cause significant side effects, including nausea, vomiting, hair loss, fatigue, and an increased risk of infection. Therefore, patients undergoing such treatment should be closely monitored and managed by a healthcare team experienced in administering chemotherapy.

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Shayan, Ramin; Achen, Marc G.; Stacker, Steven A. (2006). "Lymphatic vessels in cancer metastasis: bridging the gaps". ... These channels are the lymphatic channels, or simply lymphatics. Unlike the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system is not ... This lymphatic fluid is then transported via progressively larger lymphatic vessels through lymph nodes, where substances are ... "Definition of lymphatics". Webster's New World Medical Dictionary. MedicineNet.com. Retrieved 6 July 2008. Hedrick, Michael S ...
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"Lymphatic metastases with childhood rhabdomyosarcoma. A report from the intergroup rhabdomyosarcoma study". Cancer. 60 (4): 910 ...
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2005). "Positive association of heparanase expression with tumor invasion and lymphatic metastasis in gastric carcinoma". Mod. ...
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Grove, Narine; Zheng, Ma; Bristow, Robert E.; Eskander, Ramez N. (July 2015). "Extensive Tattoos Mimicking Lymphatic Metastasis ... Mulcahy, Nick (15 June 2015). "Tattoos Mistaken as Cancer Metastases, Surgery Performed". Medscape. Retrieved 24 October 2017. ... a portion of the ink is carried away by blood vessels and the lymphatic system, and some of it may be excreted or stored ...
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Boes KM, Durham AC (February 2017). "Bone Marrow, Blood Cells, and the Lymphoid/Lymphatic System.". Pathologic Basis of ... Holinstat M (June 2017). "Normal platelet function". Cancer and Metastasis Reviews. 36 (2): 195-198. doi:10.1007/s10555-017- ...
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Absence of FOXC2 has been shown to lead to the failure of lymphatic valves to form and problems with lymphatic remodelling. A ... FOXC2 is also involved in cancer metastases. In particular, expression of FOXC2 is induced when epithelial cells undergo an ... 2009). "Prox-1 and FOXC2 gene expression in adipose tissue: A potential contributory role of the lymphatic system to familial ... 2009). "Abnormal Shh and FOXC2 expression correlates with aberrant lymphatic development in human fetuses with increased nuchal ...
"Expression of cytoskeleton-associated protein 4 is related to lymphatic metastasis and indicates prognosis of intrahepatic ... of CLIMP-63 is observed in cholangio-cellular and hepatocellular carcinoma and it correlates with lymph node metastasis ...
Metastasis is common in the late stages of cancer and it can occur via the blood or the lymphatic system or both. The typical ... Metastasis is common in the late stages of cancer and it can occur via the blood or the lymphatic system or both. The typical ... 41 "Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: A Systematic Review". Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: A Systematic Review ... Metastasis is the spread of cancer to other locations in the body. The dispersed tumors are called metastatic tumors, while the ...
Metastasis is the spread of cancer from one part of the body to another via either the circulatory system or lymphatic system. ...
Microarray data posits the expression of LOC105377021 in certain breast cancer tissues, including metastases to lymphatic and ...
In these cases, the most common site of metastases is the liver, as well as the lymph nodes. However, the second type of ... This occurs when cancerous cells break away from the insulinoma and enter the bloodstream or lymphatic system. Thus, it is ... The main sites of metastasis for pancreatic cancer are the: liver, lung and peritoneum. Diagnosis can occur via two distinct ... Upon spreading and entering another part of the body, the process of metastasis has successfully occurred. The cancerous cells ...
Numbers 0 and 1, with subgroups, describe the metastasis status: M0: No evidence of distant metastasis M1a: Spread to 1 other ... "T" denotes the degree of invasion of the intestinal wall, "N" the degree of lymphatic node involvement, and "M" the degree of ... Adjunct staging of metastasis include abdominal ultrasound, MRI, CT, PET scanning, and other imaging studies. The most common ... Gabriel WB, Dukes C, Busset HJR: Lymphatic spread in cancer of the rectum. Br J Surg 23:395-413, 1935 Grinnell RS: The grading ...
Given the role of lymphatic vessels in tumour metastasis, Sox18 is being developed as a potential drug target for anti- ... Koopman's group also discovered Sox18, a switch gene that directs formation of the lymphatic vessels, and is defective in ... "Sox18 induces development of the lymphatic vasculature in mice". Nature. 456 (7222): 643-647. Bibcode:2008Natur.456..643F. doi: ...
The medullary cords are cords of lymphatic tissue, and include plasma cells, macrophages, and B cells. In the lymphatic system ... is predicated on the presence of node metastases. Lymphedema is the condition of swelling (edema) of tissue relating to ... Lymph enters the convex side of a lymph node through multiple afferent lymphatic vessels, which form a network of lymphatic ... In the lymphatic system a lymph node is a secondary lymphoid organ. A lymph node is enclosed in a fibrous capsule and is made ...
Cervical metastasis by a tumor is firm statement of its aggressive malignant nature. Nothing is more controversial than the ... In such cases, rerouting is possible, with metastases arising in unusual sites. Metastases have also been shown to skip first- ... encoded search term (Neck%2C Cervical Metastases%2C Detection) and Neck, Cervical Metastases, Detection What to Read Next on ... Evaluation of the Neck for Cervical Metastases: Physical Examination. Evaluating neck metastases based on physical examination ...
Lymphatic Metastasis * Mastectomy, Segmental * Metal Nanoparticles / administration & dosage* * Middle Aged * Neoplasm Grading ...
The process is called metastasis. It can lead to the formation of a secondary cancer mass in another part of the body. ... Lymphatic circulation in breast tissue helps regulate the local fluid balance as well as filter out harmful substances. But the ... Lymphatic vessels provide a highway along which invasive cancerous cells move to other parts of the body. ... That system is the lymphatic system. It runs parallel to the veins and empties into them. Lymph forms at the microscopic level ...
... excessive lymphatic vessel formation has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions including neoplasm metastasis, ... The role of the lymphatic system in these diseases has received renewed interest largely due to the discovery of lymphatic ... Lymphangiogenesis is the formation of lymphatic vessels from pre-existing lymphatic vessels in a method believed to be similar ... Ji, Rui-Cheng (2006). "Lymphatic Endothelial Cells, Lymphangiogenesis, and Extracellular Matrix". Lymphatic Research and ...
Melanoma-derived mediators can foster the premetastatic niche: crossroad to lymphatic metastasis. ... Melanoma-derived mediators can foster the premetastatic niche: crossroad to lymphatic meta ... widespread tumor dissemination is preceded by regional metastases involving tumor-draining lymph nodes [sentinel lymph nodes ( ...
artificial intelligence, breast cancer, clinical decision support, disease diagnosis, lymphatic metastasis, neural networks, ... lymphatic metastasis; neural networks; programmable calculator; sentinel lymph node}}, language = {{eng}}, publisher = {{ ... tool and facilitate the option to omit surgical axillary staging in breast cancer patients with low-risk of nodal metastasis. ... tool and facilitate the option to omit surgical axillary staging in breast cancer patients with low-risk of nodal metastasis. ...
Technologies for image-guided surgery for managing lymphatic metastases in prostate cancer. Nat Rev Urol. 2019;16:159-171. ... The intricate lymphatic drainage pathways of the prostate pose a challenge in the treatment of prostate cancer because cancer ... At the same time, PSMA PET leads to more sensitive detection of lymph node metastases, and this early oligometastatic stage ... Regional lymph node metastasis on prostate specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography correlates with decreased ...
Watch this Scientific Journal Video about Non-invasive Optical Imaging of the Lymphatic Vasculature of a Mouse at JoVE.com ... may help elucidate the role the lymphatic system plays in cancer metastasis, immune response, wound repair, and other lymphatic ... NIRF lymphatic imaging may enable a better understanding of lymphatic diseases and how lymphatic architecture and function ... In cancer metastases10 and early infection, we find loss of lymphatic propulsion in animals. Others report changes in ...
Most often, mortality is related to the development of distant metastasis. Peak incidence of metastasis occurs during the first ... If the melanoma does not show extraocular extension, it only can disseminate hematogenously, because the eye has no lymphatic ... Around half of ocular melanomas are class 1, which carry a low risk of metastasis. The other half are class 2, which have a ... Because the most common site of metastasis is the liver, obtain liver enzyme levels in any patient with ciliary body melanoma. ...
Lymphatic Metastasis. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm Staging. Neoplasm, Residual. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Stomach ... Significance of lymphatic invasion on regional lymph node metastasis in early gastric cancer using LYVE-1 immunohistochemical ... lymphatic invasion in 6). In cases with incomplete resection, the rate of residual tumor and lymph node metastasis after ... Micro-lymph node metastasis and its correlation with cathepsin D expression in early gastric cancer. J Surg Oncol. 2001; 77:188 ...
Learn more about the lymphatic system and metastasis.. The Immune System and Cancer. It was not always clear to scientists that ... Red blood cells are not found in the lymphatic system. The two systems (lymphatic and circulatory) are connected. The lymphatic ... The Lymphatic System. Once they are formed in the bone marrow, lymphocytes circulate in the body and reside in lymphatic tissue ... The lymphatic system is of great importance in cancer for several reasons:. *Cancer cells can spread (metastasize) by getting ...
Put very simply, the lymphatic system provides cells with nutrients and acts as a means of waste removal. We need it to survive ... However, the same system will also carry cancer cells to other parts of the body, which is called metastasis. Cancer cells get ...
15] Metastases are still rare and are due to angioinvasion and hematogenous spread. Lymphatic involvement is even more rare, ... The bone metastases in FTC are osteolytic. Older patients have an increased risk of developing bone and lung metastases. ... Lymphatic and blood vessel density in the follicular patterned lesions of thyroid. Mod Pathol. 2005 Nov. 18(11):1424-31. [QxMD ... Bone metastases from differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Endocr Relat Cancer. 2008 Mar. 15(1):37-49. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ...
MicroRNA-Mediated Metastasis Suppression 10/29/2009. Metastases are responsible for over 90% of cancer deaths. In the upcoming ... Venous Origin of the Mammalian Lymphatic Vasculature 09/30/2007. In the October 1 issue of G&D, Dr. Guillermo Oliver (St. Jude ... New book on metastasis: mechanism to therapy from CSHL Press 12/13/2019. Cold Spring Harbor, NY -- Cold Spring Harbor ... Mutant p53 controls tumor metabolism and metastasis by regulating PGC-1alpha 02/22/2018. The Wistar Institute press release on ...
MicroRNA-Mediated Metastasis Suppression. 10/29/2009. Metastases are responsible for over 90% of cancer deaths. In the upcoming ... Venous Origin of the Mammalian Lymphatic Vasculature. 09/30/2007. In the October 1 issue of G&D, Dr. Guillermo Oliver (St. Jude ... New book on metastasis: mechanism to therapy from CSHL Press. 12/13/2019. Cold Spring Harbor, NY -- Cold Spring Harbor ... Mutant p53 controls tumor metabolism and metastasis by regulating PGC-1alpha. 02/22/2018. The Wistar Institute press release on ...
In patients with grade 1 or 2 endometrial cancer and , 50% invasion, the probability of lymph node metastasis is , 2%. In these ... With this technique, dye penetrates to the uterine lymphatic trunks (which meet in the parametria) and appears in the broad ... and extrauterine metastases (see table FIGO Staging of Endometrial Carcinoma FIGO Staging of Endometrial Carcinoma ). ... is highly accurate for the diagnosis of endometrial cancer metastases; it was recommended as a replacement for complete ...
... of these patients will have lymphatic metastases, thereby negating the purpose of surveillance. Although patients with high- ... adenocarcinoma on biopsy who do not have an endoscopically visible lesion are unlikely to have lymphatic metastases, 7% do have ...
... discontinuous metastasis (e.g., implantation or seeding) to distant organs, issues, or via the lymphatic system to distant ... by way of the lymphatic system; or 3) by a combination of extension and regional lymph nodes. 4 Distant A neoplasm that has ...
The risk factors for lymph node metastasis were compared for lymphatic invasion and venous invasion, and lymphatic invasion ... Lymphatic vascular invasion is an independent correlated factor for lymph node metastasis and the prognosis of resectable T2 ... Although lymphatic invasion has been reported to be significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis, this study also ... Correlation between lymph node metastasis (N) and lymphatic vessel invasion (L) and venous invasion (V). ...
d) Lymphatic metastasis. Answer: d) Lymphatic metastasis. Which of the following is a targeted therapy used in the treatment of ... a) Metastasis. b) Angiogenesis. c) Apoptosis. d) Differentiation. Answer: a) Metastasis. What is the term for a benign tumor?. ... a) Metastasis. b) Angiogenesis. c) Apoptosis. d) Differentiation. Answer: a) Metastasis. Which of the following is a risk ... b) Metastasis. c) Angiogenesis. d) Apoptosis. Answer: a) Invasion. Which of the following is a symptom of bladder cancer?. a) ...
Lymphatic drainage massage is a safe and effective way to support your lymphatic system and overall health. However, it is only ... Lymphatic drainage massage is a powerful way to improve your health and well-being by supporting your lymphatic system and ... Lymphatic drainage massage is not only beneficial for people with lymphedema or other conditions that affect the lymphatic ... Lymphatic drainage massage is usually part of a comprehensive treatment program for lymphedema called decongestive lymphatic ...
Progression and metastasis of lung cancer. Cancer Metastasis Rev. 2016 Mar;35(1):75-91. ... The unique lymphatic spread of the breast cancer in this case emphasizes the use of lymphatic mapping for staging of disease ... Lymphatic spread of breast cancer is thought to be well understood. This case highlights a unique pattern of lymphatic spread ... The lymphatic drainage of the invasive lobular carcinoma was found to be atypical, spreading to the contralateral lymphatic ...
This article addresses the role of radiation therapy in the management of patients with squamous cell carcinoma metastases of ... If the primary lesion recurs, the risk of lymphatic spread to the neck is renewed, even after elective neck irradiation has ... encoded search term (Radiation Therapy for Neck Metastases) and Radiation Therapy for Neck Metastases What to Read Next on ... Neck Node Metastases With an Unknown Primary Site. In a small percentage of patients with enlarged cervical lymph nodes, the ...
Lymphatic system.. Most often, metastases are formed:. *on the skin,. *in the lungs, ... The medicine is injected into a vein of the arm or leg with melanoma or metastasis, in a procedure called isolated limb ...
In this study, the distribution of dyed lymphatic flow was evaluated for each occupied area of the tumor. We included 416 ... In contrast, for cancers located in the n zone, near-total gastrectomy is required because of the extensive lymphatic flow. ... In addition, for cancers located in the lesser P curvature, lymphatic flow to the greater curvature was not observed. Therefore ... tumors located in the watershed of the right and left gastroepiploic arteries near greater curvature had extensive lymphatic ...
Predictors of Extensive Lymphatic Dissemination and Recurrences in Node-Positive Endometrial Cancer. Gynecologic Oncology ... Genes Associated with Bowel Metastases in Ovarian Cancer.. Gynecologic Oncology *Dissociating the Effects of Oxygen Pressure ...
Overall, the prognosis is very good with a 90-95% survival rate even with lung metastases. However, metastases to liver and ... Lymphatic involvement causes lymphoedema distal to the disease process and can affect 5-10% of women with vulval cancer ... Metastases found with 25% of tumours that have reached a size of 2cm.6 Direct spread occurs to neighbouring organs and ... Metastases are found on X-ray/ CT.. Methotrexate is the treatment of choice for low risk choriocarcinoma (destructive ...
  • Cervical metastasis by a tumor is firm statement of its aggressive malignant nature. (medscape.com)
  • This is not surprising considering the lack of knowledge of carcinogenesis, pathophysiology of metastases, and implications of tumor spread. (medscape.com)
  • SCLC can be staged the same way as NSCLC, using tumor size, lymph nodes, and presence or absence of distant metastases. (healthline.com)
  • Designed to increase the accuracy and efficiency in the detection of breast cancer metastases that are most at-risk for being missed, Paige Breast Lymph Node leverages AI to empower pathologists to identify tumor metastases of any size, including small micrometastases, more efficiently and reliably. (businesswire.com)
  • Dysregulation of anoikis, such as anoikis resistance, is a critical mechanism in tumor metastasis. (hindawi.com)
  • In cases with incomplete resection, the rate of residual tumor and lymph node metastasis after gastrectomy was 69.2% (75% lateral margin, 60% deep and 75% both) and 7.7%, respectively. (koreamed.org)
  • Activation of the p53R172H allele resulted in increased skin tumor formation, accelerated tumor progression, and induction of metastasis compared with deletion of p53. (jci.org)
  • Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) is defined as the invasion of vessel walls by tumor cells and/or the presence of tumor emboli within an endothelial-lined space and this may be considered as the initial image finding for lymph node metastasis and other types of organ metastases. (iiarjournals.org)
  • Rapid blood and lymphatic spread and breast tumor emboli are the main features ofIBC 4 . (bvsalud.org)
  • The lymphatic system has 3 components: the capillaries, vessels, and nodes. (medscape.com)
  • Pooled capillaries drain lymphatic fluid into lymphatic vessels, which have 3 layers. (medscape.com)
  • Lymphatic vessels contain many more valves than the venous system, with the lymph circulation entirely dependent on compression by surrounding muscles. (medscape.com)
  • Lymphatic vessels drain into lymph nodes. (medscape.com)
  • The fluid permeates the substance of the node (composed of a cortex and a medulla) and exits through the hilum to enter more lymphatic vessels. (medscape.com)
  • The invasion of lymphatic vessels by colorectal cancer (CRC) and its subsequent spread to draining lymph nodes is a key determinant of prognosis in this common and frequently fatal malignancy. (ox.ac.uk)
  • In particular, we also discuss some new and provocative insights into the properties of tumoural lymphatics suggesting that they have specific expression profiles distinct from those of normal lymphatic vessels and that appear to promote metastasis. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Lymphatic vessels provide a highway along which invasive cancerous cells move to other parts of the body. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Lymphangiogenesis is the formation of lymphatic vessels from pre-existing lymphatic vessels in a method believed to be similar to angiogenesis (blood vessel development). (wikipedia.org)
  • If the melanoma does not show extraocular extension, it only can disseminate hematogenously, because the eye has no lymphatic vessels. (medscape.com)
  • Whole animal spatial resolution can depict fluorescent lymphatic vessels of 100 microns or less, and images of structures up to 3 cm in depth can be acquired 9 . (jove.com)
  • The lymphatic system consists of lymph vessels, lymph nodes, and lymphatic organs such as the spleen . (learninggnm.com)
  • It includes neuroblastoma cells, bone tissue, and blood and lymphatic vessels through which neuroblastoma cells can travel to the bone and metastasize," explains Aránzazu Villasante, the project leader. (ibecbarcelona.eu)
  • Increased use of modern imaging with PSMA PET has led some countries to omit lymphadenectomy in patients without evidence of lymph node metastases, whereas other guidelines still emphasize the value of extended lymph node dissection in patients with an elevated risk of metastasis in preoperative clinical nomograms. (snmjournals.org)
  • Despite these advancements, PSMA PET lacks sensitivity for small metastases, and PSMA RGS may still overlook small lymph node metastases, as Schilham et al. (snmjournals.org)
  • Particularly, in patients with PSMA PET-positive pelvic lymph node metastases at primary diagnosis, there is a risk of further additional slight lymphatic spread. (snmjournals.org)
  • Conclusion: LVI in gastric cancer is an independent prognostic factor, and tends to worsen prognosis, especially in advanced cancers with lymph node metastases. (iiarjournals.org)
  • The risk of lymph node metastases is influenced by the primary site of the lesion, the degree of histologic differentiation, the degree of the lesion's depth of invasion, and the density of capillary lymphatics. (medscape.com)
  • When contralateral lymph node metastases occur, the level II lymph nodes are involved most frequently, followed by the level III and level IV nodes. (medscape.com)
  • Other frequent sites of metastasis are lung, bone, skin, and central nervous system (CNS). (medscape.com)
  • Inguinal node metastasis in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva is reported to be as high as 27%(21). (knowcancer.com)
  • Our study, at Women and Infants' Hospital, employed Tc-99m sulfur colloid and isosulfan blue dye to identify sentinel nodes in the inguinal lymphatic chain of patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva. (knowcancer.com)
  • This article addresses the role of radiation therapy in the management of patients with squamous cell carcinoma metastases of the head and neck . (medscape.com)
  • Impaired or excessive lymphatic vessel formation has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions including neoplasm metastasis, oedema, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, lymphangiomatosis and impaired wound healing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Objective: To implement artificial neural network (ANN) algorithms for noninvasive lymph node staging (NILS) to a decision support tool and facilitate the option to omit surgical axillary staging in breast cancer patients with low-risk of nodal metastasis. (lu.se)
  • In pT2-4 patients with nodal metastasis, a significant difference was revealed, and the 5-year overall survival rates in LVI(+) cases were lower than those in LVI(−) (60.9% vs. 76.7%, p=0.005). (iiarjournals.org)
  • Nodal metastasis is known to be an important prognostic factor and is an essential element in determining the classification of patients with gastric cancer ( 3 , 4 ). (iiarjournals.org)
  • Larger than arteriovenous capillaries, lymphatic capillaries are thin-walled, with a single layer of endothelial cells. (medscape.com)
  • The lymphatic system can play a very worrisome role in the spread of breast cancer. (medlineplus.gov)
  • But the breast's lymphatic system can also spread diseases such as cancer through the body. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Cancer cells that enter the lymphatic system or bloodstream can end up virtually anywhere in the body. (healthline.com)
  • Paige Breast Lymph Node is designed to increase the accuracy and efficiency in the detection of breast cancer metastases that are most at-risk for being missed. (businesswire.com)
  • Determining whether cancer in the breast has spread to the lymphatic system is critical to a patient's diagnosis and planned treatment. (businesswire.com)
  • Accurate detection of breast cancer metastases is paramount for physicians and their patients, but it can be a laborious, manual task for pathologists," said David Klimstra, M.D., Founder and Chief Medical Officer at Paige. (businesswire.com)
  • Thus, we first would like to congratulate the authors for their efforts in the design, execution, and subtle analysis of this study that proved the feasibility and safety of this still-novel approach during robotic pelvic lymphadenectomy with or without primary prostatectomy in patients with prostate cancer and evidence of lymphatic spread on preoperative PSMA PET imaging. (snmjournals.org)
  • The intricate lymphatic drainage pathways of the prostate pose a challenge in the treatment of prostate cancer because cancer cells might disseminate to atypical regions not covered in established surgical templates. (snmjournals.org)
  • The advent of PSMA PET imaging in primary prostate cancer has substantially augmented our ability to discern lymphatic involvement compared with conventional cross-sectional imaging ( 4 ). (snmjournals.org)
  • Recently developed imaging techniques using near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) may help elucidate the role the lymphatic system plays in cancer metastasis, immune response, wound repair, and other lymphatic-associated diseases. (jove.com)
  • Spread of cancer by a process called metastasis (from Greek meaning change of place) is lethal. (itv.com)
  • Cancer cells can grow outside the organ from which they arose spreading via the lymphatic system and blood to lungs, liver, brain and bone. (itv.com)
  • Metastasis is a multistep process including dissociation of cancer cells from primary sites, survival in the vascular system, and proliferation in distant target organs. (hindawi.com)
  • Cancer cells acquire anoikis resistance to survive after detachment from the primary sites and travel through the circulatory and lymphatic systems to disseminate throughout the body. (hindawi.com)
  • Detailed molecular and functional analyses of anoikis resistant cells may provide insight into the biology of cancer metastasis and identify novel therapeutic targets for prevention of cancer dissemination. (hindawi.com)
  • Incidence of lymph node metastasis from early gastric cancer: estimation with a large number of cases at two large centers. (koreamed.org)
  • Patients with FTC are more likely to develop lung and bone metastases than are patients with papillary thyroid cancer. (medscape.com)
  • The classic approach to vulvar cancer was an en-bloc resection of the vulva and groins with a single incision. (knowcancer.com)
  • However, the same system will also carry cancer cells to other parts of the body, which is called metastasis. (weizmann-usa.org)
  • The research team will develop a model of neuroblastoma bone metastasis on a chip to serve as a testing ground for new drugs to treat this rare cancer type. (ibecbarcelona.eu)
  • The device helps us simulate how cancer behaves in a controlled environment that mimics the metastasis process in patients. (ibecbarcelona.eu)
  • You could read this book directly on your devices with pdf, epub and kindle format, check detail and related The Lymphatic System in Colorectal Cancer books below. (harperandharley.org)
  • The Lymphatic System in Colorectal Cancer: Basic Concepts, Pathology, Imaging, and Treatment Perspectives provides an in-depth overview on the role of the lymphatic system in the pathogenesis and treatment of colorectal cancer. (harperandharley.org)
  • This is the first book to provide a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach to the lymphatic system in colorectal cancer, with topics ranging from cancer biology and mathematical modeling to surgical approaches and novel imaging techniques. (harperandharley.org)
  • Lymphatic spread is one of the hallmarks of locally advanced colorectal cancer that adversely affects prognosis. (harperandharley.org)
  • Lymphangiogenesis and Cancer Metastasis introduces the new field of lymphatic vessel growth and development, and its relationship to the metastatic spread of cancer cells. (harperandharley.org)
  • Leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma are some of the most common types of blood cancer which arise from the blood forming bone marrow including the lymphatic system. (lu.se)
  • It's often used to treat brain and bone metastasis. (healthline.com)
  • The bone metastases in FTC are osteolytic. (medscape.com)
  • Older patients have an increased risk of developing bone and lung metastases. (medscape.com)
  • It could improve quality of life in patients with bone metastases. (medscape.com)
  • Although tumoural lymphangiogenesis is assumed to contribute to this process, review of the current literature fails to support any notion of a simple correlation between lymphatic vessel density and CRC metastasis. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Equal to the peristaltic motion of the intestinal muscles that move food along the intestinal canal, the smooth muscles of the lymph vessel wall move the lymphatic fluid to the lymph nodes located throughout the body. (learninggnm.com)
  • Nodes contain a subcapsular sinus below a prominent capsule, into which lymphatic fluid drains. (medscape.com)
  • Embryologically, the lymphatic system develops before the parotid gland, which surrounds the intraglandular nodes as it develops. (medscape.com)
  • In their report on penile carcinoma the concept of a sentinel node as the first group of nodes in the inguinal lymphatic chain was put forth by Cabanas et al. (knowcancer.com)
  • In 1994 Levenback et al, described of the use of isosulfan blue dye for the detection of sentinel nodes in the inguinal lymphatic chain(7). (knowcancer.com)
  • Twenty nine patients were enrolled and 107 sentinel nodes were studied with no false negative SLN being reported(22) There are over 175 patients in the reported literature who have undergone a SLN dissection for the evaluation of the inguinal lymphatic basin for metastatic disease. (knowcancer.com)
  • Further studies need to be performed in order to evaluate the use of SLN dissection alone in patients with pathologic negative sentinel nodes for metastasis. (knowcancer.com)
  • It has been shown the sentinel node is predictive of the status of the lymphatic basin for the presence of metastatic disease to non-sentinel nodes. (knowcancer.com)
  • Levels of metastasis to cervical lymph nodes. (medscape.com)
  • If the metastatic nodes significantly obstruct the lymphatic trunks, patients who have clinically positive lymph nodes on the ipsilateral side of the neck may be at risk for contralateral lymph node spread. (medscape.com)
  • It is designed to enhance diagnostic accuracy for the most subtle metastatic foci and has over 98% slide level sensitivity to detect metastases of any size. (businesswire.com)
  • The lymphatic fluid eventually enters the venous system at the junction of the internal jugular and subclavian veins. (medscape.com)
  • That system is the lymphatic system. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The role of the lymphatic system in these diseases has received renewed interest largely due to the discovery of lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC)-specific markers such as podoplanin, LYVE-1, PROX1, desmoplakin and VEGF-C receptor VEGFR-3. (wikipedia.org)
  • The lymphatic vascular system is an important component of the circulatory system that maintains fluid homeostasis, provides immune surveillance, and mediates fat absorption in the gut. (jove.com)
  • Yet despite its critical function, there is comparatively little understanding of how the lymphatic system adapts to serve these functions in health and disease 1 . (jove.com)
  • Recently, we have demonstrated the ability to dynamically image lymphatic architecture and lymph "pumping" action in normal human subjects as well as in persons suffering lymphatic dysfunction using trace administration of a near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) dye and a custom, Gen III-intensified imaging system 2-4 . (jove.com)
  • Immediately following injections, functional lymphatic imaging is conducted for up to 1 hr using a customized, small animal NIRF imaging system. (jove.com)
  • The cells may float around in the blood stream or lymphatic system or take up residence in an organ or tissue. (cancerquest.org)
  • Two of the main cell types spend a significant amount of time in the lymphatic system and are known as lymphocytes. (cancerquest.org)
  • Put very simply, the lymphatic system provides cells with nutrients and acts as a means of waste removal. (weizmann-usa.org)
  • This book details the anatomy and physiology of the lymphovascular system as well as describes the mechanisms of metastasis. (harperandharley.org)
  • 165 U/L were 3.29 times more likely to have lymph node involvement than patients with ALP levels 165 U/L. There was no statistically significant correlation between ALP level and sex, age, tumour histological type, site and size of tumour, depth of penetration, distant metastasis, degree of differentiation, presence of lymphatic invasion and presence of simultaneous multiple cancers. (who.int)
  • Patients who die from ciliary body melanoma die because of distant metastasis rather than local spread. (medscape.com)
  • bleeding in 9, perforation in 4), and 19 cases based on pathological results (incomplete resection in 13, lymphatic invasion in 6). (koreamed.org)
  • Three (50%) of the 6 cases with lymphatic invasion had lymph node metatstasis. (koreamed.org)
  • The causes of gastrectomy after ESD were the procedure-related complications, the incomplete resection and lymphatic invasion. (koreamed.org)
  • Recent evidence from animal and human models of tumour metastasis suggests that complex functional and biochemical interactions between the microvasculature of tumours and other cell types within the tumour microenvironment may play a pivotal role in the behaviour of commonly metastasizing tumours. (ox.ac.uk)
  • These findings raise the exciting prospect of future biomarkers of lymphatic metastasis and identify potential targets for new generation anti-tumour therapies. (ox.ac.uk)
  • In this protocol, we present NIRF lymphatic, small animal imaging 5,6 using indocyanine green (ICG), a dye that has been used for 50 years in humans 7 , and a NIRF dye-labeled cyclic albumin binding domain (cABD-IRDye800) peptide that preferentially binds mouse and human albumin 8 . (jove.com)
  • Mechanisms of lymphatic metastasis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Nevertheless, the molecular pathogenesis, dynamics and prognostic significance of lymphatic spread remain poorly understood. (harperandharley.org)
  • 5). Morton and colleagues advanced the technique of sentinel node lymphatic mapping in patients with cutaneous melanoma(6). (knowcancer.com)
  • For melanoma, the sentinel node dissection has become the standard of care for the evaluation of the lymphatic basins. (knowcancer.com)
  • These specific markers have enabled insights into functional and molecular lymphatic biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although pelvic lymph node dissection represents a diagnostic tool and may conciliate patients, this uncertainty about its oncologic value is even more troublesome in patients without evidence of lymphatic spread on final histopathology postoperatively. (snmjournals.org)
  • Lymphatic circulation in breast tissue helps regulate the local fluid balance as well as filter out harmful substances. (medlineplus.gov)
  • After passing through the lymphatic ducts, the lymph is returned to the bloodstream and excreted through the kidneys . (learninggnm.com)
  • As a barrier to metastasis, cells normally undergo an apoptotic process known as "anoikis," a form of cell death due to loss of contact with the extracellular matrix or neighboring cells. (hindawi.com)
  • Melanoma-derived mediators can foster the premetastatic niche: crossroad to lymphatic metastasis. (bvsalud.org)
  • Locally recurrent lesions have a higher risk of lymphatic involvement than do untreated lesions. (medscape.com)
  • bed into the left ventricle, from where or intramyocardial, However, when a Most patients with calcification of it could reach any part of the body cyst is located in subendocardial en- the cyst wall remain asymptomatic for through systemic circulation [1-3]. (who.int)
  • NIRF imaging showed dramatic changes in lymphatic architecture and function with human disease. (jove.com)
  • Approximately 5.5 times brighter than ICG, cABD-IRDye800 has a similar lymphatic clearance profile and can be injected in smaller doses than ICG to achieve sufficient NIRF signals for imaging 8 . (jove.com)
  • The steps below must be done (as needed) the day before lymphatic imaging takes place. (jove.com)
  • For many years there has been a search for a less radical surgical approach to evaluating the inguinal lymphatic basin. (knowcancer.com)
  • Due to the size of the tissue area and size of the small micro-metastases, a pathologist's accurate assessment of a lymph node slide can be tedious and time-consuming. (businesswire.com)