Inflammation of the lymph nodes.
Infection of the lymph nodes by tuberculosis. Tuberculous infection of the cervical lymph nodes is scrofula.
INFLAMMATION of LYMPH NODES in the MESENTERY.
Development of lesions in the lymph node characterized by infiltration of the cortex or paracortex by large collections of proliferating histiocytes and complete or, more often, incomplete necrosis of lymphoid tissue.
A species of gram-positive, asporogenous bacteria that was originally isolated from necrotic areas in the kidney of a sheep. It may cause ulcerative lymphangitis, abscesses, and other chronic purulent infections in sheep, horses, and other warm-blooded animals. Human disease may form from contact with infected animals.
Infections with bacteria of the genus CORYNEBACTERIUM.
A species of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria that causes granulomatous or ulcerating skin lesions in immunosuppressed persons. This organism owes its name to its requirement for growth of high levels of iron, conveniently supplied as blood, heme, or ferric ammonium citrate.
The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.
Disorders of the mediastinum, general or unspecified.
Infections with bacteria of the genus MYCOBACTERIUM.
They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.
Macrophages found in the TISSUES, as opposed to those found in the blood (MONOCYTES) or serous cavities (SEROUS MEMBRANE).
Common name for one of five species of small PARROTS, containing long tails.
Diseases of LYMPH; LYMPH NODES; or LYMPHATIC VESSELS.
A genus of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria. Most species are free-living in soil and water, but the major habitat for some is the diseased tissue of warm-blooded hosts.
So-called atypical species of the genus MYCOBACTERIUM that do not cause tuberculosis. They are also called tuberculoid bacilli, i.e.: M. buruli, M. chelonae, M. duvalii, M. flavescens, M. fortuitum, M. gilvum, M. gordonae, M. intracellulare (see MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX;), M. kansasii, M. marinum, M. obuense, M. scrofulaceum, M. szulgai, M. terrae, M. ulcerans, M. xenopi.
Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.
Infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria (atypical mycobacteria): M. kansasii, M. marinum, M. scrofulaceum, M. flavescens, M. gordonae, M. obuense, M. gilvum, M. duvali, M. szulgai, M. intracellulare (see MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX;), M. xenopi (littorale), M. ulcerans, M. buruli, M. terrae, M. fortuitum (minetti, giae), M. chelonae.
Using fine needles (finer than 22-gauge) to remove tissue or fluid specimens from the living body for examination in the pathology laboratory and for disease diagnosis.
A self-limiting bacterial infection of the regional lymph nodes caused by AFIPIA felis, a gram-negative bacterium recently identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and by BARTONELLA HENSELAE. It usually arises one or more weeks following a feline scratch, with raised inflammatory nodules at the site of the scratch being the primary symptom.
Necrotizing inflammation of the CECUM ("typhlon" in Greek), sometimes spreading to the APPENDIX and/or the ILEUM. Symptoms include ABDOMINAL PAIN and DIARRHEA. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial. Typhlitis is often associated with NEUTROPENIA and chemotherapy in immunocompromised individuals (IMMUNOCOMPROMISED HOST).
Drugs used in the treatment of tuberculosis. They are divided into two main classes: "first-line" agents, those with the greatest efficacy and acceptable degrees of toxicity used successfully in the great majority of cases; and "second-line" drugs used in drug-resistant cases or those in which some other patient-related condition has compromised the effectiveness of primary therapy.
Diseases of the domestic or wild goat of the genus Capra.
An independent state in eastern Africa. Ethiopia is located in the Horn of Africa and is bordered on the north and northeast by Eritrea, on the east by Djibouti and Somalia, on the south by Kenya, and on the west and southwest by Sudan. Its capital is Addis Ababa.
Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.
A genus of achlorophyllic algae in the family Chlorellaceae, and closely related to CHLORELLA. It is found in decayed matter; WATER; SEWAGE; and SOIL; and produces cutaneous and disseminated infections in various VERTEBRATES including humans.
A species of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria that produces TUBERCULOSIS in humans, other primates, CATTLE; DOGS; and some other animals which have contact with humans. Growth tends to be in serpentine, cordlike masses in which the bacilli show a parallel orientation.
A non-tuberculous mycobacterium causing cervical lymphadenitis in children. It very rarely causes pulmonary disease, and is believed to be non-pathogenic in animals.
Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.
A rapid-growing, nonphotochromogenic species that is potentially pathogenic, producing lesions of lung, bone, or soft tissue following trauma. It has been found in soil and in injection sites of humans, cattle, and cold-blooded animals. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Lymphangitis is an infection that affects the lymphatic vessels, causing inflammation and swelling in the affected area.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.

Lymphadenitis due to nontuberculous mycobacteria in children: presentation and response to therapy. (1/294)

The most common manifestation of infection due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in children is cervical lymphadenitis in an otherwise healthy patient. We identified and reviewed 19 cases of proven or presumptive lymphadenitis due to NTM seen at our hospital over the course of 13 months. Nine patients underwent initial surgical excision of involved lymph nodes. Ten children did not have involved lymph nodes excised initially and were treated with macrolide-containing antibiotic regimens. Of these patients, five required subsequent surgical excision and five were cured with combination chemotherapy. Six patients underwent radiographic imaging of the head and neck that revealed asymmetrical adenopathy with ring-enhancing masses but minimal inflammatory stranding of the subcutaneous fat, a finding that may distinguish adenitis caused by NTM from staphylococcal and streptococcal adenitis. Our data suggest that if surgical excision is not considered feasible, antimicrobial therapy for adenitis due to NTM may be beneficial for some patients.  (+info)

Atypical mycobacterial lymphadenitis in childhood--a clinicopathological study of 17 cases. (2/294)

AIMS: To assess the clinical and pathological features of atypical mycobacterial lymphadenitis in childhood to define the salient clinical and histological features. METHODS: 17 cases were included on the basis of positive culture or demonstration of bacilli of appropriate morphology and staining characteristics. RESULTS: The mean age at diagnosis was 4.86 years. All children were systemically well, with clear chest x rays. Unilateral cervical lymphadenopathy was the commonest mode of presentation. Differential Mantoux testing played no part in diagnosis. Clinical diagnosis improved with awareness. Treatment varied with surgeons opting for excision and paediatricians adding six months antituberculous chemotherapy. Acid- and alcohol-fast bacilli were identified in nine cases. Bacterial cultures were conducted in 16 cases and were positive for atypical or nontuberculous mycobacteria in 14, the main organism being M avium-intracellulare complex (11 cases). Histologically, 12 cases had bright eosinophilic serpiginous necrosis with nuclear debris scattered throughout the necrotic foci. Langhans type giant cells featured in the majority of cases but infiltration by plasma cells and neutrophils was not consistent. CONCLUSIONS: Atypical mycobacterial lymphadenitis of childhood represents a rare but significant disease with characteristic clinical and histological features.  (+info)

Differential avian and human tuberculin skin testing in non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection. (3/294)

OBJECTIVE: To determine the sensitivity of differential avian and human delayed-type hypersensitivity skin testing in the diagnosis of non-tuberculous mycobacterial lymphadenitis. METHOD: Retrospective review of all patients with culture proved non-tuberculous mycobacterial lymph node infections who also had differential avian and human skin testing performed over a 10 year period from 1986 to 1996. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty four patients had non-tuberculous mycobacteria isolated from lymph nodes over this period, 59 of whom had differential skin testing performed. The sensitivity of a response of >/= 10 mm to the avian precipitin was 58 of 59. No patient had both a negative human and avian Mantoux. The sensitivity of the human Mantoux alone for diagnosing non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection was 81% for a response of >/= 5 mm and 66% for >/= 10 mm. Ten patients had a 0 human response. Fifty five of the 59 patients had an avian response at least 2 mm greater than the human response. CONCLUSION: The avian Mantoux is a very sensitive method of diagnosing non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection in children. The human Mantoux is not sensitive enough to be used alone as a surrogate to diagnose non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection.  (+info)

Diagnostic approach to lymph node enlargement. (4/294)

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: How to reach the correct diagnosis of a lymph node enlargement is still a problem which strongly challenges the knowledge and experience of the clinician. Organized and specifically oriented literature on the right sequential steps and the logical criteria that should guide this diagnostic approach is still lacking. METHODS: The authors have tried to exploit available knowledge and their personal experience by correlating a large body of information regarding size, physical characteristics, anatomical location of enlarged lymph nodes, and the possible epidemiological, environmental, occupational and clinical categorization of this condition. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: It was intended that such material would have constituted the basis of a hypothetic decision-making tree, but this was impossible because of the lack of epidemiological investigation and registry data. Nevertheless, we present this preparatory work here in order to stimulate the interest of concerned readers and because of its possible direct usefulness in hematologic practice.  (+info)

Immunoglobulin G avidity in diagnosis of toxoplasmic lymphadenopathy and ocular toxoplasmosis. (5/294)

Traditional serological techniques have some limitations in evaluating the duration of Toxoplasma gondii infection in pregnant women, patients with lymphadenopathy, and older children suspected of having congenital toxoplasmosis. In these three groups of patients, two variants of T. gondii immunoglobulin G (IgG) avidity tests were used: an EIA Kit (Labsystems) and a noncommercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specially elaborated in the laboratory. The avidity of specific IgG in sera from 23 patients with a known recently acquired infection (mainly pregnant women) was low (less than 30%), whereas that in sera from 19 patients with toxoplasmic lymphadenopathy of 3 weeks to 6 months in duration (mean, 8.3 weeks) covered a large range (between 0.2 and 57.8%; mean, 25. 7%); high avidity results were observed for 10 of 19 patients (52. 6%). The large range of IgG avidity in patients with toxoplasmic lymphadenopathy suggests various durations of infection in these patients, with a tendency for a chronic phase of toxoplasmosis. According to the avidity marker, five patients with lymphadenopathy for less than 3 months did not have a recent Toxoplasma infection. In 6 of 19 patients with lymphadenopathy (31.6%), low IgG avidity values persisted until 5 months after the first serological examination. In all four patients with a documented chronic course of Toxoplasma infection (6 months to 8 years after the first positive serology), high IgG avidity values were observed. Among sera from 10 children and young immunocompetent adults suspected of having ocular reactivation of congenital toxoplasmosis, all had high IgG avidity values (over 40%), suggesting congenitally acquired ocular infection rather than noncongenital infection. In conclusion, the avidity of IgG is a valuable marker of recent toxoplasmosis in pregnant women, suggests the duration of invasion in patients with lymphadenopathy, and may be helpful for differentiation between reactivation of congenital infection and recently acquired ocular toxoplasmosis in immunocompetent patients. A low IgG avidity does not always identify a recent case of toxoplasmosis, but a high IgG avidity can exclude primary infections of less than 5 months' duration.  (+info)

Left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy associated with silicosis. (6/294)

Left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy usually results from invasion or compression of the nerve caused by diseases localized within the aortopulmonary window. This study reports the case of a 76-yr-old male with vocal cord paralysis due to lymph node involvement by silicosis. This rare entity was identified by video-mediastinoscopy, which revealed a granulomatous and fibrosed recurrent lymph node encasing the nerve. The nerve was dissected and released from scar tissues. Progressive clinical improvement was observed followed by total and durable recovery of the voice after 15 weeks follow-up.  (+info)

Nontuberculous mycobacterial infection of the head and neck in immunocompetent children: CT and MR findings. (7/294)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Infections caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) commonly manifest as cervicofacial adenitis in otherwise healthy children. The aim of this study was to characterize the imaging findings of NTM infection of the head and neck in immunocompetent children. METHODS: The medical records and imaging examinations (CT in 10, MR in two) were reviewed in 12 immunocompetent children with NTM infection of the head and neck. RESULTS: The usual presentation (n = 9) was of an enlarging, non-tender mass with violaceous skin discoloration, unresponsive to conventional antibiotics. The duration of symptoms was 6 days to 5 months. Imaging revealed asymmetric adenopathy with contiguous low-density ring-enhancing masses in all patients. There was cutaneous extension in 10 patients. Inflammatory stranding of the subcutaneous fat was minimal (n = 9) or absent (n = 2) in 11 patients. The masses involved the submandibular space (n = 3), the parotid space (n = 2), the cheek (n = 1), the anterior triangle of the neck (n = 2), the submandibular and parotid spaces (n = 2), the parotid space and neck (n = 1), and the neck and retropharyngeal space (n = 1). Surgical management included incision and drainage only (n = 2), incision and drainage with curettage (n = 2), excisional biopsy after incision and drainage (n = 1), excisional biopsy only (n = 5), superficial parotidectomy only (n = 1), and superficial parotidectomy with contralateral excisional biopsy (n = 1). All patients improved in response to surgery and long-term antimycobacterial antibiotics. CONCLUSION: NTM infection of the head and neck has a characteristic clinical presentation and imaging appearance. Recognition of this disease is important; appropriate treatment is excision and, in selected cases, antimycobacterial therapy.  (+info)

Disseminated infection due to rapidly growing mycobacteria in immunocompetent hosts presenting with chronic lymphadenopathy: a previously unrecognized clinical entity. (8/294)

Disseminated infection due to rapidly growing mycobacteria is uncommon and occurs mostly in immunocompromised patients. We report 16 cases of such infection with an unusual presentation seen at Srinagarind Hospital, a university hospital in northeastern Thailand. The clinical features were different from those in previous reports. All of the patients presented with chronic bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy. Twelve had mycobacterial involvement of other organs (sinuses, 6 patients; lungs, 4; liver, 4; spleen, 3; skin, 3; bone and joint, 2; and tonsils, 2). An interesting occurrence in 11 patients was 14 episodes of reactive skin manifestations (Sweet's syndrome, 9; generalized pustulosis and erythema nodosum, 2 each; and pustular psoriasis, 1). No identifiable predisposing factors, including human immunodeficiency disease, were found in these patients. However, 8 patients had 11 episodes of prior infection or coinfection with other opportunistic pathogens (salmonellosis, 4; penicilliosis, 3; pulmonary tuberculosis, 2; and melioidosis and cryptococcosis, 1 each). These findings suggest that cell-mediated immunity is defective in these patients.  (+info)

Lymphadenitis is an inflammation of the lymph nodes, which are small, bean-shaped organs that are part of the immune system. The lymph nodes are located throughout the body and help to filter out harmful substances, such as bacteria and viruses, from the lymph fluid that flows through them. There are several different types of lymphadenitis, including bacterial lymphadenitis, viral lymphadenitis, and fungal lymphadenitis. Bacterial lymphadenitis is usually caused by a bacterial infection, such as strep throat or a skin infection. Viral lymphadenitis is usually caused by a viral infection, such as the common cold or the flu. Fungal lymphadenitis is less common and is usually caused by a fungal infection, such as candidiasis. Symptoms of lymphadenitis may include swelling of the lymph nodes, tenderness or pain in the affected area, fever, and fatigue. Treatment for lymphadenitis depends on the underlying cause of the inflammation. In most cases, antibiotics are used to treat bacterial lymphadenitis, while antiviral medications are used to treat viral lymphadenitis. Fungal lymphadenitis may be treated with antifungal medications. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove infected lymph nodes.

Tuberculosis of the lymph nodes, also known as lymphadenitis or lymphadenopathy, is a condition in which the lymph nodes become inflamed and infected due to the presence of the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This bacterium is the same one that causes tuberculosis in other parts of the body, such as the lungs, kidneys, and bones. Tuberculosis of the lymph nodes is usually a complication of pulmonary tuberculosis, which is the most common form of the disease. The bacteria can spread to the lymph nodes through the bloodstream or by direct spread from nearby infected tissues. Symptoms of tuberculosis of the lymph nodes may include swelling of the affected lymph nodes, pain or tenderness in the affected area, fever, night sweats, and weight loss. Diagnosis is typically made through a combination of physical examination, medical history, and laboratory tests, such as a skin test or a blood test. Treatment for tuberculosis of the lymph nodes typically involves a course of antibiotics, usually for at least six months. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove the infected lymph nodes. It is important to seek medical attention if you suspect you may have tuberculosis of the lymph nodes, as prompt treatment can help prevent complications and improve outcomes.

Mesenteric lymphadenitis is a condition characterized by inflammation of the mesenteric lymph nodes, which are small, bean-shaped structures that filter lymph fluid from the digestive system. The mesenteric lymph nodes are located near the small intestine and are an important part of the body's immune system. Mesenteric lymphadenitis can be caused by a variety of factors, including bacterial or viral infections, parasitic infections, food allergies, and autoimmune disorders. Symptoms of mesenteric lymphadenitis may include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, and fatigue. Diagnosis of mesenteric lymphadenitis typically involves a physical examination, blood tests, imaging studies such as ultrasound or CT scans, and possibly a biopsy of the affected lymph nodes. Treatment depends on the underlying cause of the inflammation and may include antibiotics, antiparasitic medications, antihistamines, or immunosuppressive drugs. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove infected or inflamed lymph nodes.

Histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis, also known as Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease, is a rare disorder characterized by the inflammation and necrosis (death) of lymph nodes. It is primarily seen in young adults, particularly women, and is thought to be an autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks its own tissues. The disease typically presents with fever, fatigue, and swollen lymph nodes, which may be tender to the touch. The affected lymph nodes are usually located in the neck, armpits, or groin, and may be accompanied by other symptoms such as night sweats, weight loss, and muscle aches. The diagnosis of histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis is typically made through a combination of physical examination, blood tests, and imaging studies such as ultrasound or CT scans. Treatment is usually not necessary, as the disease tends to resolve on its own within a few months to a year. However, in some cases, medications such as corticosteroids or immunosuppressive drugs may be used to manage symptoms or prevent complications.

Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is a gram-positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming bacterium that belongs to the family Corynebacteriaceae. It is a common environmental organism found in soil, water, and decaying vegetation. In the medical field, C. pseudotuberculosis is primarily known for causing a type of infection called "farmer's lung," which is a respiratory illness that occurs in farmers and other people who work with animals or animal products. The infection is usually caused by inhaling dust or other particles that contain the bacteria. C. pseudotuberculosis can also cause other types of infections in humans, including skin infections, lymphadenitis (inflammation of the lymph nodes), and septicemia (bloodstream infection). These infections are typically acquired through direct contact with infected animals or their products. The diagnosis of C. pseudotuberculosis infection is usually made through culture of the bacteria from a sample of infected tissue or fluid. Treatment typically involves antibiotics, although the specific antibiotic used may depend on the type and severity of the infection.

Corynebacterium infections are bacterial infections caused by members of the Corynebacterium genus. These bacteria are commonly found on the skin and in the respiratory tract of humans and animals, and can cause a range of infections, including: 1. Diphtheria: a serious infection that affects the respiratory tract and can cause difficulty breathing, fever, and a thick, grayish membrane that forms on the throat. 2. Tuberculosis: a bacterial infection that primarily affects the lungs, but can also affect other parts of the body, such as the kidneys, spine, and brain. 3. Cutaneous infections: infections of the skin, such as impetigo and folliculitis, which can cause redness, swelling, and pus. 4. Otitis externa: an infection of the outer ear canal, which can cause itching, pain, and discharge. 5. Endocarditis: an infection of the inner lining of the heart, which can cause fever, chills, and heart palpitations. Corynebacterium infections can be treated with antibiotics, although the specific antibiotic used will depend on the type of infection and the severity of the illness. In some cases, hospitalization may be necessary for treatment.

Mediastinal diseases refer to conditions that affect the mediastinum, which is the central compartment of the chest that contains the heart, great vessels, esophagus, trachea, thymus gland, and other structures. These diseases can be classified into several categories, including infections, neoplasms, inflammatory disorders, and congenital anomalies. Some common mediastinal diseases include: 1. Mediastinitis: Infection of the mediastinum, which can be caused by bacteria, fungi, or viruses. 2. Thymoma: A benign or malignant tumor of the thymus gland. 3. Hodgkin's lymphoma: A type of cancer that affects the lymphatic system and commonly involves the mediastinum. 4. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: A group of blood cancers that can involve the mediastinum. 5. Mediastinal cysts: Fluid-filled sacs that can develop in the mediastinum. 6. Mediastinal fibrosis: A condition characterized by scarring and thickening of the tissues in the mediastinum. 7. Mediastinal emphysema: Air in the mediastinum, which can occur after trauma or surgery. 8. Mediastinal goiter: An enlarged thyroid gland that extends into the mediastinum. 9. Mediastinal neurofibromatosis: A genetic disorder that can cause tumors to develop in the mediastinum. Diagnosis of mediastinal diseases typically involves a combination of imaging studies, such as chest X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as blood tests and biopsies. Treatment options depend on the specific disease and may include medications, surgery, radiation therapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Mycobacterium infections are a group of diseases caused by bacteria of the Mycobacterium genus. These bacteria are known for their ability to cause persistent infections in the body, often in the lungs, but can also affect other organs such as the lymph nodes, skin, and bones. The most well-known mycobacterial infection is tuberculosis (TB), which is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. TB is a highly contagious disease that spreads through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Other mycobacterial infections include leprosy (caused by Mycobacterium leprae), which affects the skin and nerves, and Buruli ulcer (caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans), which affects the skin and underlying tissue. Mycobacterial infections can be difficult to diagnose and treat because the bacteria are slow-growing and can become resistant to antibiotics. Treatment typically involves a combination of antibiotics taken over a long period of time, and in some cases, surgery or other medical interventions may be necessary.

Lymphatic diseases refer to a group of disorders that affect the lymphatic system, which is a network of vessels, tissues, and organs that help to transport lymph fluid throughout the body. The lymphatic system plays a crucial role in the immune system, as it helps to filter out harmful substances and transport white blood cells to areas of the body where they are needed to fight infections. Lymphatic diseases can affect any part of the lymphatic system, including the lymph nodes, lymph vessels, and the spleen. Some common examples of lymphatic diseases include: 1. Lymphedema: A condition in which the lymphatic system is unable to drain lymph fluid properly, leading to swelling in the affected area. 2. Lymphoma: A type of cancer that affects the lymphatic system, causing the growth of abnormal lymphocytes (white blood cells) in the lymph nodes and other tissues. 3. Castleman's disease: A rare disorder characterized by the abnormal growth of lymph nodes, which can cause symptoms such as fever, weight loss, and fatigue. 4. Lymphatic filariasis: A parasitic infection that affects the lymphatic system, causing swelling in the legs and other areas of the body. 5. Primary Sjogren's syndrome: An autoimmune disorder that affects the glands that produce saliva and tears, leading to dryness and inflammation in the eyes and mouth. Treatment for lymphatic diseases depends on the specific condition and its severity. In some cases, medications or lifestyle changes may be sufficient to manage symptoms. In more severe cases, surgery or other medical interventions may be necessary.

In the medical field, "Sheep Diseases" refers to a group of illnesses and infections that affect sheep, which are domesticated ruminant mammals. These diseases can be caused by various agents, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. Some common sheep diseases include: 1. Scrapie: a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by a prion protein. 2. Bluetongue: a viral disease that affects the mouth and tongue of sheep and other ruminants. 3. Foot-and-mouth disease: a highly contagious viral disease that affects the mouth, feet, and udder of sheep and other cloven-hoofed animals. 4. Pneumonia: a respiratory disease caused by bacteria or viruses that can be fatal in severe cases. 5. Eimeriosis: a parasitic disease caused by coccidia that affects the digestive system of sheep. 6. Johne's disease: a chronic bacterial infection that affects the digestive system of sheep and other ruminants. 7. Coccidiosis: a parasitic disease caused by coccidia that affects the digestive system of sheep. 8. Anthrax: a bacterial disease that can affect the skin, respiratory system, and digestive system of sheep. 9. Leptospirosis: a bacterial disease that can affect the kidneys and liver of sheep. 10. Brucellosis: a bacterial disease that can affect the reproductive system of sheep and other ruminants. Prevention and control of sheep diseases are essential to maintain the health and productivity of sheep populations. This can be achieved through vaccination, proper nutrition, hygiene, and management practices.

Mycobacterium infections, nontuberculous, refer to a group of infections caused by mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These infections are also known as NTM (nontuberculous mycobacteria) infections. NTM infections can affect various parts of the body, including the lungs, skin, lymph nodes, and bones. NTM infections are typically acquired through inhalation of contaminated water or soil, or through contact with infected individuals or animals. They can also occur as a result of weakened immune systems, such as in people with HIV/AIDS or those taking immunosuppressive medications. Symptoms of NTM infections can vary depending on the affected area of the body. Common symptoms include cough, fever, night sweats, weight loss, and fatigue. Infections of the lungs can also cause chest pain, shortness of breath, and。 Diagnosis of NTM infections typically involves a combination of clinical examination, imaging studies, and laboratory testing. Treatment may involve a combination of antibiotics and surgery, depending on the severity and location of the infection.

A biopsy, fine-needle is a medical procedure used to obtain a small sample of tissue or cells from a specific area of the body for examination under a microscope. The procedure involves using a thin, hollow needle to puncture the skin and extract a small amount of tissue or cells from the target area. Fine-needle biopsy is often used to diagnose conditions such as cancer, thyroid disorders, and inflammatory diseases. It is a minimally invasive procedure that typically requires local anesthesia and has a lower risk of complications compared to other biopsy techniques. The sample obtained is then sent to a laboratory for analysis by a pathologist, who can determine the nature of the tissue or cells and provide a diagnosis.

Cat-scratch disease (CSD) is a bacterial infection caused by the bacterium Bartonella henselae. It is typically transmitted to humans through the bite or scratch of a cat, although it can also be transmitted through contact with other animals, such as dogs or rabbits, that are infected with the bacterium. The symptoms of CSD can vary widely and may include fever, swollen lymph nodes, fatigue, and aches and pains. In some cases, the infection can spread to the bloodstream and cause more serious complications, such as endocarditis (an infection of the heart valves) or meningitis (an infection of the membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord). Treatment for CSD typically involves antibiotics, which can help to clear the infection and prevent complications. In most cases, the infection resolves on its own without treatment, although it can take several weeks or months for the symptoms to subside. It is important to seek medical attention if you suspect that you may have CSD, as prompt treatment can help to prevent complications and reduce the risk of long-term health problems.

Typhlitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the cecum, a pouch-like structure located at the beginning of the large intestine. It is also known as cecal inflammation or cecitis. Typhlitis can be caused by a variety of factors, including bacterial infections, parasitic infections, inflammatory bowel disease, and certain medications. Symptoms of typhlitis may include abdominal pain, fever, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Diagnosis of typhlitis typically involves a combination of physical examination, medical history, and imaging studies such as CT scans or ultrasounds. Treatment may involve antibiotics, anti-inflammatory medications, and in severe cases, surgery. It is important to seek medical attention promptly if you suspect you may have typhlitis, as it can lead to serious complications if left untreated.

Antitubercular agents, also known as antitubercular drugs or TB drugs, are medications used to treat tuberculosis (TB), a bacterial infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These drugs work by inhibiting the growth and reproduction of the bacteria, thereby reducing the severity and duration of the infection. There are several classes of antitubercular agents, including: 1. Isoniazid (INH) 2. Rifampin (RIF) 3. Ethambutol (EMB) 4. Pyrazinamide (PZA) 5. Streptomycin (SM) 6. Fluoroquinolones (FQs) 7. Bedaquiline 8. Delamanid These drugs are typically used in combination to increase their effectiveness and reduce the risk of drug resistance. The duration of treatment depends on the type and severity of the infection, but it can range from several months to a year or more. It is important to note that antitubercular agents can have side effects, and patients should be closely monitored during treatment to ensure that the benefits outweigh the risks. Additionally, proper infection control measures should be taken to prevent the spread of TB in healthcare settings and the community.

In the medical field, "Goat Diseases" refers to a wide range of illnesses and conditions that can affect goats. These diseases can be caused by various factors, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, and environmental factors. Some common goat diseases include: 1. Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV): A viral disease that affects the central nervous system and joints of goats. 2. Q fever: A bacterial disease that can cause fever, pneumonia, and other respiratory symptoms in goats. 3. Johne's disease: A bacterial disease that affects the digestive system of goats and can cause diarrhea, weight loss, and other symptoms. 4. Coccidiosis: A parasitic disease that affects the digestive system of goats and can cause diarrhea, weight loss, and other symptoms. 5. Mycoplasma agalactiae: A bacterial disease that can cause mastitis (inflammation of the mammary glands) in goats. 6. Scrapie: A fatal neurodegenerative disease that affects the central nervous system of goats. 7. Bluetongue: A viral disease that affects the mouth and tongue of goats and can cause fever, swelling, and other symptoms. 8. Foot-and-mouth disease: A viral disease that affects the mouth and feet of goats and can cause fever, blisters, and other symptoms. 9. Anthrax: A bacterial disease that can cause fever, skin ulcers, and other symptoms in goats. 10. Rift Valley fever: A viral disease that can cause fever, muscle pain, and other symptoms in goats. These are just a few examples of the many goat diseases that can affect goats. It is important for goat owners to be aware of the common diseases in their area and to take steps to prevent and treat them.

An abscess is a localized collection of pus that forms in the body as a result of an infection. It is typically caused by bacteria or other microorganisms that enter the body through a wound or other opening, such as a tooth cavity or a surgical incision. The body's immune system responds to the infection by sending white blood cells to the area, which can lead to the formation of an abscess. Abscesses can occur in many different parts of the body, including the skin, muscles, joints, and organs. They can be painful and may cause redness, swelling, and warmth in the affected area. If left untreated, abscesses can become infected and spread to other parts of the body, potentially causing serious complications. Treatment for abscesses typically involves draining the pus and removing any infected tissue. This may be done through a surgical incision or by using a needle to drain the abscess. Antibiotics may also be prescribed to help fight the infection. In some cases, the abscess may recur if the underlying cause of the infection is not treated.

A biopsy, needle is a medical procedure in which a small sample of tissue is removed from a patient's body using a thin needle. The needle is inserted into the tissue and a small amount of tissue is removed, which is then sent to a laboratory for analysis. This procedure is often used to diagnose cancer or other diseases, as well as to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. Biopsy, needle is a minimally invasive procedure that is generally safe and well-tolerated by patients. It is typically performed in a doctor's office or an outpatient clinic, and patients are usually able to return to their normal activities soon after the procedure.

Lymphangitis is an infection of the lymphatic vessels, which are part of the immune system that helps to fight off infections. It is typically caused by bacteria, such as Streptococcus pyogenes, and can occur in any part of the body where lymphatic vessels are present. The symptoms of lymphangitis can vary depending on the location and severity of the infection, but may include redness, swelling, warmth, tenderness, and pain in the affected area. In some cases, the lymph nodes in the affected area may also be swollen and tender. Lymphangitis can be treated with antibiotics, which can help to kill the bacteria causing the infection. In severe cases, hospitalization may be necessary for intravenous antibiotics and other supportive care. It is important to seek medical attention promptly if you suspect you have lymphangitis, as untreated infections can lead to more serious complications.

Williamson, L. H. (2001). "Prevalence of caseous lymphadenitis and usage of caseous lymphadenitis vaccines in sheep flocks". ... "Caseous lymphadenitis in sheep and goats". www.omafra.gov.on.ca. Retrieved 2019-12-13. Williamson, L. H. (July 2001). "Caseous ... However, proprietary caseous lymphadenitis vaccine is still not available, which would be a complete protection against the ... "Caseous Lymphadenitis of Sheep and Goats - Circulatory System". Merck Veterinary Manual. Retrieved 2019-12-13. Baird, G.J.; ...
Stages of tubercular lymphadenitis:[citation needed] Lymphadenitis Periadenitis Cold abscess 'Collar stud' abscess Sinus ... Tuberculous lymphadenitis is seen in most developing countries, especially in the context of HIV/AIDS. M, Sriram Bhat (2016-06- ... Tuberculous lymphadenitis (or tuberculous adenitis) is the most common form of tuberculosis infections that appears outside the ... Tuberculous lymphadenitis is a chronic, specific granulomatous inflammation of the lymph node with caseation necrosis, caused ...
Cervical lymphadenitis is commonly caused by an infection of mycobacteria in the head region. This disease is very inconsistent ... Bayazit YA, Bayazit N, Namiduru M (2004). "Mycobacterial cervical lymphadenitis". ORL; Journal for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology and ... The disease mycobacterial cervical lymphadenitis, also known as scrofula and historically as king's evil, involves a ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis. Werrett, Simon. "Healing the Nation's Wounds: Royal ...
Asano S (2012). "Granulomatous lymphadenitis". Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hematopathology. 52 (1): 1-16. doi:10.3960/ ... "Clinicopathologic correlation of epidemiologic and histopathologic features of pediatric bacterial lymphadenitis". Archives of ...
inflammatory lymphadenitis. salivary gland infection. sternocleidomastoid tumor of infancy. benign tumor. Rare causes of neck ...
Caseous lymphadenitis often presents with pyogranulomatous abscess formation. Abscessation can occur in numerous areas, but it ... "Caseous Lymphadenitis of Sheep and Goats - Circulatory System". Merck Veterinary Manual. Retrieved 2020-10-06. Fontaine, M. C ... C. pseudotuberculosis causes a disease known as caseous lymphadenitis that most commonly affects small ruminants, such as goats ... Good husbandry practices can decrease the occurrence and spread of caseous lymphadenitis among small ruminants, thus improving ...
Cervical lymphadenitis (infection). Bad breath. Rarely, when stones form in the minor salivary glands, there is usually only ...
... lymphadenitis". Ioachim's Lymph Node Pathology (4th ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. pp. 156- ...
Dermatopathic lymphadenitis - pathconsultddx.com. (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, ...
Tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis Garg, RK; Somvanshi, DS (2011). "Spinal tuberculosis: A review". The Journal of Spinal Cord ...
There may be regional lymphadenitis. When pus forms, the pressure increases, with increasing pain, until it spontaneously ...
Tortoli, E.; Kirschner P; Springer B; Bartoloni A; Burrini C; Mantella A (1997). "Cervical lymphadenitis due to an unusual ... In children, M. bohemicum has induced laterocervical and submandibular lymphadenitis. The excision of the subject's lymph nodes ... Characteristics of 4 children with cervical lymphadenitis caused by Mycobacterium bohemicum, Austria, 2002-2006". Emerging ... "Mycobacterium bohemicum-a cause of paediatric cervical lymphadenitis". Swiss Med Wkly. 134 (15-16): 221-2. PMID 15190440. ...
This generally includes a focal lymphadenopathy/lymphadenitis.[citation needed] People with AIDS are given macrolide ... "Surgical excision versus antibiotic treatment for nontuberculous mycobacterial cervicofacial lymphadenitis in children: A ...
Stamos JK, Corydon K, Donaldson J, Shulman ST (March 1994). "Lymphadenitis as the dominant manifestation of Kawasaki disease". ... Myocarditis, diarrhea, pericarditis, valvulitis, aseptic meningitis, pneumonitis, lymphadenitis, and hepatitis may be present ... cervical lymphadenitis, parvovirus B19, mononucleosis, rheumatic fever, meningitis, staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, toxic ...
... and nonsuppurative lymphadenitis. Conservative management is usually adequate for nonsuppurative lymphadenitis. If suppuration ...
Infectious lymphadenitis affecting lymph nodes in the neck is often called scrofula. Lymphadenopathy is a common and ... Lymphadenopathy of an inflammatory type (the most common type) is lymphadenitis, producing swollen or enlarged lymph nodes. In ... Soft tissue edema and nodal matting on B-mode imaging suggests tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis or previous radiation therapy ... Adenitis Lymphovascular invasion "lymphadenitis" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary "lymphangitis" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary ...
2008). Cerebriform elephantiasis of the vulva following tuberculous lymphadenitis. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 74:188 ...
Lymph node: Granulomatous lymphadenitis Skin: Granulomatous dermatitis Penis Breast: Granulomatous mastitis Face: Granulomatous ... "Neck lymphadenitis due to silicone granuloma after mammary implants". Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española. 64 (3): 217-22. doi: ...
The other symptoms include regional lymphadenitis, malaise, and headache. The complications include myocarditis, endocarditis, ...
The type strain is IBS 382T (= CIP 105477T). It is associated with cases of lymphadenitis and endocarditis. Heller, R.; Kubina ...
The type strain was first isolated from an immunocompetent paediatric patient with cervical lymphadenitis with recurrent ... A new agent of mycobacterial lymphadenitis in children: Mycobacterium heidelbergense sp. nov. J. Clin. Microbiol. 35, 3203-3209 ... lymphadenitis) in immunocompetent patients. Its biosafety level is not known. ...
Cervical lymphadenitis (swelling of the lymph nodes in the neck). Aesthesia or paresthesia (altered sensation such as numbness ...
Upon medical examination, wheezing, hepatomegaly, and lymphadenitis are often noted. High parasitic loads or repeated infection ...
Other symptoms include eye pain, chest pain, lymphadenitis and lethargy. The disease is self-limiting. No fatalities due to ...
Other symptoms may include lymphadenitis, fever, excessive salivation, and conjunctivitis.[citation needed] Animals produce a ...
In humans the tick may cause dermatitis, fever and lymphadenitis. It is also a carrier of Borrelia, a spirochaete bacterium, ...
Symptoms of Chlorellosis including focal cutaneous lesions, lymphadenitis, and peritonitis. Protothecosis Hart, J.; Mooney, L ...
Four of the five patients had severe pharyngitis and submandibular lymphadenitis. Yersinia pestis was isolated from the camel's ...
Final Diagnosis - Pneumonia, Hilar Lymphadenitis and Sepsis Secondary to Rhodococcus equi. The University of Pittsburgh School ...
During her time as a trainee at YG, Park was diagnosed with lymphadenitis; Park has continued to suffer from episodes of ... lymphadenitis ever since. In 2006, she featured on two of Big Bang's earliest singles, "We Belong Together" and "Forever with U ...
Lymphadenitis is an infection of the lymph nodes (also called lymph glands). It is a complication of certain bacterial ... Lymphadenitis is an infection of the lymph nodes (also called lymph glands). It is a complication of certain bacterial ... Lymphadenitis and lymphangitis. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennetts Principles and ... Lymphadenitis occurs when the glands become enlarged by swelling (inflammation), often in response to bacteria, viruses, or ...
Lymphadenitis is the inflammation or enlargement of a lymph node. Lymph nodes are small, ovoid nodules normally ranging in size ... encoded search term (Lymphadenitis) and Lymphadenitis What to Read Next on Medscape ... Lymphadenitis may affect a single node or a group of nodes (regional adenopathy) and may be unilateral or bilateral. The onset ... Lymphadenitis is the inflammation or enlargement of a lymph node. Lymph nodes are small, ovoid nodules normally ranging in size ...
Mycobacterium mageritense Lymphadenitis in Child. Volume 28, Number 3-March 2022. Article Views: 612. Data is collected weekly ... Mycobacterium mageritense Lymphadenitis in Child. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2022;28(3):752-753. doi:10.3201/eid2803.211486. ... Thus, M. mageritense is a rapidly growing mycobacteria that can cause granulomatous lymphadenitis in children. Clinicians ... We report a case of lymphadenitis caused by M. mageritense in a child in Spain. ...
Return to Article Details Chest tuberculosis with mediastinal asymptomatic lymphadenitis without lung involvement in an ...
Lymphadenitis - Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment from the MSD Manuals - Medical Consumer Version. ... Symptoms of Lymphadenitis Infected lymph nodes enlarge and are usually tender and painful. Sometimes, the skin over the ... Treatment of lymphadenitis depends on the organism causing the infection. For a bacterial infection, an antibiotic is usually ... Lymphadenitis almost always results from an infection, which may be caused by bacteria, viruses, parasites, or fungi. Typically ...
Tag Archives: TB lymphadenitis. A Case of Septic Arthritis with Cryptococcus Neoformans in a Patient with Lupus and TB ...
Introduction: Granulomatous lung disease (GLD) is caused by a wide range of conditions and it is challenge for pulmonologist. A detailed history of exposures is fundamental in GDL and has been found pivotal to reach a precise diagnosis. ...
Lymphatics: Tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis. Mladick, Richard A. Mladick, Richard A. Less Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery ...
Characteristics of mesenteric lymphadenitis in comparison with those of acute appendicitis in children. Eur J Pediatr. 2017;176 ... Mesenteric Lymphadenitis). How to Say It: Mez-un-ter-ik Lim-fad-un-ni-tis ...
N2 - Histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (HNL) is often mistaken for malignant lymphoma clinically and is also sometimes ... AB - Histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (HNL) is often mistaken for malignant lymphoma clinically and is also sometimes ... Histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (HNL) is often mistaken for malignant lymphoma clinically and is also sometimes difficult ... abstract = "Histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (HNL) is often mistaken for malignant lymphoma clinically and is also ...
What is histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis? Read on to learn more about this rare condition, including its potential causes ... KFD is also known by other names, such as histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis or Kikuchi disease. KFD mainly. occurs in ... 2019). Histiocytic necrotising lymphadenitis.. https://dermnetnz.org/topics/histiocytic-necrotising-lymphadenitis. *. ... 2016). Kikuchi-Fujimoto necrotizing lymphadenitis: A rare case of generalized lymphadenopathy.. https://www.oatext.com/Kikuchi- ...
Cervical lymphadenitis: etiology, diagnosis, and management. Curr Infect Dis Rep. 2009 May. 11(3):183-9. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ... Localized cervical lymphadenitis typically begins as enlarged, tender, and then fluctuant nodes. The appropriate management of ... Atypical mycobacteria cause subacute cervical lymphadenitis, with nodes that are large and indurated but not tender. The only ... Erythema, tenderness, warmth, and fluctuance suggests lymphadenitis, and nodes that are fixed (nonmoveable), matted together, ...
Progressively transformed germinal centres are sometimes found in nonspecific lymphadenitis (reactive hyperplasia). The ...
Bacille-Calmette-Guérin vaccine-associated suppurative lymphadenitis in Hong Kong (China), 2004 to 2012 Authors. * Tsz-sum Lam ... Bacille-Calmette-Guérin vaccine-associated suppurative lymphadenitis in Hong Kong (China), 2004 to 2012. Western Pac Surveill ...
Lymphadenitis, lymphadenopathy.. Immune System Disorders Allergic reactions, including anaphylactic and anaphylactoid reactions ...
Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis secondary to Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis ... We herein described the coexistence of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis, ... and histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis secondary to hemodialysis catheter-related bloodstream infection caused by ...
ICER201003 Characterization of Immune Responses in Tuberculosis Lymphadenitis. Principal Investigator ICER202103 Prevalence of ...
... or cause oropharyngeal disease with cervical lymphadenitis. ...
What different types of mesenteric lymphadenitis are there?. Dr. Videh Mahajananswered ...
Initially, bacterial lymphadenitis was diagnosed; however, an infectious disease workup revealed no evidence of either a ... Initially, acute bacterial lymphadenitis was diagnosed. Intravenous antibiotics were started, and the patients inguinal ...
Ever had tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis? Probably not, its more commonly known as scrofula, and is the sort of disease ...
Regional lymphadenitis (bubonic plague) * Septicemia without an evident bubo (septicemic plague) * Plague pneumonia, resulting ... Pharyngitis and cervical lymphadenitis resulting from exposure to larger infectious droplets or ingestion of infected tissues ( ...
Mediastinal, retroperitoneal, and cervical (scrofula) lymph nodes - The most common site of tuberculous lymphadenitis (scrofula ... advanced cases of tuberculous lymphadenitis may suppurate and form a draining sinus ...
Categories: Lymphadenitis Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, CopyrightRestricted 12 ...
... and nonsuppurative lymphadenitis. Conservative management is usually adequate for nonsuppurative lymphadenitis. If suppuration ...
Hill AR, Mateo F, Hudak A. Transient exacerbation of tuberculous lymphadenitis during chemotherapy in patients with AIDS. Clin ... Most extrapulmonary forms of TB (including TB meningitis, tuberculous lymphadenitis, pericardial TB, pleural TB, and ...
  • Utility of EBUS-TBNA for diagnosis of mediastinal tuberculous lymphadenitis: a multicentre Australian experience. (medscape.com)
  • Histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (HNL) is often mistaken for malignant lymphoma clinically and is also sometimes difficult to differentiate from lymphoma even histopathologically. (elsevierpure.com)
  • KFD is also known by other names, such as histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis or Kikuchi disease. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis secondary to hemodialysis catheter-related bloodstream infection caused by Corynebacterium Striatum. (bvsalud.org)
  • We herein described the coexistence of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis , alternatively known as the Kikuchi disease (KD), secondary to hemodialysis catheter -related bloodstream infection (BSI) caused by Corynebacterium striatum. (bvsalud.org)
  • so-called histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis) is an enigmatic, benign, and self-limited syndrome characterized by regional lymphadenopathy with tenderness, usually accompanied by mild fever and night sweats. (medscape.com)
  • Haimi-Cohen Y, Markus-Eidlitz T, Amir J, Zeharia A. Long-term Follow-up of Observation-Only Management of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lymphadenitis. (medscape.com)
  • Therefore, a nontuberculous mycobacterial lymphadenitis was suspected and treatment with oral clarithromycin (7.5 mg/kg every 12 h) and ciprofloxacin (15 mg/kg every 12 h) was started. (cdc.gov)
  • Contact your provider or go to the emergency room if you have symptoms of lymphadenitis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Raoot A, Dev G. Assessment of Status of rpoB Gene in FNAC Samples of Tuberculous Lymphadenitis by Real-Time PCR. (medscape.com)
  • Characteristics of mesenteric lymphadenitis in comparison with those of acute appendicitis in children. (epnet.com)
  • Cervical lymphadenitis: etiology, diagnosis, and management. (medscape.com)
  • Dulin MF, Kennard TP, Leach L, Williams R. Management of cervical lymphadenitis in children. (medscape.com)
  • or cause oropharyngeal disease with cervical lymphadenitis. (cdc.gov)
  • Lymphadenitis is the inflammation or enlargement of a lymph node. (medscape.com)
  • Complete excision of residual lymph node and scar tissue was performed 2 months later, leading to total resolution of the lymphadenitis. (cdc.gov)
  • Initially described in Japan, KFD was first reported almost simultaneously by Kikuchi and by Fujimoto and associates in 1972 as a lymphadenitis with focal proliferation of reticular cells accompanied by numerous histiocytes and extensive nuclear debris. (medscape.com)
  • Caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, that affects the lymphatic system, resulting in abscesses in the lymph nodes and internal organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • The causative organism of caseous lymphadenitis is Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Caseous lymphadenitis (CL) is a chronic, contagious disease caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis . (msdvetmanual.com)
  • This study set out to sequence the genome of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (Cp) 3/99-5, an ovine strain isolated from a naturally-occurring case of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) in Scotland. (gla.ac.uk)
  • Differential diagnosis includes lymphoma, lymphadenitis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, and even adenocarcinoma. (medscape.com)
  • Treatment of lymphadenitis depends on the organism causing the infection. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Lymphadenitis is an infection of the lymph nodes (also called lymph glands). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Lymphadenitis may affect a single node or a group of nodes (regional adenopathy) and may be unilateral or bilateral. (medscape.com)
  • Lymphadenitis is infection of one or more lymph nodes, which usually become swollen and tender. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Caseous lymphadenitis (CL) is a chronic, contagious bacterial disease that manifests clinically as abscesses of peripheral and/or internal lymph nodes and organs. (msdvetmanual.com)
  • Lymphadenitis occurs when the glands become enlarged by swelling (inflammation), often in response to bacteria, viruses, or fungi. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The onset and course of lymphadenitis may be acute, subacute, or chronic. (medscape.com)
  • All three particles induced chronic bronchopneumonia and lymphadenitis, accompanied by pulmonary fibrosis. (cdc.gov)
  • However, proprietary caseous lymphadenitis vaccine is still not available, which would be a complete protection against the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Usually, lymphadenitis can be diagnosed based on the symptoms, and its cause is an obvious nearby infection. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Lymphadenitis may occur after skin infections or other infections caused by bacteria such as streptococcus or staphylococcus. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Loizos A, Soteriades ES, Pieridou D, Koliou MG. Lymphadenitis by non-tuberculous mycobacteria in children. (medscape.com)
  • Diagnosing nontuberculous mycobacterial cervicofacial lymphadenitis in children: A systematic review. (medscape.com)
  • Axillary lymphadenitis due to Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare. (nih.gov)
  • For example, mesenteric lymphadenitis ( inflammation of the lymph nodes in the abdomen) may mimic signs of appendicitis . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • What is Mesenteric Lymphadenitis? (paybima.com)
  • Mesenteric Lymphadenitis is a condition that often goes unnoticed amidst the maze of medical mysteries, while it silently affects the lives of thousands of people. (paybima.com)
  • When the swelling of the abdominal lymph nodes takes place near the stomach area, and it comes with abdomen pain, it is called mesenteric Lymphadenitis. (paybima.com)
  • Mesenteric Lymphadenitis is common among children and teenagers, while it is less common among people over the age of 20. (paybima.com)
  • The infection caused by parasites can cause Mesenteric Lymphadenitis. (paybima.com)
  • G astroenteritis is another cause of Mesenteric Lymphadenitis, also called stomach flu. (paybima.com)
  • Depending on the category of mesenteric Lymphadenitis, the diagnosis and treatment are decided. (paybima.com)
  • In typical cases, a CT scan is enough to diagnose mesenteric Lymphadenitis. (paybima.com)
  • Mesenteric Lymphadenitis generally does not require any distinct medical treatment. (paybima.com)
  • Histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis. (nih.gov)
  • 18. Strong association of Torque teno virus/Torque teno-like minivirus to Kikuchi-Fujimoto lymphadenitis (histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis) on quantitative analysis. (nih.gov)
  • Haimi-Cohen Y, Markus-Eidlitz T, Amir J, Zeharia A. Long-term Follow-up of Observation-Only Management of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lymphadenitis. (medscape.com)
  • Diagnosing nontuberculous mycobacterial cervicofacial lymphadenitis in children: A systematic review. (medscape.com)
  • Therefore, a nontuberculous mycobacterial lymphadenitis was suspected and treatment with oral clarithromycin (7.5 mg/kg every 12 h) and ciprofloxacin (15 mg/kg every 12 h) was started. (cdc.gov)
  • Therefore, deep pelvic infections or malignancies do not present as inguinal lymphadenitis. (medscape.com)
  • Sejben I, Rácz A, Svébis M, Patyi M, Cserni G. Petroleum jelly-induced penile paraffinoma with inguinal lymphadenitis mimicking incarcerated inguinal hernia. (medscape.com)
  • Histopathologic analysis showed necrotizing granulomatous lymphadenitis. (cdc.gov)
  • Caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, that affects the lymphatic system, resulting in abscesses in the lymph nodes and internal organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • The causative organism of caseous lymphadenitis is Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • This study set out to sequence the genome of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (Cp) 3/99-5, an ovine strain isolated from a naturally-occurring case of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) in Scotland. (gla.ac.uk)
  • Kikuchi lymphadenitis and malignant lymphoma however could be differentiated histologically. (who.int)
  • citation needed] Caseous lymphadenitis causes considerable economic harm, because skins and carcasses have to be condemned. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The most effective way of controlling caseous lymphadenitis is still a topic of discussion. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, proprietary caseous lymphadenitis vaccine is still not available, which would be a complete protection against the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wikimedia Commons has media related to Caseous lymphadenitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Utility of EBUS-TBNA for diagnosis of mediastinal tuberculous lymphadenitis: a multicentre Australian experience. (medscape.com)
  • Doctors may classify lymphadenitis as acute or chronic. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Acute lymphadenitis lasts less than 2 weeks and occurs due to an infection, such as strep throat. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The onset and course of lymphadenitis may be acute, subacute, or chronic. (medscape.com)
  • 10. [Subacute necrotizing lymphadenitis or Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease]. (nih.gov)
  • Contact your provider or go to the emergency room if you have symptoms of lymphadenitis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • 7. Histology-Independent Signature Distinguishes Kikuchi-Fujimoto Disease/Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Associated Lymphadenitis From Benign and Malignant Lymphadenopathies. (nih.gov)
  • Lymphadenitis Lymphocyte transformation Lymphocyte types (B, T) Malignant lymphomas Phytohaemagglutinin Acta Haemat. (karger.com)
  • In a patient with generalized lymphadenitis, the differential includes systemic conditions. (medscape.com)
  • Less commonly, tuberculosis and cat scratch disease can lead to lymphadenitis. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In a patient with regional lymphadenitis, knowledge of lymphatic drainage patterns and pathologic processes most likely to affect these areas can facilitate diagnostic investigation. (medscape.com)
  • We report a case of lymphadenitis caused by M. mageritense in a child in Spain. (cdc.gov)