Micrococcus: A genus of gram-positive, spherical bacteria found in soils and fresh water, and frequently on the skin of man and other animals.Micrococcus luteus: A species of gram-positive, spherical bacteria whose organisms occur in tetrads and in irregular clusters of tetrads. The primary habitat is mammalian skin.Lupinus: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that is a source of SPARTEINE, lupanine and other lupin alkaloids.Micrococcaceae: A family of bacteria ranging from free living and saprophytic to parasitic and pathogenic forms.Staphylococcus: A genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, coccoid bacteria. Its organisms occur singly, in pairs, and in tetrads and characteristically divide in more than one plane to form irregular clusters. Natural populations of Staphylococcus are found on the skin and mucous membranes of warm-blooded animals. Some species are opportunistic pathogens of humans and animals.Uronic Acids: Acids derived from monosaccharides by the oxidation of the terminal (-CH2OH) group farthest removed from the carbonyl group to a (-COOH) group. (From Stedmans, 26th ed)ArtMuramidase: A basic enzyme that is present in saliva, tears, egg white, and many animal fluids. It functions as an antibacterial agent. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-linkages between N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues in peptidoglycan and between N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues in chitodextrin. EC 3.2.1.17.PeptidoglycanPyrimidine Dimers: Dimers found in DNA chains damaged by ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. They consist of two adjacent PYRIMIDINE NUCLEOTIDES, usually THYMINE nucleotides, in which the pyrimidine residues are covalently joined by a cyclobutane ring. These dimers block DNA REPLICATION.Bacteriolysis: Rupture of bacterial cells due to mechanical force, chemical action, or the lytic growth of BACTERIOPHAGES.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Food Irradiation: Treatment of food with RADIATION.Lysostaphin: A 25-kDa peptidase produced by Staphylococcus simulans which cleaves a glycine-glcyine bond unique to an inter-peptide cross-bridge of the STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS cell wall. EC 3.4.24.75.Vicia: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that is widely used as ground cover and forage and known for the edible beans, VICIA FABA.Cell Wall: The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Polyribonucleotide Nucleotidyltransferase: An enzyme of the transferase class that catalyzes the reaction RNA(n+1) and orthophosphate to yield RNA(n) and a nucleoside diphosphate, or the reverse reaction. ADP, IDP, GDP, UDP, and CDP can act as donors in the latter case. (From Dorland, 27th ed) EC 2.7.7.8.Ultraviolet Rays: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum immediately below the visible range and extending into the x-ray frequencies. The longer wavelengths (near-UV or biotic or vital rays) are necessary for the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D and are also called antirachitic rays; the shorter, ionizing wavelengths (far-UV or abiotic or extravital rays) are viricidal, bactericidal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic and are used as disinfectants.Deoxyribonucleases: Enzymes which catalyze the hydrolases of ester bonds within DNA. EC 3.1.-.Gram-Positive Bacteria: Bacteria which retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.Alkyl and Aryl Transferases: A somewhat heterogeneous class of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of alkyl or related groups (excluding methyl groups). EC 2.5.Theaceae: A plant family of the order THEALES, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida, best known for CAMELLIA SINENSIS, which is the source of Oriental TEA.Sarcina: A genus of gram-positive, anaerobic bacteria whose organisms divide in three perpendicular planes and occur in packets of eight or more cells. It has been isolated from soil, grains, and clinical specimens.Air Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the air. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.N-Glycosyl Hydrolases: A class of enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of nitrogen-linked sugars.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Allergy and Immunology: A medical specialty concerned with the hypersensitivity of the individual to foreign substances and protection from the resultant infection or disorder.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Glycolysis: A metabolic process that converts GLUCOSE into two molecules of PYRUVIC ACID through a series of enzymatic reactions. Energy generated by this process is conserved in two molecules of ATP. Glycolysis is the universal catabolic pathway for glucose, free glucose, or glucose derived from complex CARBOHYDRATES, such as GLYCOGEN and STARCH.Gluconeogenesis: Biosynthesis of GLUCOSE from nonhexose or non-carbohydrate precursors, such as LACTATE; PYRUVATE; ALANINE; and GLYCEROL.Decarboxylation: The removal of a carboxyl group, usually in the form of carbon dioxide, from a chemical compound.Operon: In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.Riboflavin: Nutritional factor found in milk, eggs, malted barley, liver, kidney, heart, and leafy vegetables. The richest natural source is yeast. It occurs in the free form only in the retina of the eye, in whey, and in urine; its principal forms in tissues and cells are as FLAVIN MONONUCLEOTIDE and FLAVIN-ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE.Riboflavin Synthase: An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of riboflavin from two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine, utilizing a four-carbon fragment from one molecule which is transferred to the second molecule. EC 2.5.1.9.Pyridines: Compounds with a six membered aromatic ring containing NITROGEN. The saturated version is PIPERIDINES.Biotechnology: Body of knowledge related to the use of organisms, cells or cell-derived constituents for the purpose of developing products which are technically, scientifically and clinically useful. Alteration of biologic function at the molecular level (i.e., GENETIC ENGINEERING) is a central focus; laboratory methods used include TRANSFECTION and CLONING technologies, sequence and structure analysis algorithms, computer databases, and gene and protein structure function analysis and prediction.Pigments, Biological: Any normal or abnormal coloring matter in PLANTS; ANIMALS or micro-organisms.Mouth: The oval-shaped oral cavity located at the apex of the digestive tract and consisting of two parts: the vestibule and the oral cavity proper.Alexander Disease: Rare leukoencephalopathy with infantile-onset accumulation of Rosenthal fibers in the subpial, periventricular, and subependymal zones of the brain. Rosenthal fibers are GLIAL FIBRILLARY ACIDIC PROTEIN aggregates found in ASTROCYTES. Juvenile- and adult-onset types show progressive atrophy of the lower brainstem instead. De novo mutations in the GFAP gene are associated with the disease with propensity for paternal inheritance.Aerobiosis: Life or metabolic reactions occurring in an environment containing oxygen.Resuscitation: The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)Saccharomycopsis: Yeast-like ascomycetous fungi of the family Saccharomycopsidaceae, order SACCHAROMYCETALES, isolated from the stomach of rabbits and some other animals.Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: The artificial substitution of heart and lung action as indicated for HEART ARREST resulting from electric shock, DROWNING, respiratory arrest, or other causes. The two major components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are artificial ventilation (RESPIRATION, ARTIFICIAL) and closed-chest CARDIAC MASSAGE.Actinobacteria: Class of BACTERIA with diverse morphological properties. Strains of Actinobacteria show greater than 80% 16S rDNA/rRNA sequence similarity among each other and also the presence of certain signature nucleotides. (Stackebrandt E. et al, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. (1997) 47:479-491)Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Glutamic Acid: A non-essential amino acid naturally occurring in the L-form. Glutamic acid is the most common excitatory neurotransmitter in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Thiocyanates: Organic derivatives of thiocyanic acid which contain the general formula R-SCN.Lactoperoxidase: An enzyme derived from cow's milk. It catalyzes the radioiodination of tyrosine and its derivatives and of peptides containing tyrosine.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Bromates: Negative ions or salts derived from bromic acid, HBrO3.Hypochlorous Acid: An oxyacid of chlorine (HClO) containing monovalent chlorine that acts as an oxidizing or reducing agent.PeroxidasesAnti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
Micrococcus luteus • Mycobacterium smegmatis • Mycobacterium abscessus • Neisseria species • Pseudomonas aeruginosa • ...
Riazuddin, S.; Grossman, L. (1977). "Micrococcus luteus correndonucleases. II. Mechanism of action of two endonucleases ...
Bacteriophage T4 and Micrococcus luteus UV endonucleases were actually shown not to be under the class of "endonuclease," but ... Bailly, V; Sente, B; Verly, W. G. (1989). "Bacteriophage-T4 and Micrococcus luteus UV endonucleases are not endonucleases but ... Micrococcus luteus UV endonuclease; AP site-DNA 5'-phosphomonoester-lyase; and X-ray endonuclease III. Since DNA AP lyase is a ...
Suzuki O, Ishikawa Y, Miyazaki K, Izu K & Matsumoto T (1986). "Acetylputrescine deacetylase from Micrococcus luteus K-11". ...
Ohnuma, S.; Koyama, T.; Ogura, K. (1991). "Purification of solanesyl-diphosphate synthase from Micrococcus luteus. A new class ... "Solanesyl pyrophosphate synthetase from Micrococcus lysodeikticus". Biochemistry. 16: 4616-4622. doi:10.1021/bi00640a014. PMID ...
One such organism is Micrococcus luteus (American Type Culture Collection strain number ATCC 49442), which develops a yellow ... Sims GK, O'loughlin EJ (Oct 1992). "Riboflavin Production during Growth of Micrococcus luteus on Pyridine". Applied and ...
Sims GK, Sommers LE, Konopka A (May 1986). "Degradation of Pyridine by Micrococcus luteus Isolated from Soil". Appl. Environ. ...
doi:10.1016/S0964-8305(96)00032-7. Sims, Gerald K.; O (1992). "Riboflavin Production during Growth of Micrococcus luteus on ...
Fujii, H.; Koyama, T.; Ogura, K. (1982). "Hexaprenyl pyrophosphate synthetase from Micrococcus luteus B-P 26. Separation of two ... and characterization of the genes encoding the two essential protein components of Micrococcus luteus B-P 26 hexaprenyl ...
Sims, G. K.; O'Loughlin, E.J. (1992). "Riboflavin production during growth of Micrococcus luteus on pyridine". Applied and ...
Beller, H. R.; Goh, E.-B.; Keasling, J. D. (2009). "Genes Involved in Long-Chain Alkene Biosynthesis in Micrococcus luteus". ...
Sources of this enzyme includes Micrococcus luteus, Phaseolus aureus, Mycobacterium smegmatis and cotton fibers. Lahav M, Chiu ... TH, Lennarz WJ (1969). "Studies on the biosynthesis of mannan in Micrococcus lysodeikticus II. The enzymatic synthesis of ...
Gordon, LK; Haseltine WA (1981). "Early Steps of Excision Repair of Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers by the Micrococcus Luteus ... Gordon, LK; Haseltine WA (1980). "Comparison of the Cleavage of Pyrimidine Dimers by the Bacteriophage T4 and M. luteus UV- ... "Cleavage of Pyrimidine Dimers in Specific DNA Sequences by a Pyrimidine Dimer DNA-Glycosylase of M.luteus". Nature. 285 (5767 ...
This compound exhibits week antibacterial properties against the bacterium Micrococcus luteus, Salmonella typhimurium and ...
... are recognized as analogs of calcium and incorporated within Micrococcus luteus. Uranium, however, has no known function and is ...
... such as Micrococcus luteus. The currently accepted taxonomy is based on the List of Prokaryotic names with Standing in ...
Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus bovis. P. polymyxa is the source of dispase ...
Action of mycosubtilin and of bacillomycin L on Micrococcus luteus cells and protoplasts: influence of the polarity of the ... Its antibacterial activity is quite limited to bacterias such as Microccocus luteus. Walton R.B. & Woodruff H.B., 1949. A ...
Micrococcus luteus (yellow), Micrococcus roseus (pink), Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (brown), Pseudomonas ...
Micrococcus luteus, and Escherichia coli. Further research has added evidence for antimicrobial effects against Lactococcus ...
... and Micrococcus luteus. Tests with blood agar have shown some of these species can survive in vivo. This suggests infections ...
strain TN58 and shown to possess activity against two Gram-positive bacteria, S.aureus and Micrococcus luteus, and has also ...
Staphylococcus epidermidis and Micrococcus luteus. Other microbes detected not associated with humans included Lactococcus ...
... aerogenes Klebsiella pneumoniae Klebsiella planticola Legionella pneumophila Listeria monocytogenes Micrococcus luteus ...
... lactis Legionella pneumophila Listeria monocytogenes Methanobacterium extroquens Microbacterium multiforme Micrococcus luteus ...
Large cultures of Micrococcus luteus growing on pyridine (left) and succinic acid (right). The yellow pigment being produced in ... One such organism is Micrococcus luteus (American Type Culture Collection strain number ATCC 49442), which develops a yellow ... "Riboflavin Production during Growth of Micrococcus luteus on Pyridine". Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 58 (10): 3423- ...
Micrococcus luteus. staph·y·lo·coc·cus. (stăf′ə-lō-kŏk′əs). n. pl. staph·y·lo·coc·ci (-kŏk′sī, -kŏk′ī) Any of various spherical ...
Micrococcus luteus was formerly known as Micrococcus lysodeikticus. In 2003, it was proposed that one strain of Micrococcus ... demonstrate that Micrococcus luteus has survived for at least 34,000 to 170,000 years on the basis of 16S rRNA analysis, and ... Ohama T, Muto A, Osawa S. Role of GC-biased mutation pressure on synonymous codon choice in Micrococcus luteus, a bacterium ... Micrococcus luteus is a Gram-positive, to Gram-variable, nonmotile, coccus, tetrad-arranging, pigmented, saprotrophic bacterium ...
Micrococcus luteus ATCC ® 10240™ Designation: 130.21 TypeStrain=False Application: Assay of bacitracin Quality control strain ... Micrococcus luteus (Schroeter) Cohn (ATCC® 10240™) Strain Designations: 130.21 [ATCC 10786] / Type Strain: no / Biosafety Level ...
Micrococcus luteus Domain: Prokaryote Optimal Growth Medium: Nutrient Agar Optimal Growth Temperature: 25° C Package: MicroKwik ... Genus and Species: Micrococcus luteus. Domain: Prokaryote. Optimal Growth Medium: Nutrient Agar. Optimal Growth Temperature: 25 ... Micrococcus luteus, MicroKwik Culture®, Vial. Item # 155155A *bvseo_sdk, java_sdk, bvseo-4.0.0 ...
... the extract of the sponge-associated bacterial strain Micrococcus luteus was found to exhibit potent antimicrobial activity. ... Metabolites from the sponge-associated bacterium Micrococcus luteus J Mar Biotechnol. 1998 Dec;6(4):233-236. ... the extract of the sponge-associated bacterial strain Micrococcus luteus was found to exhibit potent antimicrobial activity. ...
Glycolysis / Gluconeogenesis - Micrococcus luteus [ Pathway menu , Organism menu , Pathway entry , Download KGML , Show ...
Homologous recombination - Micrococcus luteus [ Pathway menu , Organism menu , Pathway entry , Download KGML , Show description ...
Micrococcus luteus produced 29 {mu}M riboflavin during growth on 6.5 mM pyridine but not during growth on other substrates. On ... MAT.; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; MICROCOCCUS; METABOLISM; PYRIDINES; RIBOFLAVIN; BIOSYNTHESIS; BIOLOGICAL STRESS; GROWTH; ... Pyridine may interfere with riboflavin biosynthesis or elicit a general stress response in M. luteus. The optimum concentration ...
Micrococcus luteus bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These aerobic, Gram-positive bacteria are found in ... micrococcus luteus, micrococcus lysodeikticus, microorganism, microorganisms, no-one, nobody, scanning electron micrograph, ... Caption: Micrococcus luteus bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These aerobic, Gram-positive bacteria are ...
... of Micrococcus luteus, gram-positive, coccoid bacterium (.05 to 3.5 microns in diameter). It is capable of dividing in more ... M. luteus can be found in soil, dust, water and air, as well as on human skin. It is part of the normal flora of the human body ... Caption: Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Micrococcus luteus, gram-positive, coccoid bacterium (.05 to 3.5 ... luteus, microbe, micrococcaceae, micrococcales, micrococcus, micrograph, nosocomial, pathogen, pneumonia, positive, saprophyte ...
Micrococcus luteus is a bacterium that belongs to the family Micrococcaceae. An obligate aerobe, M. luteus is found in soil, ... M. luteus is considered a contaminant in sick patients and is resistant by slowing of major metabolic processes and induction ...
I was wondering if someone could tell me whether E.Coli and Microccocus luteus are eukaryotes or prokaryotes. I would really ... Micrococcus luteus and e. coli. About microscopic forms of life, including Bacteria, Archea, protozoans, algae and fungi. ... I was wondering if someone could tell me whether E.Coli and Microccocus luteus are eukaryotes or prokaryotes. I would really ...
Antibacterial activity against Micrococcus luteus MTCC 2470 at 80 ug/ml after 24 hrs by agar dilution method. ...
A high proportion of Micrococcus luteus cells in cultures which had been starved for 3 to 6 months lost the ability to grow and ... Quantitative Analysis of the Physiological Heterogeneity within Starved Cultures of Micrococcus luteus by Flow Cytometry and ... Quantitative Analysis of the Physiological Heterogeneity within Starved Cultures of Micrococcus luteus by Flow Cytometry and ... Quantitative Analysis of the Physiological Heterogeneity within Starved Cultures of Micrococcus luteus by Flow Cytometry and ...
In Micrococcus luteus, the resuscitation of dormant cells is caused by a small secreted protein (resuscitation-promoting factor ... M. luteus Rpf comprises a lysozyme-like domain that is necessary and sufficient for activity connected through a short linker ... In this report, we characterized a number of environmental isolates of M. luteus, including several recovered from amber. There ... or Rpf) that is found in "spent culture medium." Rpf is encoded by a single essential gene in M. luteus. Homologs of Rpf are ...
Rpf from Micrococcus luteus, the founder member of this protein family, is indeed a muralytic enzyme, as revealed by its ... Muralytic activity of Micrococcus luteus Rpf and its relationship to physiological activity in promoting bacterial growth and ... Muralytic activity of Micrococcus luteus Rpf and its relationship to physiological activity in promoting bacterial growth and ... Muralytic activity of Micrococcus luteus Rpf and its relationship to physiological activity in promoting bacterial growth and ...
Eliminar este artículo Patógeno/Antígeno: Micrococcus luteus Polynucleotide phosphorylase * Eliminar este artículo Patógeno/ ... Micrococcus luteus Polynucleotide phosphorylase and Pyroglutamate aminopeptidase ...
Purchase Recombinant Micrococcus luteus Ribosomal RNA small subunit methyltransferase H(rsmH). It is produced in Yeast. High ... Recombinant Micrococcus luteus Ribosomal RNA small subunit methyltransferase H(rsmH). Recombinant Micrococcus luteus Ribosomal ... Micrococcus luteus (strain ATCC 4698 / DSM 20030 / JCM 1464 / NBRC 3333 / NCIMB 9278 / NCTC 2665 / VKM Ac-2230) (Micrococcus ... Recombinant Micrococcus luteus Ribosomal RNA small subunit methyltransferase H(rsmH),E.coli. ...
Micrococcus luteus. Micrococcus luteus. was found gram-positive cocci, non-spore forming, non-haemolytic, non-motile aerobic or ... The species were ,I,Bacillus cereus, Corynebacterium pyogenes, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, Pasteurella haemolytica, ...
Micrococcus luteus • Mycobacterium smegmatis • Mycobacterium abscessus • Neisseria species • Pseudomonas aeruginosa • ...
Micrococcus luteus is a Gram-positive, to Gram-variable, nonmotile, Coccus, saprotrophic bacterium that belongs to the family ... Micrococcus luteus. NBRC No.. NBRC 13867. Scientific Name of this Strain. Micrococcus luteus (Schroeter 1872) Cohn 1872 emend. ... Micrococcus luteus - NBRC 13867. hoangvnu January 14, 2016 Vi khuẩn No Comments ...
Other articles where Micrococcus luteus is discussed: Micrococcus:.found in milk, such as M. luteus, M. varians, and M. ... Micrococcus luteus (M. luteus, 16.1 ± 0.4 mm) and Escherichia coli (E.. a differential stain; divides bacteria into two large ... Morphology And Gram Stain Results For Micrococcus Luteus. Posted byadmin May 18, 2019. ... Micrococcus luteus. yellow. round.. James Watt First Reliable Steam Engine 1775 The steam engine is thought to be the most ...
Micrococcus luteus, Escherichia coli] Description: Our earlier work on the chemical basis of mutagenesis led to certain ... luteus and E. coli; (4) the characterization of the dual gene control for incision phenomenon in M. luteus and E. coli; and (5 ... luteus and E. coli; the characterization of the dual gene control for incision phenomenon in M. luteus and E. coli; and ... luteus and E. coli. The biological role of these enzymes was inferred in appropriate mutants; (2) the isolation, purification ...
What is the morphology of Micrococcus luteus?. A: Micrococcus luteus is a spherical bacteria of between 0.5 and 3.5 millimeters ...
What is the morphology of Micrococcus luteus?. A: Micrococcus luteus is a spherical bacteria of between 0.5 and 3.5 millimeters ...
  • Eight representative strains, six from B. marisflavi and two from M. luteus, were chosen for further 16S rDNA analyses. (ekt.gr)
  • About half of the strains of M. luteus were found to carry plasmids 1 to 100MDa in size. (kenyon.edu)
  • In an ongoing survey of the bioactive potential of microorganisms associated with marine invertebrates, the extract of the sponge-associated bacterial strain Micrococcus luteus was found to exhibit potent antimicrobial activity. (nih.gov)
  • After the catalase gene was knock-downed, the H 2 O 2 level of the aphid was up-regulated significantly 12 h post M. luteus infection, the bacterial load of ds Cat -injected pea aphid was about half that of ds GFP -injected pea aphid 24 h post M. luteus infection, but the survival rate of aphids had no change after M. luteus infection. (insect.org.cn)
  • Resuscitation of dormant cells in a most-probable-number assay in the presence of supernatant taken from growing M. luteus revealed the resuscitation of cells from regions B and C but not from region A. It is suggested that initially dormant (resuscitable) cells are concentrated in regions B and C. (asm.org)
  • In Micrococcus luteus, the resuscitation of dormant cells is caused by a small secreted protein (resuscitation-promoting factor, or Rpf) that is found in "spent culture medium. (aber.ac.uk)
  • Rpf is encoded by a single essential gene in M. luteus. (aber.ac.uk)
  • Results】 The H2O2 level and the expression level of the catalase gene in the pea aphid increased markedly 12 h post infection by M. luteus . (insect.org.cn)
  • In this report, we characterized a number of environmental isolates of M. luteus, including several recovered from amber. (aber.ac.uk)
  • Conclusion】 The catalase is involved in the immune defense of the pea aphid against infection by M. luteus , but is not a key enzyme in this process. (insect.org.cn)
  • M. luteus oxidizes carbohydrates to CO2 and water, and it does not produce acid from glucose as well as it does not make arginine dihydrolase or b-galactosidase. (kenyon.edu)
  • Defining characteristics of Micrococcus are the ability to aerobically produce acid from glucose glycerol, aesculin hydrolysis, arginine dihydrolase, major pigment production, motility, and conversion of nitrate to nitrite (Smith et al . (kenyon.edu)
  • Norwegian researchers in 2013 found a M. luteus strain that synthesizes a pigment that absorbs wavelengths of light from 350 to 475 nano-meters. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although some, like Micrococcus antarcticus , are cold-adapted, and have been found living in Antarctica and in marine environments. (kenyon.edu)
  • Laparotomy was performed on the 21 st day of pregnancy, followed by the determination of reproductive variables: number of live and dead fetuses, mass of the fetuses and placentas, number of implantations and resorptions, number of corpora lutea, pre- and post-implantation loss, and analyses of the fetuses with regard to external and internal anomalies and/or malformations (skeletal and visceral). (thefreelibrary.com)
  • A high proportion of Micrococcus luteus cells in cultures which had been starved for 3 to 6 months lost the ability to grow and form colonies on agar plates but could be resuscitated from their dormancy by incubation in an appropriate liquid medium (A. S. Kaprelyants and D. B. Kell, Appl. (asm.org)
  • M. luteus can grow well in environments with little water or high salt concentrations. (kenyon.edu)
  • M. luteus was one of the early examples of novel codon usage, which led to the conclusion that the genetic code is not static, but evolves. (wikipedia.org)