Lung Volume Measurements: Measurement of the amount of air that the lungs may contain at various points in the respiratory cycle.Plethysmography, Whole Body: Measurement of the volume of gas in the lungs, including that which is trapped in poorly communicating air spaces. It is of particular use in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Blood Volume Determination: Method for determining the circulating blood volume by introducing a known quantity of foreign substance into the blood and determining its concentration some minutes later when thorough mixing has occurred. From these two values the blood volume can be calculated by dividing the quantity of injected material by its concentration in the blood at the time of uniform mixing. Generally expressed as cubic centimeters or liters per kilogram of body weight.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Functional Residual Capacity: The volume of air remaining in the LUNGS at the end of a normal, quiet expiration. It is the sum of the RESIDUAL VOLUME and the EXPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME. Common abbreviation is FRC.Total Lung Capacity: The volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration. It is the equivalent to each of the following sums: VITAL CAPACITY plus RESIDUAL VOLUME; INSPIRATORY CAPACITY plus FUNCTIONAL RESIDUAL CAPACITY; TIDAL VOLUME plus INSPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus functional residual capacity; or tidal volume plus inspiratory reserve volume plus EXPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus residual volume.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Blood Volume: Volume of circulating BLOOD. It is the sum of the PLASMA VOLUME and ERYTHROCYTE VOLUME.Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Pulmonary Emphysema: Enlargement of air spaces distal to the TERMINAL BRONCHIOLES where gas-exchange normally takes place. This is usually due to destruction of the alveolar wall. Pulmonary emphysema can be classified by the location and distribution of the lesions.Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.Lung Injury: Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.Pneumonectomy: The excision of lung tissue including partial or total lung lobectomy.Residual Volume: The volume of air remaining in the LUNGS at the end of a maximal expiration. Common abbreviation is RV.Lung Compliance: The capability of the LUNGS to distend under pressure as measured by pulmonary volume change per unit pressure change. While not a complete description of the pressure-volume properties of the lung, it is nevertheless useful in practice as a measure of the comparative stiffness of the lung. (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p562)Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Ultrasonography, Prenatal: The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Erythrocyte Volume: Volume of circulating ERYTHROCYTES . It is usually measured by RADIOISOTOPE DILUTION TECHNIQUE.Lung Transplantation: The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.Enophthalmos: Recession of the eyeball into the orbit.Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung: A heterogeneous aggregate of at least three distinct histological types of lung cancer, including SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA; ADENOCARCINOMA; and LARGE CELL CARCINOMA. They are dealt with collectively because of their shared treatment strategy.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Plasma Volume: Volume of PLASMA in the circulation. It is usually measured by INDICATOR DILUTION TECHNIQUES.Vital Capacity: The volume of air that is exhaled by a maximal expiration following a maximal inspiration.Forced Expiratory Volume: Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.Cardiac Volume: The volume of the HEART, usually relating to the volume of BLOOD contained within it at various periods of the cardiac cycle. The amount of blood ejected from a ventricle at each beat is STROKE VOLUME.Tidal Volume: The volume of air inspired or expired during each normal, quiet respiratory cycle. Common abbreviations are TV or V with subscript T.Helium: Helium. A noble gas with the atomic symbol He, atomic number 2, and atomic weight 4.003. It is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that is not combustible and does not support combustion. It was first detected in the sun and is now obtained from natural gas. Medically it is used as a diluent for other gases, being especially useful with oxygen in the treatment of certain cases of respiratory obstruction, and as a vehicle for general anesthetics. (Dorland, 27th ed)Orbital Fractures: Fractures of the bones in the orbit, which include parts of the frontal, ethmoidal, lacrimal, and sphenoid bones and the maxilla and zygoma.Serum Albumin, Radio-Iodinated: Normal human serum albumin mildly iodinated with radioactive iodine (131-I) which has a half-life of 8 days, and emits beta and gamma rays. It is used as a diagnostic aid in blood volume determination. (from Merck Index, 11th ed)Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Methods developed to aid in the interpretation of ultrasound, radiographic images, etc., for diagnosis of disease.Acute Lung Injury: A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Computer systems or networks designed to provide radiographic interpretive information.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity: The amount of a gas taken up, by the pulmonary capillary blood from the alveolar gas, per minute per unit of average pressure of the gradient of the gas across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Emphysema: A pathological accumulation of air in tissues or organs.Pulmonary Gas Exchange: The exchange of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood that occurs across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.Airway Resistance: Physiologically, the opposition to flow of air caused by the forces of friction. As a part of pulmonary function testing, it is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of air flow.Pulmonary Alveoli: Small polyhedral outpouchings along the walls of the alveolar sacs, alveolar ducts and terminal bronchioles through the walls of which gas exchange between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood takes place.Inhalation: The act of BREATHING in.Diaphragm: The musculofibrous partition that separates the THORACIC CAVITY from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. Contraction of the diaphragm increases the volume of the thoracic cavity aiding INHALATION.Spirometry: Measurement of volume of air inhaled or exhaled by the lung.Expiratory Reserve Volume: The extra volume of air that can be expired with maximum effort beyond the level reached at the end of a normal, quiet expiration. Common abbreviation is ERV.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Respiratory Muscles: These include the muscles of the DIAPHRAGM and the INTERCOSTAL MUSCLES.Pulmonary Atelectasis: Absence of air in the entire or part of a lung, such as an incompletely inflated neonate lung or a collapsed adult lung. Pulmonary atelectasis can be caused by airway obstruction, lung compression, fibrotic contraction, or other factors.Hernia, Diaphragmatic: Protrusion of abdominal structures into the THORAX as a result of congenital or traumatic defects in the respiratory DIAPHRAGM.
  • the Himalayas) that person can develop a condition called altitude sickness because their lungs remove adequate amounts of carbon dioxide but they do not take in enough oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first condition is a restriction of blood flow through the lungs thought to be caused by defects in the lung. (wikipedia.org)
  • This classification of the severity of reduced airflow in COPD by GOLD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) is based on FEV 1 after using a bronchodilator, in people with FEV 1 /FVC less than 0.70 What Are COPD GOLD Stages? (teveel-www.xyz)
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a type of obstructive lung disease characterized by long-term breathing problems and poor airflow. (teveel-www.xyz)
  • The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) sets the standards for diagnosing COPD. (teveel-www.xyz)
  • Lung diseases fall into two categories: Obstructive Lung Disease and Restrictive Lung Disease. (medindia.net)
  • Computed tomography (CT) scanning provides images of lung structure, but uses ionising radiation (x-rays) to generate these images and the associated radiation dose means that regular scanning to monitor disease progression or response to therapy is typically impossible. (ukri.org)
  • This is an example of a COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) positive patient's lung computed tomography (CT) scan. (itnonline.com)
  • Coronary CT angiography provides direct visualization of the coronary arteries, and can detect coronary disease including whether or not a blockage is present.Calcium score CT allows measurement of the amount of calcium in the coronary arteries to better assess a patient's risk of cardiovascular disease. (medstargeorgetown.org)
  • A. Consider an alveolus of radius 50 µm in this patient's right lung. (diseasepdf.com)
  • Hookah tobacco and smoke contain several toxic agents known to cause lung, bladder, and oral cancers. (dailybazarkori.com)
  • Gefitinib (GF) is a US Food and Drug Administration-approved epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor for treating the lung cancers. (elsevier.com)
  • Cancers are most likely to occur in organs like lungs, oral cavity, which comes into direct contact with smoke. (medindia.net)
  • The second component of regulating pH balance involves eliminating carbon dioxide (an acid when dissolved in blood) through exhalation of the lungs. (diabetestalk.net)
  • On standing or while breath holding at total lung capacity, shunt fraction was calculated from baseline QS/QTTc and from lung counts and the injected dose. (bmj.com)
  • Experiments on large-scale Computer Tomography (CT) datasets of lung images show that our approach compares favorably to baseline methods that do not account for the context. (batman-lab.com)
  • M. F. Krause, C. Jakel, J. Haberstroh, J. Schulte-Monting, J. U. Leititis and M. Orlowska-Volk, Alveolar recruitment promotes homogeneous surfactant distribution in a piglet model of lung injury, Pediatric Research 50 (2001), no. 1 I, 34-43. (waset.org)
  • Equally important to observe is that not every veteran with a persistent chronic cough and production of sputum in the lungs will go on to be diagnosed with COPD. (veteranslawblog.org)
  • Paraquat intoxication causes damage to multiple organs such as lungs, liver and kidney. (jcsr.co.in)
  • Paraquat toxicity affects multiple organs, however lungs are majorly involved because paraquat tends to accumulate in lungs by an active transport mechanism against concentration gradient. (jcsr.co.in)
  • Once ingested, paraquat is rapidly distributed to organs such as liver, muscle, kidney and lung. (jcsr.co.in)
  • But if the lungs fill up with fluid or become highly inflamed - both of which can happen in coronavirus - then the negative pressures that occur with normal breathing are not sufficient to expand the lungs enough and insufficient O2 and CO2 exchange will result,» Lutchen continues. (tall-white-aliens.com)
  • Fluid comes directly from the mother's circulating fluid volume and helps to support the baby before their kidneys take over this role. (huggies.co.in)
  • There are a few ways that the volume of amniotic fluid can be measured. (huggies.co.in)
  • A measurement of greater than 20-24 cms is diagnosed as being polyhydramnios (too much amniotic fluid). (huggies.co.in)
  • Though it is important to bear in mind that every pregnancy is unique and a smaller volume of amniotic fluid is not always a cause for concern. (huggies.co.in)
  • It is normal, for example, for the amniotic fluid to reduce in volume as the expected date of confinement (E.D.C.) comes closer. (huggies.co.in)
  • Women who are two weeks or more past their due date are more at risk as amniotic fluid volume decreases. (huggies.co.in)
  • Semen analysis, laboratory examination of a sample of seminal fluid, usually consisting of the determination of semen volume, alkalinity or acidity (pH), sperm number (or sperm count), and the motility, shape, and viability of sperm. (bioshield-bg.com)
  • Such fluid presses inwards on the lungs. (allthingskidney.com)
  • Upon conclusion of the study, data were analyzed and adjusted for potential confounders, such as impact of cigarette smoking on lung health. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Another 2012 study , showed that smoking marijuana may not be as detrimental to your lung health as cigarette smoking is. (wikileaf.com)
  • METHODS--Radiolabelled albumin macroaggregates (99mTc-MAA) or microspheres (MS) were injected intravenously and kidneys and lungs were imaged. (bmj.com)
  • Lung vascular development occurs as a highly choreographed sequence, regulated by hypoxia-inducible factors, vascular endothelial growth factor, nitric oxide, and many other transcription factors and mediators. (ritacrossley.com)
  • In association with fibromyalgia, diabetes is not discussed much but the writers have mentioned a comparable ANS issue in diabetes which leads to blood vessel supply issues in the very tiny (microvascular) vessels of the lungs. (healthizes.com)
  • It may decrease blood vessels, impair blood flow and even, I believe, may decrease blood volume. (healthizes.com)
  • All listed medicines relax and widen the blood vessels in the lungs as well as reduce and prevent the overgrowth of cells in the walls of the vessels. (janssenwithme.com)
  • Damaged mitochondrial ultrastructure and state of liver cells were estimated by TEM, TUNEL staining and BrdU measurement. (fluoridealert.org)
  • In the current study, serotonin-immunoreactive solitary NEE cells were observed in variable numbers in the larynx, in all parts of the trachea, and in areas of the lungs covered with ciliomucous epithelium. (storysteel.cf)
  • Thymol turbidity, laboratory test for the nonspecific measurement of globulins, a group of blood proteins that appear in abnormally high concentration in association with a wide variety of diseased states, notably those affecting the liver. (bioshield-bg.com)
  • Tumor development was examined weekly by X-ray with an MX-20 DC Digital Radiography System (Faxitron X-Ray Corporation, Lincolnshire, IL) and by caliper measurements of the length and the width of the tumor leg from which the tumor volume was calculated with the formula V = length 6 width2/2. (lckinhibitor.com)
  • Lung ultrasonography (LUS) gives results that are similar to HR-CT and superior to standard chest CXR for evaluation of pneumonia and/or ARDS with the added advantage of ease of use at point of care, repeatability, absence of radiation exposure, and low cost [12- (siemens-healthineers.com)
  • Pneumonia is an infection of the lung parenchyma and defined as combination of a novel radiological infiltrate with typical signs and symptoms. (pianolarge.gq)
  • The pneumonia typically appears along the walls of each lobe of the lung, especially the chest wall and the lower portions of the lungs. (itnonline.com)
  • This work is significant because at present there is no imaging measurement with such capabilities in widespread clinical practice. (ukri.org)
  • The lung and its disorders in the newborn infant (Volume 1 in the series Major problems in clinical pediatrics) Born Early Books by Mary Ellen Avery. (ritacrossley.com)
  • The lung and its disorders in the newborn infant (Volume 1 in the series Major problems in clinical pediatrics) Hardcover - January 1, Author: Mary Ellen Avery, Barry D. Fletcher, Roberta G. Williams. (ritacrossley.com)
  • Series Title: Major problems in clinical pediatrics, v Additional Physical Format: Online version: Avery, Mary Ellen, Lung and its disorders in the newborn infant. (ritacrossley.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS--In pulmonary arteriovenous malformations the simple physiological shunt calculated from SaO2 breathing air agreed well with the anatomical right to left shunt measured with 99mTc-MAA, but predicted poorly the changes in anatomical shunt induced by postural or lung volume changes. (bmj.com)
  • Anatomical basics of the superficial chest wall structures and lung using the panoramic view. (siemens-healthineers.com)
  • Shipping delay: Orders made before Dec 17th, 2020 should ship within 2 weeks, but due to COVID-19 and holiday package volumes, Canada Post shipments may be delayed. (clicksold.com)
  • Lung problems may not be the main symptoms of FM, but lung problems can tell if they are another expression of autonomy nervous system problem. (healthizes.com)
  • Although measurement of paraquat concentration in blood helps in confirming the diagnosis and predicting outcomes, it does not determine the intervention. (jcsr.co.in)