Lung Transplantation: The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.Bronchiolitis Obliterans: Inflammation of the BRONCHIOLES leading to an obstructive lung disease. Bronchioles are characterized by fibrous granulation tissue with bronchial exudates in the lumens. Clinical features include a nonproductive cough and DYSPNEA.Heart-Lung Transplantation: The simultaneous, or near simultaneous, transference of heart and lungs from one human or animal to another.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Primary Graft Dysfunction: A form of ischemia-reperfusion injury occurring in the early period following transplantation. Significant pathophysiological changes in MITOCHONDRIA are the main cause of the dysfunction. It is most often seen in the transplanted lung, liver, or kidney and can lead to GRAFT REJECTION.Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Transplantation, Autologous: Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.Cystic Fibrosis: An autosomal recessive genetic disease of the EXOCRINE GLANDS. It is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CYSTIC FIBROSIS TRANSMEMBRANE CONDUCTANCE REGULATOR expressed in several organs including the LUNG, the PANCREAS, the BILIARY SYSTEM, and the SWEAT GLANDS. Cystic fibrosis is characterized by epithelial secretory dysfunction associated with ductal obstruction resulting in AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION; chronic RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS; PANCREATIC INSUFFICIENCY; maldigestion; salt depletion; and HEAT PROSTRATION.Waiting Lists: Prospective patient listings for appointments or treatments.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Stem Cell Transplantation: The transfer of STEM CELLS from one individual to another within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or between species (XENOTRANSPLANTATION), or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). The source and location of the stem cells determines their potency or pluripotency to differentiate into various cell types.Collagen Type V: A fibrillar collagen found widely distributed as a minor component in tissues that contain COLLAGEN TYPE I and COLLAGEN TYPE III. It is a heterotrimeric molecule composed of alpha1(V), alpha2(V) and alpha3(V) subunits. Several forms of collagen type V exist depending upon the composition of the subunits that form the trimer.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Transplantation Conditioning: Preparative treatment of transplant recipient with various conditioning regimens including radiation, immune sera, chemotherapy, and/or immunosuppressive agents, prior to transplantation. Transplantation conditioning is very common before bone marrow transplantation.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Organ Transplantation: Transference of an organ between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Transplantation Immunology: A general term for the complex phenomena involved in allo- and xenograft rejection by a host and graft vs host reaction. Although the reactions involved in transplantation immunology are primarily thymus-dependent phenomena of cellular immunity, humoral factors also play a part in late rejection.Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.Transplantation: Transference of a tissue or organ from either an alive or deceased donor, within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Transplantation, Heterotopic: Transplantation of tissue typical of one area to a different recipient site. The tissue may be autologous, heterologous, or homologous.Organ Preservation: The process by which organs are kept viable outside of the organism from which they were removed (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Bronchial DiseasesPulmonary Fibrosis: A process in which normal lung tissues are progressively replaced by FIBROBLASTS and COLLAGEN causing an irreversible loss of the ability to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream via PULMONARY ALVEOLI. Patients show progressive DYSPNEA finally resulting in death.Immunosuppression: Deliberate prevention or diminution of the host's immune response. It may be nonspecific as in the administration of immunosuppressive agents (drugs or radiation) or by lymphocyte depletion or may be specific as in desensitization or the simultaneous administration of antigen and immunosuppressive drugs.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Pancreas Transplantation: The transference of a pancreas from one human or animal to another.Transplantation Chimera: An organism that, as a result of transplantation of donor tissue or cells, consists of two or more cell lines descended from at least two zygotes. This state may result in the induction of donor-specific TRANSPLANTATION TOLERANCE.Islets of Langerhans Transplantation: The transference of pancreatic islets within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Hypertension, Pulmonary: Increased VASCULAR RESISTANCE in the PULMONARY CIRCULATION, usually secondary to HEART DISEASES or LUNG DISEASES.Lung Injury: Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.Transplantation, Isogeneic: Transplantation between genetically identical individuals, i.e., members of the same species with identical histocompatibility antigens, such as monozygotic twins, members of the same inbred strain, or members of a hybrid population produced by crossing certain inbred strains.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Living Donors: Non-cadaveric providers of organs for transplant to related or non-related recipients.Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Application of a life support system that circulates the blood through an oxygenating system, which may consist of a pump, a membrane oxygenator, and a heat exchanger. Examples of its use are to assist victims of smoke inhalation injury, respiratory failure, and cardiac failure.Donor Selection: The procedure established to evaluate the health status and risk factors of the potential DONORS of biological materials. Donors are selected based on the principles that their health will not be compromised in the process, and the donated materials, such as TISSUES or organs, are safe for reuse in the recipients.Cell Transplantation: Transference of cells within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Lung Diseases, Interstitial: A diverse group of lung diseases that affect the lung parenchyma. They are characterized by an initial inflammation of PULMONARY ALVEOLI that extends to the interstitium and beyond leading to diffuse PULMONARY FIBROSIS. Interstitial lung diseases are classified by their etiology (known or unknown causes), and radiological-pathological features.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Pulmonary Emphysema: Enlargement of air spaces distal to the TERMINAL BRONCHIOLES where gas-exchange normally takes place. This is usually due to destruction of the alveolar wall. Pulmonary emphysema can be classified by the location and distribution of the lesions.Reperfusion Injury: Adverse functional, metabolic, or structural changes in ischemic tissues resulting from the restoration of blood flow to the tissue (REPERFUSION), including swelling; HEMORRHAGE; NECROSIS; and damage from FREE RADICALS. The most common instance is MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Respiratory Aspiration: Inhaling liquid or solids, such as stomach contents, into the RESPIRATORY TRACT. When this causes severe lung damage, it is called ASPIRATION PNEUMONIA.Tacrolimus: A macrolide isolated from the culture broth of a strain of Streptomyces tsukubaensis that has strong immunosuppressive activity in vivo and prevents the activation of T-lymphocytes in response to antigenic or mitogenic stimulation in vitro.Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Bronchomalacia: A congenital or acquired condition of underdeveloped or degeneration of CARTILAGE in the BRONCHI. This results in a floppy bronchial wall making patency difficult to maintain. It is characterized by wheezing and difficult breathing.Graft vs Host Disease: The clinical entity characterized by anorexia, diarrhea, loss of hair, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, growth retardation, and eventual death brought about by the GRAFT VS HOST REACTION.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Lymphangioleiomyomatosis: A disease characterized by the progressive invasion of SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS into the LYMPHATIC VESSELS, and the BLOOD VESSELS. The majority of the cases occur in the LUNGS of women of child-bearing age, eventually blocking the flow of air, blood, and lymph. The common symptom is shortness of breath (DYSPNEA).Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: Transplantation of STEM CELLS collected from the fetal blood remaining in the UMBILICAL CORD and the PLACENTA after delivery. Included are the HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS.Cytomegalovirus Infections: Infection with CYTOMEGALOVIRUS, characterized by enlarged cells bearing intranuclear inclusions. Infection may be in almost any organ, but the salivary glands are the most common site in children, as are the lungs in adults.Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: A common interstitial lung disease of unknown etiology, usually occurring between 50-70 years of age. Clinically, it is characterized by an insidious onset of breathlessness with exertion and a nonproductive cough, leading to progressive DYSPNEA. Pathological features show scant interstitial inflammation, patchy collagen fibrosis, prominent fibroblast proliferation foci, and microscopic honeycomb change.Bronchoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.Cyclosporine: A cyclic undecapeptide from an extract of soil fungi. It is a powerful immunosupressant with a specific action on T-lymphocytes. It is used for the prophylaxis of graft rejection in organ and tissue transplantation. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed).Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid: Washing liquid obtained from irrigation of the lung, including the BRONCHI and the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. It is generally used to assess biochemical, inflammatory, or infection status of the lung.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Insurance, Surgical: A specific type of health insurance which provides surgeons' fees for specified amounts according to the type of surgery listed in the policy.Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung: A heterogeneous aggregate of at least three distinct histological types of lung cancer, including SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA; ADENOCARCINOMA; and LARGE CELL CARCINOMA. They are dealt with collectively because of their shared treatment strategy.Organ Dysfunction Scores: Ratings that express, in numerical values, the degree of impairment or abnormality in the function of specific organs.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Cold Ischemia: The chilling of a tissue or organ during decreased BLOOD perfusion or in the absence of blood supply. Cold ischemia time during ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION begins when the organ is cooled with a cold perfusion solution after ORGAN PROCUREMENT surgery, and ends after the tissue reaches physiological temperature during implantation procedures.Brain Death: A state of prolonged irreversible cessation of all brain activity, including lower brain stem function with the complete absence of voluntary movements, responses to stimuli, brain stem reflexes, and spontaneous respirations. Reversible conditions which mimic this clinical state (e.g., sedative overdose, hypothermia, etc.) are excluded prior to making the determination of brain death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp348-9)Transplantation Tolerance: An induced state of non-reactivity to grafted tissue from a donor organism that would ordinarily trigger a cell-mediated or humoral immune response.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Bronchoalveolar Lavage: Washing out of the lungs with saline or mucolytic agents for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It is very useful in the diagnosis of diffuse pulmonary infiltrates in immunosuppressed patients.Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: Transplantation of stem cells collected from the peripheral blood. It is a less invasive alternative to direct marrow harvesting of hematopoietic stem cells. Enrichment of stem cells in peripheral blood can be achieved by inducing mobilization of stem cells from the BONE MARROW.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Liver Failure: Severe inability of the LIVER to perform its normal metabolic functions, as evidenced by severe JAUNDICE and abnormal serum levels of AMMONIA; BILIRUBIN; ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE; ASPARTATE AMINOTRANSFERASE; LACTATE DEHYDROGENASES; and albumin/globulin ratio. (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed)Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Forced Expiratory Volume: Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.Bronchial Arteries: Left bronchial arteries arise from the thoracic aorta, the right from the first aortic intercostal or the upper left bronchial artery; they supply the bronchi and the lower trachea.Histocompatibility Testing: Identification of the major histocompatibility antigens of transplant DONORS and potential recipients, usually by serological tests. Donor and recipient pairs should be of identical ABO blood group, and in addition should be matched as closely as possible for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in order to minimize the likelihood of allograft rejection. (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Fetal Tissue Transplantation: Transference of fetal tissue between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease: Pathological process resulting in the fibrous obstruction of the small- and medium-sized PULMONARY VEINS and PULMONARY HYPERTENSION. Veno-occlusion can arise from fibrous proliferation of the VASCULAR INTIMA and VASCULAR MEDIA; THROMBOSIS; or a combination of both.Respiratory Insufficiency: Failure to adequately provide oxygen to cells of the body and to remove excess carbon dioxide from them. (Stedman, 25th ed)Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Pneumonectomy: The excision of lung tissue including partial or total lung lobectomy.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Blood Group Incompatibility: An antigenic mismatch between donor and recipient blood. Antibodies present in the recipient's serum may be directed against antigens in the donor product. Such a mismatch may result in a transfusion reaction in which, for example, donor blood is hemolyzed. (From Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984).Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Bronchi: The larger air passages of the lungs arising from the terminal bifurcation of the TRACHEA. They include the largest two primary bronchi which branch out into secondary bronchi, and tertiary bronchi which extend into BRONCHIOLES and PULMONARY ALVEOLI.Rats, Inbred LewSkin Transplantation: The grafting of skin in humans or animals from one site to another to replace a lost portion of the body surface skin.Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive: A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.Transplantation, Heterologous: Transplantation between animals of different species.Acute Lung Injury: A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).Mice, Inbred C57BLAnastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Total Lung Capacity: The volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration. It is the equivalent to each of the following sums: VITAL CAPACITY plus RESIDUAL VOLUME; INSPIRATORY CAPACITY plus FUNCTIONAL RESIDUAL CAPACITY; TIDAL VOLUME plus INSPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus functional residual capacity; or tidal volume plus inspiratory reserve volume plus EXPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus residual volume.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Disorders characterized by proliferation of lymphoid tissue, general or unspecified.Organ Preservation Solutions: Solutions used to store organs and minimize tissue damage, particularly while awaiting implantation.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Mycophenolic Acid: An antibiotic substance derived from Penicillium stoloniferum, and related species. It blocks de novo biosynthesis of purine nucleotides by inhibition of the enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase. Mycophenolic acid is important because of its selective effects on the immune system. It prevents the proliferation of T-cells, lymphocytes, and the formation of antibodies from B-cells. It also may inhibit recruitment of leukocytes to inflammatory sites. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p1301)Tissue and Organ Harvesting: The procedure of removing TISSUES, organs, or specimens from DONORS for reuse, such as TRANSPLANTATION.Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS).Pulmonary Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.Burkholderia Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus BURKHOLDERIA.Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Pneumonia: Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.Corneal Transplantation: Partial or total replacement of the CORNEA from one human or animal to another.Histocompatibility: The degree of antigenic similarity between the tissues of different individuals, which determines the acceptance or rejection of allografts.HLA Antigens: Antigens determined by leukocyte loci found on chromosome 6, the major histocompatibility loci in humans. They are polypeptides or glycoproteins found on most nucleated cells and platelets, determine tissue types for transplantation, and are associated with certain diseases.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Hematologic Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.Pulmonary Edema: Excessive accumulation of extravascular fluid in the lung, an indication of a serious underlying disease or disorder. Pulmonary edema prevents efficient PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE in the PULMONARY ALVEOLI, and can be life-threatening.Tissue Transplantation: Transference of tissue within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Whole-Body Irradiation: Irradiation of the whole body with ionizing or non-ionizing radiation. It is applicable to humans or animals but not to microorganisms.Delayed Graft Function: General dysfunction of an organ occurring immediately following its transplantation. The term most frequently refers to renal dysfunction following KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Lung Diseases, Obstructive: Any disorder marked by obstruction of conducting airways of the lung. AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION may be acute, chronic, intermittent, or persistent.Tissue Preservation: The process by which a tissue or aggregate of cells is kept alive outside of the organism from which it was derived (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Eisenmenger Complex: A condition associated with VENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECT and other congenital heart defects that allow the mixing of pulmonary and systemic circulation, increase blood flow into the lung, and subsequent responses to low oxygen in blood. This complex is characterized by progressive PULMONARY HYPERTENSION; HYPERTROPHY of the RIGHT VENTRICLE; CYANOSIS; and ERYTHROCYTOSIS.Pneumonia, Viral: Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by a viral infection.Pulmonary Alveoli: Small polyhedral outpouchings along the walls of the alveolar sacs, alveolar ducts and terminal bronchioles through the walls of which gas exchange between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood takes place.Burkholderia gladioli: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that acts as both a human and plant pathogen.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Brain Tissue Transplantation: Transference of brain tissue, either from a fetus or from a born individual, between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Mice, Inbred BALB CCytomegalovirus: A genus of the family HERPESVIRIDAE, subfamily BETAHERPESVIRINAE, infecting the salivary glands, liver, spleen, lungs, eyes, and other organs, in which they produce characteristically enlarged cells with intranuclear inclusions. Infection with Cytomegalovirus is also seen as an opportunistic infection in AIDS.Azathioprine: An immunosuppressive agent used in combination with cyclophosphamide and hydroxychloroquine in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), this substance has been listed as a known carcinogen. (Merck Index, 11th ed)Ganciclovir: An ACYCLOVIR analog that is a potent inhibitor of the Herpesvirus family including cytomegalovirus. Ganciclovir is used to treat complications from AIDS-associated cytomegalovirus infections.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Lung Volume Measurements: Measurement of the amount of air that the lungs may contain at various points in the respiratory cycle.Liver Diseases: Pathological processes of the LIVER.Facial Transplantation: The transference between individuals of the entire face or major facial structures. In addition to the skin and cartilaginous tissue (CARTILAGE), it may include muscle and bone as well.

Bronchial artery perfusion scintigraphy to assess bronchial artery blood flow after lung transplantation. (1/1390)

The bronchial arterial system is inevitably interrupted in transplanted lungs when removing the organs from the donor, but it can be reestablished by direct bronchial artery revascularization (BAR) during implantation. The purpose of this study was to visualize and quantify the distribution of bronchial artery perfusion after en bloc double lung transplantation with BAR, by injecting radiolabeled macroaggregated albumin directly into the bronchial artery system. METHODS: BAR was performed using the internal mammary artery as conduit. Patients were imaged 1 mo (n = 13) or 2 y (n = 9) after en bloc double lung transplantation with BAR. Immediately after bronchial arteriography, 100 MBq macroaggregated albumin (45,000 particles) were injected through the arteriographic catheter. Gamma camera studies were then acquired in the anterior position. At the end of imaging, with the patient remaining in exactly the same position, 81mKr-ventilation scintigraphy or conventional intravenous pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy or both were performed. Images were evaluated by visual analysis, and a semiquantitative assessment of the bronchial arterial supply to the peripheral parts of the lungs was obtained with conventional pulmonary scintigraphy. RESULTS: The bronchial artery scintigraphic images showed that the major part of the bronchial arterial flow supplied central thoracic structures, but bronchial artery perfusion could also be demonstrated in the peripheral parts of the lungs when compared with conventional pulmonary scintigraphy. There were no differences between scintigrams obtained from patients studied 1 mo and 2 y post-transplantation. CONCLUSION: Total distribution of bronchial artery supply to the human lung has been visualized in lung transplant patients. This study demonstrates that this nutritive flow reaches even the most peripheral parts of the lungs and is present 1 mo as well as 2 y after lung transplantation. The results suggest that bronchial artery revascularization may be of significance for the long-term status of the lung transplant.  (+info)

Clinical significance of expression of human cytomegalovirus pp67 late transcript in heart, lung, and bone marrow transplant recipients as determined by nucleic acid sequence-based amplification. (2/1390)

Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection was monitored retrospectively by qualitative determination of pp67 mRNA (a late viral transcript) by nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) in a series of 50 transplant recipients, including 26 solid-organ (11 heart and 15 lung) transplant recipients (SOTRs) and 24 bone marrow transplant recipients (BMTRs). NASBA results were compared with those obtained by prospective quantitation of HCMV viremia and antigenemia and retrospective quantitation of DNA in leukocytes (leukoDNAemia). On the whole, 29 patients were NASBA positive, whereas 10 were NASBA negative, and the blood of 11 patients remained HCMV negative. NASBA detected HCMV infection before quantitation of viremia did but after quantitation of leukoDNAemia and antigenemia did. In NASBA-positive blood samples, median levels of viremia, antigenemia, and leukoDNAemia were significantly higher than the relevant levels detected in NASBA-negative HCMV-positive blood samples. By using the quantitation of leukoDNAemia as the "gold standard," the analytical sensitivity (47.3%), as well as the negative predictive value (68. 3%), of NASBA for the diagnosis of HCMV infection intermediate between that of antigenemia quantitation (analytical sensitivity, 72. 3%) and that of viremia quantitation (analytical sensitivity, 28.7%), while the specificity and the positive predictive value were high (90 to 100%). However, with respect to the clinically relevant antigenemia cutoff of >/=100 used in this study for the initiation of preemptive therapy in SOTRs with reactivated HCMV infection, the clinical sensitivity of NASBA reached 100%, with a specificity of 68. 9%. Upon the initiation of antigenemia quantitation-guided treatment, the actual median antigenemia level was 158 (range, 124 to 580) in SOTRs who had reactivated infection and who presented with NASBA positivity 3.5 +/- 2.6 days in advance and 13.5 (range, 1 to 270) in the group that included BMTRs and SOTRs who had primary infection (in whom treatment was initiated upon the first confirmation of detection of HCMV in blood) and who presented with NASBA positivity 2.0 +/- 5.1 days later. Following antiviral treatment, the durations of the presence of antigenemia and pp67 mRNA in blood were found to be similar. In conclusion, monitoring of the expression of HCMV pp67 mRNA appears to be a promising, well-standardized tool for determination of the need for the initiation and termination of preemptive therapy. Its overall clinical impact should be analyzed in future prospective studies.  (+info)

Retransplantation in a patient with cystic fibrosis. (3/1390)

A patient with cystic fibrosis is described who requested a third lung transplant. The medical and ethical issues involved are discussed.  (+info)

Recurrence of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma in transplanted lungs. (4/1390)

BACKGROUND: Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma is a distinctive subtype of typical adenocarcinoma of the lung that tends to metastasize widely throughout the lungs but less commonly elsewhere. Because conventional therapies for intrapulmonary metastatic bronchioloalveolar carcinoma are generally ineffective, we treated seven patients who had intrapulmonary metastatic bronchioloalveolar carcinoma with lung transplantation. METHODS: Seven patients with biopsy-proved bronchioloalveolar carcinoma and no evidence of extrapulmonary disease received transplants of either one or two cadaveric lungs. At transplantation, all native lung tissue was removed and replaced with a donor lung or lungs. The patients received the usual post-transplantation care given at the institution. RESULTS: Four of the seven patients had recurrent bronchioloalveolar carcinoma within the donor lungs; the recurrences appeared from 10 to 48 months after transplantation. All recurrences were limited to the donor lungs. Histologic and molecular analyses showed that the recurrent tumors in three patients originated from the recipients of the transplants. CONCLUSIONS: Lung transplantation for bronchioloalveolar carcinoma is technically feasible, but recurrence of the original tumor within the donor lungs up to four years after transplantation was common.  (+info)

Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency alleles and severe cystic fibrosis lung disease. (5/1390)

BACKGROUND: Alpha-1 antitrypsin (alpha 1-AT) is the most abundant proteinase inhibitor within the lung. We have recently reported the surprising observation that cystic fibrosis patients with mild to moderate deficiency of alpha 1-antitrypsin have significantly better pulmonary function than non-deficient patients. This study may have been biased as it did not include the most severely affected patients who have died in childhood or those who have undergone orthotopic lung transplantation. The prevalence of alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency alleles in this most severely affected group of patients with cystic fibrosis was therefore assessed. METHODS: DNA was obtained from neonatal blood spots from children with cystic fibrosis who had died from pulmonary disease and from formalin fixed lung tissue from transplanted cystic fibrosis patients. The common S and Z deficiency alleles of alpha 1-AT were sought by amplification mutagenesis of the appropriate region of the alpha 1-AT gene followed by restriction enzyme digestion with Xmn I and Taq I, respectively. RESULTS: Seventy-nine patients were identified (seven dead, 72 transplanted). Two patients (2.5%) were heterozygous for the Z allele of alpha 1-AT and four (5.1%) were heterozygous for the S allele. This is not significantly different from the incidence in the normal population of 4% and 8% for the S and Z alleles, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These data support previous findings that deficiency of alpha 1-AT is not associated with more severe pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis and may be associated with milder lung disease. Further work is needed to clarify the mechanisms underlying the progressive lung damage in cystic fibrosis.  (+info)

Fungal spinal osteomyelitis in the immunocompromised patient: MR findings in three cases. (6/1390)

The MR imaging findings of fungal spinal osteomyelitis in three recipients of organ transplants showed hypointensity of the vertebral bodies on T1-weighted sequences in all cases. Signal changes and enhancement extended into the posterior elements in two cases. Multiple-level disease was present in two cases (with a total of five intervertebral disks involved in three cases). All cases lacked hyperintensity within the disks on T2-weighted images. In addition, the intranuclear cleft was preserved in four of five affected disks at initial MR imaging. MR features in Candida and Aspergillus spondylitis that are distinct from pyogenic osteomyelitis include absence of disk hyperintensity and preservation of the intranuclear cleft on T2-weighted images. Prompt recognition of these findings may avoid delay in establishing a diagnosis and instituting treatment of opportunistic osteomyelitis in the immunocompromised patient.  (+info)

Exogenous surfactant improves survival and surfactant function in ischaemia-reperfusion injury in minipigs. (7/1390)

Reperfusion injury is the major cause of early morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation. This complication has been experimentally linked to dysfunction of pulmonary surfactant. Therefore, the hypothesis that reperfusion injury might be preventable by exogenous surfactant treatment was tested. Left lungs of minipigs were exposed to 120 min of ischaemia, and the lungs were then reperfused for up to 7 h. Animals were divided into a control group and a surfactant group (n=5 each). The surfactant group received 50 mg x kg(-1) Alveofact intrabronchially via a bronchoscope at the beginning of the ischaemic period. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed at baseline before ischaemia and 90 min after reperfusion. Surfactant treatment significantly improved short-term survival. Pulmonary vascular resistance increased markedly in control animals leading to right heart failure and death within 3 h after reperfusion whereas the surfactant-treated animals survived the 7 h observation period. After reperfusion, alveolar accumulation of neutrophils and exuded proteins was present in both groups to the same extent. Surfactant activity after reperfusion deteriorated markedly in the control group but was preserved in the surfactant group. In conclusion, early surfactant treatment alleviates the deterioration of surfactant function and improves survival in this minipig model of ischaemia-reperfusion injury.  (+info)

Genistein inhibits constitutive and inducible NFkappaB activation and decreases IL-8 production by human cystic fibrosis bronchial gland cells. (8/1390)

The inflammatory pathogenesis in airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is still unresolved. We demonstrate here that in in situ human DeltaF508 homozygous CF bronchial tissues, submucosal gland cells exhibit an absence of inhibitor factor kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) and high levels of chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression. These results were confirmed by cultured human CF bronchial gland cells in which a lack of cytosolic IkappaBalpha and high levels of constitutively activated nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) associated with an up-regulation of IL-8 production (13-fold increase) were found when compared to non-CF (control) disease bronchial gland cells. We also demonstrated that the isoflavone genistein, a well known CFTR mutant Cl(-) channel stimulator, significantly reduces the endogenous and Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-8 production in cultured CF bronchial gland cells by increasing cytosolic IkappaBalpha protein levels. Overall, results show that genistein is a potent inhibitor of the activated NFkappaB identified in CF gland cells. This strong inhibition of constitutively activated NFkappaB and the resulting down-regulation of IL-8 production by genistein in the CF gland cells highlights the key role played by cytosolic IkappaBalpha in the regulation of inflammatory processes in CF human airway cells.  (+info)

  • HRCT examinations were evaluated according to a scoring system for pulmonary disease in CF patients, the Severe Advanced Lung Disease (SALD) score and for pleural involvement. (uu.nl)
  • While it is difficult to compare mortality on the waiting list under the LAS system to the era before the LAS when allocation was based solely on waiting time, many believe that the recent increase in waitlist mortality reflects a change in clinical practice where sicker and older patients with more advanced lung disease are being listed for transplantation. (secondwindstl.org)
  • Improvements in perioperative mortality and morbidity will come with better lung preservation techniques and with an improved understanding of and an ability to modify the reperfusion process. (umn.edu)
  • The lung allocation scoring (LAS) system was implemented in 2005 to reduce mortality on the waiting list and maximize the transplant benefit. (secondwindstl.org)
  • Factors that have contributed to improved outcomes include a multidisciplinary management approach supported by advancements in surgical and anesthetic techniques, nursing and critical care, immunosuppressive therapy, transplant immunobiology, and the perioperative use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP). (intechopen.com)
  • Conclusions For lung transplantation candidates and a suitable transthoracic echocardiography estimate of pulmonary systolic pressure, the need for right-heart catheterization, with its inherent risks for complications, may be foregone. (bgu.ac.il)
  • Lung transplantation (LTx) is a treatment option for infants and children with untreatable and otherwise fatal pulmonary diseases. (nih.gov)
  • The surfactant protein deficiencies, other interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), and congenital heart disease are important indications among young children and infants. (nih.gov)
  • Background Right-heart-catheterization and transthoracic echocardiography are routine tests to measure pulmonary artery systolic pressure among lung transplantation candidates. (bgu.ac.il)
  • Methods We examined the correlation between pulmonary pressures estimated by echocardiography versus right-heart-catheterization among lung transplantation candidates and their correlation to measurements during lung transplantation. (bgu.ac.il)
  • It is estimated that it takes an average of one to two years to receive a suitable donor lung, and the wait is made less predictable by the necessity for tissue match. (encyclopedia.com)
  • During a lung transplant, the chest is opened to reveal the heart, lungs, and major blood vessels (A). Inferior and superior pulmonary veins and pulmonary artery are separated, and lung is removed (B). The bronchus of the donor lung is connected to the patient's existing bronchus (C). The pulmonary artery is attached (D), and the pulmonary vein and other blood vessels are also connected (E). (surgeryencyclopedia.com)
  • Our cohort included all lung transplantation candidates during 1997 through 2004 who initially underwent pulmonary pressure evaluation by right-heart-catheterization and echocardiography, as well as measurements during lung transplantation. (bgu.ac.il)
  • Burton CM, Iversen M, Scheike T, Carlsen J, Andersen CB (2008) Minimal acute cellular rejection remains prevalent up to 2 years after lung transplantation: a retrospective analysis of 2697 transbronchial biopsies. (springer.com)
  • Therefore, the aim was to provide a multidimensional assessment of self-reported chronic pain 1-5 years after lung transplantation and its relationship with self-reported psychological general well-being (PGWB) and self-efficacy. (lu.se)
  • Chronic bodily pain is a common and serious symptom up to five years after lung transplantation. (lu.se)
  • Here, we report a 66-year-old gentleman who was found to have a mass on his right chest wall two years after lung transplantation. (alliedacademies.org)
  • In effect, the new technique, called ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) cleans the lungs then attaches them to a modified heart-lung bypass machine that pumps a specialised nutrient liquid through, while at the same time providing the lungs with oxygen via a breathing machine. (theengineer.co.uk)
  • Donation After Circulatory Death Lungs Transplantable Up to Six Hours After Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion. (umassmed.edu)
  • Ex vivo lung perfusion with adenosine A2A receptor agonist allows prolonged cold preservation of lungs donated after cardiac death. (umassmed.edu)
  • Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a technique developed to counteract the increased risk which follows. (scanbalt.org)
  • Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a technique developed to counteract this increased risk in two ways: first, EVLP improves the method of preserving donor lungs while outside the body. (scanbalt.org)
  • The Lung Assist for ex vivo lung perfusion (figure 1) is developed by Organ Assist (Groningen, The Netherlands) based on proprietary organ perfusion techniques, in close cooperation with the thoracic surgery department of the University Medical Center Groningen (Groningen, the Netherlands). (scanbalt.org)
  • Ventilation perfusion scan (lung scan, V/Q scan) is a test that compares right and left lung function. (encyclopedia.com)
  • About 85% of lungs made available for donation are not used due to tissue damage that potentially could be repaired with perfusion or other techniques. (latimes.com)
  • Lungs, however, provide a unique opportunity because they are greatly needed and appear so amenable to perfusion treatment, said John Dark, a professor of cardiothoracic surgery at Newcastle University, U.K., and president of the International Society for Heart & Lung Transplantation. (latimes.com)
  • Keshavjee and his team used the Toronto XVIVO Lung Perfusion System, which was designed for this purpose. (latimes.com)
  • Researchers treated 23 sets of lungs that were impaired in some manner - and would have been rejected for transplant - with perfusion for four hours and transplanted 20 of them that looked viable after the treatment. (latimes.com)
  • The perfusion technique essentially repairs damage caused by swelling or inflammation in the lung, Dark said. (latimes.com)
  • Antegrade pulmoplegia was started with 2.8L Perfadex solution while the lungs were ventilated with 50% inspired oxygen, followed by retrograde flush with one additional liter of the same perfusion solution after the heart was extracted. (openpr.com)
  • Ex Vivo Perfusion With Adenosine A2A Receptor Agonist Enhances Rehabilitation of Murine Donor Lungs After Circulatory Death. (umassmed.edu)
  • Instead of having to survive in a cold static solution, the lungs are continuously perfused with warm optimized perfusion solution and ventilated. (scanbalt.org)
  • Organ Assist successfully introduced the Lung Assist, and other organ perfusion devices, worldwide and continues to innovate in the field of organ perfusion and transplantation. (scanbalt.org)
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome in Lung Transplantation presents the most current and up-to-date evidence regarding the diagnosis and management of BOS. (springer.com)
  • The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation has an Impact Factor of 5.611 and is ranked 2nd of 26 journals in Transplantation category, 6th out of 53 journals in the Respiratory System category, and 17th of 125 journals in Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems category in the 2013 Journal Citation Reports®, published by Thomson Reuters. (elsevier.com)
  • By sparing the respiratory muscles, median sternotomy is probably less invasive and preserves lung function. (ebscohost.com)
  • Due to progressive dyspnea and recurrent respiratory infection, she could not maintain her normal daily life without lung transplantation. (ebscohost.com)
  • To evaluate paracorporeal lung assist devices to treat neonates and children with decompensated respiratory failure as a bridge to recovery or lung transplantation. (nih.gov)
  • This therapy has the potential to bridge children with decompensated respiratory failure to lung transplantation. (nih.gov)
  • If bypass is necessary, it involves re-routing of the blood through tubes to a heart-lung bypass machine. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Throughout the surgery, a heart-lung bypass machine is on standby in case it becomes necessary to use this equipment to temporarily take over the work of the heart and lungs by pumping and oxygenating the blood. (columbiasurgery.org)
  • The thoracic team then opened pleural cavities and quickly inspected both lungs before topical cooling with ice-cold saline was started. (openpr.com)
  • Thoracic Organ Transplantation in Children: The State of Heart, Heart-Lung, and Lung Transplantation. (ebscohost.com)
  • Thoracic surgeons remove small wedges of damaged lung tissue in order to help the remaining lung tissue function more efficiently. (nm.org)
  • This multicenter, cross-sectional study is a part of the Swedish national study: Self-management after thoracic transplantation (SMATT). (lu.se)
  • Founded in 1964, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons is a not-for-profit organization representing more than 7,400 cardiothoracic surgeons, researchers, and allied health care professionals worldwide who are dedicated to ensuring the best possible outcomes for surgeries of the heart, lung, and esophagus, as well as other surgical procedures within the chest. (sts.org)
  • The ISHLT International Registry for Heart and Lung Transplantation was established to provide on-going up-to-date information on the thoracic organ transplant experience around the world. (ishlt.org)
  • 1 The only major changes since this 1991 report are that children are now assessed on a day care basis and that previous thoracic surgery is no longer an absolute contraindication for transplantation. (bmj.com)
  • In older children, CF is the most frequent indication for lung transplantation. (springer.com)
Essentials in Lung Transplantation - Allan R. Glanville - Innbundet (9783319909325) »     Bokkilden
Essentials in Lung Transplantation - Allan R. Glanville - Innbundet (9783319909325) » Bokkilden (bokkilden.no)
Current Issue : Transplantation Direct
Current Issue : Transplantation Direct (journals.lww.com)
The Transplantation and Replacement of Thoracic Organs | SpringerLink
The Transplantation and Replacement of Thoracic Organs | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Pulmonary Atresia With Ventricular Septal Defect Treatment & Management: Medical Therapy, Surgical Therapy, Preoperative Details
Pulmonary Atresia With Ventricular Septal Defect Treatment & Management: Medical Therapy, Surgical Therapy, Preoperative Details (emedicine.medscape.com)
Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome in Lung Transplantation | SpringerLink
Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome in Lung Transplantation | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Ries Langen, de - Research database - University of Groningen
Ries Langen, de - Research database - University of Groningen (rug.nl)
Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension | UPMC
Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension | UPMC (upmc.com)
Table of Contents - August 01, 2019, 54 (2) | European Respiratory Society
Table of Contents - August 01, 2019, 54 (2) | European Respiratory Society (erj.ersjournals.com)
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Search Page | CF Foundation (cff.org)
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Chest Surgery | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
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Table of Contents - December 01, 2016, 48 (6) | European Respiratory Society (erj.ersjournals.com)
Treatments - Pulmonary Hypertension Association
Treatments - Pulmonary Hypertension Association (phassociation.org)
Transmission of OXA-23-Producing Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii Through Lung Transplantation - 2018 | Attending...
Transmission of OXA-23-Producing Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii Through Lung Transplantation - 2018 | Attending... (cdc.gov)
Lung Transplantation | Texas Heart Institute
Lung Transplantation | Texas Heart Institute (texasheart.org)
Anatomy Archives | Texas Heart Institute
Anatomy Archives | Texas Heart Institute (texasheart.org)
Lung Transplantation | Springer for Research & Development
Lung Transplantation | Springer for Research & Development (rd.springer.com)
International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation | TSNN Trade Show News
International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation | TSNN Trade Show News (tsnn.com)
Paediatric lobar lung transplantation:  addressing the paucity of donor organs | The Medical Journal of Australia
Paediatric lobar lung transplantation: addressing the paucity of donor organs | The Medical Journal of Australia (mja.com.au)