Punctures: Incision of tissues for injection of medication or for other diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Punctures of the skin, for example may be used for diagnostic drainage; of blood vessels for diagnostic imaging procedures.Spinal Puncture: Tapping fluid from the subarachnoid space in the lumbar region, usually between the third and fourth lumbar vertebrae.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Post-Dural Puncture Headache: A secondary headache disorder attributed to low CEREBROSPINAL FLUID pressure caused by SPINAL PUNCTURE, usually after dural or lumbar puncture.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Lung Injury: Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.Needles: Sharp instruments used for puncturing or suturing.Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung: A heterogeneous aggregate of at least three distinct histological types of lung cancer, including SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA; ADENOCARCINOMA; and LARGE CELL CARCINOMA. They are dealt with collectively because of their shared treatment strategy.Lung Transplantation: The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Acute Lung Injury: A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).Blood Patch, Epidural: The injection of autologous blood into the epidural space either as a prophylactic treatment immediately following an epidural puncture or for treatment of headache as a result of an epidural puncture.Cecum: The blind sac or outpouching area of the LARGE INTESTINE that is below the entrance of the SMALL INTESTINE. It has a worm-like extension, the vermiform APPENDIX.Atrial Septum: The thin membrane-like muscular structure separating the right and the left upper chambers (HEART ATRIA) of a heart.Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Lung Volume Measurements: Measurement of the amount of air that the lungs may contain at various points in the respiratory cycle.Wounds, Penetrating: Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.Foot Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the foot.Ligation: Application of a ligature to tie a vessel or strangulate a part.Larynx, Artificial: A device, activated electronically or by expired pulmonary air, which simulates laryngeal activity and enables a laryngectomized person to speak. Examples of the pneumatic mechanical device are the Tokyo and Van Hunen artificial larynges. Electronic devices include the Western Electric electrolarynx, Tait oral vibrator, Cooper-Rand electrolarynx and the Ticchioni pipe.Catheterization, Peripheral: Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.Dura Mater: The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.Lung Diseases, Interstitial: A diverse group of lung diseases that affect the lung parenchyma. They are characterized by an initial inflammation of PULMONARY ALVEOLI that extends to the interstitium and beyond leading to diffuse PULMONARY FIBROSIS. Interstitial lung diseases are classified by their etiology (known or unknown causes), and radiological-pathological features.Hemostatic Techniques: Techniques for controlling bleeding.Anesthesia, Spinal: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected directly into the spinal cord.Meningitis: Inflammation of the coverings of the brain and/or spinal cord, which consist of the PIA MATER; ARACHNOID; and DURA MATER. Infections (viral, bacterial, and fungal) are the most common causes of this condition, but subarachnoid hemorrhage (HEMORRHAGES, SUBARACHNOID), chemical irritation (chemical MENINGITIS), granulomatous conditions, neoplastic conditions (CARCINOMATOUS MENINGITIS), and other inflammatory conditions may produce this syndrome. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1994, Ch24, p6)Gloves, Surgical: Gloves, usually rubber, worn by surgeons, examining physicians, dentists, and other health personnel for the mutual protection of personnel and patient.Cerebrospinal Fluid: A watery fluid that is continuously produced in the CHOROID PLEXUS and circulates around the surface of the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and in the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.Fluoroscopy: Production of an image when x-rays strike a fluorescent screen.Total Lung Capacity: The volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration. It is the equivalent to each of the following sums: VITAL CAPACITY plus RESIDUAL VOLUME; INSPIRATORY CAPACITY plus FUNCTIONAL RESIDUAL CAPACITY; TIDAL VOLUME plus INSPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus functional residual capacity; or tidal volume plus inspiratory reserve volume plus EXPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus residual volume.Extravascular Lung Water: Water content outside of the lung vasculature. About 80% of a normal lung is made up of water, including intracellular, interstitial, and blood water. Failure to maintain the normal homeostatic fluid exchange between the vascular space and the interstitium of the lungs can result in PULMONARY EDEMA and flooding of the alveolar space.Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid: Washing liquid obtained from irrigation of the lung, including the BRONCHI and the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. It is generally used to assess biochemical, inflammatory, or infection status of the lung.Pulmonary Alveoli: Small polyhedral outpouchings along the walls of the alveolar sacs, alveolar ducts and terminal bronchioles through the walls of which gas exchange between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood takes place.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Small Cell Lung Carcinoma: A form of highly malignant lung cancer that is composed of small ovoid cells (SMALL CELL CARCINOMA).Mice, Inbred C57BLTreatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Carcinoma, Small Cell: An anaplastic, highly malignant, and usually bronchogenic carcinoma composed of small ovoid cells with scanty neoplasm. It is characterized by a dominant, deeply basophilic nucleus, and absent or indistinct nucleoli. (From Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1286-7)Lung Abscess: Solitary or multiple collections of PUS within the lung parenchyma as a result of infection by bacteria, protozoa, or other agents.Pulmonary Fibrosis: A process in which normal lung tissues are progressively replaced by FIBROBLASTS and COLLAGEN causing an irreversible loss of the ability to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream via PULMONARY ALVEOLI. Patients show progressive DYSPNEA finally resulting in death.Meningitis, Bacterial: Bacterial infections of the leptomeninges and subarachnoid space, frequently involving the cerebral cortex, cranial nerves, cerebral blood vessels, spinal cord, and nerve roots.Jugular Veins: Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury: Lung damage that is caused by the adverse effects of PULMONARY VENTILATOR usage. The high frequency and tidal volumes produced by a mechanical ventilator can cause alveolar disruption and PULMONARY EDEMA.Anesthesia, Epidural: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected into the epidural space.Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Radiography, Interventional: Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are invasive or surgical in nature, and require the expertise of a specially trained radiologist. In general, they are more invasive than diagnostic imaging but less invasive than major surgery. They often involve catheterization, fluoroscopy, or computed tomography. Some examples include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, percutaneous transthoracic biopsy, balloon angioplasty, and arterial embolization.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Axillary Vein: The venous trunk of the upper limb; a continuation of the basilar and brachial veins running from the lower border of the teres major muscle to the outer border of the first rib where it becomes the subclavian vein.Blood Specimen Collection: The taking of a blood sample to determine its character as a whole, to identify levels of its component cells, chemicals, gases, or other constituents, to perform pathological examination, etc.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult: A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Pneumonia: Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure: Manometric pressure of the CEREBROSPINAL FLUID as measured by lumbar, cerebroventricular, or cisternal puncture. Within the cranial cavity it is called INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE.Speech, Alaryngeal: Methods of enabling a patient without a larynx or with a non-functional larynx to produce voice or speech. The methods may be pneumatic or electronic.Lung Diseases, Obstructive: Any disorder marked by obstruction of conducting airways of the lung. AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION may be acute, chronic, intermittent, or persistent.Catheterization, Central Venous: Placement of an intravenous CATHETER in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein.Peritonitis: INFLAMMATION of the PERITONEUM lining the ABDOMINAL CAVITY as the result of infectious, autoimmune, or chemical processes. Primary peritonitis is due to infection of the PERITONEAL CAVITY via hematogenous or lymphatic spread and without intra-abdominal source. Secondary peritonitis arises from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY itself through RUPTURE or ABSCESS of intra-abdominal organs.Pulmonary Edema: Excessive accumulation of extravascular fluid in the lung, an indication of a serious underlying disease or disorder. Pulmonary edema prevents efficient PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE in the PULMONARY ALVEOLI, and can be life-threatening.Farmer's Lung: A form of alveolitis or pneumonitis due to an acquired hypersensitivity to inhaled antigens associated with farm environment. Antigens in the farm dust are commonly from bacteria actinomycetes (SACCHAROPOLYSPORA and THERMOACTINOMYCES), fungi, and animal proteins in the soil, straw, crops, pelts, serum, and excreta.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Bloodletting: Puncture of a vein to draw blood for therapeutic purposes. Bloodletting therapy has been used in Talmudic and Indian medicine since the medieval time, and was still practiced widely in the 18th and 19th centuries. Its modern counterpart is PHLEBOTOMY.Neurosyphilis: Infections of the central nervous system caused by TREPONEMA PALLIDUM which present with a variety of clinical syndromes. The initial phase of infection usually causes a mild or asymptomatic meningeal reaction. The meningovascular form may present acutely as BRAIN INFARCTION. The infection may also remain subclinical for several years. Late syndromes include general paresis; TABES DORSALIS; meningeal syphilis; syphilitic OPTIC ATROPHY; and spinal syphilis. General paresis is characterized by progressive DEMENTIA; DYSARTHRIA; TREMOR; MYOCLONUS; SEIZURES; and Argyll-Robertson pupils. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp722-8)Anesthesia, Obstetrical: A variety of anesthetic methods such as EPIDURAL ANESTHESIA used to control the pain of childbirth.Laryngectomy: Total or partial excision of the larynx.Carcinoma, Lewis Lung: A carcinoma discovered by Dr. Margaret R. Lewis of the Wistar Institute in 1951. This tumor originated spontaneously as a carcinoma of the lung of a C57BL mouse. The tumor does not appear to be grossly hemorrhagic and the majority of the tumor tissue is a semifirm homogeneous mass. (From Cancer Chemother Rep 2 1972 Nov;(3)1:325) It is also called 3LL and LLC and is used as a transplantable malignancy.Epidural Space: Space between the dura mater and the walls of the vertebral canal.Seizures, Febrile: Seizures that occur during a febrile episode. It is a common condition, affecting 2-5% of children aged 3 months to five years. An autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance has been identified in some families. The majority are simple febrile seizures (generally defined as generalized onset, single seizures with a duration of less than 30 minutes). Complex febrile seizures are characterized by focal onset, duration greater than 30 minutes, and/or more than one seizure in a 24 hour period. The likelihood of developing epilepsy (i.e., a nonfebrile seizure disorder) following simple febrile seizures is low. Complex febrile seizures are associated with a moderately increased incidence of epilepsy. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p784)Myelography: X-ray visualization of the spinal cord following injection of contrast medium into the spinal arachnoid space.Pulmonary Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.Pneumonectomy: The excision of lung tissue including partial or total lung lobectomy.Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Bleeding into the intracranial or spinal SUBARACHNOID SPACE, most resulting from INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM rupture. It can occur after traumatic injuries (SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC). Clinical features include HEADACHE; NAUSEA; VOMITING, nuchal rigidity, variable neurological deficits and reduced mental status.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Pulmonary Emphysema: Enlargement of air spaces distal to the TERMINAL BRONCHIOLES where gas-exchange normally takes place. This is usually due to destruction of the alveolar wall. Pulmonary emphysema can be classified by the location and distribution of the lesions.Pulmonary Surfactants: Substances and drugs that lower the SURFACE TENSION of the mucoid layer lining the PULMONARY ALVEOLI.Analgesia, Epidural: The relief of pain without loss of consciousness through the introduction of an analgesic agent into the epidural space of the vertebral canal. It is differentiated from ANESTHESIA, EPIDURAL which refers to the state of insensitivity to sensation.Subarachnoid Space: The space between the arachnoid membrane and PIA MATER, filled with CEREBROSPINAL FLUID. It contains large blood vessels that supply the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD.Bronchi: The larger air passages of the lungs arising from the terminal bifurcation of the TRACHEA. They include the largest two primary bronchi which branch out into secondary bronchi, and tertiary bronchi which extend into BRONCHIOLES and PULMONARY ALVEOLI.Respiratory Mucosa: The mucous membrane lining the RESPIRATORY TRACT, including the NASAL CAVITY; the LARYNX; the TRACHEA; and the BRONCHI tree. The respiratory mucosa consists of various types of epithelial cells ranging from ciliated columnar to simple squamous, mucous GOBLET CELLS, and glands containing both mucous and serous cells.Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of a prosthesis.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Needlestick Injuries: Penetrating stab wounds caused by needles. They are of special concern to health care workers since such injuries put them at risk for developing infectious disease.Phlebotomy: The techniques used to draw blood from a vein for diagnostic purposes or for treatment of certain blood disorders such as erythrocytosis, hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, and porphyria cutanea tarda.Morganella morganii: A species of MORGANELLA formerly classified as a Proteus species. It is found in the feces of humans, dogs, other mammals, and reptiles. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Mice, Inbred BALB CRNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Analgesia, Obstetrical: The elimination of PAIN, without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS, during OBSTETRIC LABOR; OBSTETRIC DELIVERY; or the POSTPARTUM PERIOD, usually through the administration of ANALGESICS.Iatrogenic Disease: Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.Intracranial Hypotension: Reduction of CEREBROSPINAL FLUID pressure characterized clinically by HEADACHE which is maximal in an upright posture and occasionally by an abducens nerve palsy (see ABDUCENS NERVE DISEASES), neck stiffness, hearing loss (see DEAFNESS); NAUSEA; and other symptoms. This condition may be spontaneous or secondary to SPINAL PUNCTURE; NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES; DEHYDRATION; UREMIA; trauma (see also CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA); and other processes. Chronic hypotension may be associated with subdural hematomas (see HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL) or hygromas. (From Semin Neurol 1996 Mar;16(1):5-10; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp637-8)Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Groin: The external junctural region between the lower part of the abdomen and the thigh.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Neutrophils: Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.Heel: The back (or posterior) of the FOOT in PRIMATES, found behind the ANKLE and distal to the TOES.Macrophages, Alveolar: Round, granular, mononuclear phagocytes found in the alveoli of the lungs. They ingest small inhaled particles resulting in degradation and presentation of the antigen to immunocompetent cells.Lung Diseases, Fungal: Pulmonary diseases caused by fungal infections, usually through hematogenous spread.Heart Septum: This structure includes the thin muscular atrial septum between the two HEART ATRIA, and the thick muscular ventricular septum between the two HEART VENTRICLES.Pseudotumor Cerebri: A condition marked by raised intracranial pressure and characterized clinically by HEADACHES; NAUSEA; PAPILLEDEMA, peripheral constriction of the visual fields, transient visual obscurations, and pulsatile TINNITUS. OBESITY is frequently associated with this condition, which primarily affects women between 20 and 44 years of age. Chronic PAPILLEDEMA may lead to optic nerve injury (see OPTIC NERVE DISEASES) and visual loss (see BLINDNESS).Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Meningitis, Fungal: Meningitis caused by fungal agents which may occur as OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS or arise in immunocompetent hosts.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Biopsy, Needle: Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Wounds, Stab: Penetrating wounds caused by a pointed object.Nephrostomy, Percutaneous: The insertion of a catheter through the skin and body wall into the kidney pelvis, mainly to provide urine drainage where the ureter is not functional. It is used also to remove or dissolve renal calculi and to diagnose ureteral obstruction.Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Forced Expiratory Volume: Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.Catheter Ablation: Removal of tissue with electrical current delivered via electrodes positioned at the distal end of a catheter. Energy sources are commonly direct current (DC-shock) or alternating current at radiofrequencies (usually 750 kHz). The technique is used most often to ablate the AV junction and/or accessory pathways in order to interrupt AV conduction and produce AV block in the treatment of various tachyarrhythmias.Cisterna Magna: One of three principal openings in the SUBARACHNOID SPACE. They are also known as cerebellomedullary cistern, and collectively as cisterns.Subclavian Vein: The continuation of the axillary vein which follows the subclavian artery and then joins the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Paraphimosis: A condition in which the FORESKIN, once retracted, cannot return to its original position. If this condition persists, it can lead to painful constriction of GLANS PENIS, swelling, and impaired blood flow to the penis.Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Vital Capacity: The volume of air that is exhaled by a maximal expiration following a maximal inspiration.Hyperoxia: An abnormal increase in the amount of oxygen in the tissues and organs.Bronchoalveolar Lavage: Washing out of the lungs with saline or mucolytic agents for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It is very useful in the diagnosis of diffuse pulmonary infiltrates in immunosuppressed patients.Neutrophil Infiltration: The diffusion or accumulation of neutrophils in tissues or cells in response to a wide variety of substances released at the sites of inflammatory reactions.Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteins: Proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid, normally albumin and globulin present in the ratio of 8 to 1. Increases in protein levels are of diagnostic value in neurological diseases. (Brain and Bannister's Clinical Neurology, 7th ed, p221)Hematoma: A collection of blood outside the BLOOD VESSELS. Hematoma can be localized in an organ, space, or tissue.Aerosols: Colloids with a gaseous dispersing phase and either liquid (fog) or solid (smoke) dispersed phase; used in fumigation or in inhalation therapy; may contain propellant agents.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Administration, Inhalation: The administration of drugs by the respiratory route. It includes insufflation into the respiratory tract.Paracentesis: A procedure in which fluid is withdrawn from a body cavity or organ via a trocar and cannula, needle, or other hollow instrument.Pleura: The thin serous membrane enveloping the lungs (LUNG) and lining the THORACIC CAVITY. Pleura consist of two layers, the inner visceral pleura lying next to the pulmonary parenchyma and the outer parietal pleura. Between the two layers is the PLEURAL CAVITY which contains a thin film of liquid.Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Hydrocephalus: Excessive accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid within the cranium which may be associated with dilation of cerebral ventricles, INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; HEADACHE; lethargy; URINARY INCONTINENCE; and ATAXIA.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Injections, Spinal: Introduction of therapeutic agents into the spinal region using a needle and syringe.Peroxidase: A hemeprotein from leukocytes. Deficiency of this enzyme leads to a hereditary disorder coupled with disseminated moniliasis. It catalyzes the conversion of a donor and peroxide to an oxidized donor and water. EC 1.11.1.7.Bleomycin: A complex of related glycopeptide antibiotics from Streptomyces verticillus consisting of bleomycin A2 and B2. It inhibits DNA metabolism and is used as an antineoplastic, especially for solid tumors.Intracranial Pressure: Pressure within the cranial cavity. It is influenced by brain mass, the circulatory system, CSF dynamics, and skull rigidity.Pneumothorax: An accumulation of air or gas in the PLEURAL CAVITY, which may occur spontaneously or as a result of trauma or a pathological process. The gas may also be introduced deliberately during PNEUMOTHORAX, ARTIFICIAL.Lipopolysaccharides: Lipid-containing polysaccharides which are endotoxins and important group-specific antigens. They are often derived from the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria and induce immunoglobulin secretion. The lipopolysaccharide molecule consists of three parts: LIPID A, core polysaccharide, and O-specific chains (O ANTIGENS). When derived from Escherichia coli, lipopolysaccharides serve as polyclonal B-cell mitogens commonly used in laboratory immunology. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunts: Tubes inserted to create communication between a cerebral ventricle and the internal jugular vein. Their emplacement permits draining of cerebrospinal fluid for relief of hydrocephalus or other condition leading to fluid accumulation in the ventricles.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha: Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.Anthracosilicosis: A form of pneumoconiosis caused by inhalation of dust that contains both CARBON and crystalline SILICON DIOXIDE. These foreign matters induce fibrous nodule formation in the lung.Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Pulmonary Gas Exchange: The exchange of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood that occurs across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.Capillary Permeability: The property of blood capillary ENDOTHELIUM that allows for the selective exchange of substances between the blood and surrounding tissues and through membranous barriers such as the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER; BLOOD-AQUEOUS BARRIER; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; BLOOD-NERVE BARRIER; BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER; and BLOOD-TESTIS BARRIER. Small lipid-soluble molecules such as carbon dioxide and oxygen move freely by diffusion. Water and water-soluble molecules cannot pass through the endothelial walls and are dependent on microscopic pores. These pores show narrow areas (TIGHT JUNCTIONS) which may limit large molecule movement.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Wound Closure Techniques: Methods to repair breaks in tissue caused by trauma or to close surgical incisions.Carcinoma, Large Cell: A tumor of undifferentiated (anaplastic) cells of large size. It is usually bronchogenic. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Carcinoma, Squamous Cell: A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Electrocoagulation: Procedures using an electrically heated wire or scalpel to treat hemorrhage (e.g., bleeding ulcers) and to ablate tumors, mucosal lesions, and refractory arrhythmias. It is different from ELECTROSURGERY which is used more for cutting tissue than destroying and in which the patient is part of the electric circuit.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Catheters, Indwelling: Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Bronchoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.Interleukin-6: A cytokine that stimulates the growth and differentiation of B-LYMPHOCYTES and is also a growth factor for HYBRIDOMAS and plasmacytomas. It is produced by many different cells including T-LYMPHOCYTES; MONOCYTES; and FIBROBLASTS.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Blood Gas Analysis: Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.Hemostasis, Surgical: Control of bleeding during or after surgery.Tidal Volume: The volume of air inspired or expired during each normal, quiet respiratory cycle. Common abbreviations are TV or V with subscript T.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Anesthetics, Local: Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts and supports research program related to diseases of the heart, blood vessels, lung, and blood; blood resources; and SLEEP WAKE DISORDERS. From 1948 until October 10, 1969, it was known as the National Heart Institute. From June 25, 1976, it was the National Heart and Lung Institute. Since October 1997, the NHLBI has also had administrative responsibility for the NIH Woman's Health Initiative.Extravasation of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Materials: The escape of diagnostic or therapeutic material from the vessel into which it is introduced into the surrounding tissue or body cavity.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Paresthesia: Subjective cutaneous sensations (e.g., cold, warmth, tingling, pressure, etc.) that are experienced spontaneously in the absence of stimulation.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Cystic Fibrosis: An autosomal recessive genetic disease of the EXOCRINE GLANDS. It is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CYSTIC FIBROSIS TRANSMEMBRANE CONDUCTANCE REGULATOR expressed in several organs including the LUNG, the PANCREAS, the BILIARY SYSTEM, and the SWEAT GLANDS. Cystic fibrosis is characterized by epithelial secretory dysfunction associated with ductal obstruction resulting in AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION; chronic RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS; PANCREATIC INSUFFICIENCY; maldigestion; salt depletion; and HEAT PROSTRATION.Aneurysm, False: Not an aneurysm but a well-defined collection of blood and CONNECTIVE TISSUE outside the wall of a blood vessel or the heart. It is the containment of a ruptured blood vessel or heart, such as sealing a rupture of the left ventricle. False aneurysm is formed by organized THROMBUS and HEMATOMA in surrounding tissue.Spasm: An involuntary contraction of a muscle or group of muscles. Spasms may involve SKELETAL MUSCLE or SMOOTH MUSCLE.Bronchiolitis Obliterans: Inflammation of the BRONCHIOLES leading to an obstructive lung disease. Bronchioles are characterized by fibrous granulation tissue with bronchial exudates in the lumens. Clinical features include a nonproductive cough and DYSPNEA.Headache Disorders: Various conditions with the symptom of HEADACHE. Headache disorders are classified into major groups, such as PRIMARY HEADACHE DISORDERS (based on characteristics of their headache symptoms) and SECONDARY HEADACHE DISORDERS (based on their etiologies). (International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd ed. Cephalalgia 2004: suppl 1)Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive: A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Degenerative changes in the INTERVERTEBRAL DISC due to aging or structural damage, especially to the vertebral end-plates.Maxillary Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the MAXILLARY SINUS. In many cases, it is caused by an infection of the bacteria HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE; STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE; or STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS.Pulmonary Atelectasis: Absence of air in the entire or part of a lung, such as an incompletely inflated neonate lung or a collapsed adult lung. Pulmonary atelectasis can be caused by airway obstruction, lung compression, fibrotic contraction, or other factors.Adenocarcinoma, Bronchiolo-Alveolar: A carcinoma thought to be derived from epithelium of terminal bronchioles, in which the neoplastic tissue extends along the alveolar walls and grows in small masses within the alveoli. Involvement may be uniformly diffuse and massive, or nodular, or lobular. The neoplastic cells are cuboidal or columnar and form papillary structures. Mucin may be demonstrated in some of the cells and in the material in the alveoli, which also includes denuded cells. Metastases in regional lymph nodes, and in even more distant sites, are known to occur, but are infrequent. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Subdural Effusion: Leakage and accumulation of CEREBROSPINAL FLUID in the subdural space which may be associated with an infectious process; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; BRAIN NEOPLASMS; INTRACRANIAL HYPOTENSION; and other conditions.Peritoneal Lavage: Washing out of the peritoneal cavity. The procedure is a diagnostic as well as a therapeutic technique following abdominal trauma or inflammation.Complement C5a: The minor fragment formed when C5 convertase cleaves C5 into C5a and COMPLEMENT C5B. C5a is a 74-amino-acid glycopeptide with a carboxy-terminal ARGININE that is crucial for its spasmogenic activity. Of all the complement-derived anaphylatoxins, C5a is the most potent in mediating immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE), smooth MUSCLE CONTRACTION; HISTAMINE RELEASE; and migration of LEUKOCYTES to site of INFLAMMATION.
His lung and aorta were punctured. After extensive surgery and rehabilitation, De Groote recuperated and resumed flying and ...
He suffered three broken ribs, which punctured his lung. He was hospitalised for a few days with a tube in his chest. He ...
He had also punctured his lung. Addison J. (1948). The People Speedway Guide. Odhams Press Limited Henry, J. & Moultray, I. ( ...
His ripped aorta and punctured lung and heart proved fatal. Pennington, Bill (2006-03-13). "Fall Claims Life of Olympic ...
She now had trouble breathing, as her lung was punctured. Nonetheless, she held on, riding Pepperment Grove over another 15 ...
The piece of bat punctured Colvin's lung. Colvin was brought to the hospital and remained in stable condition. He missed the ...
Mieses was severely injured, suffering a fractured spine and punctured lung. Mieses later stated that he was checking on Cruz ...
West received broken ribs, a broken wrist, and a punctured lung. West's wife, Michelle, revealed that West didn't want to get ...
In 2009, he suffered a punctured lung and broken ribs when he collided with Brendan Fevola in the final 30 seconds of the loss ... Richards has broken ribs, punctured lung Curley, Adam (5 August 2016). "Ted's excellent adventure over at season's end". ...
Patton suffered multiple fractures and a punctured lung. The truck then knocked down a utility pole and crashed, together with ...
His right lung was punctured when a robber stabbed him. He died one year later when his heart lining collapsed. 1982: Surplus ... Thomas, Jocko (19 September 1986). "Cab driver's lung punctured in $80 Scarborough holdup". The Toronto Star. p. A.8. Retrieved ...
Channon was reported to have suffered a punctured lung and broken arm. During an interview with Clare Balding broadcast on BBC ...
From the punctured lungs or airways, the air travels up the perivascular sheaths and into the mediastinum, from which it can ... The condition may also occur when a fractured rib punctures a lung; in fact, 27% of patients who have rib fractures also have ... When the pleural membranes are punctured, as occurs in penetrating trauma of the chest, air may travel from the lung to the ... by puncturing the airways or by increasing the pressure in the affected lung(s) enough to cause them to burst. Subcutaneous ...
It requires a direct lung puncture, or the use of trans-tracheal aspiration. Anaerobic gram-positive cocci are part of the ... Peptostreptococcus can cause brain, liver, breast, and lung abscesses, as well as generalized necrotizing soft tissue ... lung abscesses, and mediastinitis. These bacteria account for 10-20% of anaerobic isolated recovered from pulmonary infections ...
He was hospitalized in Los Angeles with a punctured and collapsed lung, and doctors said they expected him to make a full ... "News - Dean McDermott in ICU With Punctured, Collapsed Lung - Healthy Lifestyle - UsMagazine.com". www.usmagazine.com. ...
The rib fracture had punctured his left lung which affected the pulmonary functions. Due to his advanced age of 83 years, one ...
It hit him in the shoulder and punctured a lung. One source reported that warning shots had been fired, while another said the ...
The lung and kidney samples in mice carrying the gene showed lower expression of TNF-α mRNA. The investigators concluded that ... Some have developed a mouse model sepsis via cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Male Balb/c mice subjected to CLP were given an ... Lung, Liver and kidney tissue destruction were measured by assessing myeloperoxidase and malonialdehyde activity; these last ... The authors assessed the level neutrophil infiltration in lung and liver tissue. IL-10 protein expression was measured using ...
A broken rib punctured a lung and his heart was bruised, according to doctors. Phillies' catcher Darren Daulton was also in the ...
She had died from a stab wound to the chest that punctured her lung. The investigation into Patton's murder was protracted and ...
Sid Vicious suffered a punctured lung due to a broken rib. With Vicious out of action, Teddy Long brought in another tall ...
Hill suffered collapsed lungs, and a punctured bladder, kidney and liver. Philpott was convicted of attempted murder of Hill, ...
Gumbleton suffered yet another injury in round 18, with broken ribs and a punctured lung, ruling him out for the remainder of ... 21 July 2010) "Scott Gumbleton out for season with broken ribs and punctured lung" AAP. Retrieved 7 August 2010. Gumbleton ...
He suffered ten broken ribs, a broken collarbone, a punctured lung and a broken spine. He lost the use of both legs and was ...
"Wounded Winter Olympian battles insurance company after puncturing lung in ski crash". abc.net.au. Retrieved 2016-08-14. ...
... but not very much in their lungs.[77] It is believed that this is the reason researchers have observed pig to primate ... Bleeding from mucous membranes or from sites of needle punctures has been reported in 40-50% of cases.[31] This may cause ... pigs with EVD get very high ebolavirus concentrations in their lungs, and not their bloodstream.[76] Therefore, pigs with EVD ... and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation may be used for lung dysfunction.[33] ...
... mice were sensitized to ventilator-induced lung injury with increased lung vascular permeability.ConclusionsWe demonstrate that ... We demonstrate that mkk3−/− or jnk1−/− mice displayed significantly reduced inflammatory lung injury and apoptosis relative to ... Mitogen-activated protein kinases have been implicated in ventilator-induced lung injury though their functional significance ... Since jnk1−/− mice were highly resistant to ventilator-induced lung injury, we performed comprehensive gene expression ...
A woman who went to an acupuncturist to seek relief from a wrist injury ended up with two punctured lungs, according to a new ... News Lungs Health New Zealand Health and Medicine. A New Zealand woman ended up with two punctured lungs after an acupuncturist ... Acupuncturist Inserts Needles Too Deeply, Punctures Patients Lungs. By K Thor Jensen On 9/9/19 at 2:57 PM EDT ... He also criticized her for not realizing she had punctured the womans lungs and sending her home rather than to the hospital. ...
... also referred to as pneumothorax or a collapsed lung--can occur when your chest sustains severe trauma, such as a rib fracture ... Air that builds up around the lungs as a result of lung puncture can interfere with the ability of the lungs to expand normally ... If you suspect that you have sustained a lung puncture, or if you develop any lung puncture symptoms, seek immediate emergency ... Low oxygen levels in the body due to lung puncture can affect cardiac (heart) function. Patients who sustain lung puncture can ...
Los Angeles Chargers quarterback Tyrod Taylor missed last Sundays game because a team doctor accidentally punctured his lung, ... However, with a punctured lung, the 10-year veteran is expected to be out indefinitely. ... Los Angeles Chargers quarterback Tyrod Taylor missed last Sundays game because a team doctor accidentally punctured his lung, ... A Chargers team doctor reportedly punctured Tyrod Taylors lung while attempting to administer a pain-killing injection. ...
Ive been able to find plenty of information on symptoms of broken ribs/collapsed lungs, but not enough on how this type of ... injury is treated-- everything Im finding addresses collapsed lungs do to sucking chest wounds or emphysema. My question is ... A broken rib can puncture a lung, which basically results in a collapsed lung (called a pneumothorax). If air builds up in the ... one of which punctures her lung. Ive been able to find plenty of information on symptoms of broken ribs/collapsed lungs, but ...
Former Giants coach and Jaguars executive Tom Coughlin is recovering after breaking four ribs and slightly puncturing a lung in ... Former New York Giants coach and Jaguars executive Tom Coughlin fractured four ribs, slightly punctured his lung and needed ... Tom Coughlin recovering after breaking ribs, puncturing lung in bicycle accident. *Facebook ...
15 responses to "Hunter Renfrow broke a rib and punctured his lung Sunday" * jjackwagon says: ... Hunter Renfrow broke a rib and punctured his lung Sunday. Posted by Josh Alper on November 25, 2019, 3:42 PM EST ... Ian Rapoport of NFL Media reports that Renfrow broke a rib and punctured his lung during the 34-3 loss. Its unclear how long ...
Defensive end Leon Mackey will be available this week after he partially punctured his lung in the Red Raiders season opener ... Big 12 Quick Hits: Broken bones, ineligibility, and punctured lungs. Big 12 Quick Hits: Broken bones, ineligibility, and ...
According to ESPN, Coughlin slightly punctured a lung, needed stitches in his head, and fractured four ribs that resulted in an ... Going home and not immediately going to the hospital after puncturing a lung, fracturing four ribs, and cutting your head open ... Tom Coughlin Suffers Fractured Ribs And A Punctured Lung In Scary Cycling Accident #NFL ...
B Inhibition after Cecal Ligation and Puncture Reduces Sepsis-Associated Lung Injury without Altering Bacterial Host Defense. ... Mice underwent cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). An NF-. B inhibitor, BMS-345541 (50 µg/g mice), was administered by peroral ... In addition, mice treated with CLP+BMS had minimal histological evidence of lung injury and normal wet-dry ratios, indicating ... B inhibition during a defined time period after the onset of sepsis would reduce acute lung injury without compromising ...
B Inhibition after Cecal Ligation and Puncture Reduces Sepsis-Associated Lung Injury without Altering Bacterial Host Defense. ... D. S. Cheng, W. Han, S. M. Chen et al., "Airway epithelium controls lung inflammation and injury through the NF-κB pathway," ... M. Lagranderie, M.-A. Nahori, A.-M. Balazuc et al., "Dendritic cells recruited to the lung shortly after intranasal delivery of ... K. D. Singleton and P. E. Wischmeyer, "Glutamines protection against sepsis and lung injury is dependent on heat shock protein ...
A relative of a teenager critically injured in a knife attack near a north Belfast bonfire has said he suffered a punctured ... lung and was stabbed three times in the back. ... suffered punctured lung and was stabbed three times in back A ... relative of a teenager critically injured in a knife attack near a north Belfast bonfire has said he suffered a punctured lung ...
Los Angeles Chargers quarterback Tyrod Taylor missed last Sundays game because a team doctor accidentally punctured his lung, ... AP Source: Chargers team doctor punctured Taylors lung Los Angeles Chargers quarterback Tyrod Taylor (5) looks to throw ... ESPN first reported the punctured lung.. Taylors teammates echoed Lynn in voicing confidence about the teams medical staff ... Los Angeles Chargers quarterback Tyrod Taylor missed last Sundays game because a team doctor accidentally punctured his lung, ...
Where respiratory swabs were examined simultaneously, there was little correlation with the puncture specimen. The puncture ... Lung punctures were undertaken in selected cases of pneumonia, in adults and children admitted to Harare Hospital. In 13 out of ... oa Central African Journal of Medicine - Lung puncture in the diagnosis of acute pneumonia in children and adults * Navigate ... Lung punctures were undertaken in selected cases of pneumonia, in adults and children admitted to Harare Hospital. In 13 out of ...
What causes lung puncture in the coronary period, which patients recovering from the corona are facing; Understand from the ... What Causes Lung Puncture In The Coronary Period, Which Patients Recovering From The Corona Are Facing; Understand From The ...
... By Matthew Cenzon. May 7th 2016. A punctured lung is a type of classification ... Since a punctured lung is caused by some form of chest trauma, there are certain people who are at a greater risk for suffering ... this is used to define when a collapsed lung is caused by a degenerative lung disease like asthma, lung cancer or a chronic ... Symptoms of a Punctured Lung. Recognizing a traumatic pneumothorax as soon as possible is essential for treatment and to avoid ...
A lumbar puncture is a procedure performed on the lower back in which a needle is inserted into the spinal column in order to ... What Is the Procedure for Removing Fluid From the Lung?. A: The procedure for removing fluid from the lung is thoracentesis, ... A lumbar puncture is a procedure performed on the lower back in which a needle is inserted into the spinal column in order to ... A lumbar puncture is a sterile procedure in which a doctor uses a local anesthetic to numb the injection site, states Johns ...
Womans ribs broken, lung punctured and liver torn in horror kangaroo attack October 14, 2018 3:31 pm. in National by Jaydan ... Paramedic Stephen Johns said Mrs Smith suffered significant injuries, including broken ribs, a punctured lung, torn liver, ... lung punctured and liver torn in horror kangaroo attack. ...
These Weapons Destroy Intestines, Puncture Lungs, Cause Fractures And Bleeding In The Pelvis. ...
Sinus puncture and irrigation techniques allow for a surgical means of removal of thick purulent sinus secretions. The purpose ... Lung Defense: intrinsic, innate and adaptive. Chernick V, Boat TF, Wilmott RW, Bush A, eds. Kendigs Disorders of the ... When are sinus puncture and irrigation techniques indicated in the treatment of acute sinusitis (sinus infection)?. Updated: ... Sinus puncture and irrigation techniques allow for a surgical means of removal of thick purulent sinus secretions. The purpose ...
... and is able to pass through tissue within the transition region generally on the opposite side of a tissue puncture from the ... Lung assist apparatus and methods for use. US6846319 *. 14 Dec 2000. 25 Jan 2005. Core Medical, Inc.. Devices for sealing ... whereby the puncture site will be conformed to expose tissue adjacent the puncture site within the gap between the entry and ... particularly a puncture site through the wall of a body lumen, and more particularly a percutaneous vascular puncture site at ...
effects of foreign body in lung (T17.8). *effects of foreign body in trachea (T17.4) ... Puncture wound with foreign body of left breast, sequela. 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Billable/Specific Code POA Exempt *S21.042S ...
effects of foreign body in lung (T17.8). *effects of foreign body in trachea (T17.4) ... Puncture wound of left posterior thorax. ICD-10-CM S21.232A is grouped within Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v37.0): *604 ... Puncture wound without foreign body of left back wall of thorax without penetration into thoracic cavity, initial encounter. ... S21.231 Puncture wound without foreign body of right back wall of thorax without penetration into thoracic cavity ...
Accidental puncture and laceration of GI organ during GI procedure. *Accidental puncture and laceration of GI organ during ... Accidental puncture and laceration of digestive system organ during other procedure. *Accidental puncture and laceration of ear ... Accidental puncture & laceration of ear and mastoid. *Accidental puncture and laceration of digestive system organ during ... puncture or laceration caused by implanted device intentionally left in operation wound (996.0. -996.5. )*specified ...
Rivers Cuomo -- who wasnt allowed to fly last month due to the punctured lung he suffered in a freak bus accident -- is back ... Rivers Cuomo, the lead singer of Weezer, is making significant improvements on his health, after puncturing his lung and ... Cuomos internal injuries, which include a punctured lung and wounded spleen, are also "continuing to improve.". Hes expected ... but due to Cuomos punctured lung, hes not allowed to fly.. FYI -- The band will be driving the southern route across country ...
  • Based on the kinetics of the innate immune response, we postulated that selective NF- B inhibition during a defined time period after the onset of sepsis would reduce acute lung injury without compromising bacterial host defense. (hindawi.com)
  • Transiently blocking NF- B activity after the onset of CLP-induced sepsis can effectively reduce acute lung injury in mice without compromising bacterial host defense or survival after CLP. (hindawi.com)
  • In addition, mice treated with CLP+BMS had minimal histological evidence of lung injury and normal wet-dry ratios, indicating protection from acute lung injury. (hindawi.com)
  • Duration and intensity of NF- κ B activity determine the severity of endotoxin-induced acute lung injury," The Journal of Immunology , vol. 176, no. 8, pp. 4995-5005, 2006. (hindawi.com)
  • Malignant pleural effusion is recognized as a poor prognosticator in non-small cell lung cancer patients and has recently been upgraded from a T4 to an M1a status in the new edition of the AJCC NSCLC Staging System (7th Edition). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Pleural ultrasonography with evaluation, quantification and aspiration of pleural effusion allows for improved pre-operative staging and alters decision-making patterns for lung cancer patients. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Pleural ultrasonography with evaluation of appropriate diaphragmatic respiratory movement can predict post-operative complications in patient undergoing lung cancer surgery. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This study will consist of a prospective evaluation of surgeon-performed pleural and diaphragmatic ultrasound in the pre-operative evaluation of lung cancer patients. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Ultrasound-guided vascular access in adults and children: beyond the internal jugular vein puncture. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Based on our clinical experience and a review of the current literature, this paper describes a large variety of ultrasound-guided vascular puncture techniques used in adults and children far beyond the well described puncture of the internal jugular vein. (semanticscholar.org)
  • A vascular puncture dressing is described. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • The dressing preferably is transparent at least in an area adjacent the forward edge so that the vascular puncture wound can be observed without removal of the dressing. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • 3. The dressing of claim 1 wherein the adhesive tape section and adhesive tape strips respectively comprise a flexible backing and a pressure-sensitive adhesive layer carried by the backing, and further including releasable liner means carried by and protecting said adhesive layers and readily removable therefrom to expose said adhesive layers when the dressing is to be applied to a vascular puncture wound. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo turned in an incredible performance in the fourth quarter and overtime of the team's victory over the 49ers on Sunday, playing despite suffering a broken rib and collapsed lung. (nbcsports.com)
  • When a player has a broken rib and collapsed lung, should the medical staff really just give him a painkilling shot and send him back out there, even though he can barely breathe? (nbcsports.com)
  • The limping Weezer front man hopped a plane at LAX that was bound for Florida yesterday -- where he'll play his first concert with the band since the bus accident that left him with the busted lung and a wounded spleen. (tmz.com)
  • Rivers Cuomo , the lead singer of Weezer , is making significant improvements on his health, after puncturing his lung and damaging his spleen in a freak bus accident over the weekend. (tmz.com)
  • According to the site, Rivers' blood pressure has stabilized, his spleen is "no longer leaking" and his lung is "gaining strength. (tmz.com)
  • S. F. Liu and A. B. Malik, "NF- κ B activation as a pathological mechanism of septic shock and inflammation," American Journal of Physiology-Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology , vol. 290, no. 4, pp. (hindawi.com)
  • Airway epithelium controls lung inflammation and injury through the NF- κ B pathway," The Journal of Immunology , vol. 178, no. 10, pp. 6504-6513, 2007. (hindawi.com)
  • Measurement of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), albumin, TNF-alpha, and cell differentials were conducted to access lung damage and inflammation. (cdc.gov)
  • This study was to investigate the hypothesis that hydrogen could ameliorate CLP-induced lung injury in rats. (molecularhydrogenstudies.com)
  • In order to further confirm the role of HS during hydrogen improve the lung injury of CLP rats, we also observed the effect of hydrogen-rich saline on the lung injury induced by HS donor-sodium sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). (bvsalud.org)
  • An article from the Won Institute of Graduate Studies advises caution when performing jian jang point treatment, recommending that needles be placed at an oblique, rather than perpendicular angle, to limit the possibility of contacting the lung wall. (newsweek.com)
  • People who have been involved in a car accident and experience direct trauma to their chest should also be closely examined to check for the possibility of a punctured lung. (symptomfind.com)
  • HDC Commissioner Anthony Hill found the acupuncturist failed to advise her patient about the risk to her lungs or to get written consent before carrying out the procedure. (newsweek.com)
  • What Is the Procedure for Removing Fluid From the Lung? (reference.com)
  • The risks involved with this diagnostic procedure are much less than those of transthoracic puncturing and, of course, than those of a thoracotomy (open surgery of the thorax). (bio-medicine.org)
  • Eight hours after the LPS saline or NaHS administration, lung coefficient, MDA content, and MPO activity were detected. (bvsalud.org)
  • Hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly inhibited CSE/HS system as indicated by significantly reduced HS production in lung, along with a decreased CSE activity and CSE mRNA expression (all P<0.05). (bvsalud.org)