Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult: A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.Fetal Organ Maturity: Functional competence of specific organs or body systems of the FETUS in utero.Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn: A condition of the newborn marked by DYSPNEA with CYANOSIS, heralded by such prodromal signs as dilatation of the alae nasi, expiratory grunt, and retraction of the suprasternal notch or costal margins, mostly frequently occurring in premature infants, children of diabetic mothers, and infants delivered by cesarean section, and sometimes with no apparent predisposing cause.Amniotic Fluid: A clear, yellowish liquid that envelopes the FETUS inside the sac of AMNION. In the first trimester, it is likely a transudate of maternal or fetal plasma. In the second trimester, amniotic fluid derives primarily from fetal lung and kidney. Cells or substances in this fluid can be removed for prenatal diagnostic tests (AMNIOCENTESIS).Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Pulmonary Surfactants: Substances and drugs that lower the SURFACE TENSION of the mucoid layer lining the PULMONARY ALVEOLI.Hyaline Membrane Disease: A respiratory distress syndrome in newborn infants, usually premature infants with insufficient PULMONARY SURFACTANTS. The disease is characterized by the formation of a HYALINE-like membrane lining the terminal respiratory airspaces (PULMONARY ALVEOLI) and subsequent collapse of the lung (PULMONARY ATELECTASIS).Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Sphingomyelins: A class of sphingolipids found largely in the brain and other nervous tissue. They contain phosphocholine or phosphoethanolamine as their polar head group so therefore are the only sphingolipids classified as PHOSPHOLIPIDS.Acute Lung Injury: A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).Positive-Pressure Respiration: A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Barotrauma: Injury following pressure changes; includes injury to the eustachian tube, ear drum, lung and stomach.Tidal Volume: The volume of air inspired or expired during each normal, quiet respiratory cycle. Common abbreviations are TV or V with subscript T.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Prenatal Diagnosis: Determination of the nature of a pathological condition or disease in the postimplantation EMBRYO; FETUS; or pregnant female before birth.Prone Position: The posture of an individual lying face down.Lung Injury: Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.High-Frequency Ventilation: Ventilatory support system using frequencies from 60-900 cycles/min or more. Three types of systems have been distinguished on the basis of rates, volumes, and the system used. They are high frequency positive-pressure ventilation (HFPPV); HIGH-FREQUENCY JET VENTILATION; (HFJV); and high-frequency oscillation (HFO).Infant, Premature: A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.Pulmonary Gas Exchange: The exchange of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood that occurs across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Phosphatidylglycerols: A nitrogen-free class of lipids present in animal and particularly plant tissues and composed of one mole of glycerol and 1 or 2 moles of phosphatidic acid. Members of this group differ from one another in the nature of the fatty acids released on hydrolysis.Amniocentesis: Percutaneous transabdominal puncture of the uterus during pregnancy to obtain amniotic fluid. It is commonly used for fetal karyotype determination in order to diagnose abnormal fetal conditions.Infant, Newborn, Diseases: Diseases of newborn infants present at birth (congenital) or developing within the first month of birth. It does not include hereditary diseases not manifesting at birth or within the first 30 days of life nor does it include inborn errors of metabolism. Both HEREDITARY DISEASES and METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS are available as general concepts.Phosphatidylcholines: Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to a choline moiety. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid and choline and 2 moles of fatty acids.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein B: A pulmonary surfactant associated-protein that plays an essential role in alveolar stability by lowering the surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Inherited deficiency of pulmonary surfactant-associated protein B is one cause of RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME, NEWBORN.Pulmonary Alveoli: Small polyhedral outpouchings along the walls of the alveolar sacs, alveolar ducts and terminal bronchioles through the walls of which gas exchange between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood takes place.Term Birth: CHILDBIRTH at the end of a normal duration of PREGNANCY, between 37 to 40 weeks of gestation or about 280 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period.Fluorescence Polarization: Measurement of the polarization of fluorescent light from solutions or microscopic specimens. It is used to provide information concerning molecular size, shape, and conformation, molecular anisotropy, electronic energy transfer, molecular interaction, including dye and coenzyme binding, and the antigen-antibody reaction.Lung Compliance: The capability of the LUNGS to distend under pressure as measured by pulmonary volume change per unit pressure change. While not a complete description of the pressure-volume properties of the lung, it is nevertheless useful in practice as a measure of the comparative stiffness of the lung. (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p562)Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid: Washing liquid obtained from irrigation of the lung, including the BRONCHI and the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. It is generally used to assess biochemical, inflammatory, or infection status of the lung.Pulmonary Edema: Excessive accumulation of extravascular fluid in the lung, an indication of a serious underlying disease or disorder. Pulmonary edema prevents efficient PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE in the PULMONARY ALVEOLI, and can be life-threatening.Respiratory Dead Space: That part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT or the air within the respiratory tract that does not exchange OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE with pulmonary capillary blood.Pregnancy in Diabetics: The state of PREGNANCY in women with DIABETES MELLITUS. This does not include either symptomatic diabetes or GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE induced by pregnancy (DIABETES, GESTATIONAL) which resolves at the end of pregnancy.Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Application of a life support system that circulates the blood through an oxygenating system, which may consist of a pump, a membrane oxygenator, and a heat exchanger. Examples of its use are to assist victims of smoke inhalation injury, respiratory failure, and cardiac failure.Blood Gas Analysis: Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury: Lung damage that is caused by the adverse effects of PULMONARY VENTILATOR usage. The high frequency and tidal volumes produced by a mechanical ventilator can cause alveolar disruption and PULMONARY EDEMA.Respiratory Insufficiency: Failure to adequately provide oxygen to cells of the body and to remove excess carbon dioxide from them. (Stedman, 25th ed)Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Biological Products: Complex pharmaceutical substances, preparations, or matter derived from organisms usually obtained by biological methods or assay.Infant, Premature, DiseasesOxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Phospholipids: Lipids containing one or more phosphate groups, particularly those derived from either glycerol (phosphoglycerides see GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS) or sphingosine (SPHINGOLIPIDS). They are polar lipids that are of great importance for the structure and function of cell membranes and are the most abundant of membrane lipids, although not stored in large amounts in the system.Ventilators, Mechanical: Mechanical devices used to produce or assist pulmonary ventilation.Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: A chronic lung disease developed after OXYGEN INHALATION THERAPY or mechanical ventilation (VENTILATION, MECHANICAL) usually occurring in certain premature infants (INFANT, PREMATURE) or newborn infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME, NEWBORN). Histologically, it is characterized by the unusual abnormalities of the bronchioles, such as METAPLASIA, decrease in alveolar number, and formation of CYSTS.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Respiratory Aspiration: Inhaling liquid or solids, such as stomach contents, into the RESPIRATORY TRACT. When this causes severe lung damage, it is called ASPIRATION PNEUMONIA.Oxygenators, Membrane: Devices in which blood and oxygen are separated by a semipermeable membrane, generally of Teflon or polypropylene, across which gas exchange occurs. The membrane may be arranged as a series of parallel plates or as a number of hollow fibers; in the latter arrangement, the blood may flow inside the fibers, which are surrounded by gas, or the blood may flow outside the fibers and the gas inside the fibers. (Dorland, 28th ed)Fatty Alcohols: Usually high-molecular-weight, straight-chain primary alcohols, but can also range from as few as 4 carbons, derived from natural fats and oils, including lauryl, stearyl, oleyl, and linoleyl alcohols. They are used in pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, detergents, plastics, and lube oils and in textile manufacture. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)APACHE: An acronym for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, a scoring system using routinely collected data and providing an accurate, objective description for a broad range of intensive care unit admissions, measuring severity of illness in critically ill patients.Multiple Organ Failure: A progressive condition usually characterized by combined failure of several organs such as the lungs, liver, kidney, along with some clotting mechanisms, usually postinjury or postoperative.Pneumonia: Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein C: A pulmonary surfactant associated protein that plays a role in alveolar stability by lowering the surface tension at the air-liquid interface. It is a membrane-bound protein that constitutes 1-2% of the pulmonary surfactant mass. Pulmonary surfactant-associated protein C is one of the most hydrophobic peptides yet isolated and contains an alpha-helical domain with a central poly-valine segment that binds to phospholipid bilayers.Pneumothorax: An accumulation of air or gas in the PLEURAL CAVITY, which may occur spontaneously or as a result of trauma or a pathological process. The gas may also be introduced deliberately during PNEUMOTHORAX, ARTIFICIAL.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Proteins: Proteins found in the LUNG that act as PULMONARY SURFACTANTS.Lung Volume Measurements: Measurement of the amount of air that the lungs may contain at various points in the respiratory cycle.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Extravascular Lung Water: Water content outside of the lung vasculature. About 80% of a normal lung is made up of water, including intracellular, interstitial, and blood water. Failure to maintain the normal homeostatic fluid exchange between the vascular space and the interstitium of the lungs can result in PULMONARY EDEMA and flooding of the alveolar space.Chromatography, Thin Layer: Chromatography on thin layers of adsorbents rather than in columns. The adsorbent can be alumina, silica gel, silicates, charcoals, or cellulose. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Critical Care: Health care provided to a critically ill patient during a medical emergency or crisis.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Pulmonary Atelectasis: Absence of air in the entire or part of a lung, such as an incompletely inflated neonate lung or a collapsed adult lung. Pulmonary atelectasis can be caused by airway obstruction, lung compression, fibrotic contraction, or other factors.Partial Pressure: The pressure that would be exerted by one component of a mixture of gases if it were present alone in a container. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Intensive Care: Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein A: An abundant pulmonary surfactant-associated protein that binds to a variety of lung pathogens, resulting in their opsinization. It also stimulates MACROPHAGES to undergo PHAGOCYTOSIS of microorganisms. Surfactant protein A contains a N-terminal collagen-like domain and a C-terminal lectin domain that are characteristic of members of the collectin family of proteins.Intensive Care Units, Neonatal: Hospital units providing continuing surveillance and care to acutely ill newborn infants.Intensive Care, Neonatal: Continuous care and monitoring of newborn infants with life-threatening conditions, in any setting.Pulmonary Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.Administration, Inhalation: The administration of drugs by the respiratory route. It includes insufflation into the respiratory tract.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Betamethasone: A glucocorticoid given orally, parenterally, by local injection, by inhalation, or applied topically in the management of various disorders in which corticosteroids are indicated. Its lack of mineralocorticoid properties makes betamethasone particularly suitable for treating cerebral edema and congenital adrenal hyperplasia. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p724)Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Surface Tension: The force acting on the surface of a liquid, tending to minimize the area of the surface. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Critical Illness: A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Oxygen Inhalation Therapy: Inhalation of oxygen aimed at restoring toward normal any pathophysiologic alterations of gas exchange in the cardiopulmonary system, as by the use of a respirator, nasal catheter, tent, chamber, or mask. (From Dorland, 27th ed & Stedman, 25th ed)Proteolipids: Protein-lipid combinations abundant in brain tissue, but also present in a wide variety of animal and plant tissues. In contrast to lipoproteins, they are insoluble in water, but soluble in a chloroform-methanol mixture. The protein moiety has a high content of hydrophobic amino acids. The associated lipids consist of a mixture of GLYCEROPHOSPHATES; CEREBROSIDES; and SULFOGLYCOSPHINGOLIPIDS; while lipoproteins contain PHOSPHOLIPIDS; CHOLESTEROL; and TRIGLYCERIDES.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Adrenal Cortex HormonesTime Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Smoke Inhalation Injury: Pulmonary injury following the breathing in of toxic smoke from burning materials such as plastics, synthetics, building materials, etc. This injury is the most frequent cause of death in burn patients.Tuberculosis, Miliary: An acute form of TUBERCULOSIS in which minute tubercles are formed in a number of organs of the body due to dissemination of the bacilli through the blood stream.Bronchoalveolar Lavage: Washing out of the lungs with saline or mucolytic agents for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It is very useful in the diagnosis of diffuse pulmonary infiltrates in immunosuppressed patients.Pneumonia, Aspiration: A type of lung inflammation resulting from the aspiration of food, liquid, or gastric contents into the upper RESPIRATORY TRACT.Infant, Very Low Birth Weight: An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1500 grams (3.3 lbs), regardless of gestational age.Infant, Low Birth Weight: An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.Intubation: Introduction of a tube into a hollow organ to restore or maintain patency if obstructed. It is differentiated from CATHETERIZATION in that the insertion of a catheter is usually performed for the introducing or withdrawing of fluids from the body.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Birth Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Embolism, Fat: Blocking of a blood vessel by fat deposits in the circulation. It is often seen after fractures of large bones or after administration of CORTICOSTEROIDS.Instillation, Drug: The administration of therapeutic agents drop by drop, as eye drops, ear drops, or nose drops. It is also administered into a body space or cavity through a catheter. It differs from THERAPEUTIC IRRIGATION in that the irrigate is removed within minutes, but the instillate is left in place.Leukomalacia, Periventricular: Degeneration of white matter adjacent to the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES following cerebral hypoxia or BRAIN ISCHEMIA in neonates. The condition primarily affects white matter in the perfusion zone between superficial and deep branches of the MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY. Clinical manifestations include VISION DISORDERS; CEREBRAL PALSY; PARAPLEGIA; SEIZURES; and cognitive disorders. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1021; Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1997, Ch4, pp30-1)Air Pressure: The force per unit area that the air exerts on any surface in contact with it. Primarily used for articles pertaining to air pressure within a closed environment.Pulmonary Ventilation: The total volume of gas inspired or expired per unit of time, usually measured in liters per minute.Neuromuscular Blocking Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission of nerve impulses at the skeletal neuromuscular junction. They can be of two types, competitive, stabilizing blockers (NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS) or noncompetitive, depolarizing agents (NEUROMUSCULAR DEPOLARIZING AGENTS). Both prevent acetylcholine from triggering the muscle contraction and they are used as anesthesia adjuvants, as relaxants during electroshock, in convulsive states, etc.Capnography: Continuous recording of the carbon dioxide content of expired air.Respiratory Therapy: Care of patients with deficiencies and abnormalities associated with the cardiopulmonary system. It includes the therapeutic use of medical gases and their administrative apparatus, environmental control systems, humidification, aerosols, ventilatory support, bronchopulmonary drainage and exercise, respiratory rehabilitation, assistance with cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and maintenance of natural, artificial, and mechanical airways.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Ventilator Weaning: Techniques for effecting the transition of the respiratory-failure patient from mechanical ventilation to spontaneous ventilation, while meeting the criteria that tidal volume be above a given threshold (greater than 5 ml/kg), respiratory frequency be below a given count (less than 30 breaths/min), and oxygen partial pressure be above a given threshold (PaO2 greater than 50mm Hg). Weaning studies focus on finding methods to monitor and predict the outcome of mechanical ventilator weaning as well as finding ventilatory support techniques which will facilitate successful weaning. Present methods include intermittent mandatory ventilation, intermittent positive pressure ventilation, and mandatory minute volume ventilation.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Neutrophils: Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Down Syndrome: A chromosome disorder associated either with an extra chromosome 21 or an effective trisomy for chromosome 21. Clinical manifestations include hypotonia, short stature, brachycephaly, upslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthus, Brushfield spots on the iris, protruding tongue, small ears, short, broad hands, fifth finger clinodactyly, Simian crease, and moderate to severe INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY. Cardiac and gastrointestinal malformations, a marked increase in the incidence of LEUKEMIA, and the early onset of ALZHEIMER DISEASE are also associated with this condition. Pathologic features include the development of NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES in neurons and the deposition of AMYLOID BETA-PROTEIN, similar to the pathology of ALZHEIMER DISEASE. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p213)Leukocyte Elastase: An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of proteins, including elastin. It cleaves preferentially bonds at the carboxyl side of Ala and Val, with greater specificity for Ala. EC 3.4.21.37.Lung Diseases, Interstitial: A diverse group of lung diseases that affect the lung parenchyma. They are characterized by an initial inflammation of PULMONARY ALVEOLI that extends to the interstitium and beyond leading to diffuse PULMONARY FIBROSIS. Interstitial lung diseases are classified by their etiology (known or unknown causes), and radiological-pathological features.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Anoxia: Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.Shock: A pathological condition manifested by failure to perfuse or oxygenate vital organs.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Fluid Therapy: Therapy whose basic objective is to restore the volume and composition of the body fluids to normal with respect to WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE. Fluids may be administered intravenously, orally, by intermittent gavage, or by HYPODERMOCLYSIS.Hypercapnia: A clinical manifestation of abnormal increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in arterial blood.Capillary Permeability: The property of blood capillary ENDOTHELIUM that allows for the selective exchange of substances between the blood and surrounding tissues and through membranous barriers such as the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER; BLOOD-AQUEOUS BARRIER; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; BLOOD-NERVE BARRIER; BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER; and BLOOD-TESTIS BARRIER. Small lipid-soluble molecules such as carbon dioxide and oxygen move freely by diffusion. Water and water-soluble molecules cannot pass through the endothelial walls and are dependent on microscopic pores. These pores show narrow areas (TIGHT JUNCTIONS) which may limit large molecule movement.Respiratory System Agents: Drugs used for their effects on the respiratory system.Metabolic Syndrome X: A cluster of metabolic risk factors for CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES and TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS. The major components of metabolic syndrome X include excess ABDOMINAL FAT; atherogenic DYSLIPIDEMIA; HYPERTENSION; HYPERGLYCEMIA; INSULIN RESISTANCE; a proinflammatory state; and a prothrombotic (THROMBOSIS) state. (from AHA/NHLBI/ADA Conference Proceedings, Circulation 2004; 109:551-556)Persistent Fetal Circulation Syndrome: A syndrome of persistent PULMONARY HYPERTENSION in the newborn infant (INFANT, NEWBORN) without demonstrable HEART DISEASES. This neonatal condition can be caused by severe pulmonary vasoconstriction (reactive type), hypertrophy of pulmonary arterial muscle (hypertrophic type), or abnormally developed pulmonary arterioles (hypoplastic type). The newborn patient exhibits CYANOSIS and ACIDOSIS due to the persistence of fetal circulatory pattern of right-to-left shunting of blood through a patent ductus arteriosus (DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS, PATENT) and at times a patent foramen ovale (FORAMEN OVALE, PATENT).Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D: An abundant pulmonary surfactant-associated protein that binds to a variety of lung pathogens and enhances their opsinization and killing by phagocytic cells. Surfactant protein D contains a N-terminal collagen-like domain and a C-terminal lectin domain that are characteristic of members of the collectin family of proteins.Interactive Ventilatory Support: Mechanical ventilation delivered to match the patient's efforts in breathing as detected by the interactive ventilation device.Hyperoxia: An abnormal increase in the amount of oxygen in the tissues and organs.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Intermittent Positive-Pressure Ventilation: Application of positive pressure to the inspiratory phase when the patient has an artificial airway in place and is connected to a ventilator.Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.Glucocorticoids: A group of CORTICOSTEROIDS that affect carbohydrate metabolism (GLUCONEOGENESIS, liver glycogen deposition, elevation of BLOOD SUGAR), inhibit ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE secretion, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory activity. They also play a role in fat and protein metabolism, maintenance of arterial blood pressure, alteration of the connective tissue response to injury, reduction in the number of circulating lymphocytes, and functioning of the central nervous system.Almitrine: A respiratory stimulant that enhances respiration by acting as an agonist of peripheral chemoreceptors located on the carotid bodies. The drug increases arterial oxygen tension while decreasing arterial carbon dioxide tension in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It may also prove useful in the treatment of nocturnal oxygen desaturation without impairing the quality of sleep.Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: A technique of respiratory therapy, in either spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated patients, in which airway pressure is maintained above atmospheric pressure throughout the respiratory cycle by pressurization of the ventilatory circuit. (On-Line Medical Dictionary [Internet]. Newcastle upon Tyne(UK): The University Dept. of Medical Oncology: The CancerWEB Project; c1997-2003 [cited 2003 Apr 17]. Available from: http://cancerweb.ncl.ac.uk/omd/)Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation: A disorder characterized by procoagulant substances entering the general circulation causing a systemic thrombotic process. The activation of the clotting mechanism may arise from any of a number of disorders. A majority of the patients manifest skin lesions, sometimes leading to PURPURA FULMINANS.Trachea: The cartilaginous and membranous tube descending from the larynx and branching into the right and left main bronchi.Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS with the surface proteins hemagglutinin 1 and neuraminidase 1. The H1N1 subtype was responsible for the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Therapeutic Irrigation: The washing of a body cavity or surface by flowing water or solution for therapy or diagnosis.Scrub Typhus: An acute infectious disease caused by ORIENTIA TSUTSUGAMUSHI. It is limited to eastern and southeastern Asia, India, northern Australia, and the adjacent islands. Characteristics include the formation of a primary cutaneous lesion at the site of the bite of an infected mite, fever lasting about two weeks, and a maculopapular rash.Respiration Disorders: Diseases of the respiratory system in general or unspecified or for a specific respiratory disease not available.Fetal Membranes, Premature Rupture: Spontaneous tearing of the membranes surrounding the FETUS any time before the onset of OBSTETRIC LABOR. Preterm PROM is membrane rupture before 37 weeks of GESTATION.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Shock, Septic: Sepsis associated with HYPOTENSION or hypoperfusion despite adequate fluid resuscitation. Perfusion abnormalities may include, but are not limited to LACTIC ACIDOSIS; OLIGURIA; or acute alteration in mental status.Respiratory Mucosa: The mucous membrane lining the RESPIRATORY TRACT, including the NASAL CAVITY; the LARYNX; the TRACHEA; and the BRONCHI tree. The respiratory mucosa consists of various types of epithelial cells ranging from ciliated columnar to simple squamous, mucous GOBLET CELLS, and glands containing both mucous and serous cells.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Acidosis, Respiratory: Respiratory retention of carbon dioxide. It may be chronic or acute.Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome: A systemic inflammatory response to a variety of clinical insults, characterized by two or more of the following conditions: (1) fever >38 degrees C or HYPOTHERMIA 90 beat/minute; (3) tachypnea >24 breaths/minute; (4) LEUKOCYTOSIS >12,000 cells/cubic mm or 10% immature forms. While usually related to infection, SIRS can also be associated with noninfectious insults such as TRAUMA; BURNS; or PANCREATITIS. If infection is involved, a patient with SIRS is said to have SEPSIS.Pneumonia, Mycoplasma: Interstitial pneumonia caused by extensive infection of the lungs (LUNG) and BRONCHI, particularly the lower lobes of the lungs, by MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE in humans. In SHEEP, it is caused by MYCOPLASMA OVIPNEUMONIAE. In CATTLE, it may be caused by MYCOPLASMA DISPAR.Blood-Air Barrier: The barrier between capillary blood and alveolar air comprising the alveolar EPITHELIUM and capillary ENDOTHELIUM with their adherent BASEMENT MEMBRANE and EPITHELIAL CELL cytoplasm. PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE occurs across this membrane.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Meconium Aspiration Syndrome: A condition caused by inhalation of MECONIUM into the LUNG of FETUS or NEWBORN, usually due to vigorous respiratory movements during difficult PARTURITION or respiratory system abnormalities. Meconium aspirate may block small airways leading to difficulties in PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE and ASPIRATION PNEUMONIA.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Fetal Distress: A nonreassuring fetal status (NRFS) indicating that the FETUS is compromised (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists 1988). It can be identified by sub-optimal values in FETAL HEART RATE; oxygenation of FETAL BLOOD; and other parameters.Lung Transplantation: The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung: A heterogeneous aggregate of at least three distinct histological types of lung cancer, including SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA; ADENOCARCINOMA; and LARGE CELL CARCINOMA. They are dealt with collectively because of their shared treatment strategy.Ductus Arteriosus, Patent: A congenital heart defect characterized by the persistent opening of fetal DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS that connects the PULMONARY ARTERY to the descending aorta (AORTA, DESCENDING) allowing unoxygenated blood to bypass the lung and flow to the PLACENTA. Normally, the ductus is closed shortly after birth.Premature Birth: CHILDBIRTH before 37 weeks of PREGNANCY (259 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period, or 245 days after FERTILIZATION).Crush Syndrome: Severe systemic manifestation of trauma and ischemia involving soft tissues, principally skeletal muscle, due to prolonged severe crushing. It leads to increased permeability of the cell membrane and to the release of potassium, enzymes, and myoglobin from within cells. Ischemic renal dysfunction secondary to hypotension and diminished renal perfusion results in acute tubular necrosis and uremia.Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome: A viral disorder characterized by high FEVER, dry COUGH, shortness of breath (DYSPNEA) or breathing difficulties, and atypical PNEUMONIA. A virus in the genus CORONAVIRUS is the suspected agent.Airway Resistance: Physiologically, the opposition to flow of air caused by the forces of friction. As a part of pulmonary function testing, it is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of air flow.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Pneumonia, Viral: Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by a viral infection.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Functional Residual Capacity: The volume of air remaining in the LUNGS at the end of a normal, quiet expiration. It is the sum of the RESIDUAL VOLUME and the EXPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME. Common abbreviation is FRC.Phosphorylcholine: Calcium and magnesium salts used therapeutically in hepatobiliary dysfunction.Pulmonary Fibrosis: A process in which normal lung tissues are progressively replaced by FIBROBLASTS and COLLAGEN causing an irreversible loss of the ability to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream via PULMONARY ALVEOLI. Patients show progressive DYSPNEA finally resulting in death.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Intensive Care Units, Pediatric: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill infants and children. Neonates are excluded since INTENSIVE CARE UNITS, NEONATAL is available.Fluorocarbons: Liquid perfluorinated carbon compounds which may or may not contain a hetero atom such as nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur, but do not contain another halogen or hydrogen atom. This concept includes fluorocarbon emulsions and fluorocarbon blood substitutes.Ventilation-Perfusion Ratio: The ratio of alveolar ventilation to simultaneous alveolar capillary blood flow in any part of the lung. (Stedman, 25th ed)Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Patient Positioning: Moving a patient into a specific position or POSTURE to facilitate examination, surgery, or for therapeutic purposes.Interleukin-8: A member of the CXC chemokine family that plays a role in the regulation of the acute inflammatory response. It is secreted by variety of cell types and induces CHEMOTAXIS of NEUTROPHILS and other inflammatory cells.Apgar Score: A method, developed by Dr. Virginia Apgar, to evaluate a newborn's adjustment to extrauterine life. Five items - heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and color - are evaluated 60 seconds after birth and again five minutes later on a scale from 0-2, 0 being the lowest, 2 being normal. The five numbers are added for the Apgar score. A score of 0-3 represents severe distress, 4-7 indicates moderate distress, and a score of 7-10 predicts an absence of difficulty in adjusting to extrauterine life.Bronchoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.Hemoperfusion: Removal of toxins or metabolites from the circulation by the passing of blood, within a suitable extracorporeal circuit, over semipermeable microcapsules containing adsorbents (e.g., activated charcoal) or enzymes, other enzyme preparations (e.g., gel-entrapped microsomes, membrane-free enzymes bound to artificial carriers), or other adsorbents (e.g., various resins, albumin-conjugated agarose).Suction: The removal of secretions, gas or fluid from hollow or tubular organs or cavities by means of a tube and a device that acts on negative pressure.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Pneumocytes: Epithelial cells that line the PULMONARY ALVEOLI.Fetus: The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Macrophages, Alveolar: Round, granular, mononuclear phagocytes found in the alveoli of the lungs. They ingest small inhaled particles resulting in degradation and presentation of the antigen to immunocompetent cells.Elafin: A secretory proteinase inhibitory protein that was initially purified from human SKIN. It is found in a variety mucosal secretions and is present at high levels in SPUTUM. Elafin may play a role in the innate immunity (IMMUNITY, INNATE) response of the LUNG.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Tocolysis: Any drug treatment modality designed to inhibit UTERINE CONTRACTION. It is used in pregnant women to arrest PREMATURE LABOR.Mice, Inbred C57BLThoracic Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Short filamentous organism of the genus Mycoplasma, which binds firmly to the cells of the respiratory epithelium. It is one of the etiologic agents of non-viral primary atypical pneumonia in man.Peroxidase: A hemeprotein from leukocytes. Deficiency of this enzyme leads to a hereditary disorder coupled with disseminated moniliasis. It catalyzes the conversion of a donor and peroxide to an oxidized donor and water. EC 1.11.1.7.Methylguanidine: A product of putrefaction. Poisonous.

*Infant respiratory distress syndrome

The presence of PG usually indicates fetal lung maturity. For the S/A ratio, the result is given as mg of surfactant per gm of ... also called neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS), respiratory distress syndrome of newborn, or increasingly surfactant ... Transient tachypnea of the newborn presents with respiratory distress syndrome in the preterm newborn. In 1963, Patrick Bouvier ... The lungs of infants with respiratory distress syndrome are developmentally deficient in a material called surfactant, which ...

*Transient tachypnea of the newborn

... such as respiratory distress syndrome. A chest X-ray may show a radiopaque line - fluid - in the horizontal fissure of the ... Levels of phosphatidylglycerol (an indicator of lung maturity) were found to be negative in certain newborns Mild surfactant ... is a respiratory problem that can be seen in the newborn shortly after delivery. Amongst causes of respiratory distress in term ... ISBN 0-7234-3397-6 Hermansen CL, Lorah KN (October 2007). "Respiratory distress in the newborn". Am Fam Physician. 76 (7): 987- ...

*Henrik Verder

... concentrating on prenatal determination of lung maturity and prevention of RDS (Infant Respiratory Distress Syndrome). In 1980 ... "Prediction of respiratory distress syndrome by the microbubble stability test on gastric aspirates in newborns of less than 32 ... Surfactant treatment of newborn infants with respiratory distress syndrome primarily treated with nasal continuous positive air ... Surfactant treatment of newborn infants with respiratory distress syndrome primarily treated with nasal continuous positive air ...

*Neonatal intensive care unit

... and infant respiratory distress syndrome due to immaturity of the lungs. In general, the leading cause of death in NICUs is ... Infant respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) Neonatal sepsis Transient tachypnea of the newborn ... Neonates weighing more than 1800 grams or having gestational maturity of 34 weeks or more are categorized under level I care. ... Infant respiratory distress syndrome is the leading cause of death in preterm infants, and the main treatments are CPAP, in ...

*Preterm birth

Respiratory problems are common, specifically the respiratory distress syndrome (RDS or IRDS) (previously called hyaline ... One of the main organs greatly affected by premature birth is the lungs. The lungs are one of the last organs to mature in the ... A 2003 study in the US determined neonatal costs to be $224,400 for a newborn at 500-700 g versus $1,000 at over 3,000 g. The ... In the normal human fetus, several organ systems mature between 34 and 37 weeks, and the fetus reaches adequate maturity by the ...

*List of syndromes

... lung syndrome in newborn WHIM syndrome White dog shaker syndrome White dot syndromes White spot syndrome White-nose syndrome ... Acute respiratory distress syndrome Acute retroviral syndrome Adams-Nance syndrome Adams-Oliver syndrome Adams-Stokes syndrome ... syndrome Post-Ebola virus syndrome post-embolization syndrome Post-intensive care syndrome Post-maturity syndrome Post-polio ... Setleis syndrome Severe acute respiratory syndrome Shaken baby syndrome Shapiro syndrome Sheehan's syndrome Shell nail syndrome ...

*Childbirth

Health problems among babies delivered "pre-term" included respiratory distress, jaundice and low blood sugar. The American ... December 2010). "Neonatal outcomes after demonstrated fetal lung maturity before 39 weeks of gestation". Obstetrics & ... keeping the newborn warm, and monitoring of vital signs such as respiratory rate and effort, pulse, blood pressure(rarely taken ... Rare sequelae include Hypopituitarism Sheehan's syndrome. The maternal mortality rate (MMR) varies from 9 per 100,000 live ...

*List of OMIM disorder codes

OCRL Lujan-Fryns syndrome; 309520; MED12 Lung cancer; 211980; DLEC1 Lung cancer; 211980; RASSF1 Lung cancer; 211980; KRAS Lung ... and neonatal respiratory distress; 610978; NKX2-1 Choriodal dystrophy, central areolar 2,; 613105; PRPH2 Choroid plexus ... RAB3GAP2 MASA syndrome; 303350; L1CAM MASS syndrome; 604308; FBN1 Mast syndrome; 248900; ACP33 Maturity-onset diabetes of the ... TCN2 Transient bullous of the newborn; 131705; COL7A1 Transposition of the great arteries, dextro-looped 1; 608808; MED13L ...

*Lung

... and infant respiratory distress syndrome caused by a deficiency in lung surfactant. An azygos lobe is a congenital anatomical ... The development of the human lungs arise from the laryngotracheal groove and develop to maturity over several weeks in the ... ISBN 978-1-4160-6257-8. Medline Plus (4 December 2013). "Changes in the newborn at birth". NIH. Archived from the original on 5 ... Humans have two lungs, a right lung and a left lung. They are situated within the thoracic cavity of the chest. The right lung ...
... definition. Explain adult respiratory distress syndrome. What is adult respiratory distress syndrome? adult respiratory distress syndrome meaning. adult respiratory distress syndrome sense. adult respiratory distress syndrome FAQ. adult respiratory distress syndrome synonyms.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Air cysts and bronchiectasis prevail in nondependent areas in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. T2 - A computed tomographic study of ventilator-associated changes. AU - Treggiari, Miriam. AU - Romand, Jacques Andr. AU - Martin, Jean Baptiste. AU - Suter, Peter M.. PY - 2002. Y1 - 2002. N2 - Objective: To investigate prevalence and spatial distribution of air cysts and bronchiectasis associated with mechanical ventilation in patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Design: Retrospective observational study. Setting: University hospital intensive care division. Subjects: A total of 21 patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation and undergoing thoracic computed tomographic scanning. Measurements and Main Results: Lung fields were anatomically ...
Looking for online definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome in the Medical Dictionary? acute respiratory distress syndrome explanation free. What is acute respiratory distress syndrome? Meaning of acute respiratory distress syndrome medical term. What does acute respiratory distress syndrome mean?
TY - JOUR. T1 - Characteristics of early acute respiratory distress syndrome in newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. AU - Van De Louw, Andry. AU - Desai, Ruchi J.. AU - Zhu, Junjia. AU - Claxton, David. PY - 2018/10/3. Y1 - 2018/10/3. N2 - Acute respiratory complications occur frequently during the early phase of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but information on the most severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), is lacking. We retrospectively analyzed 280 patients with newly diagnosed AML in order to describe the incidence, risk factors and early mortality associated with ARDS within 15 d. Univariate and then multivariate analysis were performed. ARDS developed in 9% of patients and was associated with 64% day-30 mortality. White blood cell count on admission was an independent risk factor for ARDS (OR = 1.007, 95% CI = 1.001-1.012, p =.012) with a moderate prediction ability ...
Another name for Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome is Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Physicians from the following specialties evaluate and treat ...
ALI/ARDS is a life-threatening condition that involves inflammation of the lungs and fluid accumulation in the air sacs, which leads to low blood oxygen levels and respiratory failure. Common causes include pneumonia, septic shock, and lung trauma. Symptoms usually develop within 24 to 48 hours of the original injury or illness, and most patients require immediate care in an intensive care unit (ICU). The main form of treatment for ALI/ARDS is the delivery of oxygen and a continuous level of pressure to the damaged lungs through mechanical ventilation. Past research has shown that lower tidal volume ventilation (LTVV), a protective ventilator management technique in which lower volumes of oxygen are administered, improves short-term clinical outcomes in individuals with ALI/ARDS. However, the long-term impact of LTVV remains unknown. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of LTVV on long-term outcomes in individuals with ...
ALI/ARDS is a life-threatening condition that involves inflammation of the lungs and fluid accumulation in the air sacs, which leads to low blood oxygen levels and respiratory failure. Common causes include pneumonia, septic shock, and lung trauma. Symptoms usually develop within 24 to 48 hours of the original injury or illness, and most patients require immediate care in an intensive care unit (ICU). The main form of treatment for ALI/ARDS is the delivery of oxygen and a continuous level of pressure to the damaged lungs through mechanical ventilation. Past research has shown that lower tidal volume ventilation (LTVV), a protective ventilator management technique in which lower volumes of oxygen are administered, improves short-term clinical outcomes in individuals with ALI/ARDS. However, the long-term impact of LTVV remains unknown. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of LTVV on long-term outcomes in individuals with ...
Another name for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome is Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome. What to expect with adult respiratory distress syndrome: ...
en] Plasmatic immunoreactive trypsin (IRT), thromboxane and trypsin-like enzymatic activity were measured in 117 patients at risk of developing adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (53 multiple injury, 30 abdominal surgery, 17 acute pancreatitis, 12 burnt and 5 disseminated intravascular coagulation patients). 69 of these patients developed ARDS. Immunoreactive trypsin and thromboxane were measured by radio-immuno-assay and trypsin-like enzymatic activity by spectrophotometry, using a specific chromogenic substrate. Mean IRT value was 675 ng/ml in ARDS and 265 ng/ml in non ARDS patients (p less than 0.05). Mean IRT value was 685 ng/ml in septic and 170 ng/ml in non septic patients (p less than 0.01). An abnormal trypsin-like enzymatic activity was measured in 26 ARDS patients. In 60 patients (37 ARDS and 23 non ARDS), thromboxane appeared in plasma simultaneously or about 24 hours after the beginning of IRT release. The importance of thromboxane ...
How is lecithin/sphingomyelin ratios abbreviated? L/S stands for lecithin/sphingomyelin ratios. L/S is defined as lecithin/sphingomyelin ratios rarely.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Biomarker evidence of myocardial cell injury is associated with mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome. AU - Bajwa, Ednan K.. AU - Boyce, Paul D.. AU - Januzzi, James L.. AU - Gong, Michelle N.. AU - Thompson, B. Taylor. AU - Christiani, David C.. PY - 2007/11. Y1 - 2007/11. N2 - OBJECTIVE: Although a number of studies have reported elevated levels of markers of myocardial necrosis among critically ill patients, the association between these markers and outcome remains poorly studied in patients with lung injury. We investigated the association of elevated troponin and creatine phosphokinase isoenzyme levels with mortality and organ failure in subjects with acute respiratory distress syndrome. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: Tertiary academic medical center. PATIENTS: A total of 305 subjects with acute respiratory distress ...
What is fetal lung maturity? Fetal lung maturity measures the amount of surfactant in amniotic fluid. Deficiency causes respiratory distress.
The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Its development leads to high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Key components of a strategy include avoiding lung overdistension by limiting tidal volumes and airway pressures, and the use of positive endexpiratory pressure with or without lung recruitment manoeuvres in patients with severe ARDS.In this review article, we describe updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss the new definition of ARDS, its risk factors and pathophysiology, and current evidence regarding ventilation management, prone ventilation, and intervention required in refractory hypoxemia.. ...
Looking for online definition of Acute respiratory distress in the Medical Dictionary? Acute respiratory distress explanation free. What is Acute respiratory distress? Meaning of Acute respiratory distress medical term. What does Acute respiratory distress mean?
Introduction: Coagulation and fibrinolysis remain sparsely addressed with regards to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We hypothesized that ARDS development might be associated with changes in plasma coagulation and fibrinolysis. Our aim was to investigate the relationships between ARDS diagnosis and plasma concentrations of tissue factor (TF), tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), and plasminogen activator inhibitor- 1 (PAI-1) in mechanically ventilated patients at increased risk of developing ARDS. Materials and methods: We performed an ethically approved prospective observational pilot study. Inclusion criteria were patients with PaO2/FiO2 < 300 mmHg admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for mechanical ventilation for 24 h, or more, because of one or more disease conditions associated with increased risk of developing ARDS. Exclusion criteria were age below 18 years; cardiac disease. We sampled plasma prospectively and compared patients who ...
The present study aimed to evaluate the predictive value of serum soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) regarding the risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in sepsis patients, and investigate its correlation/association with disease severity, inflammation and mortality in sepsis patients with ARDS. A total of 57 sepsis patients with ARDS and 58 sepsis patients without ARDS were recruited for the present case‑control study. Laboratory tests, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II score and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score were evaluated, and mortality during hospitalization was recorded. Blood samples were collected and serum suPAR was detected by ELISA. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α, interleukin (IL)‑1β, IL‑6, IL‑8, IL‑10 and IL‑17, as well as C‑reactive protein (CRP) were detected. The results indicated that the serum levels of suPAR in sepsis patients with ARDS were higher ...
This study by the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network supports the use of low tidal volumes in acute lung injury and ARDS, and is consistent with a previous trial.1 It differs from 3 previous negative trials2-4 by having a larger difference in tidal volumes between groups, and by having a more aggressive approach to correcting acidosis. This study provides important information about tidal volume size; however, further research is still needed to determine the importance of concurrent strategies such as positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP).. In this study, an equation based on sex and height was used to calculate a predicted body weight, which was then used to set tidal volumes. Obesity is a common problem; the use of measured body weight can inadvertently lead to the use of high tidal volume ventilation. Tidal volumes should be based on ideal versus measured body weight.. This information is relevant to nurses who care for ...
Data & statistics on Acute Lung Injury: MRNA expression of Interleukin-8 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells before injury and after injury. NG, acute lung injury with normoglycemia group; HG, acute lung injury with hyperglycemia group; HG-VI, acute lung injury with hyperglycemia treated with intravenous insulin group; HG-AI, acute lung injury with hyperglycemia treated with aerosolized insulin group; IL-8, interleukin-8. Boxes extend ..., Particle-induced acute lung injury. Results obtained from analysis performed on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples recovered from animals at 24 h post-exposure. Animals were exposed by intratracheal instillation to: saline ( E); OFA100 ( C); OFA400 (P); ROFA#6 ( 1); or ARD ([). Various biomarkers of acute lung injury were assessed such as: A) edema/secretory activity (protein/mL); B) edema (albumin/mL); ..., Inhaltsverzeichnis Einleitung Hypothesen ...
Background We conducted an exploratory study of genome-wide gene expression in whole blood and found that the expression of neutrophil elastase inhibitor (PI3, elafin) was down-regulated during the early phase of ARDS. Further analyses of plasma PI3 levels revealed a rapid decrease during early ARDS development. PI3 and secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) are important low-molecular-weight proteinase inhibitors produced locally at neutrophil infiltration site in the lung. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that an imbalance between neutrophil elastase (HNE) and its inhibitors in blood is related to the development of ARDS. Methodology/Principal Findings PI3, SLPI, and HNE were measured in plasma samples collected from 148 ARDS patients and 63 critical ill patients at risk for ARDS (controls). Compared with the controls, the ARDS patients had higher HNE, but lower PI3, at the onset of ARDS, resulting in increased HNE/PI3 ratio (mean = 14.5; 95% CI, 10.9-19.4, P|0.0001), ...
This report describes a 24-year-old patient with marked and continuous hypoxemia resulting from severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) secondary to pneumonia, which in turn was refractory to mechanical ventilation and other conventional adjunctive therapies. Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was applied for 14 days and resulted in significant improvement in the hypoxemia. We conclude that ECMO presents a therapeutic option for ARDS patients who fail to respond to conventional mechanical ventilation ...
Respiratory distress syndrome, also known as hyaline membrane disease, occurs almost exclusively in premature infants. The incidence and severity of respiratory distress syndrome are related inversely to the gestational age of the newborn infant.
The results from the meta-analysis are in accord with recent literature questioning the decrease in mortality in ARDS in the past decade despite the implementation of new ventilatory strategies.6-8 In the ARDSNet trial,9 a significant reduction in mortality was observed when a "protective strategy," based on a low tidal volume (6 ml/kg), was used. But we may speculate that patients were actually being protected from an "aggressive strategy" (tidal volume 12 ml/kg in the control arm). It is likely that the application of a high PEEP in the initial phase of severe ARDS, with an expected important lung edema and inflammation, is justified.10 Even accepting this approach, it remains unanswered for how long the PEEP should be "high." The lack of clear benefits in unselected patients is probably related to the absence of objective tests that help in the individual titration of the ventilatory parameters. Several techniques have been proposed, such as the plotting of pressure-volume curves,11 the ...
Immature: ,15,000/mcL. Indeterminate: 15,000-50,000/mcL. Mature: ,50,000/mcL. Cutoffs are based on consensus protocol (Neerhof M, Dohnal JC, Ashwood ER, et al: Lamellar body counts: a consensus on protocol. Obstet Gynecol 2001;97:318-320). ...
Background: Talc is the most effective chemical pleurodesis agent for patients with malignant pleural effusion. However, concerns have arisen about the safety of intrapleural application of talc, after reports of development of acute respiratory distress syndrome in 1-9% of treated patients. Our aim was to establish whether use of large-particle-size talc is safe in patients with malignant pleural effusion. Methods: We did a multicentre, open-label, prospective cohort study of 558 patients with malignant pleural effusion who underwent thoracoscopy and talc poudrage with 4 g of calibrated French large-particle talc in 13 European hospitals, and one in South Africa. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of acute respiratory distress syndrome after talc pleurodesis. Findings: No patients developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (frequency 0%, one-sided ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Prone position reverses gravitational distribution of perfusion in dog lungs with oleic acid-induced injury. AU - Wiener, Charles M. AU - Kirk, W.. AU - Albert, R. K.. PY - 1990. Y1 - 1990. N2 - Although oxygenation improves in patients with the adult respiratory distress syndrome and in animals with oleic acid- (OA) induced acute lung injury when they are turned from the supine to the prone position, the mechanism(s) by which this improvement occurs is not known. Several groups have speculated that this improvement results from preferential edema accumulation in the dorsal lung regions and redistribution of perfusion away from these regions when the patients are turned to the prone position. We used radiolabeled microspheres to measure the regional distribution of perfusion (Q̇r) to the dorsal, mid, and ventral lungs of eight dogs in vivo in the supine and prone positions, ...
BackgroundMechanical ventilation causes ventilator-induced lung injury in animals and humans. Mitogen-activated protein kinases have been implicated in ventilator-induced lung injury though their functional significance remains incomplete. We characterize the role of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase/mitogen activated protein kinase kinase-3 and c-Jun-NH2-terminal kinase-1 in ventilator-induced lung injury and investigate novel independent mechanisms contributing to lung injury during mechanical ventilation.Methodology and Principle FindingsC57/BL6 wild-type mice and mice genetically deleted for mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-3 (mkk-3−/−) or c-Jun-NH2-terminal kinase-1 (jnk1−/−) were ventilated, and lung injury parameters were assessed. We demonstrate that mkk3−/− or jnk1−/− mice displayed significantly reduced inflammatory lung injury and apoptosis relative to wild-type mice. Since jnk1−/− mice ...
Purpose of review The aim of this article is to describe the physiologic utility, correlation with lung morphology, difficulties in interpretation and current clinical applications of static-volume curves at the bedside in patients with acute lung respiratory system pressure injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Recent findings Complex interpretation of pressure-volume curves indicates that alveolar reopening continues past the lower inflection point on the linear part of the curve and suggests the presence of homogeneous lung disease in which recruitment is still possible by positive end-expiratory pressure application. Setting positive end-expiratory pressure above the lower inflection point and tidal ventilation (approximately 6 ml/kg) in the linear portion of the respiratory system pressure-volume curve improved mortality and ameliorated lung ...
Now that youre 12 weeks pregnant, your dexanethasone has grown to the size of an Amaretto cookie, a bittersweet Dexamethasone in pregnancy for lung maturity creation with a romantic story attached. There is currently a medication that can prevent the transmission of HIV called Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, or PrEP. Some tissue remains in the uterus. And I agree with Amy you can a lot better stories on the Internet. Normally thought to be a trigger of adjusting hormones in your body throughout pregnancy, complications are widespread maladies of parenting plan template alabama who are newly pregnant. If a sperm meets the egg, fertilisation may occur. If you dont, the effectiveness of this method decreases. Many people dont realize that diet foods, soda pop (including diet formula) aspartame and other substitute sugars, and HFCS, are enhanced flavorings. Dun dun dun. Bend your right knee and take dexamethasone in pregnancy for lung maturity right ...
Our results are in keeping with those of previous studies [13,14] that have shown that PC-IRV did not improve PaO2compared with traditional CMV with PEEP, when the comparison is made at equal levels of PEEP, while keeping the other ventilator variables constant. Lessard et al. [14] also observed a lower PaO2with PC-IRV compared with conventional ventilation with PEEP. Similarly, these authors did not find a significant change in cardiac output with PC-IRV. Mercat et al. [13] and Lessard et al. [14] used higher levels of PEEPtthan in the present study, namely from 11 to 14 cmH2O. This, however, indicates that our negative results with IRV cannot be attributed to insufficient PEEPt. [6] We cannot compare our results obtained with inverse I:E ratio ventilation with those of most previous studies because of lack of information on the level of PEEPtused due to uncontrolled modifications in the ventilator settings after implementation of IRV. Clearly, we cannot exclude the possibility that different ...
We have studied a respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) occurring in newborn calves of the Belgian White and Blue (BWB) breed that represents the large majority of beef cattle in Belgium. Pulmonary surfactant isolated from 14 BWB newborn calves that died from RDS and from 7 healthy controls was analysed for composition and surface activity. An extremely low content or, in some instances, an absence of surfactant protein C (SP-C) was detected in the RDS samples by Western blotting and differential amino acid analysis [0.03±0.01% (w/w) relative to total phospholipids, compared with 0.39±0.06% for healthy controls (means±S.E.M., P , 0.001)]. The contents of surfactant protein B (SP-B) were similar in RDS and control samples. The crude surfactant samples isolated from RDS calves had higher ratios of total protein to total phospholipid, altered phospholipid profiles and lower SP-A contents. Both crude and organic extracts of RDS ...
article{0090a939-9497-4dcd-8b37-91681bced4bd, abstract = {Aims: Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) contributes to mortality in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, the most severe form of acute lung injury (ALI). Absence of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) confers susceptibility to ALI/VILI. To identify cell-specific ATF3-dependent mechanisms of susceptibility to ALI/VILI, we generated ATF3 chimera by adoptive bone marrow (BM) transfer and randomized to inhaled saline or lipopolysacharide (LPS) in the presence of mechanical ventilation (MV). Adenovirus vectors to silence or overexpress ATF3 were used in primary human bronchial epithelial cells and murine BM-derived macrophages from wild-type or ATF3-deficient mice. Results: Absence of ATF3 in myeloid-derived cells caused increased pulmonary cellular infiltration. In contrast, absence of ATF3 in parenchymal cells resulted in loss of alveolar-capillary ...
Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is a problem often seen in premature babies. The condition makes it hard for the baby to breathe.
Ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI) is an acute lung injury that develops during mechanical ventilation and is termed ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) if it can be proven that the mechanical ventilation caused the acute lung injury. In contrast, ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI) exists if the cause cannot be proven. VALI is the appropriate term in most situations because it is virtually impossible to prove what actually caused the lung injury in the hospital. It is generally regarded, based on animal models and human studies, that volutrauma is the most harmful aspect of mechanical ventilation. This may be regarded as the over-stretching of the airways and alveoli. During mechanical ventilation, the flow of gas into the lung will take the path of least resistance. Areas of the lung that are collapsed (atelectasis) or filled with secretions will be ...
Brochard L, Roudot-Thoraval F, Roupie E, Delclaux C, Chastre J, Fernandez-Mondejar E, Clementi E, Mancebo J, Factor P, Matamis D, Ranieri M, Blanch L, Rodi G, Mentec H, Dreyfuss D, Ferrer M, Brun-Buisson C, Tobin M, Lemaire F (1998) Tidal volume reduction for prevention of ventilator-induced lung injury in acute respiratory distress syndrome. The Multicenter Trail Group on Tidal Volume reduction in ARDS. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 158:1831-1838PubMedGoogle Scholar ...
Acute liver failure is a very complex type of disease with a mortality of up to 90%, leading to numerous severe disturbances of the whole organism. Bleeding because of absent synthesis of various coagulation factors and disseminated intravascular coagulation, acute kidney failure, circulatory failure with vasopressor dependence, respiratory failure with adult respiratory distress syndrome, neurological failure up to coma because of hepatic encephalopathy, and a very high risk of infection and sepsis frequently result from the initial state of isolated liver failure. High urgency liver transplantation is a highly efficient therapy if performed in time. However, increasing the rate of spontaneous recovery of the patients own liver, and reducing the need for liver transplantation is preferable and would further improve the outcome of acute liver failure. Extracorporeal liver support by multipass albumin dialysis or plasmapheresis and filtering ...
Rhonda Rollinson underwent a safe, legal abortion by Dr. Jay I. Levin at Malcom Poliss Philadelphia Womens Center September 3, 1992. The abortion attempt was unsuccessful. Rhonda was then sent home, with instructions to return on September 12 to try again. Rhonda experienced such severe pain, dizziness, fever, and discharge that on September 10 she sought emergency care at a hospital. She was suffering "severe non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema consistent with adult respiratory distress syndrome." Doctors did a laparoscopy, dilation and evacuation, abdominal hysterectomy, and splenectomy, to no avail. Rhonda died on September 14. The autopsy revealed a perforation from her vagina into the uterine cavity, sepsis, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (a clotting disorder), non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis, pulmonary infarctions, and dysplastic kidney. The suit filed by Rhondas survivors also charged the facility and Polis with hiring Levin despite his ...
Introduction: Aeromonas hydrophila is implicated in a wide spectrum of skin and soft‐tissue infections, ranging from cellulitis to life‐threatening necrotizing fasciitis and myonecrosis. Most reported cases of fulminant A. hydrophila necrotizing soft‐tissue infections occur following a history of trauma sustained in an aquatic environment. However, fatal Aeromonas myonecrosis and gas gangrene without antecedent trauma, underlying liver disease, malignancy or immunosuppression has rarely been reported in the literature. Case presentation: A 50‐year‐old woman who underwent elective percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty became acutely ill with septic shock and adult respiratory distress syndrome, on post‐operative day 3. She developed severe oedema, blistering and gangrenous patches in the right lower limb. She died on post‐operative day 3 despite intensive care. A. hydrophila was cultured from the blister fluid, two blood cultures and tissue. An ...
Deep neck infections may be lethal if life‐threatening complications occur, such as descending mediastinitis, pleural empyema, pericardial effusion, epidural abscess, adult respiratory distress syndrome and septic shock, particularly in immunocompromised hosts such as diabetic patients. The occurrence of deep neck infections has been declining since the advent of antibiotic therapy; however, they do still occur and represent challenging diagnostic and treatment cases. The authors describe a case of a 63‐year‐old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus diagnosed 10 years ago treated with oral antidiabetic drugs with poor glycemic control (HbA1c=9.2%) that was admitted in Otolaryngology department for surgical drainage of a deep neck infection with unclear source. The neck CT scan showed a right parapharyngeal abscess with 13mm diameter with slight compression of the upper airway, extending to the lower edge of the right lobe of the thyroid gland with a ...
A case of primary large cell splenic lymphoma of B lineage exhibiting filiform cell appearance is reported. The patient presented with massive splenomegaly, and following spontaneous splenic rupture, died of adult respiratory distress syndrome. The clinical aspects of the case, notably a lymphoma arising as a primary tumour in the spleen, with spontaneous spleen rupture and rapid fatal outcome, in combination with the filiform appearance of the lymphoma on electron microscopic examination, constitute an unusual combination of features. As far as is known, this B cell neoplasm is only the second primary splenic lymphoma of filiform type to be recorded.. ...
Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI) is an important life-threatening complication that is related with blood transfusion. The frequency is reported as 1/5.000. It is generally characterized with hypoxia that appears at the 2-6th hours after the blood transfusion, bilateral infiltration in the chest radiography, and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Acute respiratory distress, hypotension, tachycardia and fever accompany the clinical picture. Past surgery, blood transfusion, and sepsis are among the factors that trigger the disease. In this study, the efficiency of the hemodialysis applied in the right time in the treatment of a heavy TRALI case developed after a blood transfusion has been presented.. Keywords: Acute lung injury, efficiency, hemodialysis, ...
Hollow-fibre oxygenators and Mendler-designed centrifugal pumps have replaced the old silicon oxygenators and roller pumps. The advantages of these novel systems and the principles that underlie their function are outlined. Advances in cannula technology allow greater ease of patient positioning, in some cases facilitating extubation and ambulation on ECMO. Improvements in ECMO circuitry have led to a reduction in heparin and blood product requirements, with consequently fewer complications. Greater understanding of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome has allowed clinicians to successfully support adults on ECMO for months at a time, as a bridge to either recovery or transplantation.. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Effects of transglutaminase 2 inhibition on ventilator-induced lung injury. AU - Suh, In Bum. AU - Yoon, Dae Wui. AU - Oh, Won-Oak. AU - Lee, Eun Joo. AU - Min, Kyung-Hoon. AU - Hur, Gyu Young. AU - Lee, Seung Heon. AU - Lee, Sung Yong. AU - Lee, Sang Yeub. AU - Shin, Chol. AU - Shim, Jae Jeong. AU - In, Kwang Ho. AU - Kang, Kyung Ho. AU - Kim, Je Hyeong. PY - 2014/1/1. Y1 - 2014/1/1. N2 - This study was performed to examine the role of transglutaminase 2 (TG2) in ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). C57BL/6 mice were divided into six experimental groups: 1) control group; 2) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group; 3) lung protective ventilation (LPV) group; 4) VILI group; 5) VILI with cystamine, a TG2 inhibitor, pretreatment (Cyst+VILI) group; and 6) LPV with cystamine pretreatment (Cyst+LPV) group. Acute lung injury (ALI) score, TG2 activity and gene expression, inflammatory cytokines, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity were ...
Transfusion-related acute lung injury is emerging as a common cause of transfusion-related adverse events. However, awareness about this entity in the medical fraternity is low and it, consequently, remains a very under-reported and often an under-diagnosed complication of transfusion therapy. We report a case of a 46-year old woman who developed acute respiratory and hemodynamic instability following a single unit blood transfusion in the postoperative period. Investigation results were non-specific and a diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury was made after excluding other possible causes of acute lung injury. She responded to symptomatic management with ventilatory and vasopressor support and recovered completely over the next 72 hours. The diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury relies on excluding other causes of acute pulmonary edema following transfusion, such as sepsis, volume overload, and ...
The pathophysiology of fat embolism syndrome has not yet been definitively characterized. A mechanical theory holds that the embolization event results from a transient rise in pressure in a fat-containing cavity in association with torn blood vessels, allowing escape of marrow or adipose fat cells into the circulation.Two alternative biochemical theories posit explanations for fat embolism syndrome, both of which could account for the observation of the syndrome in nontraumatic settings. In one, fat droplets already in the circulation are broken down at distal sites to free fatty acids, which then exert a local toxic effect on the tissues. This theory explains the appearance of petechiae and the histologic changes in pneumocytes in association with fat-embolism-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).The obstructive explanation for fat embolism syndrome proposes that free fatty ...
Lobar Emphysema 1 (Differential Diagnosis RDS). Repeated chest radiographs in a newborn with progressive respiratory distress syndrome. Left picture: 3rd day of life. The upper right hemithorax is larger than its left counterpart. Notice the large intervals between the ribs. Center picture: 10th day of life. The difference between left and right becomes more pronounced; an absent lung structure in the right upper and middle hemithorax is recognizable. Right picture: 21st day of life: There is no heart shadow in the right hemithorax; an increase of the zone with absent lung structure is obvious and partially so in the left hemithorax, too. In contrast to the sudden onset of respiratory distress syndrome in most patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia, respiratory distress syndrome or the signs of the ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Spillover of cytokines and reactive oxygen species in ventilator-induced lung injury associated with inflammation and apoptosis in distal organs. AU - Liu, Yung Yang. AU - Chiang, Chi Huei. AU - Chuang, Chiao Hui. AU - Liu, Shiou Ling. AU - Jheng, Yi Han. AU - Ryu, Jay H. PY - 2014. Y1 - 2014. N2 - BACKGROUND: The mechanism between ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) and multiple organ injury is unclear. The aim of our study was to investigate the mechanisms of VILI-induced distal organ injury. METHODS: VILI was induced in rat lungs with high tidal volume (VT) ventilation of 40 mL/kg for 6 h. Rats with low VT ventilation of 6 mL/kg served as controls. Inflammatory and apoptotic indices in lung and distal organs were assessed. RESULTS: VILI increased lung weight, airway pressure, inflammation, and apoptotic pathologic changes without hemodynamic changes. The white blood cell count and the levels of H2O2, ...
In order to investigate FeSO4, ZnSO4 (the two of main metal compositions of Shanghai PM2.5 (particle matter with those aerodynamical diameter |2.5 mu m)) effects on acute lung injury, six solutions contained PM2.5 aerosol particles, FeSO4, ZnSO4 and their mixtures were instilled intratracheally into mouse lungs for experiment. By 2 days. after instillation, the live mice were checked in vivo by synchrotron refractive index microradiography. In addition after extracted and examined by dissection, the right lobes of lung were fixed by formalin, then imaged by synchrotron microradiography again. Corresponding parts of those lung tissues were embedded in paraffin for histopathologic study. The synchrotron X-ray microradiographs of live mouse lung showed different lung texture changes after instilled with different toxic solutions. Hemorrhage points in lung were observed more from those mice ...
Protocol for a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis of benefit of so-called lung-protective ventilation settings in patients under general anesthesia for surgery. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
To find out which ventilation mode or method your patient is receiving, check the ventilator itself or the respiratory flow sheet. The mode depends on patient variables, including the indication for mechanical ventilation.. Modes include those that provide specific amounts of TV during inspiration, such as assist-control (A/C) and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV); and those that provide a preset level of pressure during inspiration, such as pressure support ventilation (PSV) and airway pressure release ventilation. PSV allows spontaneously breathing patients to take their own amount of TV at their own rate. A/C and continuous mandatory ventilation provide a set TV at a set respiratory rate. SIMV delivers a set volume at a set rate, but lets patients initiate their own breaths in synchrony with the ventilator.. Some patients may receive adjuvant therapy, such as positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). With PEEP, a small amount of continuous pressure ...
Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined as noncardiogenic pulmonary edema temporally related to the transfusion of blood products. We present a patient who, while undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation, developed acute pulmonary edema within minutes of administration of fresh frozen plasma (FFP).
Although these findings are interesting, they deserve some comments. First, whereas indexing EVLW to PBW may reduce the number of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with normal EVLW, in this population, the EVLW/ABW index performed best [2]. Furthermore, the absence of a link between EVLW and PaO2/FiO2 (calculated r2 of 0.14 to 0.23) could explain that these indices identified only 33% of ALI and 38% of ARDS cases. Second, the EVLW/PBV terminology appears very unusual. The transpulmonary thermodilution technique determines cardiac output, intrathoracic thermal volume (ITTV), pulmonary thermal volume (PTV) and global end-diastolic volume (Global end-diastolic volume (GEDV) = ITTV - PTV). The estimated blood volume of the chest (Intrathoracic blood volume (ITBV) = GEDV + PBV) permits the calculation of PBV (ITBV = 1.25 × GEDV - 28.4 ml) [3]. Importantly, the PiCCO monitor automatically provides, at each calibration, an estimation of the ...
A proteomics approach to ventilator-induced lung injury might identify protein patterns that contribute to epithelial injury. To identify changes in alveolar type II cells (ATII), rats were mechanically ventilated for 5 hours with a high tidal volume (HTV; 20 ml/kg, no positive end expiratory pressure) or a low tidal volume (LTV; 6 ml/kg, positive end expiratory pressure 4 cmH2O) and compared with pooled controls without mechanical ventilation (SV). ATII were isolated and lysed. Protein expression was compared using the recently introduced cleavable isotope coded affinity tag (ICAT) methodology. After tryptic digestion, cysteine containing peptides were tagged with biotin, extracted using an avidin-coated column and identified by HPLC and mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation. Spectra were interrogated against the Swissprot database and quantified using the ProteinProspector software. HTV ventilation resulted in morphologic changes, pulmonary edema and neutrophil influx in ...
In April 2009, CDC reported the first two cases in the United States of human infection with a novel influenza A (H1N1) virus (1). As of July 6, a total of 122 countries had reported 94,512 cases of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection, 429 of which were fatal; in the United States, a total of 33,902 cases were reported, 170 of which were fatal.* Cases of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection have included rapidly progressive lower respiratory tract disease resulting in respiratory failure, development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) admission (2). Since April 26, communitywide transmission of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus has occurred in Michigan, with 655 probable and confirmed cases reported as of June 18 (Michigan Department of Community Health [MDCH], unpublished data, 2009). This report summarizes the clinical characteristics of a series of 10 patients with ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Hemodynamic benefit of positive end-expiratory pressure during acute descending aortic occlusion. AU - Johnston, William E.. AU - Conroy, Brendan P.. AU - Miller, Gregory S.. AU - Lin, Cheng Y.. AU - Deyo, Donald J.. PY - 2002/10/1. Y1 - 2002/10/1. N2 - Background: Acute aortic occlusion in vascular surgery patients abruptly increases arterial resistance and blood pressure, which, in turn, makes subsequent volume expansion during cross-clamp application difficult. The use of vasodilatory drugs or volatile anesthetic agents to attenuate this response may have persistent detrimental effects after clamp removal. Another potential therapy that produces rapid effects on myocardial loading conditions is positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). In a porcine model of acute aortic clamping, the hemodynamic consequences of 15 cm H2O PEEP with and without plasma volume expansion were studied. Methods: Forty anesthetized pigs underwent 30-min occlusion of the abdominal aorta 1 cm above the ...
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Takotsubo cardiomyopathy which is characterised by a transient left ventricular wall motion abnormality was first described in 1990. The disease is still not well known, and as such it is suggested that an emotional trigger is mandatory in this disease. We present the case of a 51-year old female patient seven years after bilateral lung transplantation, who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome and subsequently suffered from atypical takotsubo cardiomyopathy with transient severe reduction of ejection fraction and haemodynamic instability needing acute intensive care treatment. Acute respiratory failure has emerged as an important physical trigger factor in takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Little is known about the association of hypoxia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy which can elicit a life-threatening condition requiring acute intensive care. Therefore, experimental studies are needed to investigate the role of hypoxia in ...
Dr Chew Huck Chin is a respiratory medicine specialist at Mount Elizabeth Novena Hospital and Gleneagles Hospital, Singapore. He has special interests in intensive care medicine, bronchoscopy and non-invasive ventilation. He is well-versed in advanced ventilator support including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), airway pressure release ventilation, high frequency oscillatory ventilation and advanced bronchoscopic techniques such as endobronchial ultrasound guided transbronchial needle aspiration.. Dr Chew graduated from the National University of Singapore in 1999. He then obtained the Master of Medicine (Emergency Medicine) and the Membership of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh in 2003. After undergoing specialty training in emergency medicine at the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) he further obtained his Master of Medicine (Internal Medicine) and the Membership of the Royal College of Physicians of UK in 2004, and underwent a dual specialty training in ...
Objective To investigate the pathological change of ventilator-induced lung injury and oxygen inhalation and the regularity of white blood cell changes in broncho alveolar lavage fluid(BALF).Methods One hundred and eight newborn rabbits were divided randomly into two groups according to high concentration oxygen(FiO_2=1.0) and low concentration oxygen(FiO_2=0.45).Each group was sub-divided into three parts:high peak inspiratory pressure group (HPIP),moderate peak inspiratory pressure group (MPIP)and low peak inspiratory pressure group (LPIP). All rabbits were given mechanical ventilation(MV) and killed to obtain lungs at 1, 3, 6 hours after trail respectively. Cells in BALF were counted and the percentage of WBC was classified in sediment film. The ratio of wet to dry of lungs was detected, at the same time,pathological section was analyzed.Results The findings were demonstrated within 6 hours in newborn rabbits by MV. The ...
Figure 6: At top, Members of the 59th Medical Wing Extrcorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support Team undergoing hands-on ECMO training during an exercise on July 1, 2009, at Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. The ECMO machine is a portable extended use cardiopulmonary bypass device that circulates and oxygenates the patients blood allowing time for acute lung injury or ARDS to resolve and the patient to recover. The lower picture is the current patient and ECMO hardware support cart mounted in a C-17 cargo plane. Anything that can reduce the weight and complexity of the ECMO system is invaluable under such conditions and ultra-compact and automated systems would allow for immediate application in forward, near battlefield positions.. Ive been told that the US military has purchased Lifebridge B2T® units to evaluate in planned expanded deployment of extended (ECMO) support in cases of acute respiratory distress ...
Objective:Although ventilation with small tidal volumes is recommended in patients with established acute lung injury, most others receive highly variable tidal volume aimed in part at normalizing arterial blood gas values. We tested the hypothesis that acute lung injury, which develops after the in
Definition : Immunoassay reagents intended to perform quantitative analyses on amniotic fluid samples obtained from pregnant women to determine the ratio of phospholipids (i.e., surfactants) to albumin. These tests are typically used to estimate fetal lung maturity and to assess the associated risk of respiratory distress syndrome if birth occurs. The predictive values are less than 40mg/g for immature lungs and more than 70mg/g for mature lungs, but values may change as pregnancy progresses.. Entry Terms : "Reagents, Immunoassay, Pregnancy, Phospholipid/Albumin Ratio". UMDC code : 20669 ...
BACKGROUND The respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in premature newborns has been etiologically correlated to immature lungs and specifically with surfactant deficiency. Exogenous administration of surfactant is nowadays considered to be the treatment of choice. In this paper we attempt a comparison of clinical results from the administration of natural Alveofact and synthetic Exosurf surfactants in premature newborns with respiratory distress syndrome. METHODS The study subjects were 92 premature newborns who had been hospitalized in the Department of Neonatology, of the University of Crete. A total of 42 subjects received synthetic surfactant and 50 subjects received natural surfactant. The surfactant was administered in one to three doses, depending on respiratory support requirements. RESULTS The time of ...
Overwhelming inflammatory responses leading to neutrophil invasion are hypothesised to be the main cause of mortality in influenza virus induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Previously, pulmonary surfactant has been shown to modulate inflammatory responses to bacterial agents. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of pulmonary surfactant on innate immune responses in an in vitro model of influenza virus infected human airway epithelial cells. Human lung type II alveolar epithelial cells A549 and BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells were infected with influenza A virus H1N1 strains A/Swine/1976/31, A/WSN/33 and A/PR/8/34. Poly I:C, Escherichia coli Ol 11 :B4 LPS and measles virus strain Edmonston were used as cytokine stimulation controls. The effect of pulmonary surfactant was compared to that of dexamethasone. This in vitro study showed that physiological concentrations (up to 500 ug/ml) of clinically ...
We develop tidal-ventilation pulmonary gas-exchange equations that allow pulmonary shunt to have different values during expiration and inspiration, in accordance with lung collapse and recruitment during lung dysfunction (Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 158 (1998) 1636). Their solutions are tested against published animal data from intravascular oxygen tension and saturation sensors. These equations provide one explanation for (i) observed physiological phenomena, such as within-breath fluctuations in arterial oxygen saturation and blood-gas tension; and (ii) conventional (time averaged) blood-gas sample oxygen tensions. We suggest that tidal-ventilation models are needed to describe within-breath fluctuations in arterial oxygen saturation and blood-gas tension in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) subjects. Both the amplitude of these oxygen saturation and tension fluctuations, and the mean oxygen blood-gas values, ...
Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSCs)-based therapy seems to be a promising treatment for acute lung injury, but the therapeutic effects of BMSCs transplantation on acute lung injury induced by brain ischemia and the mechanisms have not been totally elucidated. This study explores the effects of transplantation of BMSCs on acute lung injury induced by focal cerebral ischemia and investigates the underlying mechanism. Acute lung injury model was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). BMSCs (with concentration of 1 × 106/ml) were transplanted into host through tail vein 1 day after MCAO. Then, the survival, proliferation and migration of BMSCs in lung were observed at 4 days after transplantation, and histology observation and lung function were assessed for 7 days. Meanwhile, in situ hybridization (ISH), qRT-PCR and western blotting were employed to detect the expression of TNF-α in ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Acute respiratory failure in children. AU - Friedman, Matthew L.. AU - Nitu, Mara. PY - 2018/7/1. Y1 - 2018/7/1. N2 - This article reviews the definition, pathophysiology, etiology, assessment, and management of acute respiratory failure in children. Acute respiratory failure is the inability of the respiratory system to maintain oxygenation or eliminate carbon dioxide. Acute respiratory failure is a common cause for admission to a pediatric intensive care unit. Most causes of acute respiratory failure can be grouped into one of three categories: lung parenchymal disease, airway obstruction, or neuromuscular dysfunction. Many patients with acute respiratory failure are managed successfully with noninvasive respiratory support; however, in severe cases, patients may require intubation and mechanical ventilation.. AB - This article reviews the ...
BACKGROUND: One course of antenatal corticosteroids reduces the risk of respiratory distress syndrome and neonatal death. Weekly doses given to women who remain undelivered after a single course may have benefits (less respiratory morbidity) or cause harm (reduced growth in utero). We aimed to find out whether multiple courses of antenatal corticosteroids would reduce neonatal morbidity and mortality without adversely affecting fetal growth. METHODS: 1858 women at 25-32 weeks gestation who remained undelivered 14-21 days after an initial course of antenatal corticosteroids and continued to be at high risk of preterm birth were randomly assigned to multiple courses of antenatal corticosteroids (n=937) or placebo (n=921), every 14 days until week 33 or delivery, whichever came first. The primary outcome was a composite of perinatal or neonatal mortality, severe respiratory distress syndrome, ...
Hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation induces pulmonary inflammation that leads to acute lung injury. Biliverdin, a metabolite of heme catabolism, has been shown to have potent cytoprotective, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant effects. This study aimed to examine the effects of intravenous biliverdin administration on lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in rats. Biliverdin or vehicle was administered to the rats 1 h before sham or hemorrhagic shock-inducing surgery. The sham-operated rats underwent all surgical procedures except bleeding. To induce hemorrhagic shock, rats were bled to achieve a mean arterial pressure of 30 mmHg that was maintained for 60 min, followed by resuscitation with shed blood. Histopathological changes in the lungs were evaluated by histopathological scoring analysis. Inflammatory gene expression was determined by Northern blot analysis, and oxidative DNA damage was assessed by measuring 8-hydroxy-2 ...
Human β-defensin (hBD)-2, antimicrobial peptide primarily induced in epithelial cells, is a key factor in the innate immune response of the respiratory tract. Several studies showed increased defensin levels in both inflammatory lung diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, diffuse panbronchiolitis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and acute respiratory distress syndrome, and infectious diseases. Recently, epidemiologic studies have demonstrated acute and serious adverse effects of particulate air pollution on respiratory health, especially in people with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease. To elucidate the effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on pulmonary innate immune response, we investigated the hBD-2 and interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression to DEP exposure in interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β)-stimulated A549 cells. IL-1β markedly up-regulated the hBD-2 promoter activity, and the subsequent DEP ...
The fetal cells, chemicals, and microorganisms surrounding the fetus provide a wide range of information regarding your childs genetic makeup. Amniocentesis involves extracting and examining these things in order to determine if your baby has a chromosomal abnormality as wekk as his fetal lung maturity.
Twenty infants, mechanically ventilated in the neonatal period for respiratory distress syndrome, were compared with 15 healthy controls, matched for birthweight(less than 1501 g) but greater in mean gestational age. Clinical features and lung mechanics (by whole body plethysmography) were recorded at 6-monthly intervals until about one year. THe neonatal course of the mechanically ventilated infants was commonly complicated by tracheobronchial hypersecretion and the later course by a fairly high incidence of lower respiratory tract illness. In this group, thoracic gas volume, dynamic compliance, pulmonary and airways conductance were all abnormal during the middle 4 months of the first year and reverted towards normal towards the end of the first year. The control group had normal lung mechanics. Early lung function tests were of limited value in predicting later lower ...
Huynh-moynot, S., D. Commandeur, M. D. Deserts, I. Drouillard, P. Leguen and M. Ould-Ahmed. 2011. Septic shock Fusobacterium necrophorum from origin gynecological at complicated an acute respiratory distress syndrome: a variant of Lemierres syndrome. Ann. Biol. Clin. (Paris) 69:202-207 ...
ABSTRACT: The neonatal risks of late preterm (34 0/7-36 6/7 weeks of gestation) and early-term (37 0/7-38 6/7 weeks of gestation) births are well established. However, there are a number of maternal, fetal, and placental complications in which either a late-preterm or early-term delivery is warranted. The timing of delivery in such cases must balance the maternal and newborn risks of late-preterm and early-term delivery with the risks of further continuation of pregnancy. Decisions regarding timing of delivery must be individualized. Amniocentesis for the determination of fetal lung maturity ... ...
ABSTRACT: The neonatal risks of late preterm (34 0/7-36 6/7 weeks of gestation) and early-term (37 0/7-38 6/7 weeks of gestation) births are well established. However, there are a number of maternal, fetal, and placental complications in which either a late-preterm or early-term delivery is warranted. The timing of delivery in such cases must balance the maternal and newborn risks of late-preterm and early-term delivery with the risks of further continuation of pregnancy. Decisions regarding timing of delivery must be individualized. Amniocentesis for the determination of fetal lung maturity ... ...
Abasia, Abdominal Discomfort, Abdominal Distension, Abdominal Infection, Abdominal Mass, Abdominal Pain, Abdominal Pain Lower, Abdominal Pain Upper, Abdominal Tenderness, Abnormal Behaviour, Abnormal Dreams, Abnormal Faeces, Abnormal Sensation In Eye, Abnormal Sleep-Related Event, Abortion Induced, Abortion Spontaneous, Abscess, Accident, Accident at Home, Accidental Death, Accidental Drug Intake By Child, Accidental Exposure, Accidental Overdose, Accommodation Disorder, Acholia, Acne, Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time Prolonged, Activities of Daily Living Impaired, Acute Abdomen, Acute Myocardial Infarction, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Acute Sinusitis, Acute Stress Disorder, Adenocarcinoma, Adenoidectomy, Adjustment Disorder, Adrenal Adenoma, Adrenal Disorder, Adrenal Insufficiency, Adrenal Neoplasm, Adverse Drug Reaction, Adverse Event, Affect Lability, Affective Disorder, Age Indeterminate Myocardial Infarction, Ageusia, Aggression, ...
Correction: The value of universally available raw NMR data for transparency, reproducibility, and integrity in natural product research Nat Prod Rep. 2019 01 01; 36(1):248-249. . View in PubMed. The value of universally available raw NMR data for transparency, reproducibility, and integrity in natural product research Nat Prod Rep. 2019 01 01; 36(1):35-107. . View in PubMed. Rare Pediatric Invasive Gliofibroma Has BRAFV600E Mutation and Transiently Responds to Targeted Therapy Before Progressive Clonal Evolution JCO Precis Oncol. 2019; 3. . View in PubMed. Noninvasive estimation of fetal lung maturity with magnetic resonance spectroscopy Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2018 08; 219(2):209-210. . View in PubMed. Association between Subcortical Morphology and Cerebral White Matter Energy Metabolism in Neonates with Congenital Heart Disease Sci Rep. 2018 09 19; 8(1):14057. . View in PubMed. Clinical Factors Associated with Cerebral Metabolism in Term Neonates with Congenital Heart ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Intravascular membrane oxygenation and carbon dioxide removal with IVOX. T2 - Can improved design and permissive hypercapnia achieve adequate respiratory support during severe respiratory failure?. AU - Zwischenberger, J. B.. AU - Cardenas, V. J.. AU - Tao, W.. AU - Niranjan, S. C.. AU - Clark, J. W.. AU - Bidani, A.. PY - 1994. Y1 - 1994. N2 - The intravenacaval oxygenator and carbon dioxide removal device (IVOX) conceived by Mortensen at CardioPulmonics is a diffusion-limited device capable of removing 30% of CO2 production of an adult at normocapnia with minimal reduction in ventilator requirements. Through mathematical modeling, an ex vivo venovenous bypass circuit to model the vena cava and animal models of severe smoke inhalation injury, the practice of permissive hypercapnia has been established to enhance CO2 removal by IVOX. By allowing the blood Pco2 to rise gradually, the CO2 excretion by IVOX can be linearly increased in a 1:1 relationship. ...
Located within Massachusetts General Hospitals Pulmonary and Critical Care Unit, the Critical Care Translational Medicine Group is led by medical director B. Taylor Thompson, MD.. One of Dr. Thompsons primary roles is medical director and co-principal investigator of the National Heart, Lung & Blood Institute (NHLBI) ARDS Network Clinical Coordinating Center, which resides in the Mass General Biostatistics Unit. Under the direction of David Schoenfeld, PhD, the center coordinates the design, execution and interpretation of multicenter clinical trials of ARDS treatments. These trials are carried out in more than 40 hospitals (organized into 12 clinical sites).. The ARDS Network has completed eight randomized controlled trials. Dr. Thompson has a major role in the design and management of these trials and has held three Investigational New Drug Applications with the Food and Drug Administration on behalf of the ARDS Network. Five of the trials have been published in The New England Journal of ...
Mechanical ventilation is a common but technically challenging therapy that requires extensive education and experience to develop proficiency. This interactive computer module was developed to address a deficit in pediatric resident education. The instructional material focuses on respiratory physiology and basic concepts of conventional mechanical ventilation. In comparison to traditional didactic lectures, the computer module is brief, self-paced, and easily accessible and can be used whenever the pediatric resident has available time. These attributes are consistent with principles of adult learning and medical education.6,14. Residents preferred the interactive computer module compared to an annotated PowerPoint presentation with the same content. After using the module, they perceived an increase in self-confidence and had higher scores on a posttraining knowledge assessment. This demonstrates that self-directed learning is a feasible instructional method for learning this complex ...
A normal lamellar body count indicates an extremely low risk of respiratory distress syndrome.. A decreased count indicates an increased risk.. ...
Fat embolism syndrome, a condition characterizedby hypoxia, bilateral pulmonary infiltrates, andmental status change, is commonly thought of inassociation with long-bone trauma. Fat embolizationcan frequently take place, however, within thesetting of elective and semiacute orthopedic procedures.1 In particular, there is a high incidence of fatembolization during placement of hip prostheses.Although studies suggest that embolization eventsinfrequently result in a clinically apparent fat embolismsyndrome,1,2 clinicians should be vigilant inconsidering fat embolism syndrome as a causativeagent of postoperative respiratory distress.Case ReportAn 80-year-old woman with a history of hip fractureand prosthesis placement of the left hip cameto the emergency department after a fall. A displacedfemoral neck fracture of the right hip wasdiagnosed based on clinical examination and radiologicfindings. The patient was admitted to ...
article{dc35f6eb-2fe8-4e13-a6ad-684fbfae520e, abstract = {Introduction: The diagnosis of acute lung injury (ALI) may be more robust if more accurate physiological markers can be identified. Extravascular lung water (EVLW) is one possible marker, and it has been shown to correlate with respiratory function and mortality in patients with sepsis. Whether EVLW confers diagnostic value in a general population with shock, as well as which index performs best, is unclear. We investigated the diagnostic accuracy of various EVLW indices in patients with shock. Methods: We studied a prospective, observational cohort of 51 patients with shock admitted to a tertiary ICU. EVLW was measured within 6 hours of ICU admission and indexed to actual body weight (EVLW/ABW), predicted body weight (EVLW/PBW) and pulmonary blood volume (EVLW/PBV). The relationship of these indices to the diagnosis and severity of lung injury and ICU mortality were studied. Positive ...
In the present study we show that, in the mouse model of aseptic lung injury, macrophages first exhibit a proinflammatory M1 phenotype, followed by an M2 anti-inflammatory phenotype. Genetic ablation of Akt2 suppresses M1 activation via miR-146a induction, promotes an M2 phenotype, and protects mice from acid-induced lung injury.. ARDS, the devastating clinical syndrome of acute respiratory failure characterized by lung inflammation and alveolar barrier dysfunction, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients in the intensive care unit. Although pneumonia and sepsis are the most common causes of ARDS, several aseptic conditions are associated with ARDS, such as acute pancreatitis, burns, near drowning, multiple trauma, and inhalation injury (1). With no effective treatment available, there is an urgent need to understand and, subsequently, modulate the pathogenesis of lung inflammation.. It is ...
The classical functional linear regression model (FLM) and its extensions, which are based on the assumption that all individuals are mutually independent, have been well studied and are used by many researchers. This independence assumption is sometimes violated in practice, especially when data with a network structure are collected in scientific disciplines including marketing, sociology and spatial economics. However, relatively few studies have examined the applications of FLM to data with network structures. We propose a novel spatial functional linear model (SFLM), that incorporates a spatial autoregressive parameter and a spatial weight matrix into FLM to accommodate spatial dependencies among individuals. The proposed model is relatively flexible as it takes advantage of FLM in handling high-dimensional covariates and spatial autoregressive (SAR) model in capturing network dependencies. We develop an estimation method based on functional principal component analysis (FPCA) and maximum
BACKGROUND Lung injury is a serious complication of surgery. We did a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess whether incidence, morbidity, and in-hospital mortality associated with postoperative lung injury are affected by type of surgery and whether outcomes are dependent on type of ventilation. METHODS We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for observational studies and randomised controlled trials published up to April, 2014, comparing lung-protective mechanical ventilation with conventional mechanical ventilation during abdominal or thoracic surgery in adults. Individual patients data were assessed. Attributable mortality was calculated by subtracting the in-hospital mortality of patients without postoperative lung injury from that of patients with postoperative lung injury. FINDINGS We identified 12 investigations involving 3365 patients. The total ...
Result: 300 late preterm babies were studied. 84.33% of the total late preterm newborns were low birth weight babies. 28% were associated with maternal complications. Incidence of pregnancy induced hypertension was 14% in this study. 11.33% of the late preterm newborns needed resuscitation. Out of all the morbidities associated with late preterms, incidence of respiratory distress was highest with 31 %. According to this study, incidence of hyperbilirubinemia, hypothermia and respiratory distress syndrome was more towards the 34 weeks of gestation. This study shows that as the gestational age decreases, the late preterms are more prone for RDS, hypothermia and hyperbilirubinemia ...
PubMed Central Canada (PMC Canada) provides free access to a stable and permanent online digital archive of full-text, peer-reviewed health and life sciences research publications. It builds on PubMed Central (PMC), the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature and is a member of the broader PMC International (PMCI) network of e-repositories.
Contrary to our hypothesis, we found no difference in the success rate of the initial trial to wean from NCPAP between the sudden and gradual weaning methods, which were started only when the infants were stable on NCPAP of 5 cm of H2O and on FIO2 of 0.21. Weight, post-menstrual age at time of successful wean, and the length of stay did not differ between the 2 methods. These findings suggest that the ability to be successfully weaned off NCPAP may be independent of the weaning method and may be a phenomenon of pulmonary maturity.. Jardine et al, in a recent review12 based on 3 abstracts on weaning from CPAP,17-19 identified lack of data on the clinical criteria or best strategy for withdrawal of NCPAP. These abstracts lack one or more aspects that are integral components of such comparative research. Our study is more comprehensive, as we randomized the infants in a predetermined manner, with the person randomizing not being involved in the direct medical care. There was no clear ...
Had the booster Betamethasone shot today at Fairfax. Its used to stimulate fetal lung maturation (prevention of IRDS), and to decrease the incidence and mortality from intracranial hemorrhage in premature infants (src). Dr. Bronsky pretty much confirmed what Dr. Baschat said....if I make to to 28 weeks, I can plan to be hospitalized for daily monitoring. At…
Sales, means the sales volume of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) Systems Revenue, means the sales value of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) Systems This report studies sales (consumption) of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) Systems in United States market, focuses on the top players, with sales, price, revenue and market share for each player, covering Maquet Ho
Pulmonary surfactant proteins and lipids are required for lung function after birth. Lung immaturity and resultant surfactant deficiency cause respiratory distress syndrome, a common disorder contributing to morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. Surfactant synthesis increases prior to birth in association with formation of the alveoli that mediate efficient gas exchange. To identify mechanisms controlling perinatal lung maturation, the Calcineurin b1 (Cnb1) gene was deleted in the respiratory epithelium of the fetal mouse. Deletion of Cnb1 caused respiratory failure after birth and inhibited the structural maturation of the peripheral lung. Synthesis of surfactant and a lamellar body-associated protein, ABC transporter A3 (ABCA3), was decreased prior to birth. Nuclear factor of activated T cells (Nfat) calcineurin-dependent 3 (Nfatc3), ...
VetVine is an accredited Continuing Education provider for veterinary professionals and resource of expert-driven pet health information for pet owners. This is the forum topic view page. When a cat in respiratory distress (dyspnea) is brought to a veterinary hospital, it creates a challenging emergency situation that requires quick assessment and appropriate intervention. The patient must be handled carefully to avoid decompensation or death. The two most common causes of dyspnea in cats are congestive heart failure and respiratory tract disease. A minimally invasive or patient-side test to help identify cats with heart failure would be clinically useful. From the results of previous studies, the circulating concentrations of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) are supportive in distinguishing cats with dyspnea due to respiratory disease from those with underlying heart disease. It has been noted that cTnI concentrations may be elevated in cats with ...
Henrik Verder (born 1942) is a pediatrician and the inventor of the INSURE (Intubation Surfactant Extubation) method combined with nasal CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure). In 1989 he used this pioneering method to successfully treat the first premature infant with severe RDS. Verder is a significant researcher within the field of paediatrics, with more than 50 publications and over 500 citations. Verder received his medical degree from Copenhagen University in 1968 and went on to specialise in paediatrics in 1978, concentrating on prenatal determination of lung maturity and prevention of RDS (Infant Respiratory Distress Syndrome). In 1980 he was awarded his medical doctorate from Copenhagen University for his thesis on "Prenatal determination of lung maturity and prevention of RDS". In 1972 Verder began his associated professorship at Copenhagen University where he went on to become ...
The incidence of PVA is very high during pediatric conventional ventilation. As a whole, children spend about one-third of the time in conflict with their ventilator. We described an a priori defined group with severe PVA, but marked PVA was present even in the other children, and the proportion of children which could be considered as "well synchronized" is low. Besides, an unexpected form of bad interaction was observed, with the high prevalence of low ventilatory drive.. The magnitude of PVA that we observed is in agreement with that previously described [10-12]. In a recent study conducted in a PICU, Blokpoel et al. [10] showed that PVA occurred in 33% of breaths. These authors identified PVA using the analysis of ventilator waveforms, a method which has a low sensitivity [6]. We used the Edi signal which clearly facilitates the detection of PVA, in particular the calculation of timing errors for triggering or cycling off [3, 12, 13, 17, 22, 23]. We were therefore able to show that most of ...
Kain1 I was going to say that Arnold`s would have to be high because of Commando also I was thinking Red Heat had to be pretty high. I think he had something like 10 kills in the first minute of that movie ...
Cena: neregulovaná / Liek GREPID s uč. látkou Klopidogrel, na lekársky predpis (Rp), Antikoagulanciá (fibrinolyt..., príbalový leták, podobné lieky, interakcie, kód: 78890
He explains that a complex series of events occurs in late pregnancy to prepare the baby to survive outside the womb: The fetus acquires fat needed to maintain body temperature; the liver matures enough to eliminate a toxin called bilirubin from the body; and the lungs get ready to exchange oxygen as soon as the umbilical cord is clamped. Disrupting any of those steps can result in brain damage and other problems. In addition, the squeezing of the uterus during labor stimulates the baby and the placenta to make steroid hormones that help this last phase of lung maturation -- and thats missed if the mother never goes into labor ...
He explains that a complex series of events occurs in late pregnancy to prepare the baby to survive outside the womb: The fetus acquires fat needed to maintain body temperature; the liver matures enough to eliminate a toxin called bilirubin from the body; and the lungs get ready to exchange oxygen as soon as the umbilical cord is clamped. Disrupting any of those steps can result in brain damage and other problems. In addition, the squeezing of the uterus during labor stimulates the baby and the placenta to make steroid hormones that help this last phase of lung maturation -- and thats missed if the mother never goes into labor ...
Tsídii Deílʼésígíí éí "Ciconiiformes" daolyé, ndaʼałkaahíkʼehjí; díí saadígíí éí "Tsídii bidaanézí Ndahalinígíí" óolyé.. Táłtłʼááh álééh dóó toohjįʼ ndiigaii dóó yáhashjool éí "Ciconiiformes"-jįʼ atah daasdzoh. Łaʼ ndaʼałkaahí ádaaníigo tsídiidaatsohí éí ałdóʼ díí tsídii dahyikahjįʼ atah yisdzoh daaní; náánáłaʼ ndaʼałkaahí éí doo bił ákódaatʼée da.. Díí tsídii éí tʼáá ałtso bijáád nineez, áádóó éí tábąąhgi naakai łeh; łaʼ éí halgaiigi dóó tłʼoh dahólǫ́ǫgi naakai ałdóʼ. Nááná éí bidaaʼ nineez łeh. Łaʼ éí łóóʼ dóó naʼashǫ́ʼii haalzhéehgo deílʼéés, náánáłaʼ éí tʼóó chʼosh deildeeł.. ...

NAVER Academic > Search...NAVER Academic > Search...

Newborn, Lung, embryology, Pregnancy, Respiratory Distress Syndrome,... ... Interpretation of indices of fetal pulmonary maturity by gestational age.. 1988 L J VanMarter et al. Paediatric and Perinatal ... Seasonality in the sudden infant death syndrome.. 1988 C Osmond et al. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology cited 0 times ... Cerebral Palsy, diagnosis, Female, Fetal Hypoxia, Fetal Monitoring, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Labor, Obstetric, Nervous System ...
more infohttps://academic.naver.com/search.naver?field=3&query=Paediatric+and+Perinatal+Epidemiology+2%EA%B6%8C+4%ED%98%B8

WHO recommendation on antenatal corticosteroid therapy for women with pre-gestational and gestational diabetes at risk of...WHO recommendation on antenatal corticosteroid therapy for women with pre-gestational and gestational diabetes at risk of...

In intubated preterm newborns with respiratory distress syndrome, surfactant should be administered early (within the first 2 ... Delay in fetal lung maturity is generally more frequent in pregnant diabetic women compared with the general obstetric ... WHO recommendation on the early administration of surfactant in intubated preterm newborns with respiratory distress syndrome. ... WHO recommendation on the early administration of surfactant in intubated preterm newborns with respiratory distress syndrome. ...
more infohttps://extranet.who.int/rhl/topics/preconception-pregnancy-childbirth-and-postpartum-care/pregnancy-complications/preterm-birth/who-recommendation-antenatal-corticosteroid-therapy-women-pre-gestational-and-gestational-diabetes

Pulmonary surfactant | definition of pulmonary surfactant by Medical dictionaryPulmonary surfactant | definition of pulmonary surfactant by Medical dictionary

Synthetic lung surfactant is available for treating patients with respiratory distress syndrome. In obstetrics, fetal ... As a quick reminder, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) of the newborn is the seventh most common cause of perinatal mortality ... Preanalytical factors that influence the Abbott TDx Fetal Lung Maturity II assay ... respiratory distress syndrome results from an insufficient amount of pulmonary surfactant that is produced by the neonatal lung ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/pulmonary+surfactant

Iranian Journal of Pediatrics - The Role of Lung Ultrasound in Diagnosis of Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Newborn InfantsIranian Journal of Pediatrics - The Role of Lung Ultrasound in Diagnosis of Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Newborn Infants

... and declines with maturity to 5% at 35-36 weeks. Accordingly, the RDS incidence rate is estimated to be 80% for infants ... Keywords: Lung; Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn; Infant, Newborn Copyright © 2015, Growth & Development Research Center. ... The Role of Lung Ultrasound in Diagnosis of Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Newborn Infants Jing Liu 1 , Hai Ying Cao 2 , * , ... To Cite: Liu J, Cao H Y, Wang H, Kong X Y. The Role of Lung Ultrasound in Diagnosis of Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Newborn ...
more infohttp://ijp.tums.pub/en/articles/323.html

Lamellar body count is a measure of surfactant and fetal lung maturityLamellar body count is a measure of surfactant and fetal lung maturity

Lamellar body count or LBC is an indicator of lung surfactant and fetal lung maturity. Low surfactant predisposes to ... the number of newborn deaths due to respiratory distress syndrome has declined considerably over the last 15 years.Most ... Many obstetricians in the United States have indicated that laboratory tests for fetal lung maturity are no longer needed for ... Due to improvements in gestational age dating, maternal administration of corticosteroids that accelerate fetal lung maturity ...
more infohttp://www.clinlabnavigator.com/lamellar-body-counts.html

Infant respiratory distress syndrome - WikipediaInfant respiratory distress syndrome - Wikipedia

The presence of PG usually indicates fetal lung maturity. For the S/A ratio, the result is given as mg of surfactant per gm of ... also called neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS), respiratory distress syndrome of newborn, or increasingly surfactant ... Transient tachypnea of the newborn presents with respiratory distress syndrome in the preterm newborn. In 1963, Patrick Bouvier ... The lungs of infants with respiratory distress syndrome are developmentally deficient in a material called surfactant, which ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infant_respiratory_distress_syndrome

The Effect of β-Carotene, Vitamin D3 and Zinc on Hyaline Membrane Disease and Feeding Intolerance in Premature Neonates - Full...The Effect of β-Carotene, Vitamin D3 and Zinc on Hyaline Membrane Disease and Feeding Intolerance in Premature Neonates - Full...

Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn. Lung Diseases. Respiratory Tract Diseases. Respiration Disorders. Infant, Premature, ... raises questions whether there are other factors influencing the development and maturity of lung and gut in preterm newborn, ... Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Infant Necrotizing Enterocolitis Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome ... Hyaline membrane disease, now commonly called respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), and feeding intolerance, which can lead to ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03366584?map_cntry=ID&

Transient tachypnea of the newborn - WikipediaTransient tachypnea of the newborn - Wikipedia

... such as respiratory distress syndrome. A chest X-ray may show a radiopaque line - fluid - in the horizontal fissure of the ... Levels of phosphatidylglycerol (an indicator of lung maturity) were found to be negative in certain newborns Mild surfactant ... is a respiratory problem that can be seen in the newborn shortly after delivery. Amongst causes of respiratory distress in term ... ISBN 0-7234-3397-6 Hermansen CL, Lorah KN (October 2007). "Respiratory distress in the newborn". Am Fam Physician. 76 (7): 987- ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transient_tachypnea_of_the_newborn

Fetal and neonatal samples of a precursor surfactant protein B inversely related to gestational age | BMC Pediatrics | Full TextFetal and neonatal samples of a precursor surfactant protein B inversely related to gestational age | BMC Pediatrics | Full Text

... respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia. Awasthi et al. [28] showed that in premature newborn baboons, the amounts of SP-A ... increased levels of surfactant proteins in body fluids reflect alterations of capillary-alveolar membranes and lung maturity. ... in neonatal and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Exp Lung Res. 2002, 28: 623-640. 10.1080/01902140260426733.View Article ... Cho K, Matsuda T, Okajima S, Matsumoto Y, Sagawa T, Fujimoto S, et al: Prediction of respiratory distress syndrome by the level ...
more infohttps://bmcpediatr.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2431-13-164

Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Newborn and Surfactant TherapyRespiratory Distress Syndrome in Newborn and Surfactant Therapy

Mostly preterm baby has ards baby lung problems ards ... ARDS Newborn caused by deficiency of surfactant in newborn. ... How to Prevent Respiratory Distress Syndrome?. Assessment of fetal lungs maturity before delivery by amniotic fluid indices: L/ ... Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Newborn and Surfactant Therapy. Dr. Alamgir Hossain Shemul October 4, 2016 Neonatology Leave a ... Deficiency of surfactant causes Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) in Newborn. It is also called hyaline membrane disease. ...
more infohttp://pedimedicine.com/respiratory-distress-syndrome-newborn-surfactant-therapy/

Frontiers | Palmitic Acid: Physiological Role, Metabolism and Nutritional Implications | PhysiologyFrontiers | Palmitic Acid: Physiological Role, Metabolism and Nutritional Implications | Physiology

... and in the lung an efficient surfactant activity. In order to maintain membrane phospholipids (PL) balance may be crucial an ... and in the lung an efficient surfactant activity. In order to maintain membrane phospholipids (PL) balance may be crucial an ... Jobe, A., and Ikegami, M. (1987). Surfactant for the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome. Am. Rev. Respir. Dis. 136, ... which levels decrease with lung maturity, has an inverse proportion relative to PC, indeed the ratio PC/SM is used to determine ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fphys.2017.00902/full

Fetal monitoring | definition of fetal monitoring by Medical dictionaryFetal monitoring | definition of fetal monitoring by Medical dictionary

... that the fetal lungs are mature and the newborn infant is not likely to develop respiratory distress syndrome of the newborn.. ... Fetal lung maturity can be assessed by evaluating the presence of pulmonary surfactant, a phospholipid protein, in the amniotic ... or to determine fetal lung maturity. Cells floating in the amniotic fluid sample can be examined to detect genetic disorders ... fetal alcohol syndrome a group of symptoms characterized by mental and physical abnormalities of the infant and linked to the ...
more infohttp://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/fetal+monitoring

Transmission and Mode of Delivery  | Perinatal | AIDSinfoTransmission and Mode of Delivery | Perinatal | AIDSinfo

Among 1,194 infants born to mothers with HIV, 9 (1.6%) infants born vaginally had respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) compared ... Amniocentesis to document lung maturity should be avoided when possible in women with HIV and is rarely indicated before ... respiratory complications, hypoglycemia, newborn sepsis, or admission to the neonatal intensive care unit-is 15.3% at 37 weeks ... Steroids should be given, if appropriate, to accelerate fetal lung maturity because no data exist to suggest that these ...
more infohttps://aidsinfo.nih.gov/guidelines/html/3/perinatal/182/transmission-and-mode-of-delivery

Maternal & Fetal MedicineMaternal & Fetal Medicine

Babies born with immature lungs can suffer from a condition referred to as Respiratory Distress Syndrome or Hyaline Membrane ... Fetal Maturity Test. Several tests can be performed with the amniotic fluid to determine the maturity of foetal lungs. The ... Disease, which is the leading cause of death in newborns. This condition results from lack of certain chemical substances that ... a blood test to help determine the risk of Down syndrome, Edward syndrome or neural tube defects in the foetus. ...
more infohttps://www.thenest.in/maternal-fetal-medicine-bangalore/

Premature Birth Complications: Risks of ComplicationsPremature Birth Complications: Risks of Complications

Immature lungs are associated with the following complications:. Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS) causes harsh, irregular ... The major concern in cases of premature labor is the development of the newborns lungs. ... an amniocentesis may be performed to check the maturity level of the lungs. In some cases, an injection of steroids will be ... Immature Lungs - Most babies have mature lungs by 36 weeks of gestation. However, since babies develop at different rates, ...
more infohttps://americanpregnancy.org/labor-and-birth/premature-birth-complications/

Caremark - Disease and Health Management ProgramsCaremark - Disease and Health Management Programs

Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Newborns. (Hyaline Membrane Disease; RDS). by Laurie Rosenblum, MPH ... Steroids can help your babys lungs develop faster.. *Your doctor may do an amniocentesis. This test will check the maturity of ... Respiratory distress syndrome. The Merck Manual Professional Edition website. Available at: ...(Click grey area to select URL) ... Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) of the newborn. EBSCO DynaMed Plus website. Available at: http://www.dynamed.... Updated ...
more infohttp://healthlibrary.epnet.com/GetContent.aspx?token=35cd8c16-7dff-43e2-92cc-6a1c93b5abd4&chunkiid=11599

Tests for Your Developing BabyTests for Your Developing Baby

... the babys doctor may introduce surfactant directly into the lungs of the newborn, preventing respiratory-distress syndrome. ... Tests for Fetal Lung Maturity. A couple of tests can evaluate the maturity of fetal lungs. When a baby is born prematurely, a ... which can lead to development of respiratory-distress syndrome in the baby. This means the lungs are not completely mature at ... there is greater assurance that the baby will not develop respiratory-distress syndrome. ...
more infohttp://pregnancysurvey.com/pregnancy_tests/article_36.html

Tests for Your Developing BabyTests for Your Developing Baby

... the babys doctor may introduce surfactant directly into the lungs of the newborn, preventing respiratory-distress syndrome. ... Tests for Fetal Lung Maturity. A couple of tests can evaluate the maturity of fetal lungs. When a baby is born prematurely, a ... which can lead to development of respiratory-distress syndrome in the baby. This means the lungs are not completely mature at ... there is greater assurance that the baby will not develop respiratory-distress syndrome. ...
more infohttp://www.pregnancysurvey.com/pregnancy_tests/article_36.html

Respiratory Distress Syndrome | National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)Respiratory Distress Syndrome | National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

... is a lung disease that affects newborns and prevents normal breathing. Learn the causes, symptoms, and treatments for RDS. ... Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Infant Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Surfactant Deficiency Respiratory distress ... Respiratory Distress Syndrome In support of our mission, we are committed to advancing respiratory distress syndrome research, ... Respiratory Distress Syndrome Surfactant helps keep the lungs open so that a newborn can breathe in air once he or she is born ...
more infohttps://phgkb.cdc.gov/PHGKB/phgHome.action?action=forward&dbsource=cluster&id=21079

Enteral Nutrition - an overview | ScienceDirect TopicsEnteral Nutrition - an overview | ScienceDirect Topics

Fetal lung maturity tests for prediction of Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Fibreoptic phototherapy for neonatal jaundice. ... Lung lavage for meconium aspiration syndrome in newborn infants. Lung recruitment manoeuvres for reducing respiratory morbidity ... Diuretics for respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants.. Diuretics for transient tachypnoea of the newborn. Dopamine ... Non-invasive high-frequency ventilation in newborn infants with respiratory distress. Non-invasive respiratory support for the ...
more infohttp://neoclassics.us/tame/enteral-nutrition-vs-parenteral-nutrition-1356.php

Pediatric Notes « Diary of a Caribbean Med StudentPediatric Notes « Diary of a Caribbean Med Student

Respiratory Distress in newborn - LOOK AT AGE of baby. There is respiratory and non-respiratory causes.. Non-respiratory causes ... Give mom steroids to help lung maturity.. Transient Tachypnia of Newborn (TTN) - from short second stage of labor or c section ... If baby is preterm, then RDS (respiratory distress syndrome) is most likely cause of respiratory distress. If is term baby, esp ... and Neurologic problems lead to respiratory distress too.. Most common cause of respiratory distress in newborn is respiratory ...
more infohttps://www.caribbeanmedstudent.com/notes/pediatrics/

Gestational Diabetes: Basic Treatment ProtocolsGestational Diabetes: Basic Treatment Protocols

Prematurity and Respiratory Distress Syndrome are also theoretical risks of gd, but again these may be influenced by the past ... If the lungs are immature, steroids can increase lung maturity quickly in many cases. ... Metabolic Problems in the Newborn. Researchers are rightly concerned about higher rates of hypoglycemia and jaundice in the gd ... A real concern in early delivery is the possibility of Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS) in the baby, so unless the babys ...
more infohttp://plus-size-pregnancy.org/gd/gd_treatment.htm

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Severe complications, such as respiratory distress syndrome, intracranial hemorrhage, hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, and ... Obstetricians frequently try to inhibit preterm labor to obtain time for fetal lung maturity. Delaying delivery by even 24-48 ... Risk of Drug Exposure: Fetus Versus Newborn. The fetus can excrete local anesthetics back into the maternal circulation after ... Reports of transient neurologic syndrome and/ or cauda equina syndrome have been associated with lidocaine in doses greater ...
more infohttps://www.nysora.com/obstetric-regional-anesthesia

Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy - American Family PhysicianHypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy - American Family Physician

HELLP (i.e., hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count) syndrome is a form of severe preeclampsia with high ... but it may increase the risk of respiratory distress syndrome of the newborn, severe hypertension, and antenatal ... irrespective of gestational age or fetal lung maturity. Fetuses older than 34 weeks, or those with documented lung maturity, ... Fetal factors include gestational age, evidence of lung maturity, and signs of fetal compromise on antenatal assessment. ...
more infohttps://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0701/p93.html

CDC Grand Rounds: Public Health Strategies to Prevent Preterm Birth  | MMWRCDC Grand Rounds: Public Health Strategies to Prevent Preterm Birth | MMWR

Morbidity associated with preterm birth includes respiratory distress syndrome, necrotizing enterocolitis, and intraventricular ... to improve fetal lung maturity (14). A Cochrane review (15) determined that maternal treatment with a single course of ANCS ... The Ohio PQC has advanced evidence-based clinical practices and processes to improve pregnancy outcomes for women and newborns ... Because infants with preterm births from 24 to 34 weeks gestation are at higher risk for respiratory distress syndrome, ...
more infohttps://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6532a4.htm
  • However, the group placed its emphasis on the overall benefits of antenatal steroid in preterm, the potential benefits in terms of reducing the higher risk of newborn respiratory morbidity posed by maternal diabetes, and the potential impact on overall newborn survival, and therefore made a strong recommendation. (who.int)
  • HELLP (i.e., hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count) syndrome is a form of severe preeclampsia with high rates of neonatal and maternal morbidity. (aafp.org)
  • Subjects from both groups receive the hospital protocol of preterm birth, 4 doses of 6 mg of dexamethasone, intravenous 12 hours apart to support lung maturation. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Imam Khomeini General Hospital, which is of alveolar structures (including thinning of the largest educational hospital in Tehran, interstitial tissues of the lung) in the fetus consisting of obstetric, gynaecology and [ 3 ]. (who.int)
  • These tests determine the age of the fetus or lung maturity. (cdc.gov)
  • Venous occlusion by the growing fetus causes supine hypotensive syndrome in 10% of pregnant women and manifests as maternal tachycardia, arterial hypotension, faintness, and pallor. (nysora.com)
  • If a pregnant woman contracts rubella, the fetus is at risk to develop Congenital Rubella Syndrome (CRS) which can result in tissue and organ damage. (brightkite.com)
  • The rubella Virus is very teratogenic, and should a maternal infection occur, the developing fetus might develop congenital rubella syndrome. (brightkite.com)
  • It is used to keep the lungs from collapsing and support the baby's breathing. (epnet.com)
  • This helps keep the lungs open so breathing can occur after birth. (cdc.gov)
  • Explore this Health Topic to learn more about respiratory distress syndrome, our role in research and clinical trials to improve health, and where to find more information. (cdc.gov)
  • The available endogenous surfactant also influences lung aeration and, therefore, assessing the surfactant pool available early in life could be interesting to better understand the clinical picture and eventually guide surfactant replacement. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Further, the College has stated that a mature fetal lung maturity profile is not an indication for delivery in the absence of other clinical indications ( 1 ). (acog.org)
  • Each participant of each group will be given dexamethasone 2x6 mg intravenous for 2 days which aims to support lung maturation followed by planned delivery within 1 week due to indication of maternal or fetal. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The second phase of non-invasive testing is the Maternal Serum Screening (MSS) test - a blood test to help determine the risk of Down syndrome, Edward syndrome or neural tube defects in the foetus. (thenest.in)
  • The typical x-ray findings (develop during, the first 6 hours) are low lung volume, a generalized haziness or reticulogranular "ground glass" appearance in the lung fields, and when severe, obscuring heart borders and an air bronchogram due to air in the major bronchi being highlighted against the white opacified lungs. (pedimedicine.com)
  • If preterm labor is identified and is inevitable, there are medications that can be given to the mother to help reduce the risk of severe intracranial hemorrhage in the newborn. (americanpregnancy.org)
  • Delay in fetal lung maturity is generally more frequent in pregnant diabetic women compared with the general obstetric population. (who.int)
  • This deficiency of surfactant is related to an inhibition from the insulin that is produced in the newborn especially in diabetic mothers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lung ultrasound was performed at bedside by a single expert. (tums.pub)
  • A lung ultrasound has many advantages over other techniques. (tums.pub)
  • Lung ultrasound is typically not included in the diagnostic work-up of neonatal RDS. (tums.pub)