Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health: Longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood. (from http://www.cpc.unc.edu/projects/addhealth accessed 08/2012)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.BaltimoreAge Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Child Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.United StatesCognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Parenting: Performing the role of a parent by care-giving, nurturance, and protection of the child by a natural or substitute parent. The parent supports the child by exercising authority and through consistent, empathic, appropriate behavior in response to the child's needs. PARENTING differs from CHILD REARING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the children and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Patient Dropouts: Discontinuance of care received by patient(s) due to reasons other than full recovery from the disease.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Child of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.Puberty: A period in the human life in which the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal system takes place and reaches full maturity. The onset of synchronized endocrine events in puberty lead to the capacity for reproduction (FERTILITY), development of secondary SEX CHARACTERISTICS, and other changes seen in ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT.EnglandAdolescent Psychology: Field of psychology concerned with the normal and abnormal behavior of adolescents. It includes mental processes as well as observable responses.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Juvenile Delinquency: The antisocial acts of children or persons under age which are illegal or lawfully interpreted as constituting delinquency.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Body Height: The distance from the sole to the crown of the head with body standing on a flat surface and fully extended.Adolescent Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological changes during ADOLESCENCE, approximately between the age of 13 and 18.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Temperament: Predisposition to react to one's environment in a certain way; usually refers to mood changes.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Anthropometry: The technique that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human or other primate body.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Great BritainDementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Personality Development: Growth of habitual patterns of behavior in childhood and adolescence.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Intelligence: The ability to learn and to deal with new situations and to deal effectively with tasks involving abstractions.Growth: Gradual increase in the number, the size, and the complexity of cells of an individual. Growth generally results in increase in ORGAN WEIGHT; BODY WEIGHT; and BODY HEIGHT.Achievement: Success in bringing an effort to the desired end; the degree or level of success attained in some specified area (esp. scholastic) or in general.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Fathers: Male parents, human or animal.WisconsinLife Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.SwedenGeriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Personality: Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Birth Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Father-Child Relations: Interaction between the father and the child.Crime Victims: Individuals subjected to and adversely affected by criminal activity. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Intelligence Tests: Standardized tests that measure the present general ability or aptitude for intellectual performance.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects: The consequences of exposing the FETUS in utero to certain factors, such as NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; DRUGS; RADIATION; and other physical or chemical factors. These consequences are observed later in the offspring after BIRTH.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Family Conflict: Struggle or disagreement between parents, parent and child or other members of a family.Motion Pictures as Topic: The art, technique, or business of producing motion pictures for entertainment, propaganda, or instruction.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Breast Feeding: The nursing of an infant at the breast.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Socialization: The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Sex Characteristics: Those characteristics that distinguish one SEX from the other. The primary sex characteristics are the OVARIES and TESTES and their related hormones. Secondary sex characteristics are those which are masculine or feminine but not directly related to reproduction.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Personality Inventory: Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Weight Gain: Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.Psychotic Disorders: Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Absorptiometry, Photon: A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.Family Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.Adiposity: The amount of fat or lipid deposit at a site or an organ in the body, an indicator of body fat status.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Quebec: A province of eastern Canada. Its capital is Quebec. The region belonged to France from 1627 to 1763 when it was lost to the British. The name is from the Algonquian quilibek meaning the place where waters narrow, referring to the gradually narrowing channel of the St. Lawrence or to the narrows of the river at Cape Diamond. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p993 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p440)Friends: Persons whom one knows, likes, and trusts.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.DenmarkRisk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.BangladeshEpidemiologic Research Design: The form and structure of analytic studies in epidemiologic and clinical research.Osteoarthritis, Knee: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the knee joint consisting of three large categories: conditions that block normal synchronous movement, conditions that produce abnormal pathways of motion, and conditions that cause stress concentration resulting in changes to articular cartilage. (Crenshaw, Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics, 8th ed, p2019)ChicagoLanguage Development: The gradual expansion in complexity and meaning of symbols and sounds as perceived and interpreted by the individual through a maturational and learning process. Stages in development include babbling, cooing, word imitation with cognition, and use of short sentences.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Alzheimer Disease: A degenerative disease of the BRAIN characterized by the insidious onset of DEMENTIA. Impairment of MEMORY, judgment, attention span, and problem solving skills are followed by severe APRAXIAS and a global loss of cognitive abilities. The condition primarily occurs after age 60, and is marked pathologically by severe cortical atrophy and the triad of SENILE PLAQUES; NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES; and NEUROPIL THREADS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1049-57)Marriage: The social institution involving legal and/or religious sanction whereby individuals are joined together.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Human Development: Continuous sequential changes which occur in the physiological and psychological functions during the life-time of an individual.Affective Symptoms: Mood or emotional responses dissonant with or inappropriate to the behavior and/or stimulus.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Bias (Epidemiology): Any deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to such deviation. Bias can result from several sources: one-sided or systematic variations in measurement from the true value (systematic error); flaws in study design; deviation of inferences, interpretations, or analyses based on flawed data or data collection; etc. There is no sense of prejudice or subjectivity implied in the assessment of bias under these conditions.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Physical Fitness: The ability to carry out daily tasks and perform physical activities in a highly functional state, often as a result of physical conditioning.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Infant Behavior: Any observable response or action of a neonate or infant up through the age of 23 months.Object Attachment: Emotional attachment to someone or something in the environment.Causality: The relating of causes to the effects they produce. Causes are termed necessary when they must always precede an effect and sufficient when they initiate or produce an effect. Any of several factors may be associated with the potential disease causation or outcome, including predisposing factors, enabling factors, precipitating factors, reinforcing factors, and risk factors.Developmental Disabilities: Disorders in which there is a delay in development based on that expected for a given age level or stage of development. These impairments or disabilities originate before age 18, may be expected to continue indefinitely, and constitute a substantial impairment. Biological and nonbiological factors are involved in these disorders. (From American Psychiatric Glossary, 6th ed)Schools: Educational institutions.FinlandCardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).New Zealand: A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.MarylandTwins: Two individuals derived from two FETUSES that were fertilized at or about the same time, developed in the UTERUS simultaneously, and born to the same mother. Twins are either monozygotic (TWINS, MONOZYGOTIC) or dizygotic (TWINS, DIZYGOTIC).Overweight: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is above certain standard of acceptable or desirable weight. In the scale of BODY MASS INDEX, overweight is defined as having a BMI of 25.0-29.9 kg/m2. Overweight may or may not be due to increases in body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE), hence overweight does not equal "over fat".Social Identification: The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Includes two similar disorders: oppositional defiant disorder and CONDUCT DISORDERS. Symptoms occurring in children with these disorders include: defiance of authority figures, angry outbursts, and other antisocial behaviors.Nutritional Status: State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.Antisocial Personality Disorder: A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Suicidal Ideation: A risk factor for suicide attempts and completions, it is the most common of all suicidal behavior, but only a minority of ideators engage in overt self-harm.Social Control, Informal: Those forms of control which are exerted in less concrete and tangible ways, as through folkways, mores, conventions, and public sentiment.

Effect of growth hormone treatment on adult height of children with idiopathic short stature. Genentech Collaborative Group. (1/19822)

BACKGROUND: Short-term administration of growth hormone to children with idiopathic short stature results in increases in growth rate and standard-deviation scores for height. However, the effect of long-term growth hormone therapy on adult height in these children is unknown. METHODS: We studied 121 children with idiopathic short stature, all of whom had an initial height below the third percentile, low growth rates, and maximal stimulated serum concentrations of growth hormone of at least 10 microg per liter. The children were treated with growth hormone (0.3 mg per kilogram of body weight per week) for 2 to 10 years. Eighty of these children have reached adult height, with a bone age of at least 16 years in the boys and at least 14 years in the girls, and pubertal stage 4 or 5. The difference between the predicted adult height before treatment and achieved adult height was compared with the corresponding difference in three untreated normal or short-statured control groups. RESULTS: In the 80 children who have reached adult height, growth hormone treatment increased the mean standard-deviation score for height (number of standard deviations from the mean height for chronologic age) from -2.7 to -1.4. The mean (+/-SD) difference between predicted adult height before treatment and achieved adult height was +5.0+/-5.1 cm for boys and +5.9+/-5.2 cm for girls. The difference between predicted and achieved adult height among treated boys was 9.2 cm greater than the corresponding difference among untreated boys with initial standard-deviation scores of less than -2, and the difference among treated girls was 5.7 cm greater than the difference among untreated girls. CONCLUSION: Long-term administration of growth hormone to children with idiopathic short stature can increase adult height to a level above the predicted adult height and above the adult height of untreated historical control children.  (+info)

Incidence and occupational pattern of leukaemias, lymphomas, and testicular tumours in western Ireland over an 11 year period. (2/19822)

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To determine incidence of the following malignancies, testicular tumours, all leukaemias and all lymphomas in the West of Ireland in an 11 year period. Secondly, to examine the relation between disease patterns and available occupational data in male subjects of working age. DESIGN: A census survey of all cases occurring in the three counties in the Western Health Board (WHB) area, Galway, Mayo and Roscommon, for the 11 year period 1980 to 1990 inclusive. Average annual age standardised incidence rates for the period were calculated using the 1986 census data. Rates for the area are compared with rates from the southern region of Ireland, which had a tumour registry. Trends over the time period are evaluated. All male subjects for whom occupational data were available were categorised using the Irish socioeconomic group classification and incidence rates by occupation were compared using the standardised incidence ratio method. In one of the counties, Galway, a detailed occupational history of selected cases and an age matched control group was also elicited through patients' general practitioners. SETTING: All available case records in the West of Ireland. RESULTS: There are no national incidence records for the period. Compared with data from the Southern Tumour Registry, the number of cases of women with myeloid leukaemias was significantly lower. Male leukaemia rates were significantly lower as a group (SIR 84 (95% CI 74, 95) but not when considered as individual categories. Regression analysis revealed an increasing trend in the number of new cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among both men (r = 0.47, p = 0.02) and women (r = 0.90, p = 0.0001) and of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia in men (r = 0.77, p = 0.005) and women (r = 0.68 p = 0.02) in the WHB region over the last decade. Four hundred and fifty six male cases over the age of 15 years were identified and adequate occupational information was available for 74% of these. Standardised incidence ratios of testicular tumours 100, 938) and agriworkers other than farmers (SIR 377, 95% CI 103, 967). There were also significantly increased incidence ratios for both non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (SIR 169, 95% CI 124, 266) and three categories of leukaemias among farmers. Hodgkin's disease and acute myeloid leukaemias were significantly increased among semi-skilled people. Interview data with 90 cases and 54 controls of both sexes revealed that among farmers, cases (n = 31) were significantly less likely than controls (n = 20) to use tractor mounted spraying techniques (OR = 0.19 (95% CI 0.04, 0.80)) and less likely to wear protective masks (OR 0.22 (95% CI 0.05, 0.84)). CONCLUSIONS: Trends of increase in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and some leukaemias are consistent with studies elsewhere. The study provides further evidence of the relation between agricultural work and certain lymphoproliferative cancers. The possible carcinogenic role of chemicals used in agricultural industries must be considered as an explanation.  (+info)

Do housing tenure and car access predict health because they are simply markers of income or self esteem? A Scottish study. (3/19822)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate relations between health (using a range of measures) and housing tenure or car access; and to test the hypothesis that observed relations between these asset based measures and health are simply because they are markers for income or self esteem. DESIGN: Analysis of data from second wave of data collection of West of Scotland Twenty-07 study, collected in 1991 by face to face interviews conducted by nurse interviewers. SETTING: The Central Clydeside Conurbation, in the West of Scotland. SUBJECTS: 785 people (354 men, 431 women) in their late 30s, and 718 people (358 men, 359 women) in their late 50s, participants in a longitudinal study. MEASURES: General Health Questionnaire scores, respiratory function, waist/hip ratio, number of longstanding illnesses, number of symptoms in the last month, and systolic blood pressure; household income adjusted for household size and composition; Rosenberg self esteem score; housing tenure and care access. RESULTS: On bivariate analysis, all the health measures were significantly associated with housing tenure, and all except waist/hip ratio with car access; all except waist/hip ratio were related to income, and all except systolic blood pressure were related to self esteem. In models controlling for age, sex, and their interaction, neither waist/hip ratio nor systolic blood pressure remained significantly associated with tenure or care access. Significant relations with all the remaining health measures persisted after further controlling for income or self esteem. CONCLUSIONS: Housing tenure and car access may not only be related to health because they are markers for income or psychological traits; they may also have some directly health promoting or damaging effects. More research is needed to establish mechanisms by which they may influence health, and to determine the policy implications of their association with health.  (+info)

Carotenoid intakes, assessed by dietary questionnaire, are associated with plasma carotenoid concentrations in an elderly population. (4/19822)

High intakes of fruits and vegetables and of carotenoids are associated with a lower risk for a variety of chronic diseases. It is therefore important to test the validity of dietary questionnaires that assess these intakes. We compared intakes of five carotenoids, as calculated from responses to the Willett 126-item food-frequency questionnaire, with corresponding biochemical measures. Subjects included 346 women and 201 men, aged 67-93 y, in the Framingham Heart Study. Unadjusted correlations were higher among women than men as follows: alpha-carotene 0.33 and 0.18, beta-carotene, 0.36 and 0.25; beta-cryptoxanthin, 0.44 and 0.32; lycopene, 0.35 and 0.21; and lutein + zeaxanthin, 0.27 and 0.10, respectively. Adjustment for age, energy intake, body mass index (BMI, kg/m2), plasma cholesterol concentrations and smoking reduced the gender differences, respectively, to the following: alpha-carotene 0.30 and 0.28; beta-carotene, 0.34 and 0.31; beta-cryptoxanthin, 0.45 and 0.36; lycopene, 0.36 and 0.31; and lutein + zeaxanthin, 0.24 and 0.14. Plots of adjusted mean plasma carotenoid concentration by quintile of respective carotenoid intake show apparent greater responsiveness among women, compared with men, to dietary intake of alpha- and beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin, but similar blood-diet relationships for lycopene and lutein + zeaxanthin. Reported daily intake of fruits and vegetables correlated most strongly with plasma beta-cryptoxanthin and beta-carotene among women and with plasma alpha- and beta-carotene among men. With the exception of lutein + zeaxanthin, this dietary questionnaire does provide reasonable rankings of carotenoid status among elderly subjects, with the strongest correlations for beta-cryptoxanthin. Appropriate adjustment of confounders is necessary to clarify these associations among men.  (+info)

Obstructive uropathy and hydronephrosis in male KK-Ay mice: a report of cases. (5/19822)

Uropathy associated with hydronephrosis was observed frequently in our male KK-Ay mouse colony during a long-term study of diabetes. The lesion occurred in 24 of the 31 KK-Ay male mice and accounted for the greatest number of spontaneous deaths among them. It was observed after 4 months of age and involved about hard plugs of altered seminal material resembling the seminal vesicle secretion. The plugs became impacted in the urethral bulb and the bladder. The penile anatomy, with its flexure, pressure on the urethra from the bulbocavernosus muscle, and the characteristic ability of the seminal fluid to easily coagulate to form the vaginal plug may have contributed to the lesion. Correlation between development of the uropathy and diabetes has not been established.  (+info)

Measurement of striatal D2 dopamine receptor density and affinity with [11C]-raclopride in vivo: a test-retest analysis. (6/19822)

Subacute and long-term stability of measurements of D2 dopamine receptor density (Bmax), affinity (Kd) was studied with positron emission tomography in eight healthy male volunteers. [11C]-Raclopride and the transient equilibrium method were used to measure D2 receptor characteristics. The interval between measurements (scan pairs) was 3 to 7 weeks (subacute) for four subjects and 6 to 11 months (long-term) for four subjects. A test-retest analysis of quantitative measurements of D2 receptor Bmax and Kd was compared with that done on binding potential (BP, Bmax/Kd) measures. In addition, the effect of error in defining the transient equilibrium time (tmax) in the parameter estimation procedure was explored with simulations. The subacute test-retest indicates good reproducibility of D2 receptor density, affinity, and BP ratio measurements with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.90, 0.96, and 0.86, respectively. The variability of the measurements after 6 to 11 months was slightly higher than that seen in a subacute testing for Kd and more clearly so for binding potential and Bmax. The absolute variability in Bmax (14.5%) measurements was consistently higher than that of Kd (8.4%) or BP (7.9%) both in subacute and long-term measurements. Simulations indicated that the Bmax and Kd estimation procedure is more sensitive to error in the tmax than that for the BP. The results indicate a good overall stability of the equilibrium method with [11C]raclopride for measuring dopamine D2 receptor binding characteristics in the striatum. The BP approach is more stable than Kd and especially Bmax measurements. Error in defining the tmax in particular in the low specific radioactivity scan may be one source of greater variability in Bmax versus BP. However, a higher intraindividual variability in measurements of the D2 receptor Bmax also may include a component of continuous regulation of this parameter over time. These methodologic aspects should be considered in the design and interpretation of longitudinal studies on D2 dopamine receptor characteristics with [11C]-raclopride.  (+info)

New-onset sustained ventricular tachycardia after cardiac surgery. (7/19822)

BACKGROUND: The de novo occurrence of sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) after CABG has been described, but the incidence, mortality rate, long-term follow-up, and mechanism are not well defined. METHODS AND RESULTS: This prospective study enrolled consecutive patients undergoing CABG at a single institution. Patients were followed up for the development of sustained VT, and a detailed analysis of clinical, angiographic, and surgical variables associated with the occurrence of VT was performed. A total of 382 patients participated, and 12 patients (3.1%) experienced >/=1 episode of sustained VT 4.1+/-4.8 days after CABG. In 11 of 12 patients, no postoperative complication explained the VT; 1 patient had a perioperative myocardial infarction. The in-hospital mortality rate was 25%. Patients with VT were more likely to have prior myocardial infarction (92% versus 50%, P<0.01), severe congestive heart failure (56% versus 21%, P<0.01), and ejection fraction <0.40 (70% versus 29%, P<0.01). When all 3 factors were present, the risk of VT was 30%, a 14-fold increase. Patients with VT had more noncollateralized totally occluded vessels on angiogram (1.4+/-0.97 versus 0.54+/-0.7, P<0.01), a bypass graft across a noncollateralized occluded vessel (1.50+/-1.0 versus 0.42+/-0.62, P<0.01), and a bypass graft across a noncollateralized occluded vessel to an infarct zone (1.50+/-1.0 versus 0.17+/-0.38, P<0.01). By multivariate analysis, the number of bypass grafts across a noncollateralized occluded vessel to an infarct zone was the only independent factor predicting VT. CONCLUSIONS: The first presentation of sustained monomorphic VT in the recovery period after CABG is uncommon, but the incidence is high in specific clinical subsets. Placement of a bypass graft across a noncollateralized total occlusion in a vessel supplying an infarct zone was strongly and independently associated with the development of VT.  (+info)

Septicemia in dialysis patients: incidence, risk factors, and prognosis. (8/19822)

BACKGROUND: Infection is second to cardiovascular disease as a cause of death in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and septicemia causes a majority of these infectious deaths. To identify patients at high risk and to characterize modifiable risk factors for septicemia, we examined the incidence, risk factors, and prognosis for septicemia in a large, representative group of U.S. dialysis patients. METHODS: We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of incident ESRD patients in the case-mix study of the U.S. Renal Data System with seven years of follow-up from hospitalization and death records. Poisson regression was used to examine independent risk factors for hospital-managed septicemia. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to assess the independent effect of septicemia on all-cause mortality and on death from septicemia. Separate analyses were performed for patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD). RESULTS: Over seven years of follow-up, 11.7% of 4005 HD patients and 9.4% of 913 PD patients had at least one episode of septicemia. Older age and diabetes were independent risk factors for septicemia in all patients. Among HD patients, low serum albumin, temporary vascular access, and dialyzer reuse were also associated with increased risk. Among PD patients, white race and having no health insurance at dialysis initiation were also risk factors. Patients with septicemia had twice the risk of death from any cause and a fivefold to ninefold increased risk of death from septicemia. CONCLUSIONS: Septicemia, which carries a marked increased risk of death, occurs frequently in patients on PD as well as HD. Early referral to a nephrologist, improving nutrition, and avoiding temporary vascular access may decrease the incidence of septicemia. Further study of how race, insurance status, and dialyzer reuse can contribute to the risk of septicemia among ESRD patients is indicated.  (+info)

  • Briggs R, Carey D, Kennelly SP, Kenny RA (2018) Longitudinal association between orthostatic hypotension at 30 seconds post-standing and late-life depression. (springer.com)
  • In 2017/2018 through interviewing and shadowing HR Business Partners and line-managers, as well as HR managers within the global HR function on HR's work, practice and tools, as well as studies of relevant documents such as leadership documents etc. (gu.se)
  • The search was completed in April 1997 and identified six studies of asthma incidence, seven of prognosis, 22 case-control studies, and 10 case series addressing disease severity. (bmj.com)
  • If you have questions about your rights as a participant in this study, please call the Research Ethics Review Board at the National Center for Health Statistics, toll free, at 1-800-223-8118. (cdc.gov)
  • Research method used to study changes over time. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In longitudinal research, results are recorded for the same group of subjects, referred to as a cohort, throughout the course of the study. (encyclopedia.com)
  • To provide an analytical research database for the purpose of studying the effect of demographic and socio-economic differentials on U.S. mortality rates. (census.gov)
  • We have examined the validity of SMPY's identification and educational facilitation procedures by means of longitudinal research. (hoagiesgifted.org)
  • Study design depends greatly on the nature of the research question. (iwh.on.ca)
  • Each newsletter required 31 h of study personnel time (mostly research student) to produce. (springer.com)
  • We would also like to thank the Canadian Cancer Society, the Canadian Institutes for Health Research, and Prostate Cancer Canada for providing funding for this study, as well as the larger studies. (springer.com)
  • The larger studies, the newsletters, and the survey were all approved by the institutional research ethics board prior to study commencement. (springer.com)
  • Longitudinal research involves the follow up of individuals, households, communities or other groups over time. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • The Editors seek to ensure that all research reporting is accessible to the journal's multi-disciplinary readership and encourage comparisons and collaborations between countries and studies. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • At the request of program sponsors, the Krell Institute contracted with Westat, an employee-owned research corporation based in Rockville, Maryland, to conduct a study of the more than 400 DOE CSGF fellows and alumni. (krellinst.org)
  • There is growing recognition of the powerful role that longitudinal research can play in building evidence for policy and programme development, and there is considerable interest in establishing new longitudinal studies in developing countries. (unicef-irc.org)
  • Symposium attendees addressed a set of thematic, methodological and governance related issues on longitudinal research. (unicef-irc.org)
  • The Symposium seeks to provide an opportunity to reflect on challenges and opportunities of longitudinal research in low income settings, identifying lessons and best practices for future studies. (unicef-irc.org)
  • This study will be conducted as part of the NIH-supported Childhood Liver Disease Research and Education Network (ChiLDREN). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • A longitudinal study is a correlational research study that involves repeated observations of the same variables over long periods of time - often many decades. (primidi.com)
  • Nationwide Children's Hospital is one of only five institutions nationally to join a multi-institution clinical research study to understand the benefits and risks of bariatric surgery in adolescents. (nationwidechildrens.org)
  • The Teen-Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) research study is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). (nationwidechildrens.org)
  • Adolescents participating in this clinical research study will visit the Clinical Research Services research facility at Nationwide Children's four times over a span of two years to complete questionnaires, provide blood and urine samples and to have body measurements recorded. (nationwidechildrens.org)
  • The study is being undertaken by a global research team led by University of Technology Sydney. (edu.au)
  • The achievements of this study can in large part be credited to his conscientious management and commitment to the integrity of the research objectives. (hhs.gov)
  • This document is the work of both parts of the Pennhurst Longitudinal Study team, Temple University and Human Services Research Institute, and was developed at the request of the Office of Human Development Services in the Region III Office of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (hhs.gov)
  • Under the assumption that UWC develops particular characteristics in its community members (represented by students and alumni) that will lead them to have a positive impact on society, the central research question of the exploratory study was: "What characteristics related to ethical standards does UWC develop in its students and how does this manifest in their daily lives, as current students or later as alumni? (uwc.org)
  • To address some of the potential issues of using a longitudinal design in a conflict-affected setting, the research team from John Hopkins and their NGO partners (Comitato Internazionale per lo Sviluppo dei Popoli - CISP) had to carefully consider the study design. (endvawnow.org)
  • Funded by the National Institute on Aging, the grant will support ongoing research, including large-scale behavioral genetics studies, of cognition, aging and the risk for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). (news-medical.net)
  • We, the directors of NIDA, NIAAA, NCI's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, and NICHD, are now calling on the research community to help us design a large longitudinal study that would accomplish this objective. (drugabuse.gov)
  • this will be followed this summer by a formal request for information (RFI) to get input from the research community on proposed study design and measures. (drugabuse.gov)
  • Purpose: Accelerate research on lung complications associated with HIV-infection by characterizing lung infections, other HIV-associated lung complications, and their consequences in longitudinal studies in existing HIV-infected cohorts and other established groups of HIV-infected patients. (nih.gov)
  • The information collected by these calls is only being used for this research study. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Clinical Research Services, a one-stop, comprehensive resource for investigators conducting clinical and translational research, will be providing the research support and clinical resources for this study. (nationwidechildrens.org)
  • The Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey is a government-funded, longitudinal social research project, for which Roy Morgan Research conducts the survey. (roymorgan.com)
  • At the time of the 1992 WLS study, very few households had Internet access, and an Internet module would have been impractical at that time. (wisc.edu)
  • DESIGN: This prospective study, based on a random sample of the total female population of 430,000 in Gothenburg, Sweden, was started in 1968, with follow-ups in 1974, 1980, and 1992. (gu.se)
  • In addition to the cross-sectional surveys, there are several longitudinal studies that track the same person, family, or household over time. (hhs.gov)
  • Table 6-3 presents a summary of the eight longitudinal surveys that were identified and reviewed for this effort according to the same features used to review the cross-sectional surveys. (hhs.gov)
  • 9 As with the cross-sectional surveys, the longitudinal surveys were initially examined according to four key selection criteria to identify surveys that offer the best opportunity to be enhanced to inform efforts to develop a typology of homeless families. (hhs.gov)
  • BACKGROUND The relation of parental smoking to wheezing and asthma occurring after the first year of life was assessed by a systematic quantitative review of case-control and longitudinal studies, complementing earlier reviews of cross sectional surveys and wheezing in early childhood. (bmj.com)
  • A total of 6796 children of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) birth cohort were interviewed at elementary school age (8 and 10 years) about bullying experiences with a previously validated bullying interview and at secondary school age (12.9 years) about parasomnias such as nightmares, night terrors and sleepwalking by trained postgraduate psychologists. (aappublications.org)
  • Based on the expected size of the Annual Social and Economic Supplements to be conducted, the expected number of deaths to be added to the NLMS through the updating process will increase the mortality content of the study to over 550,000 cases out of a total number of approximately 3.8 million records. (census.gov)
  • Hammond and colleagues recent Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) longitudinal cohort study is a valuable contribution to electronic cigarette related public health problems for adolescents (1). (cmaj.ca)
  • This systematic review and meta-analysis of 9 longitudinal studies found consistent and strong evidence that electronic cigarette use is associated with increased odds of subsequent cigarette smoking initiation and current cigarette smoking among adolescents. (cmaj.ca)
  • The magnitude, chronicity, impairment, longitudinal stability and distinction from anxiety and depression associated with this condition in the general population, suggest that neurasthenia is an important diagnostic entity for which additional validation studies should be undertaken. (prohealth.com)
  • The objective of this study was to develop a prospectively applicable method for classifying comorbid conditions which might alter the risk of mortality for use in longitudinal studies. (nih.gov)
  • The method of classifying comorbidity provides a simple, readily applicable and valid method of estimating risk of death from comorbid disease for use in longitudinal studies. (nih.gov)
  • Unfortunately, similar studies and claims still occur in metabolomics despite contrary experience from larger cohorts ( 3 ). (pnas.org)
  • This study explores the exegetical meanings, or meanings derived from local interpretation, that a megaproject can encapsulate and how those meanings shape the megaproject's process. (pmi.org)
  • The article explores the longitudinal relationship between subjective and objective deprivation in early adolescence on the one hand, and criminal offending in adolescence and early adulthood on the other. (diva-portal.org)
  • The good news is, with the combined resources and ingenuity of multiple NIH institutes and other partners, we now have the capability to conduct such a study-one that would help us more confidently establish the effects of occasional or regular use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs on the brains and lives of young Americans. (drugabuse.gov)
  • This study will cover topics such as heart disease, diabetes, and other health conditions, and will help us understand how our health changes over time. (cdc.gov)
  • If you received our letter and are interested in helping us with this study, we would like to arrange an appointment with you at a time that is most convenient for you. (cdc.gov)
  • The longitudinal study allows the researcher to focus on these children as they mature and record developmental patterns across time. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In this method, the subjects, or cohort, are drawn from different groups and are studied at the same point in time. (encyclopedia.com)
  • longitudinal study (long-i- tew -di-năl) n. a systematic study of a group of people over a period of time. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Longitudinal studies deal with change over time among individuals or groups. (nationalarchives.gov.uk)
  • Longitudinal studies offer many of the same potential advantages as cross-sectional studies, and they have the added potential benefit of tracking people over time and thus may provide an opportunity to examine entries into, and exits out of, homelessness (depending on their tracking methods). (hhs.gov)
  • The defining feature of a cross-sectional study is that it can compare different population groups at a single point in time. (iwh.on.ca)
  • The key here is that longitudinal studies extend beyond a single moment in time. (iwh.on.ca)
  • The longitudinal study design would account for cholesterol levels at the onset of a walking regime and as the walking behaviour continued over time. (iwh.on.ca)
  • However, because of the repeated observation at the individual level, they have more power than cross-sectional observational studies, by virtue of being able to exclude time-invariant unobserved individual differences and also of observing the temporal order of events. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some of the disadvantages of longitudinal study are that they take a lot of time and are very expensive. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cross-sectional study Time series Repeated measures design Shadish, William R. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some of the disadvantages of longitudinal study include the fact that it takes a lot of time and is very expensive. (primidi.com)
  • To be considered for the Teen-LABS study, an adolescent must be 19 years of age or younger at the time of study enrollment, have a Body Mass Index of 95% or greater, and have been approved to have bariatric surgery at Nationwide Children's Hospital. (nationwidechildrens.org)
  • Longitudinal and cohort studies follow the same group of individuals over time. (endvawnow.org)
  • Given the inherent time frame required of this approach, it can be very challenging to employ such a study in conflict and post-conflict settings where conditions can change rapidly. (endvawnow.org)
  • Case-control studies are relatively simple and economical to carry out, but the one weakness is that only one outcome may be studied at a time. (endvawnow.org)
  • As a group, scans of SDAT subjects showed greater atrophy than those of control subjects in all volumetric indexes at each time of testing and demonstrated greater progression of atrophy during the study period. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The longitudinal design involved repeated measures nested within classes and schools and repeated measures on schools that were changing over time. (readingrecovery.org)
  • Footprints In Time was an innovative study aiming to improve the understanding of, and policy response to, the diverse circumstances faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, their families and communities. (roymorgan.com)
  • A two-site, two-arm assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a 12-session parent-mediated social communication intervention delivered between 9 and 14 months of age (Intervention in the British Autism Study of Infant Siblings-Video Interaction for Promoting Positive Parenting), against no intervention. (nih.gov)
  • Two study newsletters issues were mailed out 4 months apart to prostate cancer patients participating in a bone health and/or exercise intervention trial. (springer.com)
  • A longitudinal design was used to study the effectiveness of an intervention, the Communities Care program (CCP), in changing harmful social norms associated with GBV in a community in Mogadishu, Somalia. (endvawnow.org)
  • This study reports a mean total cholesterol (TC) of 5.1 mmol/L (95% CI 5.0-5.1 mmol/L) and a mean LDL-C of 2.9 mmol/L (95% CI 2.8-2.9 mmol/L) in those aged 50-79 years. (springer.com)
  • The aim of this study is to document the distribution of serum cholesterol in a community living population of older adults aged 50-79 years in Ireland and apply clinical guideline targets [ 9 ] to examine the awareness, treatment and control of hypercholesterolaemia in a subgroup aged 50-64 years according to their absolute risk of CVD. (springer.com)
  • Statistics Sweden (SCB) has a system of longitudinal sample surveys for reviewing the school situation during years 3-9 in compulsory education. (scb.se)
  • During the 30 years of the study, around 1 million people have been recorded in the sample at some point. (nationalarchives.gov.uk)
  • Preschoolers are eating more grains, fruits, and vegetables, but youngsters are still consuming too much sugar and juice, according to a recently released study covering the years 1977 to 1998. (edweek.org)
  • The Early School Leavers longitudinal study followed a sample of young people who left Queensland schools in Years 10, 11 or before completing Year 12 during 2010 and participated in the 2011 Early School Leavers survey. (qld.gov.au)
  • Reports exploring the pathways taken by this group of young people in the years since leaving school are available for each survey year (or wave) of the longitudinal study. (qld.gov.au)
  • Thanks to the responsiveness of current and past fellowship recipients, the study provides a comprehensive look at the satisfaction and impact of those the program supported over its first 25 years. (krellinst.org)
  • In 1974, a longitudinal study was planned to monitor over a period of four years the growth, health, and lifestyle of boys and girls entering secondary school. (emgo.nl)
  • The general purpose of the ALSA study is to gain further understanding of how social, biomedical and environmental factors are associated with age related changes in health and well-being of persons aged 70 years and over. (edu.au)
  • provides a descriptive overview of the first 15 years of the study and its policy implications. (edu.au)
  • Studies of wheezing illness in the first two years of life 1 and cross sectional studies of asthma and wheeze 3 have been reviewed earlier in this series. (bmj.com)
  • Part 1 of this study is a retrospective cohort study of 92 men and 59 women (mean age, 51 years) who had metabolic syndrome and 154 randomly selected adults matched for age and sex who did not have the syndrome. (nih.gov)
  • This study shows that adult onset wheeze represents an important source of morbidity that may be currently underrecognised and undertreated. (bmj.com)
  • i ) metabolic heterogeneity of individuals, ( ii ) cross-sectional vs. longitudinal study design, ( iii ) multiple statistical tests, and ( iv ) independent biological replication. (pnas.org)
  • We also intend to present a revised design for the study, based on input from the RFI, at a satellite symposium at the annual Society for Neuroscience meeting in November, in Washington DC. (drugabuse.gov)
  • The planned outcome of the pilot study should be a funding application to create a new LPS. (wellcome.ac.uk)
  • To explore whether, in early fetal growth restriction (FGR), the longitudinal pattern of fetal heart rate (FHR) short-term variation (STV) can be used to identify imminent fetal distress and whether abnormalities of FHR recordings are associated with 2-year infant outcome. (nih.gov)
  • The study will focus on the natural history, disease progression, treatment, and outcome of individuals with UCD. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The researcher's intent was not specifically to study Reading Recovery, but information on Reading Recovery's effectiveness emerged as an outcome. (readingrecovery.org)
  • METHODS: We studied 3961 randomly selected public school students and 1 parent per student in 3 US metropolitan areas in fifth and again in tenth grades. (rand.org)
  • The European Longitudinal Study of Pregnancy and Childhood (‎ELSPAC)‎ was initiated by the Regional Office in 1985 to improve epidemiological knowledge of factors influencing children's health in European countries. (who.int)
  • Biological samples including blood, urine, hair, nails, saliva and placenta have been collected from study children and their parents since early pregnancy. (bris.ac.uk)
  • This study has enrolled a total of 1700 pregnant women and their children in Slovenia, Croatia, Italy and Greece to assess the impact of mercury exposure through fish consumption during pregnancy on child neurodevelopment. (lww.com)
  • This study aims to describe the distribution of serum cholesterol in a community living population of older adults in Ireland and to examine the awareness, treatment and control of hypercholesterolaemia according to CVD risk status. (springer.com)
  • We studied the onset of wheezing in adults who had had no respiratory symptoms as children. (bmj.com)
  • This age-specific pattern of onset is similar to that found in other population studies of wheeze in adults. (bmj.com)
  • Further work in larger populations is still required to refine the approach because the number of patients with any given condition in this study was relatively small. (nih.gov)
  • In this paper we have included longitudinal and case-control studies of asthma or wheeze occurring after infancy and case series of asthmatic patients among whom parental smoking was related to disease severity. (bmj.com)
  • This study seeks to determine the biologic causes of inflammation in patients with Transverse Myelitis (TM) Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder (NMOSD) and related conditions. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • A total of up to 224 patients will take part in this multicenter study. (bioportfolio.com)
  • This study draws insights from a novel, rich and powerful dataset containing hundreds of thousands contractual transactions made by members of HackForums - the most popular online cybercrime community. (lightbluetouchpaper.org)
  • The report 'Homecare Re-ablement Prospective Longitudinal Study Final Report' (Dec 2010) commissioned by the Department of Health's Care Services Efficiency Delivery programme (CSED) has provided further insight and understanding about the nature and beneficial impacts of homecare re-ablement. (scie.org.uk)
  • This report is dedicated to the memory of Dr. William Datel -- a scholar and humanitarian who made significant contributions to the Longitudinal Study and to services for mentally disabled persons. (hhs.gov)
  • The recommended citation for this publication is: Bradley, V.J., & Conroy, J.W. Third year comprehensive report of the Pennhurst Longitudina Study . (hhs.gov)
  • Such a report is necessary because the documents generated by the Pennhurst Study now extend into the thousands of pages. (hhs.gov)
  • You are encouraged to report your symptoms to your treating physicians during the study, especially if you have any symptom that you rate greater than 7 on the 0 to 10 scale. (bioportfolio.com)