Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Liver Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced tumors of the LIVER.Carcinogens: Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.Carcinoma, Hepatocellular: A primary malignant neoplasm of epithelial liver cells. It ranges from a well-differentiated tumor with EPITHELIAL CELLS indistinguishable from normal HEPATOCYTES to a poorly differentiated neoplasm. The cells may be uniform or markedly pleomorphic, or form GIANT CELLS. Several classification schemes have been suggested.Rats, Inbred F344Liver Diseases: Pathological processes of the LIVER.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Liver Cirrhosis: Liver disease in which the normal microcirculation, the gross vascular anatomy, and the hepatic architecture have been variably destroyed and altered with fibrous septa surrounding regenerated or regenerating parenchymal nodules.Microsomes, Liver: Closed vesicles of fragmented endoplasmic reticulum created when liver cells or tissue are disrupted by homogenization. They may be smooth or rough.Liver Regeneration: Repair or renewal of hepatic tissue.Fatty Liver: Lipid infiltration of the hepatic parenchymal cells resulting in a yellow-colored liver. The abnormal lipid accumulation is usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES, either as a single large droplet or multiple small droplets. Fatty liver is caused by an imbalance in the metabolism of FATTY ACIDS.Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Liver Function Tests: Blood tests that are used to evaluate how well a patient's liver is working and also to help diagnose liver conditions.Mitochondria, Liver: Mitochondria in hepatocytes. As in all mitochondria, there are an outer membrane and an inner membrane, together creating two separate mitochondrial compartments: the internal matrix space and a much narrower intermembrane space. In the liver mitochondrion, an estimated 67% of the total mitochondrial proteins is located in the matrix. (From Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2d ed, p343-4)Drug-Induced Liver Injury: A spectrum of clinical liver diseases ranging from mild biochemical abnormalities to ACUTE LIVER FAILURE, caused by drugs, drug metabolites, and chemicals from the environment.Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous: Neoplasms containing cyst-like formations or producing mucin or serum.Liver Extracts: Extracts of liver tissue containing uncharacterized specific factors with specific activities; a soluble thermostable fraction of mammalian liver is used in the treatment of pernicious anemia.Liver Circulation: The circulation of BLOOD through the LIVER.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Liver Failure, Acute: A form of rapid-onset LIVER FAILURE, also known as fulminant hepatic failure, caused by severe liver injury or massive loss of HEPATOCYTES. It is characterized by sudden development of liver dysfunction and JAUNDICE. Acute liver failure may progress to exhibit cerebral dysfunction even HEPATIC COMA depending on the etiology that includes hepatic ISCHEMIA, drug toxicity, malignant infiltration, and viral hepatitis such as post-transfusion HEPATITIS B and HEPATITIS C.Neoplasms, Multiple Primary: Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.Liver Abscess: Solitary or multiple collections of PUS within the liver as a result of infection by bacteria, protozoa, or other agents.Liver Diseases, Alcoholic: Liver diseases associated with ALCOHOLISM. It usually refers to the coexistence of two or more subentities, i.e., ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER; ALCOHOLIC HEPATITIS; and ALCOHOLIC CIRRHOSIS.Kidney Neoplasms: Tumors or cancers of the KIDNEY.Hepatectomy: Excision of all or part of the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)Neoplasms, Second Primary: Abnormal growths of tissue that follow a previous neoplasm but are not metastases of the latter. The second neoplasm may have the same or different histological type and can occur in the same or different organs as the previous neoplasm but in all cases arises from an independent oncogenic event. The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause.Hepatocytes: The main structural component of the LIVER. They are specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that are organized into interconnected plates called lobules.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous: An adenocarcinoma producing mucin in significant amounts. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Thyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.Myeloproliferative Disorders: Conditions which cause proliferation of hemopoietically active tissue or of tissue which has embryonic hemopoietic potential. They all involve dysregulation of multipotent MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS, most often caused by a mutation in the JAK2 PROTEIN TYROSINE KINASE.Liver Cirrhosis, Experimental: Experimentally induced chronic injuries to the parenchymal cells in the liver to achieve a model for LIVER CIRRHOSIS.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic: FIBROSIS of the hepatic parenchyma due to chronic excess ALCOHOL DRINKING.Cystadenoma: A benign neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. In some instances, considerable portions of the neoplasm, or even the entire mass, may be cystic. (Stedman, 25th ed)Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.Parotid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PAROTID GLAND.Liver, Artificial: Devices for simulating the activities of the liver. They often consist of a hybrid between both biological and artificial materials.Liver Glycogen: Glycogen stored in the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)Neoplasms, Connective and Soft Tissue: Neoplasms developing from some structure of the connective and subcutaneous tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in connective or soft tissue.Neoplasms, Plasma Cell: Neoplasms associated with a proliferation of a single clone of PLASMA CELLS and characterized by the secretion of PARAPROTEINS.Appendiceal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the APPENDIX.Alanine Transaminase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-alanine and 2-oxoglutarate to pyruvate and L-glutamate. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.6.1.2.Ovarian Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.Cystadenoma, Mucinous: A multilocular tumor with mucin secreting epithelium. They are most often found in the ovary, but are also found in the pancreas, appendix, and rarely, retroperitoneal and in the urinary bladder. They are considered to have low-grade malignant potential.Gastrointestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, from the MOUTH to the ANAL CANAL.Endocrine Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ENDOCRINE GLANDS.End Stage Liver Disease: Final stage of a liver disease when the liver failure is irreversible and LIVER TRANSPLANTATION is needed.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Bile Duct Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the BILE DUCTS.Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal: Carcinoma that arises from the PANCREATIC DUCTS. It accounts for the majority of cancers derived from the PANCREAS.Neoplasms, Vascular Tissue: Neoplasms composed of vascular tissue. This concept does not refer to neoplasms located in blood vessels.Eye Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the EYE.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Nose Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the NOSE.Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced: Tumors, cancer or other neoplasms produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Salivary Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SALIVARY GLANDS.Adenoma: A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Adenocarcinoma, Papillary: An adenocarcinoma containing finger-like processes of vascular connective tissue covered by neoplastic epithelium, projecting into cysts or the cavity of glands or follicles. It occurs most frequently in the ovary and thyroid gland. (Stedman, 25th ed)Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.Carcinoma, Papillary: A malignant neoplasm characterized by the formation of numerous, irregular, finger-like projections of fibrous stroma that is covered with a surface layer of neoplastic epithelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Neoplasms, Muscle Tissue: Neoplasms composed of muscle tissue: skeletal, cardiac, or smooth. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in muscles.Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial: Neoplasms composed of glandular tissue, an aggregation of epithelial cells that elaborate secretions, and of any type of epithelium itself. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the various glands or in epithelial tissue.Intestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the INTESTINES.Testicular Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the TESTIS. Germ cell tumors (GERMINOMA) of the testis constitute 95% of all testicular neoplasms.Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Lymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Cystadenocarcinoma, Mucinous: A malignant cystic or semisolid tumor most often occurring in the ovary. Rarely, one is solid. This tumor may develop from a mucinous cystadenoma, or it may be malignant at the onset. The cysts are lined with tall columnar epithelial cells; in others, the epithelium consists of many layers of cells that have lost normal structure entirely. In the more undifferentiated tumors, one may see sheets and nests of tumor cells that have very little resemblance to the parent structure. (Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972, p184)Soft Tissue Neoplasms: Neoplasms of whatever cell type or origin, occurring in the extraskeletal connective tissue framework of the body including the organs of locomotion and their various component structures, such as nerves, blood vessels, lymphatics, etc.Adenoma, Liver Cell: A benign epithelial tumor of the LIVER.Hematologic Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.Vascular Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the vasculature system, such as ARTERIES and VEINS. They are differentiated from neoplasms of vascular tissue (NEOPLASMS, VASCULAR TISSUE), such as ANGIOFIBROMA or HEMANGIOMA.Uterine Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERUS.

Intensive investigation in management of Hodgkin's disease. (1/16288)

Ninety-eight patients with clinically localised Hodgkin's disease underwent laparotomy and splenectomy to determine the extent of microscopic spread. In 68 patients the procedure was carried out for untreated disease apparently confined above the diaphragm. Abdominal disease cannot be confidently excluded on the basis of non-invasive investigation at presentation. Clinical assessment of splenic disease was unreliable unless gross splenomegaly was present. Pedal lymphography was accurate in assessing para-aortic and iliac disease but of no value in assessing other intra-abdominal lymph node involvement, including that of the mesenteric lymph node. Trephine bone marrow biopsy findings were normal in all patients before surgery, and only one patient was found to have diseased bone marrow by Stryker-saw biopsy at operation. Liver disease was identified at operation in nine patients, some of whom were asymptomatic with clinically undetectable splenic and nodal disease. Detailed clinical staging failed to detect disease in one-third of patients who underwent laparotomy. These studies show that if radiotherapy is to remain the treatment of choice for disease truly localised to lymph nodes a detailed staging procedure, including laparotomy and splenectomy, remains essential. The value of this potentially curative treatment is considerably diminished in the patient who has been inadequately staged.  (+info)

Peripheral hepatojejunostomy as palliative treatment for irresectable malignant tumors of the liver hilum. (2/16288)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the concept of surgical decompression of the biliary tree by peripheral hepatojejunostomy for palliative treatment of jaundice in patients with irresectable malignant tumors of the liver hilum. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Jaundice, pruritus, and recurrent cholangitis are major clinical complications in patients with obstructive cholestasis resulting from malignant tumors of the liver hilum. Methods for palliative treatment include endoscopic stenting, percutaneous transhepatic drainage, and surgical decompression. The palliative treatment of choice should be safe, effective, and comfortable for the patient. METHODS: In a retrospective study, surgical technique, perioperative complications, and efficacy of treatment were analyzed for 56 patients who had received a peripheral hepatojejunostomy between 1982 and 1997. Laparotomy in all of these patients had been performed as an attempt for curative resection. RESULTS: Hepatojejunostomy was exclusively palliative in 50 patients and was used for bridging to resection or transplantation in 7. Anastomosis was bilateral in 36 patients and unilateral in 20. The 1-month mortality in the study group was 9%; median survival was 6 months. In patients surviving >1 month, a marked and persistent decrease in cholestasis was achieved in 87%, although complete return to normal was rare. Among the patients with a marked decrease in cholestasis, 72% had no or only mild clinical symptoms such as fever or jaundice. CONCLUSIONS: Peripheral hepatojejunostomy is a feasible and reasonably effective palliative treatment for patients with irresectable tumors of the liver hilum. In patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy for attempted curative resection, this procedure frequently leads to persistent-although rarely complete-decompression of the biliary tree. In a few cases it may also be used for bridging to transplantation or liver resection after relief of cholestasis.  (+info)

Risk of major liver resection in patients with underlying chronic liver disease: a reappraisal. (3/16288)

OBJECTIVE: To explore the relation of patient age, status of liver parenchyma, presence of markers of active hepatitis, and blood loss to subsequent death and complications in patients undergoing a similar major hepatectomy for the same disease using a standardized technique. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Major liver resection carries a high risk of postoperative liver failure in patients with chronic liver disease. However, this underlying liver disease may comprise a wide range of pathologic changes that have, in the past, not been well defined. METHODS: The nontumorous liver of 55 patients undergoing a right hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma was classified according to a semiquantitative grading of fibrosis. The authors analyzed the influence of this pathologic feature and of other preoperative variables on the risk of postoperative death and complications. RESULTS: Serum bilirubin and prothrombin time increased on postoperative day 1, and their speed of recovery was influenced by the severity of fibrosis. Incidence of death from liver failure was 32% in patients with grade 4 fibrosis (cirrhosis) and 0% in patients with grade 0 to 3 fibrosis. The preoperative serum aspartate transaminase (ASAT) level ranged from 68 to 207 IU/l in patients with cirrhosis who died, compared with 20 to 62 in patients with cirrhosis who survived. CONCLUSION: A major liver resection such as a right hepatectomy may be safely performed in patients with underlying liver disease, provided no additional risk factors are present. Patients with a preoperative increase in ASAT should undergo a liver biopsy to rule out the presence of grade 4 fibrosis, which should contraindicate this resection.  (+info)

Intrahepatic recurrence after curative resection of hepatocellular carcinoma: long-term results of treatment and prognostic factors. (4/16288)

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the long-term results of treatment and prognostic factors in patients with intrahepatic recurrence after curative resection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Recent studies have demonstrated the usefulness of re-resection, transarterial oily chemoembolization (TOCE), or percutaneous ethanol injection therapy (PEIT) in selected patients with intrahepatic recurrent HCC. The overall results of a treatment strategy combining these modalities have not been fully evaluated, and the prognostic factors determining survival in these patients remain to be clarified. METHODS: Two hundred and forty-four patients who underwent curative resection for HCC were followed for intrahepatic recurrence, which was treated aggressively with a strategy including different modalities. Survival results after recurrence and from initial hepatectomy were analyzed, and prognostic factors were determined by univariate and multivariate analysis using 27 clinicopathologic variables. RESULTS: One hundred and five patients (43%) with intrahepatic recurrence were treated with re-resection (11), TOCE (71), PEIT (6), systemic chemotherapy (8) or conservatively (9). The overall 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year survival rates from the time of recurrence were 65.5%, 34.9%, and 19.7%, respectively, and from the time of initial hepatectomy were 78.4%, 47.2%, and 30.9%, respectively. The re-resection group had the best survival, followed by the TOCE group. Multivariate analysis revealed Child's B or C grading, serum albumin < or = 40 g/l, multiple recurrent tumors, recurrence < or = 1 year after hepatectomy, and concurrent extrahepatic recurrence to be independent adverse prognostic factors. CONCLUSIONS: Aggressive treatment with a multimodality strategy could result in prolonged survival in patients with intrahepatic recurrence after curative resection for HCC. Prognosis was determined by the liver function status, interval to recurrence, number of recurrent tumors, any concurrent extrahepatic recurrence, and type of treatment.  (+info)

Tumour ablation and hepatic decompensation rates in multi-agent chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma. (5/16288)

Thirty-seven cirrhotic patients with 62 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) foci--most Child-Pugh class B or C and/or with large, inoperable tumours--underwent 148 sessions of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) using lipiodol, doxorubicin and cisplatin. Treatment efficacy was assessed by serial hepatic arteriography in 34/37 (91.9%) patients and abdominal CT scanning in 3/37 (8.1%) patients. Child-Pugh status was determined prior to each treatment session. Varying degrees of control of tumour neovascularity occurred for a median 390 days (range 90 to > 1680 days) in 33/34 (97.1%) patients in whom progress hepatic arteriography was performed. Ablation of tumour neovascularity occurred in 6/6 (100%), 4/12 (33.3%) and 6/16 (37.5%) patients with HCC diameters < 4 cm, 4-7 cm and > 8 cm, respectively (p < 0.02). Significantly more sessions were required for ablation of larger tumours (p < 0.05). Recurrent HCC was detected in 50% of patients after a median 240 days (range 60-1120 days). Deterioration in Child-Pugh status followed a session of TACE on 19/148 (12.8%) occasions but resulted in unscheduled hospitalization on only 4/148 (2.7%) occasions, the highest incidence (8.3%) in Child-Pugh C patients. Actuarial survival was 27/36 (75.0%) at 6 months, 17/34 (50.0%) at 12 months, 14/34 (41.2%) at 18 months, 9/31 (29.0%) at 24 months and 4/27 (14.8%) at 36 months. Multi-agent TACE with lipiodol, doxorubicin and cisplatin provides a useful anti-tumour effect, even in cirrhotic patients with large HCCs. The incidence of clinically significant deterioration in hepatic function due to ischaemia of non-tumorous liver is acceptably low, even in Child-Pugh C patients.  (+info)

Detection of liver metastases from pancreatic cancer using FDG PET. (6/16288)

We evaluated the potential of the glucose analog [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) as a PET tracer for the hepatic staging in 168 patients designated for resective pancreatic surgery. METHODS: Metastatic liver disease was confirmed or excluded during surgery or with CT follow-up for at least 6 mo. Proven metastases were then retrospectively identified on preoperative CT (gold standard). Hepatic PET scans of all patients were interpreted blindly. Any focal FDG uptake was considered malignant. Both proven hepatic metastases and suspicious hepatic PET lesions were then compared, lesion by lesion, with CT. Standardized uptake values (SUV) and tumor-to-liver ratios (T/L) were determined for the most intense lesion of each patient. RESULTS: Sensitivity of FDG PET was 68% (15 of 22 patients). The lesion detection rate was 97% (28 of 29 metastases) for lesions >1 cm and 43% (16 of 37 metastases) for lesions < or = 1 cm. Specificity was 95% (138 of 146 patients). Six of eight patients with false-positive results had marked intrahepatic cholestasis (versus 3 of 15 patients with true-positive lesions), one had an infrahepatic abscess and one had a right basal pulmonary metastasis. The SUV and T/L were 4.6+/-1.4 and 2.3+/-1.1, respectively, for malignant lesions and 4.1+/-1.5 and 1.9+/-0.3, respectively, for false-positive lesions and therefore are of limited value. CONCLUSION: FDG PET provides reliable hepatic staging for lesions >1 cm. False-positive results are associated with the presence of marked intrahepatic cholestasis. For lesions < or = 1 cm, FDG PET can define malignancy in 43% of suspicious CT lesions in the absence of dilated bile ducts.  (+info)

Clinical significance of circulating anti-p53 antibodies in European patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. (7/16288)

p53 alterations are considered to be predictive of poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and may induce a humoral response. Anti-p53 serum antibodies were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using purified recombinant human p53 on 130 European HCC patients before treatment and during the clinical course of the disease. p53 immunohistochemistry was performed on tumours from the 52 patients who underwent surgery, and DNA sequencing analysis was initiated when circulating anti-p53 antibodies were detected. Nine (7%) HCC patients had anti-p53 serum antibodies before treatment. During a mean period of 30 months of follow-up, all the negative patients remained negative, even when recurrence was observed. Of the nine positive patients, eight were still positive 12-30 months after surgery. The presence of anti-p53 serum antibodies was correlated neither with mutation of the p53 gene nor the serum alpha-fetoprotein levels and clinicopathological characteristics of the tumours. However, a greater incidence of vascular invasion and accumulation of p53 protein were observed in the tumours of these patients (P<0.03 and P<0.01 respectively) as well as a better survival rate without recurrence (P = 0.05). In conclusion, as was recently shown in pancreatic cancer, anti-p53 serum antibodies may constitute a marker of relative 'good prognosis' in a subgroup of patients exhibiting one or several markers traditionally thought to be of bad prognosis.  (+info)

Gallstones, cholecystectomy and risk of cancers of the liver, biliary tract and pancreas. (8/16288)

To examine the association between gallstones and cholecystectomy, we conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study in Denmark. Patients with a discharge diagnosis of gallstones from 1977 to 1989 were identified from the Danish National Registry of Patients and followed up for cancer occurrence until death or the end of 1993 by record linkage to the Danish Cancer Registry. Included in the cohort were 60 176 patients, with 471 450 person-years of follow-up. Cancer risks were estimated by standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) stratified by years of follow-up and by cholecystectomy status. Among patients without cholecystectomy, the risks at 5 or more years of follow-up were significantly elevated for cancers of liver (SIR = 2.0, CI = 1.2-3.1) and gallbladder (SIR = 2.7, CI = 1.5-4.4) and near unity for cancers of extrahepatic bile duct (SIR = 1.1), ampulla of Vater (SIR = 1.0) and pancreas (SIR = 1.1). The excess risk of liver cancer was seen only among patients with a history of hepatic disease. Among cholecystectomy patients, the risks at 5 or more years of follow-up declined for cancers of liver (SIR = 1.1) and extrahepatic bile duct (SIR = 0.7), but were elevated for cancers of ampulla of Vater (SIR = 2.0, CI = 1.0-3.7) and pancreas (SIR = 1.3, CI = 1.1-1.6). These findings confirm that gallstone disease increases the risk of gallbladder cancer, whereas cholecystectomy appears to increase the risk of cancers of ampulla of Vater and pancreas. Further research is needed to clarify the carcinogenic risks associated with gallstones and cholecystectomy and to define the mechanisms involved.  (+info)

  • This trial is studying the effects (good and bad) of a combination of drugs, Irinotecan in combination with infusional 5-FU, leucovorin (FOLFIFI) plus Bevacizumab, for cancer of the colon or rectum that has spread to the liver only and is currently not able to be removed by surgery. (pfizer.com)
  • All of the drugs that will be received in this research study have been approved in the United States for colorectal cancer, that has spread to other areas of the body, including the liver. (pfizer.com)
  • Another reason for doing this study is to see if the chemotherapy drugs FOLFIFI plus Bevacizumab can sufficiently decrease the size of the cancer in the liver so that any tumor remaining can be completely removed with surgery and, if it can be removed whether doing so will prolong the time it takes the cancer to return and/or prolong the life of these patients. (pfizer.com)
  • The liver resection remains the main treatment for resectable CRLM, but the progress of the chemotherapy regimens has been changing the oncologic approach for those patients who present unrespectable liver disease treated with chemotherapy who reach tumor shrinkage allowing hepatic resection. (omicsonline.org)
  • Advances in surgical fields and chemotherapy regimens have been increasing long-term outcomes for patients with Colorectal Liver Metastases (CRLM). (omicsonline.org)
  • Colorectal Liver Metastases (CRLM) is present in 15-20% of patients at the time of diagnosis and develops in another 60% of patients during the course of the disease [ 5 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • Looking for potentially resectable CRLM, it seems that chemotherapy should always be offered as additional treatment to curative-intention liver resections, increasing Recurrence Free Survival (RFS), but not affecting Overall Survival (OS). (omicsonline.org)
  • CRLM are the most common indication of hepatectomy in Western countries, since improved comprehension of liver anatomy, refinements in surgical technologies, improved imaging techniques, better post-operative care and new systemic chemotherapy made the surgical management of the CRLM possible [ 6 - 11 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • To enhance the knowledge of medical society on the mucinous cystic neoplasms of the liver, here we aim to summarise contemporary data on these tumours, including the current definition and classification [ 1 ], the recent molecular genetic findings [ 3 , 4 ] as well as the practical issues of clinical presentation, diagnostic approach, treatment and prognosis. (intechopen.com)
  • However, whether the neoplasm is benign or malignant can be determined by biopsy, especially if some of the following symptoms are present: jaundice, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, dark-colored urine, unexplained loss of appetite with weight loss, and feeling bloated or full following a small portion of food. (livestrong.com)
  • Fine needle aspiration (FNA) and needle core biopsy are the most commonly used procedures for the morphological evaluation of liver lesions because of their decreased rates of procedural complications compared with open and more invasive approaches. (springer.com)
  • Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the liver: diagnostic problems. (springer.com)
  • In all cases reviewed, the liver biopsy had significant treatment implications. (online-prednisone-purchase.com)
  • We conclude that hepatology referral and liver biopsy in patients receiving ruxolitinib therapy with biochemical evidence of liver injury reveals a variety of etiologies which have significant treatment impact. (online-prednisone-purchase.com)
  • Clinicians should be aware of the potential causes of liver damage in this population and initiate prompt referral and liver biopsy. (online-prednisone-purchase.com)
  • Liver Neoplasms, Experimental is also known as Experimental Liver Neoplasms. (novusbio.com)
  • In 2018, primary liver tumors will be diagnosed in approximately 42,220 new patients in the United States, and approximately 30,200 individuals will die from this disease. (abdominalkey.com)
  • We prospectively investigated 615,532 diabetic patients and 614,871 age-matched and sex-matched control subjects selected from National Health Insurance claims for malignant neoplasms of liver and biliary tract (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 9th edition, codes 155 and 156, respectively) between 2000 and 2006. (nih.gov)
  • Adherence to the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases criteria for evaluation and treatment of chronic HBV infection was found to be poor in all practice settings assessed. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Over the past 56 years, thousands of physicians have depended on Diseases of the Liver and Biliary System . (wiley.com)
  • This brand-new edition, now named Sherlock's Diseases of the Liver and Biliary System , after the late Professor Dame Sheila Sherlock, continues to provide concise clinical guidance for all those treating patients with hepato-biliary disease. (wiley.com)
  • Participants encouraged prospective cohort studies of persons with chronic liver diseases in which the use of various screening modalities and regimens could be assessed and suggested that cost-effectiveness studies of AFP screening could be useful in decision-making. (cdc.gov)
  • It is one of the three most common myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) - rare blood diseases that develop when the bone marrow makes too many blood cells. (cancersupportcommunity.org)
  • In recent years, metabolic syndrome (MetS) - Including glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia, obesity, hypertension and chronic in﫿ammation - and its individual components have been proven to be the risk for colorectal neoplasm. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Colonoscopy is the most accurate technique for diagnosis, surveillance and exclusion of colorectal neoplasm for high-risk CRC groups. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Although it has been also well established that MetS and its individual components are risk factors for colorectal neoplasm, as above, there is paucity of research looking at the relation between NAFLD and CRC. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Chronic clonorchiasis may be complicated with gallbladder and intrahepatic duct stones, recurrent pyogenic cholangitis, cholecystitis, liver abscess, and cholangiocarcinoma (5). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • This hypothesis was confirmed by comparing histopathological specimens of the breast and liver tumours using advanced pathological methods. (termedia.pl)
  • 2020). Laparoscopic vs. open liver resections of posterolateral liver segments - a systematic review and meta-analysis. (termedia.pl)
  • These pathways complement our catalog of research reagents for the study of Liver Neoplasms, Experimental including antibodies and ELISA kits against GLUTATHIONE TRANSFERASE, GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE, GST-P, AFP, ALB. (novusbio.com)
  • Liver cysts are fluid-filled crevices or sacs in the liver. (livestrong.com)
  • Cysts in the liver may manifest because of an infection from ingesting contaminated food or liquids that contain a parasitic worm, specifically, echinococcus granulosus. (livestrong.com)
  • The statistical powers of mortality studies were calculated with respect to the liver, brain, and lung sites and plotted on power curves to relate positive and negative findings to power, and to show the variability in powers. (cdc.gov)
  • Gestational trophoblastic neoplasm (GTN) is a rare pregnancy-related disorder with an incidence ranging from 0.12-0.7/1000 pregnancies in Western nations. (sun.ac.za)
  • For the quantitative analysis for subclinical AKI, urine interleukin-6 (IL-6), plasma and urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), serum cystatin C, urine liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), urine N-acetyl--D-Glucosaminidase (NAG), and urine albumin concentration are measured preoperatively, on the day of the surgery, and 1st postoperative day. (centerwatch.com)
  • Enhanced recovery in liver surgery decreases postoperative outpatient use of opioids. (viictr.org)
  • As much as 85% of the liver can be safely removed during surgery because the remaining liver is able to regenerate itself within a few months. (oncolink.org)