Lithotripsy: The destruction of a calculus of the kidney, ureter, bladder, or gallbladder by physical forces, including crushing with a lithotriptor through a catheter. Focused percutaneous ultrasound and focused hydraulic shock waves may be used without surgery. Lithotripsy does not include the dissolving of stones by acids or litholysis. Lithotripsy by laser is LITHOTRIPSY, LASER.Lithotripsy, Laser: Fragmentation of CALCULI, notably urinary or biliary, by LASER.Ureteral Calculi: Stones in the URETER that are formed in the KIDNEY. They are rarely more than 5 mm in diameter for larger renal stones cannot enter ureters. They are often lodged at the ureteral narrowing and can cause excruciating renal colic.Ureteroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the ureter.Kidney Calculi: Stones in the KIDNEY, usually formed in the urine-collecting area of the kidney (KIDNEY PELVIS). Their sizes vary and most contains CALCIUM OXALATE.Urinary Calculi: Low-density crystals or stones in any part of the URINARY TRACT. Their chemical compositions often include CALCIUM OXALATE, magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite), CYSTINE, or URIC ACID.Calculi: An abnormal concretion occurring mostly in the urinary and biliary tracts, usually composed of mineral salts. Also called stones.Nephrostomy, Percutaneous: The insertion of a catheter through the skin and body wall into the kidney pelvis, mainly to provide urine drainage where the ureter is not functional. It is used also to remove or dissolve renal calculi and to diagnose ureteral obstruction.Ureteroscopes: Endoscopes for examining the interior of the ureter.Cholelithiasis: Presence or formation of GALLSTONES in the BILIARY TRACT, usually in the gallbladder (CHOLECYSTOLITHIASIS) or the common bile duct (CHOLEDOCHOLITHIASIS).Lasers, Solid-State: Lasers which use a solid, as opposed to a liquid or gas, as the lasing medium. Common materials used are crystals, such as YAG (YTTRIUM aluminum garnet); alexandrite; and CORUNDUM, doped with a rare earth element such as a NEODYMIUM; ERBIUM; or HOLMIUM. The output is sometimes additionally modified by addition of non-linear optical materials such as potassium titanyl phosphate crystal, which for example is used with neodymium YAG lasers to convert the output light to the visible range.Urolithiasis: Formation of stones in any part of the URINARY TRACT, usually in the KIDNEY; URINARY BLADDER; or the URETER.Gallstones: Solid crystalline precipitates in the BILIARY TRACT, usually formed in the GALLBLADDER, resulting in the condition of CHOLELITHIASIS. Gallstones, derived from the BILE, consist mainly of calcium, cholesterol, or bilirubin.Holmium: Holmium. An element of the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Ho, atomic number 67, and atomic weight 164.93.Ureterolithiasis: Formation of stones in the URETER.High-Energy Shock Waves: High-amplitude compression waves, across which density, pressure, and particle velocity change drastically. The mechanical force from these shock waves can be used for mechanically disrupting tissues and deposits.Urinary Bladder Calculi: Stones in the URINARY BLADDER; also known as vesical calculi, bladder stones, or cystoliths.Bile Duct Diseases: Diseases in any part of the ductal system of the BILIARY TRACT from the smallest BILE CANALICULI to the largest COMMON BILE DUCT.Kidney Calices: Recesses of the kidney pelvis which divides into two wide, cup-shaped major renal calices, with each major calix subdivided into 7 to 14 minor calices. Urine empties into a minor calix from collecting tubules, then passes through the major calix, renal pelvis, and ureter to enter the urinary bladder. (From Moore, Clinically Oriented Anatomy, 3d ed, p211)Lithiasis: A condition characterized by the formation of CALCULI and concretions in the hollow organs or ducts of the body. They occur most often in the gallbladder, kidney, and lower urinary tract.Sphincterotomy, Endoscopic: Incision of Oddi's sphincter or Vater's ampulla performed by inserting a sphincterotome through an endoscope (DUODENOSCOPE) often following retrograde cholangiography (CHOLANGIOPANCREATOGRAPHY, ENDOSCOPIC RETROGRADE). Endoscopic treatment by sphincterotomy is the preferred method of treatment for patients with retained or recurrent bile duct stones post-cholecystectomy, and for poor-surgical-risk patients that have the gallbladder still present.Operating Tables: A raised flat surface on which a patient is placed during surgical procedures.Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde: Fiberoptic endoscopy designed for duodenal observation and cannulation of VATER'S AMPULLA, in order to visualize the pancreatic and biliary duct system by retrograde injection of contrast media. Endoscopic (Vater) papillotomy (SPHINCTEROTOMY, ENDOSCOPIC) may be performed during this procedure.Pancreatic Diseases: Pathological processes of the PANCREAS.Gastroscopes: Endoscopes used for examining the interior of the stomach.Common Bile Duct: The largest bile duct. It is formed by the junction of the CYSTIC DUCT and the COMMON HEPATIC DUCT.Cholangiography: An imaging test of the BILIARY TRACT in which a contrast dye (RADIOPAQUE MEDIA) is injected into the BILE DUCT and x-ray pictures are taken.Cystoscopes: Endoscopes for visual examination of the urinary bladder.Choledocholithiasis: Presence or formation of GALLSTONES in the COMMON BILE DUCT.Surgical Equipment: Nonexpendable apparatus used during surgical procedures. They are differentiated from SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, usually hand-held and used in the immediate operative field.Operative Time: The duration of a surgical procedure in hours and minutes.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Electromagnetic Phenomena: Characteristics of ELECTRICITY and magnetism such as charged particles and the properties and behavior of charged particles, and other phenomena related to or associated with electromagnetism.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Nephrolithiasis: Formation of stones in the KIDNEY.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Menstrual Hygiene Products: Personal care items used during MENSTRUATION.Gardnerella: A genus of bacteria found in the human genital and urinary tract. It is considered to be a major cause of bacterial vaginosis (VAGINOSIS, BACTERIAL).Urology: A surgical specialty concerned with the study, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases of the urinary tract in both sexes, and the genital tract in the male. Common urological problems include urinary obstruction, URINARY INCONTINENCE, infections, and UROGENITAL NEOPLASMS.Calcium Oxalate: The calcium salt of oxalic acid, occurring in the urine as crystals and in certain calculi.Thulium: Thulium. An element of the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Tm, atomic number 69, and atomic weight 168.93.Rare Diseases: A large group of diseases which are characterized by a low prevalence in the population. They frequently are associated with problems in diagnosis and treatment.Ultrasonic Therapy: The use of focused, high-frequency sound waves to produce local hyperthermia in certain diseased or injured parts of the body or to destroy the diseased tissue.Colic: A clinical syndrome with intermittent abdominal pain characterized by sudden onset and cessation that is commonly seen in infants. It is usually associated with obstruction of the INTESTINES; of the CYSTIC DUCT; or of the URINARY TRACT.Renal Colic: A severe intermittent and spasmodic pain in the lower back radiating to the groin, scrotum, and labia which is most commonly caused by a kidney stone (RENAL CALCULUS) passing through the URETER or by other urinary track blockage. It is often associated with nausea, vomiting, fever, restlessness, dull pain, frequent urination, and HEMATURIA.Laser Therapy: The use of photothermal effects of LASERS to coagulate, incise, vaporize, resect, dissect, or resurface tissue.Erbium: Erbium. An element of the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Er, atomic number 68, and atomic weight 167.26.Viscosity: The resistance that a gaseous or liquid system offers to flow when it is subjected to shear stress. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Ureter: One of a pair of thick-walled tubes that transports urine from the KIDNEY PELVIS to the URINARY BLADDER.Hydronephrosis: Abnormal enlargement or swelling of a KIDNEY due to dilation of the KIDNEY CALICES and the KIDNEY PELVIS. It is often associated with obstruction of the URETER or chronic kidney diseases that prevents normal drainage of urine into the URINARY BLADDER.Oxalates: Derivatives of OXALIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that are derived from the ethanedioic acid structure.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Urinary Bladder: A musculomembranous sac along the URINARY TRACT. URINE flows from the KIDNEYS into the bladder via the ureters (URETER), and is held there until URINATION.Kidney Diseases: Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.

Ballistic shock wave lithotripsy in an 18-year-old thoroughbred gelding. (1/366)

Prolonged postoperative recuperation time and restricted exercise were circumvented by using ballistic shock wave lithotripsy to break up an 8-cm diameter vesical calculus and by flushing out the sand-like residue under epidural anesthesia with the horse standing. Recovery was uneventful.  (+info)

Profiles in laparoscopy: Mouret, Dubois, and Perissat: the laparoscopic breakthrough in Europe (1987-1988). (2/366)

In the late 1980s, laparoscopy was essentially a gynecologist's tool. One of the French private surgeons, Phillipe Mouret of Lyon, shared his surgery practice with a gynecologist and thus had access to both laparoscopic equipment and to patients requiring laparoscopy. In March of 1987, Mouret carried out his first cholecystectomy by means of electronic laparoscopy. Although he never published anything about this experience, the news on his technique reached Francois Dubois of Paris. Although having no prior laparoscopic experience, Dubois acted immediately. He borrowed the instruments from gynecologists, performed his first animal experiments and, in April 1988, carried out the first laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) in Paris. Inspired by Dubois, Jacques Perissat of Bordeaux, introduced endoscopic cholecystectomy in his clinic and presented this technique at a SAGES meeting in Louisville in April 1989. Very soon, news of the French work in LC soon swept beyond the country's borders. Dubois and Perissat spoke enthusiastically about their work at the meetings and were largely responsible for establishing what is today called the French technique.  (+info)

Long term follow up of patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic stones treated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. (3/366)

BACKGROUND: There have been conflicting reports as to whether pancreatic ductal drainage achieved by endoscopy and lithotripsy improves the clinical outcome of patients with chronic pancreatitis. AIMS: To determine the clinical outcome in patients with chronic pancreatitis who received extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and were followed up for two to eight years. METHODS: Eighty patients with severe chronic pancreatitis and endoscopically unretrievable obstructive stones underwent ESWL with a piezoelectric lithotripter between 1989 and 1996. Clinical status, relief of symptoms, further endoscopic or surgical interventions, and mortality were defined. RESULTS: Forty three (54%) patients were treated successfully with ESWL. The only feature associated with treatment success was the presence of a single stone rather than multiple stones. Successfully treated patients tended to experience less pain, although this did not reach statistical significance. A slight increase in weight was noted in our patients; however, there was no notable improvement in anomalous stools and diabetes mellitus. Five patients died due to extrapancreatic reasons. No pancreatic carcinomas developed. CONCLUSIONS: ESWL associated with endoscopic drainage is a safe technique that is particularly successful in patients with a single stone. However, pancreatic drainage by endoscopy and ESWL has almost no effect on pain in chronic pancreatitis. Furthermore, endoscopic management and ESWL does not prevent or postpone the development of glandular insufficiency.  (+info)

Relationship between kidney size, renal injury, and renal impairment induced by shock wave lithotripsy. (4/366)

The relationship between kidney size and impaired renal function induced by shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) was examined in 6- and 10-wk-old anesthetized pigs. Each pig received 2000 shock waves, 24 kV, or sham SWL to the lower pole calyx of one kidney. Bilateral GFR, renal plasma flow (RPF), and para-aminohippurate extraction was measured 1 h before and 1 and 4 h after SWL. The kidneys were then removed for morphometric analysis. Mean kidney weights were 66.1+/-2.7 g (n = 9) and 103.1+/-3.3 g (n = 8) in the SWL groups, and 60.1+/-2.6 g (n = 9) and 82.3+/-4.0 g (n = 9) in the sham-SWL groups. SWL-induced lesions occupied a significantly greater volume of the small kidneys (6.1+/-1.7 vol % versus 1.5+/-0.2 vol% in the large kidneys). RPF was significantly reduced by SWL in small and large kidneys, but to a significantly greater extent in small kidneys. RPF was also significantly reduced in the contralateral kidneys of both groups, but only at 1 h after SWL. SWL significantly reduced GFR to similar degrees in both kidneys of both groups, regardless of kidney size. Para-aminohippurate extraction was likewise reduced to similar degrees in both groups, but this effect was evident only in the SWL-treated kidneys, and only in the pole to which the shock waves had been applied. The injury induced by SWL affected a larger fraction of small kidneys than large ones, and the renal vasoconstriction induced by SWL was greatest in small kidneys.  (+info)

National trend of the incidence of urolithiasis in Japan from 1965 to 1995. (5/366)

BACKGROUND: A nationwide survey of urolithiasis in Japan was made in order to evaluate the chronological trend of upper urinary tract stones in the Japanese. It succeeded previous studies done in 1955, 1966, 1979, and 1990. METHODS: All outpatient visits to urologists that resulted in a diagnosis of first-episode upper urinary tract stones in the years 1990 and 1995 were enumerated, irrespective of admission and treatment. The study enrolled all of the Japanese Board of Urology-approved hospitals, thereby covering nearly all urologists practicing in Japan. The annual incidence by sex and age was estimated and compared with the incidences in the previous nationwide surveys. RESULTS: The age-adjusted annual incidence of first-episode upper urinary tract stones in 1995 was estimated as 68.9 per 100,000 (100.1 in men and 55.4 in women), a steady increase from 54.2 in 1965. The annual incidence has increased in all age groups, except in those of the first three decades. The peak age for both sexes has shifted in toward the older population's direction. Estimations of longitudinal changes between 1965 and 1995 showed that the annual incidence has more than doubled for the cohort of the 1965 census population (from 43.7 in 1965 to 110.9 in 1995) and that younger generations have had progressively higher annual incidences. CONCLUSIONS: The annual incidence of upper urinary tract stones in Japan has increased steadily over the past 30 years and will continue to do so in the near future, but it still is lower than in the United States.  (+info)

The effect of discharge voltage on renal injury and impairment caused by lithotripsy in the pig. (6/366)

The present study was designed to determine the effects of shock wave voltage (kV) on lesion size and renal function induced by shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) in the 6- to 8-wk-old pig. Each SWL-treated pig received 2000 shock waves at 12, 18, or 24 kV to the lower pole calyx of one kidney. A group of sham SWL pigs served as time controls. Bilateral GFR, renal plasma flow (RPF), and para-aminohippurate (PAH) extraction were measured 1 h before and 1 and 4 h after SWL in all treated and sham animals. The kidneys were removed at the end of each experiment for morphometric analysis. The SWL-induced lesion increased significantly in size as shock wave energy was increased from 12 to 24 kV. PAH extraction, a measure of tubular function, was not significantly affected at 12 kV, was transiently reduced at 18 kV, and was reduced for the duration of the experiment at 24 kV. GFR and RPF, however, were significantly and similarly reduced at the 1 h post-SWL period at all three kilovolt levels. At the 4-h post-SWL period, both GFR and RPF had returned to baseline levels. Lesion size and tubular injury were correlated with changes in kilovoltage, while changes in renal hemodynamics were already maximal at the lowest discharge voltage. These findings suggest that renal microvessels are highly sensitive to shock waves and that frank injury to tubules and vessels may be more closely related to discharge energy than is renal blood flow.  (+info)

Section 4--bioeffects in tissues with gas bodies. American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine. (7/366)

Several animal models have exhibited thresholds for petechial hemorrhage in lung within the current output of diagnostic ultrasound systems. In addition, thresholds for damage in the mouse intestine due to diagnostic pulses of ultrasound have been explored. The implications for human lung and intestinal exposure to clinical diagnostic ultrasound have not yet been determined. In this section, the data supporting the thresholds of petechial hemorrhage in these organ systems and the morphological observations will be reviewed. The potential mechanical mechanisms of damage to these organs due to diagnostic ultrasound also will be reviewed. Special attention will be given to the occurrence of inertial cavitation both in vitro and in vivo. The effects of ultrasound parameters, age, and species on the threshold for damage in animal models will be explored.  (+info)

Management of gallstones and their complications. (8/366)

The accurate differentiation of gallstone-induced biliary colic from other abdominal disease processes is the most crucial step in the successful management of gallstone disease. Despite the availability of many imaging techniques to demonstrate the presence of gallstones, clinical judgment ultimately determines the association of symptoms with cholelithiasis and its complications. Adult patients with silent or incidental gallstones should be observed and managed expectantly, with few exceptions. In symptomatic patients, the intervention varies with the type of gallstone-induced complication. In this article, we review the salient clinical features, diagnostic tests and therapeutic options employed in the management of gallstones and their complications.  (+info)

  • Further, lithotripsy devices' manufacturers are focusing on creating novel and cutting-edge lithotripsy devices, which is expected to fuel growth in global lithotripsy devices market during 2018-2026. (express-press-release.net)
  • The report deeply explores the recent significant developments by the leading vendors and innovation profiles in the Global Lithotripsy Devices Market including Boston Scientific Corporation, Cook Medical, Direx Medical Systems Ltd., Dornier MedTech, EMS, Karl Storz, Lumenis, NOVAmedtek, Olympus Corporation, and Siemens Healthineers AG. (reportlinker.com)
  • According to Fact.MR analysis of lithotripsy devices market, Europe is envisaged to dominate lithotripsy devices market and is projected to reach US$ 307.5 MN by the end of foreseeable period due to the presence of leading market players in the region. (express-press-release.net)
  • Information about how lithotripsy works and a comparison with other treatments can be found here . (ox.ac.uk)
  • Lithotripsy services were performed by dedicated technicians who visited hospitals periodically and provided treatments using a mobile lithotripsy system. (biomedcentral.com)
  • According to Fact.MR report on lithotripsy devices market, apart from widespread prevalence, urolithiasis has been linked to an increased risk of end-stage renal failure, which has further accelerated the demand for lithotripsy devices. (express-press-release.net)
  • The hospital, outpatient facility, or surgical center, along with the patient's urologist, provide the scheduling for the lithotripsy and make the arrangements for the patient's preoperative and postoperative care. (keystonekidney.com)
  • A Randomized, Controlled, Prospective, Single Blind Clinical Evaluation of BackStop in Patients Undergoing Intraureteric Stone Lithotripsy. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The primary goal of this study is to verify the applicability of a miniature wet-coupling device specifically designed for shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and its effect on improving the stone comminution efficiency. (duke.edu)
  • The physician and certified renal lithotripsy technologist focus the shockwaves on the stone using fluroscopic guidance. (keystonekidney.com)
  • 2,3 Lithotripsy in conjunction with conventional endoscopic techniques increases the rate of successful stone removal. (practicalgastro.com)
  • Stone Extraction Basket, Stone Retrieval Basket, Extraction Basket manufacturer / supplier in China, offering Jiuhong FDA Approved Disposable Lithotripsy Stone Extraction Basket, Jiuhong Disposable Grasping Forceps for Foreign Body Removal, CE & FDA Approved Endoscopic Mouth Guard and so on. (made-in-china.com)
  • This study presents an assessment of the efficacy of such commercialised lithotripsy service in terms of stone free rate and auxiliary procedures. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Based on End User, the Lithotripsy Devices Market studied across Clinics, Diagnostic Centers, and Hospitals. (reportlinker.com)
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