Proton Therapy: The use of an external beam of PROTONS as radiotherapy.Protons: Stable elementary particles having the smallest known positive charge, found in the nuclei of all elements. The proton mass is less than that of a neutron. A proton is the nucleus of the light hydrogen atom, i.e., the hydrogen ion.Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted: Computer-assisted mathematical calculations of beam angles, intensities of radiation, and duration of irradiation in radiotherapy.Radiotherapy Dosage: The total amount of radiation absorbed by tissues as a result of radiotherapy.Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated: CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY that combines several intensity-modulated beams to provide improved dose homogeneity and highly conformal dose distributions.Organs at Risk: Organs which might be damaged during exposure to a toxin or to some form of therapy. It most frequently refers to healthy organs located in the radiation field during radiation therapy.Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Radiometry: The measurement of radiation by photography, as in x-ray film and film badge, by Geiger-Mueller tube, and by SCINTILLATION COUNTING.Craniospinal Irradiation: A comprehensive radiation treatment of the entire CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Neutrons: Electrically neutral elementary particles found in all atomic nuclei except light hydrogen; the mass is equal to that of the proton and electron combined and they are unstable when isolated from the nucleus, undergoing beta decay. Slow, thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons refer to the energy levels with which the neutrons are ejected from heavier nuclei during their decay.Chordoma: A malignant tumor arising from the embryonic remains of the notochord. It is also called chordocarcinoma, chordoepithelioma, and notochordoma. (Dorland, 27th ed)Monte Carlo Method: In statistics, a technique for numerically approximating the solution of a mathematical problem by studying the distribution of some random variable, often generated by a computer. The name alludes to the randomness characteristic of the games of chance played at the gambling casinos in Monte Carlo. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Proton Pumps: Integral membrane proteins that transport protons across a membrane. This transport can be linked to the hydrolysis of ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE. What is referred to as proton pump inhibitors frequently is about POTASSIUM HYDROGEN ATPASE.Photons: Discrete concentrations of energy, apparently massless elementary particles, that move at the speed of light. They are the unit or quantum of electromagnetic radiation. Photons are emitted when electrons move from one energy state to another. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)Radiotherapy, Conformal: Radiotherapy where there is improved dose homogeneity within the tumor and reduced dosage to uninvolved structures. The precise shaping of dose distribution is achieved via the use of computer-controlled multileaf collimators.Radiotherapy, High-Energy: Radiotherapy using high-energy (megavolt or higher) ionizing radiation. Types of radiation include gamma rays, produced by a radioisotope within a teletherapy unit; x-rays, electrons, protons, alpha particles (helium ions) and heavy charged ions, produced by particle acceleration; and neutrons and pi-mesons (pions), produced as secondary particles following bombardment of a target with a primary particle.Relative Biological Effectiveness: The ratio of radiation dosages required to produce identical change based on a formula comparing other types of radiation with that of gamma or roentgen rays.Radiation Injuries: Harmful effects of non-experimental exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation in VERTEBRATES.Uncertainty: The condition in which reasonable knowledge regarding risks, benefits, or the future is not available.Scattering, Radiation: The diversion of RADIATION (thermal, electromagnetic, or nuclear) from its original path as a result of interactions or collisions with atoms, molecules, or larger particles in the atmosphere or other media. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography: Three-dimensional computed tomographic imaging with the added dimension of time, to follow motion during imaging.Radiation Dosage: The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).Phantoms, Imaging: Devices or objects in various imaging techniques used to visualize or enhance visualization by simulating conditions encountered in the procedure. Phantoms are used very often in procedures employing or measuring x-irradiation or radioactive material to evaluate performance. Phantoms often have properties similar to human tissue. Water demonstrates absorbing properties similar to normal tissue, hence water-filled phantoms are used to map radiation levels. Phantoms are used also as teaching aids to simulate real conditions with x-ray or ultrasonic machines. (From Iturralde, Dictionary and Handbook of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Imaging, 1990)Radiation Oncology: A subspecialty of medical oncology and radiology concerned with the radiotherapy of cancer.Fibromatosis, Abdominal: A relatively large mass of unusually firm scarlike connective tissue resulting from active participation of fibroblasts, occurring most frequently in the abdominal muscles of women who have borne children. The fibroblasts infiltrate surrounding muscle and fascia. (Stedman, 25th ed)Radiotherapy, Computer-Assisted: Computer systems or programs used in accurate computations for providing radiation dosage treatment to patients.Radiotherapy: The use of IONIZING RADIATION to treat malignant NEOPLASMS and some benign conditions.Proton Pump Inhibitors: Compounds that inhibit H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE. They are used as ANTI-ULCER AGENTS and sometimes in place of HISTAMINE H2 ANTAGONISTS for GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation: The relationship between the dose of administered radiation and the response of the organism or tissue to the radiation.Tumor Burden: The total amount (cell number, weight, size or volume) of tumor cells or tissue in the body.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced: Tumors, cancer or other neoplasms produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Spine: The spinal or vertebral column.Trustees: Board members of an institution or organization who are entrusted with the administering of funds and the directing of policy.LondonArchitecture as Topic: The art and science of designing buildings and structures. More generally, it is the design of the total built environment, including town planning, urban design, and landscape architecture.Walkers: Walking aids generally having two handgrips and four legs.Physician Executives: Physicians who serve in a medical and administrative capacity as head of an organized medical staff and who also may serve as liaison for the medical staff with the administration and governing board.Esomeprazole: The S-isomer of omeprazole.Chemistry, Analytic: The branch of chemistry dealing with detection (qualitative) and determination (quantitative) of substances. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Literature, ModernScleroderma, Localized: A term used to describe a variety of localized asymmetrical SKIN thickening that is similar to those of SYSTEMIC SCLERODERMA but without the disease features in the multiple internal organs and BLOOD VESSELS. Lesions may be characterized as patches or plaques (morphea), bands (linear), or nodules.Famous PersonsForehead: The part of the face above the eyes.Hospitals, Pediatric: Special hospitals which provide care for ill children.TennesseeClinical Protocols: Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma: A neoplasm characterized by abnormalities of the lymphoid cell precursors leading to excessive lymphoblasts in the marrow and other organs. It is the most common cancer in children and accounts for the vast majority of all childhood leukemias.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
  • Nearly 90 percent of adults use digital devices for two or more hours per day, according to The Vision Council's 2016 Digital Eye Strain Report , exposing consumers to blue light that some suggest is dangerous. (uab.edu)
  • In this report, the global Proton Therapy market is valued at USD XX million in 2016 and is expected to reach USD XX million by the end of 2022, growing at a CAGR of XX% between 2016 and 2022. (rnrmarketresearch.com)
  • Physicians use protons to treat conditions in two broad categories: Disease sites that respond well to higher doses of radiation, i.e., dose escalation. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is important to appreciate that with currently available proton systems, the high dose region around the tumour, and therefore the doses to critical structures close to this region, are generally more or less unchanged from best quality IMRT delivered with X-rays. (bir.org.uk)
  • Regions in dark blue and light blue are receiving 25% and 50% of the prescribed dose, respectively. (cmaj.ca)
  • Evaluation of altered dose fractionation with the previously noted technology advances led to advent of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). (nih.gov)
  • Evolution of newer proton therapy techniques, such as pencil-beam scanning (PBS), could improve tolerability and possibly allow reexamination of dose escalation. (nih.gov)
  • Evaluation of the local dose enhancement in the combination of proton therapy and nanoparticles. (medworm.com)
  • Analysis of the track- and dose-averaged LET and LET spectra in proton therapy using the geant4 Monte Carlo code. (medworm.com)
  • Photofrin 2mg/kg Photoradiation The light dose delivered will be a total of 200 joules per centimeter fiber which has previously been shown to ablate Barrett's mucosa. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The proton can actually be conformed to release cancer-killing energy at a precise dose and depth. (cancerconnect.com)
  • The aim of these studies was to investigate depth dose distribution of a 60 MeV proton beam formed by a set of dedicated mesh-formed collimators. (bioportfolio.com)
  • With protons a very high dose is delivered right at the tumour, then there is a sharp cut-off where the dose drops right down. (cancerresearchuk.org)
  • This was likely the case because proton therapy allowed us to decrease the radiation dose to the mouth and throat compared to equivalent plans using x-ray therapy. (healthcanal.com)
  • The aim of the course is to provide an understanding of the basic physical and biological effects of ionising radiation in order to learn the principles of radiation therapy and to provide an overview of different mathematical tools for dose plan calculations. (kth.se)
  • Jan 10, 2020 (The Expresswire) -- Proton Therapy Market report provides a comprehensive landscape of the business, correct market estimates and forecast split by product, application, technology, region and end-use. (marketwatch.com)
  • This report focuses on Professional Global Proton Therapy Market 2020-2024 volume and value at Global level, regional level and company level. (marketwatch.com)
  • According to the "US Proton Therapy Market Outlook 2020", report by RNCOS, the United States will be home to 29 such centers by 2020. (rncos.com)
  • The Scripps Proton Therapy Center in San Diego, California, filed for bankruptcy in March, just three years after opening its doors. (nature.com)
  • TOKYO, Sept 14, 2018 - (JCN Newswire) - Hitachi, Ltd. (TSE: 6501) announced today that it has received an order for the compact proton therapy system from Tokushukai Medical Group , and the system will be installed at Shonan Kamakura Advanced Medical Center, which is planned to be built near Shonan Kamakura General Hospital. (biospace.com)
  • market for Proton Therapy is expected to grow at a CAGR of roughly xx% over the next five years, will reach xx million US$ in 2023, from xx million US$ in 2017, according to a new study. (marketwatch.com)
  • The 2017 market research report on Global Proton Therapy Systems Market is an in-depth study and analysis of the market by our industry experts with unparalleled domain knowledge. (medgadget.com)
  • As of 2012 there have been no controlled clinical trials that demonstrate proton beam therapy yields improved survival or other clinical outcomes compared to other types of radiation therapy. (ebme.co.uk)
  • The particular proton technology used at the Maryland center, something called spot scanning, hasn't undergone any randomized clinical trials at all, Mehta acknowledges. (kpbs.org)
  • The University of Washington received a contract from the National Cancer Institute in the late 1970s to design and build a clinical neutron therapy facility and then participated in many research studies, called clinical trials, to determine when and how to use neutron therapy effectively. (seattlecca.org)
  • As the official newsletter of the Institute, the content is compiled and prepared by our communications representative and approved by the editor Stuart Klein, executive director of UF Health Proton Therapy Institute. (floridaproton.org)
  • A UF Health Proton Therapy Institute patient with Microsoft contacts connected Kim with a programmer who initiated the app's development, and a UF engineering faculty member Stephen Arce, PhD, programmed Proton U with music and animation features that brought the app to life. (floridaproton.org)
  • It is the time that it takes light (which trav--els at 300,000 kilometres per second) to cover the tiny distance cor--re--sponding to the diameter of three hydrogen atoms. (ebn24.com)
  • Following the expansion of demand for proton therapy system with minimized footprint worldwide, Hitachi has developed dedicated single room proton therapy system (Single Room Solution). (biospace.com)
  • As of April 2019, there were 81 operating proton beam therapy centres worldwide, 41 under construction and 20 centres in the planning phase. (cmaj.ca)
  • Sir Robert Naylor, chief executive of UCLH, said: "I am absolutely delighted with today's announcement of the preferred providers for the UCLH proton beam therapy centre. (uclh.nhs.uk)
  • Made up of the PBT centre below ground and five floors above ground, this state-of-the-art facility will offer even more than protons. (uclh.nhs.uk)
  • A new clinical facility to house a Proton Beam Therapy (PBT) Centre and inpatient services at University College London Hospitals (UCLH) NHS Foundation Trust, has been approved by the UK Department of Health. (stwarchitects.com)
  • The first results, obtained in collaboration with the Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (Intense Lasers and Applications Center) (Talence, France) and the Laboratoire d'Étude du Rayonnement et de la Matière en Astrophysique (Radiation and Astrophysics Material Study Laboratory) (Meudon, France), now make it possible to test astrophysics models of plasma evolution. (polytechnique.edu)
  • Behind a small red brick building housing a pub, the first floors of the future proton therapy centre of University College London Hospitals (UCLH) are under construction. (bouygues.com)
  • This is the first order for Hitachi's dedicated compact proton therapy system. (biospace.com)
  • DAVIS, CA -- With a technology transfer agreement announced today, the first compact proton therapy system - one that would fit in any major cancer center and cost a fifth as much as a full-scale machine - is one step closer to reality. (llnl.gov)
  • The best way to understand how proton therapy works is to take a look at the physics and engineering inside the proton accelerator, or the synchrotron, and the beam delivery system. (mdanderson.org)
  • The development of a medical facility for boron neutron capture therapy at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics is under way. (bioportfolio.com)
  • This is one of the main reasons that protons are thought to have an advantage over x-rays," explains Professor Karen Kirkby , Professor of Proton Therapy Physics at the University of Manchester and The Christie Hospital. (cancerresearchuk.org)
  • In chemistry, scientists use light to ex--plore the properties of protein structures at the atomic scale and in physics, light is the key to research into quantum phenomena in the microcosm. (ebn24.com)
  • At the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (MPQ) in Garching and at Lud-wig--Maximilians University in Munich (LMU), a team of about 100 scientists of the MPQ-LMU Laboratory for Attosecond and High-Field Physics (LAP) have specialized in the generation and application of ultrashort light pulses. (ebn24.com)
  • This tech-nique, which is presently be---ing de--vel---oped at the MPQ-LMU Laboratory for Atto---second and High-Field Physics, will make it possible to obtain an entirely new quality of X-radiation by means of laser light. (ebn24.com)