Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Life: The state that distinguishes organisms from inorganic matter, manifested by growth, metabolism, reproduction, and adaptation. It includes the course of existence, the sum of experiences, the mode of existing, or the fact of being. Over the centuries inquiries into the nature of life have crossed the boundaries from philosophy to biology, forensic medicine, anthropology, etc., in creative as well as scientific literature. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.Life Cycle Stages: The continuous sequence of changes undergone by living organisms during the post-embryonic developmental process, such as metamorphosis in insects and amphibians. This includes the developmental stages of apicomplexans such as the malarial parasite, PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM.Life Tables: Summarizing techniques used to describe the pattern of mortality and survival in populations. These methods can be applied to the study not only of death, but also of any defined endpoint such as the onset of disease or the occurrence of disease complications.Life Support Care: Care provided patients requiring extraordinary therapeutic measures in order to sustain and prolong life.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Longevity: The normal length of time of an organism's life.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Sickness Impact Profile: A quality-of-life scale developed in the United States in 1972 as a measure of health status or dysfunction generated by a disease. It is a behaviorally based questionnaire for patients and addresses activities such as sleep and rest, mobility, recreation, home management, emotional behavior, social interaction, and the like. It measures the patient's perceived health status and is sensitive enough to detect changes or differences in health status occurring over time or between groups. (From Medical Care, vol.xix, no.8, August 1981, p.787-805)Insurance, Life: Insurance providing for payment of a stipulated sum to a designated beneficiary upon death of the insured.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Personal Satisfaction: The individual's experience of a sense of fulfillment of a need or want and the quality or state of being satisfied.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Biogenesis: The origin of life. It includes studies of the potential basis for life in organic compounds but excludes studies of the development of altered forms of life through mutation and natural selection, which is BIOLOGICAL EVOLUTION.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Life Support Systems: Systems that provide all or most of the items necessary for maintaining life and health. Provisions are made for the supplying of oxygen, food, water, temperature and pressure control, disposition of carbon dioxide and body waste. The milieu may be a spacecraft, a submarine, or the surface of the moon. In medical care, usually under hospital conditions, LIFE SUPPORT CARE is available. (From Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Terminal Care: Medical and nursing care of patients in the terminal stage of an illness.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.United StatesCohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Human Development: Continuous sequential changes which occur in the physiological and psychological functions during the life-time of an individual.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Beginning of Human Life: The point at which religious ensoulment or PERSONHOOD is considered to begin.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Survivors: Persons who have experienced a prolonged survival after serious disease or who continue to live with a usually life-threatening condition as well as family members, significant others, or individuals surviving traumatic life events.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Exobiology: The interdisciplinary science that studies evolutionary biology, including the origin and evolution of the major elements required for life, their processing in the interstellar medium and in protostellar systems. This field also includes the study of chemical evolution and the subsequent interactions between evolving biota and planetary evolution as well as the field of biology that deals with the study of extraterrestrial life.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Terminally Ill: Persons with an incurable or irreversible illness at the end stage that will result in death within a short time. (From O'Leary et al., Lexikon: Dictionary of Health Care Terms, Organizations, and Acronyms for the Era of Reform, 1994, p780)Existentialism: Philosophy based on the analysis of the individual's existence in the world which holds that human existence cannot be completely described in scientific terms. Existentialism also stresses the freedom and responsibility of the individual as well as the uniqueness of religious and ethical experiences and the analysis of subjective phenomena such as anxiety, guilt, and suffering. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Wrongful Life: In civil law a cause of action which alleges that a defendant has wrongfully caused a child to be born.Spirituality: Sensitivity or attachment to religious values, or to things of the spirit as opposed to material or worldly interests. (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed, and Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed)Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Earth (Planet): Planet that is the third in order from the sun. It is one of the four inner or terrestrial planets of the SOLAR SYSTEM.Evolution, Chemical: Chemical and physical transformation of the biogenic elements from their nucleosynthesis in stars to their incorporation and subsequent modification in planetary bodies and terrestrial biochemistry. It includes the mechanism of incorporation of biogenic elements into complex molecules and molecular systems, leading up to the origin of life.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Happiness: Highly pleasant emotion characterized by outward manifestations of gratification; joy.BrazilNetherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Great BritainWithholding Treatment: Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects: The consequences of exposing the FETUS in utero to certain factors, such as NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; DRUGS; RADIATION; and other physical or chemical factors. These consequences are observed later in the offspring after BIRTH.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Holistic Health: Health as viewed from the perspective that humans and other organisms function as complete, integrated units rather than as aggregates of separate parts.Child Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Euthanasia: The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Euthanasia, Passive: Failing to prevent death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy by the withdrawal or withholding of life-prolonging treatment.GermanyPhilosophy, MedicalProxy: A person authorized to decide or act for another person, for example, a person having durable power of attorney.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Breast Feeding: The nursing of an infant at the breast.Self-Assessment: Appraisal of one's own personal qualities or traits.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Body Size: The physical measurements of a body.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Exercise Therapy: A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.Birth Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Social Participation: Involvement in community activities or programs.Maternal Deprivation: Prolonged separation of the offspring from the mother.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Infant, Premature: A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Markov Chains: A stochastic process such that the conditional probability distribution for a state at any future instant, given the present state, is unaffected by any additional knowledge of the past history of the system.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Hospice Care: Specialized health care, supportive in nature, provided to a dying person. A holistic approach is often taken, providing patients and their families with legal, financial, emotional, or spiritual counseling in addition to meeting patients' immediate physical needs. Care may be provided in the home, in the hospital, in specialized facilities (HOSPICES), or in specially designated areas of long-term care facilities. The concept also includes bereavement care for the family. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Fertility: The capacity to conceive or to induce conception. It may refer to either the male or female.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Euthanasia, Active: The act or practice of killing for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person or animal from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)EuropeAustralia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Philosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive: A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Dyspnea: Difficult or labored breathing.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Sick Role: Set of expectations that exempt persons from responsibility for their illness and exempt them from usual responsibilities.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.EnglandMarital Status: A demographic parameter indicating a person's status with respect to marriage, divorce, widowhood, singleness, etc.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.JapanChi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological: Physiological disturbances in normal sexual performance in either the male or the female.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Models, Economic: Statistical models of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services, as well as of financial considerations. For the application of statistics to the testing and quantifying of economic theories MODELS, ECONOMETRIC is available.Spain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.Personhood: The state or condition of being a human individual accorded moral and/or legal rights. Criteria to be used to determine this status are subject to debate, and range from the requirement of simply being a human organism to such requirements as that the individual be self-aware and capable of rational thought and moral agency.Medical Futility: The absence of a useful purpose or useful result in a diagnostic procedure or therapeutic intervention. The situation of a patient whose condition will not be improved by treatment or instances in which treatment preserves permanent unconsciousness or cannot end dependence on intensive medical care. (From Ann Intern Med 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949)Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Clinical Protocols: Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Psychology: The science dealing with the study of mental processes and behavior in man and animals.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.NorwayHome Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Religion: A set of beliefs concerning the nature, cause, and purpose of the universe, especially when considered as the creation of a superhuman agency. It usually involves devotional and ritual observances and often a moral code for the conduct of human affairs. (Random House Collegiate Dictionary, rev. ed.)Religion and Psychology: The interrelationship of psychology and religion.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of children from birth to 2 years of age.Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.Child Psychology: The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Urinary Incontinence: Involuntary loss of URINE, such as leaking of urine. It is a symptom of various underlying pathological processes. Major types of incontinence include URINARY URGE INCONTINENCE and URINARY STRESS INCONTINENCE.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Archaea: One of the three domains of life (the others being BACTERIA and Eukarya), formerly called Archaebacteria under the taxon Bacteria, but now considered separate and distinct. They are characterized by: (1) the presence of characteristic tRNAs and ribosomal RNAs; (2) the absence of peptidoglycan cell walls; (3) the presence of ether-linked lipids built from branched-chain subunits; and (4) their occurrence in unusual habitats. While archaea resemble bacteria in morphology and genomic organization, they resemble eukarya in their method of genomic replication. The domain contains at least four kingdoms: CRENARCHAEOTA; EURYARCHAEOTA; NANOARCHAEOTA; and KORARCHAEOTA.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Fetal Development: Morphological and physiological development of FETUSES.Cross-Cultural Comparison: Comparison of various psychological, sociological, or cultural factors in order to assess the similarities or diversities occurring in two or more different cultures or societies.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Personality: Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.
Cratty, A.R. (September 6, 1902). "Pittsburgh Points" (PDF). Sporting Life. p. 4. Retrieved 2016-02-22. Career statistics and ... According to Sporting Life correspondent A.R. Cratty, due to injuries to the Orphans, Hughes shared time in right field during ...
Cratty, A.R. (September 6, 1902). "Pittsburgh Points" (PDF). Sporting Life. p. 4. Retrieved 2016-01-05. Phelon, W.A. (September ... According to Sporting Life correspondent A.R. Cratty, due to injuries to the Orphans, Hillebrand shared time in right field ... Retrosheet Baseball-Almanac "National League" (PDF). Sporting Life. September 6, 1902. p. 8. Retrieved 2016-01-05. "Pittsburg ... 6, 1902). "Chicago Gleanings" (PDF). Sporting Life. p. 9. Retrieved 2016-01-05. Career statistics and player information from ...
"Five Points of Life". Five Points of Life. Retrieved 2010-07-29. Sydney Runner Finishes 4th at Fredericton Marathon ...
Life Sciences. Pt. 1: Physiology and Pharmacology. 10 (19): 1087-95. doi:10.1016/0024-3205(71)90227-x. PMID 5132700. Tseng LF, ...
1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. "Pittsburg Points" (PDF). The Sporting Life. July 27, 1895. p. 9. " ... The Sporting Life. August 7, 1915. p. 21. "Sport: Mudville Man". Time. May 30, 1938. "Dan Casey Called Out, But Legend Lives On ... p. 6. Gerald R. Smith (July 18, 2014). "Spanning Time: Some bet Binghamton-born pitcher was real-life Casey at the Bat". Press ... p. 8. "Pitcher Dan Casey Yoked in Matrimony" (PDF). The Sporting Life. December 11, 1889. p. 3. 1900 U.S. Census entry for ...
The Reason of Life. New York: Longmans, Green, & Co., 1911. Turning Points in My Life. New York: Longmans, Green, & Co., 1912 ... Turning Points in My Life, (New York: Longmans, Green, & Co) 1912, p. 18-19. Stone, DeWitt Boyd, Jr., Wandering to Glory: ...
"2013 Yorkshire Bank 40 Points Table". ESPNcricinfo. ESPN Sports Media. Retrieved 27 July 2015. "2013 Friends Life t20 Points ... "2013 County Championship Points Table". ESPNcricinfo. ESPN Sports Media. Retrieved 27 July 2015. " ... or the Friends Life t20 (won 3, lost 7). 23-year-old all-rounder Matt Coles joined Hampshire on loan in August before signing a ... Group A of the 40-over Yorkshire Bank 40 and the South Group of the Friends Life t20. Kent also hosted a first-class match at ...
"Friends Life t20 2012 Points Tables". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2012-06-17. "Friends Life t20 Midlands/Wales/West: Somerset v ... Pts = Points. Note: Pld = Played, W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, NR = No result, Pts = Points, NRR = Net run rate. "Player ... "Friends Life t20 Quarter-final: Somerset v Essex at Taunton, 24 July 2012". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2012-07-24. "Friends Life t20 ... Batting points, Bwl = Bowling points, Adj = Adjustments/Penalties, ...
" "World Famous Party Band Sets Up Shop in Point Loma." Point Loma Life. May 2014. Pgs. 14-17 Varga, George. "Sammy Hagar and ...
"Life" 03. "My Sub Pt. 3 (Big Bang)" 07. "King of the South" 08. "Mind Control" (featuring E-40 and Wiz Khalifa) 09. "Standby ( ... Pt. 2: The Jackin')" Sample Credit: Indeep - "Last Night a D.J. Saved My Life" 8. "Don't Let Me Down" 9. "Porchlight" ( ... "My Life Ain't Rosey" 15. "I Ain't Playin No Moe" 16. "Put Cha Sign In Da Air" 17. "Bottom Ain't The Place 4 a 'G" 18. "Adidas ... "Jet Life" (featuring Big K.R.I.T. & Wiz Khalifa) 00. "I'm Flexin'" (featuring Big K.R.I.T.) 2. "Street Nigga" (featuring ...
"Historical turning points that affected my life". Virtual Gallery. Birzeit University. "Personalities: Who's Who". Arab Thought ...
Player Master Point History. WBF Master Points ACBL Grand Life Masters. American Contract Bridge League Bridge tourney players ... 1981 Life Master Pairs (1) 1979 Life Master Open Pairs (1) 2008 Open Pairs (1) 1986 Open Pairs I (2) 1996, 2003 IMP Pairs (1) ... Katz is a Grand Life Master of the American Contract Bridge League with over 26,000 masterpoints and a World Grand Master of ... 1997 Life Master Pairs (4) 1989, 2001, 2003, 2016 IMP Pairs (1) 2006 Vanderbilt (1) 2012 United States Bridge Championships (2 ...
Bombs (which must be avoided). Coins that yield various numbers of points. An extra life. If all three types of power-ups are ... If the player manages to hit Damazu, bonus points are awarded. If the JaJaMaru-kun is hit by a bomb, he goes on to the next ... Enemies use various projectiles, one of which will cause the player to lose a life. If JaJaMaru-kun lands on top of an enemy, ... In the game, the player starts with three lives and can only run, jump and throw shurikens. The game is divided into stages, ...
Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.; Campisi, Judith; Keyomarsi, Khandan; Medrano, Estela E. (2001). "No Restriction Points in Life and ... Pardee published on this so-called 'Restriction Point', sometimes called the 'Pardee Point', in the Proceedings of the National ... In the early 1970s Pardee identified that the cell cycle has a point in the 'G1' Phase where the cell, as it were, 'commits' to ... He is also well known as the discoverer of the restriction point, in which a cell commits itself to certain cell cycle events ...
"The Red Chase". Sporting Life, September 19, 1908, p. 2. "Porkopolis Points". Sporting Life, October 7, 1899, p. 7. "Butte Has ... Sporting Life later wrote of that day: "All records were broken after acquisition of "Lefty" Houtz, who was hailed by the late ... On October 7, Sporting Life reported that Houtz ("the Texas League wonder") had been released outright from Cincinnati. He then ...
"Late News from All Points". Sporting Life, May 30, 1903, p. 5. "Baseball Notes". The Pittsburgh Press, June 12, 1905, p. 12. ...
The Life of Pt. Bhaskarbuwa Bakhale. Popular Publication, Mumbai, 1959. N.N. Shukla. Alladiya Khan: As I Knew Him. Journal of ... Pt Ram Marathe was the famous disciple of Master Krishnarao Phulambrikar. Master Krishnarao Phulambrikar not only taught Pt.Ram ... Pune University annually confers a Pt. Bhaskarbuwa Bakhale Award on the student standing first in its Bachelor of Arts program ... Pran Piya Ustad Vilayat Hussain Khan: His Life and Contribution to the World. Atlantic Publishers, New Delhi, 2008. P.L. ...
... is life's real point." January 1976, United States, Galaxy Science Fiction, Jan 1976, ed. James Baen, publ. UPD Publishing ... and reproduction only a reparative process to extend that quality-and not the point of life at all... only feudal societies can ... "Russ suggests that the quality of life is the purpose of living, ...
p. 6. "New York News" (PDF). The Sporting Life. July 28, 1894. p. 2. "Late News From All Points" (PDF). The Sporting Life. ... p. 2. "A Relic of Happy Days" (PDF). The Sporting Life. September 8, 1900. p. 1. "For More Batting" (PDF). The Sporting Life. ... "Time's Changes: The Players of a Once-Famous Team Widely Scattered" (PDF). The Sporting Life. October 20, 1900. ... p. 5. "Editorial Views, Comment" (PDF). The Sporting Life. March 25, 1893. ...
Accounts of his life differ in certain points. The following is that given in the Pāli Canon. Prince Siddhartha was preparing ... She told Rāhula that since his father had renounced the palace life and as he was the next royal prince in line, he should ask ... The Life of Buddha as Legend and History, Routledge, p. 53, note 1 . Gnoli, Raniero, ed. (1977), The Gilgit Manuscript of the ... that ties individuals to life and suffering, not just through eventual loss and separation of loved ones but more deeply and ...
Corbally, Christopher (2003). "The Anchor Points in Bob Garrison's Astronomical Life". The Garrison Festschrift : held in ...
"Beatriz Elorza and the Breathing Points of Life". artefuse.com. Retrieved 23 August 2014. "Breathing Color Inc". fineart.co.uk ...
An extra life is granted every 20,000 points. In 1984 Softline readers named Tubeway the sixth-worst Apple program of 1983. ... The opponents consist of triangular green homers (100 points) and triangular blue seekers (200 points), both of which can ... The goal of the game is to clear as many levels as possible before running out of lives. ...
As he later recalled, "It was terrific... one of the high points of my life." In 1965 Adams transferred to the Vietnam desk, ... A life in the Central Intelligence Agency (New York: Random House 2003). C. Michael Hiam, Who the Hell Are We Fighting? The ... 469-470 (Adams bitter as wrong numbers lost lives). At the Ellsberg espionage trial, see section below. Krebs (1988). Ellsberg ...
... (2006). Salvation Creek: an unexpected life. Milsons Point, NSW:Random House. ISBN 1-86325-474-9. Susan Duncan ( ... Duncan lives in New South Wales with her current husband, Bob. They have homes at Pittwater and the mid-north coast of NSW. The ... ISBN 978-1-86325-648-3. Susan Duncan (2009). A life on Pittwater. North Sydney, NSW: Random House. ISBN 978-1-74166-669-4. ...
One of the ultimate goals of psychology/neuroscience is to be able to explain the everyday experience of conscious life. ... the request of the Systems Development Foundation to provide a summary of the current status of a field which until that point ...
Life insurance is a great way to protect your family, not so much as an investment. ... Whole Life Insurance offers pros and cons but for most Americans term life insurance is a better option. ... We are just over 4 years into our whole life policy. Would it be wise to cancel at this point? ... Whole Life. As a quick refresher, term life insurance is as basic and inexpensive as it gets. Youll get life insurance for a ...
In other words, your quality of life wont slip, which is the whole point of the insurance in the first place. ... Filed Under: Finance, money Tagged With: life, life insurance. Leave a Reply Cancel reply. Your email address will not be ... worry about guarding the quality of life you can expect both for yourself and your family throughout their lives and your life ... What Is Quality of Life Insurance?. This type of insurance is a way of financially warding against an unexpected death, an ...
The low cost Life Insurance and Critical Illness cover helps protect your dependants in the event of your death or diagnosis of ... Police Welfare Fund Insurances Ltd has arranged for members to purchase Life Insurance cover for their dependants at very ... At that point, your Critical Illness cover ends.. A Guaranteed Funeral Benefit ... Life Insurance Cover. Life insurance is to protect you and your family. It creates an asset when needed most - should you die ...
In the meantime, here are the key points made in the article:. Many people purchase life insurance to pay for funeral and other ... LIFE presents The Seven Wonders of Life Insurance. As part of this years Life Insurance Awareness Month, LIFE (The Life and ... With proper planning, life insurance can provide much more for your family. Here is what life insurance can do for you:. Life ... LIFE presents The Seven Wonders of Life Insurance. National Health InsuranceIndividual Plans at Group Rates! Great Coverage/ ...
The point is to make sure that when you are gone, your family can continue to maintain the standard of living that they have ... Direct Line Life Insurance. You could be looking to save taxes by investing in life insurance or you could be looking at it as ... Among the popular life insurance providers that have made their presence felt in the UK marketplace is Direct Line Life ... If that is not tempting enough, take a look at the varieties of cover that Direct Line Life Insurance has on offer. Their fixed ...
Affinity Life Insurance Definition - Crying that she isnt here, then, wizard, if you should find a thing. Instant that his ... Point-couldnt be helped off the stuff. Particle/ antiparticle pair (say, the tattlesnivel bleater? who are you? what prophet ... Later that she needed for him life for you. The law of perjury, and that brought down the staircase. He was a fundamentally ... affinity life insurance definition tds on life insurance premium. Amount of her halberd cleanly across its roof. Branches of ...
Whole of Life insurance - As the name suggests, there is no end point to this type of life insurance, instead it lasts for the ... There are two types of Life insurance. Term insurance - Has a start and end point, a fixed period of time or term, in which the ... Life AND Critical Illness, which pays out on each event.. *Life OR Critical Illness, which pays out once, on whichever event ... For life insurance especially, the use of trusts is essential. Using a trust places the life policy outside your estate. Why ...
How expensive is it, and do you really "neeeed" it? They will sell only to those clients to whom they can effectively point out ... Life Insurance a solution for Safe Money?. Those who say that life insurance is a bad investment are not relating to real life ... The big difference between "investing" in life insurance versus mutual funds (for example) is that with life insurance you ... The critics of life insurance are many; mostly because of a lack of understanding of what it does and how it works. They miss a ...
do i need life insurance when im 20 wit no kids. i currently have it with state farm but i didnt pay last months premium its ... like no point….should i still keep it tho?. BEST ANSWER: Try this site where you can compare quotes from the best companies : ... His life insurance company has been mailing me for me to send them the death certificate and to fill out the form so they can ... I am the beneficiary to a life insurance policy that my Uncle issued and died a year ago.He was in a nursing home in ...
The Sleeping Bear Point Life Saving Station, also known as the Glen Haven Coast Guard Station, is a Coast Guard station located ... The Sleeping Bear Point Life Saving Station includes four buildings: a residence, a boat house, a storage shed, and a signal ... The Sleeping Bear Point Life Saving Station was constructed in 1901 by Robert J.B. Newcombe using prototype plans developed by ... "Sleeping Bear Point Life Saving Station". Michigan State Housing Development Authority: Historic Sites Online. Retrieved ...
Private Life: The Compass Point Sessions on Allmusic Private Life: The Compass Point Sessions on Discogs Private Life: The ... "Private Life: The Compass Point Sessions - Grace Jones". www.allmusic.com. Retrieved 2006-12-28. "Grace Jones - Private Life - ... "Private Life". Private Life: The Compass Point Sessions contains long and extended version of Jones hits, and although the CD ... Nightclubbing and Living My Life. Private Life: The Compass Point Sessions includes a selection of tracks from the recording ...
Topic: 20 points about life Posted By: candid Subject: 20 points about life Date Posted: 09 November 2006 at 11:23pm 20 points ... 20 points about life Printed From: IslamiCity.org Category: General Forum Name: Humour Forum Discription: "CLEAN" humour only ... to describe life in india. 1. Regular naps prevent old age especially if you take them while driving.. 2. Having one child ...
Heres proof that all those miles and rewards points youve racked up are good for more than a subscription to Golf Digest. One ... Now, hes using the more than one million frequent-flier miles and rewards points he accrued in his career to survive and help ... Hes found that mixing cash and points gives you the best value. This week, hes at a Holiday Inn in San Clemente Calif., ... Heres proof that all those frequent-flier miles and rewards points youve racked up are good for more than a subscription to ...
... and Sorority Life is no exception. Right now, if you purchase flowers for your Mom for Mothers Day, you will earn 100 ... why not earn a few Brownie Points in Sorority Life while youre at it?. Have you sent Mom flowers and earned your Sorority Life ... you will earn 100 Brownie Points in Sorority Life. The main trick is that you have to purchase the points through the Sorority ... Many games right now are holding special Mothers Day promotions, and Sorority Life is no exception. Right now, if you purchase ...
Performance charts for Russell LifePoints Growth Strategy Fund (RALCX) including intraday, historical and comparison charts, ... All Signs Point to Big Democratic Wins in 2018 * Trump Takes Credit for Killing Hundreds of Regulations That Were Already Dead ... Russell LifePoints Growth Strategy Fund is an open-end fund incorporated in the USA. The Fund seeks high long-term capital ...
Life may have begun on land instead - just as Darwin thought ... Russian hot springs point to rocky origins for life. New ... Although the fossil record doesnt capture events at the origin of life, it does record some slightly later chapters in lifes ... Life appeared sometime before 3.8 billion years ago, towards the end of a turbulent phase in our planets early history dubbed ... Its a question that strikes at the very heart of one of the deepest mysteries in the universe: how did life begin on ...
So how can acupressure save your life? Lets move on to the next life saving point. ... Hold each point together until the pain subsides. Acupuncturists often use this point to help birth a baby and so should not be ... Try this next point located at the top of the head on the skull. Feel around until you find a little dip, exactly where the ... Give that point some good pressure with your thumb, even using you finger nail to give it a pinch has proven effective. This ...
... explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives. ... Mummy Hair Points to a Low-Stress Life in Ancient South America. Scant cortisol levels in mummified locks change ideas about ... last months of life-and may be an invaluable window into the emotional life of the remote past. Although it is impossible to ... But this assumption of a low-stress life for the remote Atacama people should not necessarily be extrapolated to the experience ...
Drug points: Life threatening arrhythmia after self poisoning with dichloralphenazone and lorazepam. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) ... Drug points: Life threatening arrhythmia after self poisoning with dichloralphenazone and lorazepam Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1987 ... Drug points: Life threatening arrhythmia after self poisoning with dichloralphenazone and lorazepam ... Drug points: Life threatening arrhythmia after self poisoning with dichloralphenazone and lorazepam ...
Lordofthehorizon should be able to make his class count at Lingfield, according to Matt Rennie - he has a tip for every race on every card. ...
Ask a question about real estate , quality of life in Point Lookout, and get answers from local experts. ... Advice about quality of life in Point Lookout on Trulia Voices. ... Quality of Life in Point Lookout : Real Estate Advice. change ...
The Life One and Studio phones will be comparable or cheaper: the Life One, which launches in March, will be priced at $179 ($ ... The Life One series, now in its second generation, features a quad-core processor, 5 or 5.5-inch (in the case of the larger ... The Studio Energy, meanwhile, packs a 5000 mAh battery, and its lower-end entries, the Studio and Life One series, sport ... But it excels in a singular area - battery life. The Studio Energys massive 5000 mAh pack can deliver up to 52 hours of talk ...
The Point layout needs to work for both free-standing Points, Points in a single-row Digest, and Points in a matrix. The ... Figure 16.13: Simple Point, Filtered Point, Overflow Point.. In a Simple Point, no Dimension Attributes have been selected, so ... Point designs continue to evolve as they are used more. Wider Points, like this set, sacrifice the space of more Points in a ... By definition, these points are deemed important by the author, and are thus called Key Points. Key Points may be made ...
At the conclusion of a White House forum on criminal justice, Obama said he wanted to make a final point about the nexus of ... "I think the reason that the organizers used the phrase Black Lives Matter was not because they were suggesting nobody elses ... Obama paired his defense of the Black Lives Matter movement with praise for police and other law enforcement officials. Some ... Those deaths, and others of black women, have inspired protests around the country under the "Black Lives Matter" moniker. ...
The Point: MPAA Ratings: Protecting Immorality... by: John Stonestreet Category: Marriage, Family, and Society , The Point ... And for pro-life resources, download the "21 Days of Prayer for Life" prayer guide here, and check out the books from our ... Erics theme was one I picked up on later that evening in my speech for the Evangelicals for Life conference. With the pro-life ... The Reason We March for Life: Civility Is not a Strategy. As John said, we are all made in the image of God and deserve to be ...
  • In most cases the tax free rate of return is about 3.5% if one dies at age 93 and much greater (8.5%/yr.) if our client dies at 85 (about life expectancy) and EVEN GREATER (24%/yr.) if death occurs at 75. (iwantmyltc.net)
  • The arguments in favor for this type of insurance include that you shouldn't just be worried about what happens if you're dead in terms of your family, you should worry about guarding the quality of life you can expect both for yourself and your family throughout their lives and your life. (citizeneffect.org)
  • So this is another argument in favor of the quality of life insurance, namely that there's an effort given to give someone a certain standard of quality of life even while they are dying so they don't have to worry about financial stressors on top of everything else. (citizeneffect.org)
  • Overall, quality of life insurance can be of significant benefit to people who are worried about the unexpected happening and being forced into a bad situation for the rest of their life due to a chronic illness or another unexpected event. (citizeneffect.org)
  • If you buy this kind of insurance, you will have a lot of leeway when it comes to mitigating risk over time with a small fee that you can eventually cash in on when it comes to a sudden downturn in your fortune so that you lose the level of life that you and your family are accustomed to in general. (citizeneffect.org)
  • Life insurance can be used to pay off your mortgage and other debts, provide for your children's educational needs and act as a safeguard for your family's continued financial wellbeing. (policeassn.org.nz)
  • They will sell only to those clients to whom they can effectively point out that the individual's untimely death will leave a significant deficiency in the financial condition of those he/she leaves behind. (iwantmyltc.net)
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