A local anesthetic and cardiac depressant used as an antiarrhythmia agent. Its actions are more intense and its effects more prolonged than those of PROCAINE but its duration of action is shorter than that of BUPIVACAINE or PRILOCAINE.
Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.
A local anesthetic that is similar pharmacologically to LIDOCAINE. Currently, it is used most often for infiltration anesthesia in dentistry.
A blocking of nerve conduction to a specific area by an injection of an anesthetic agent.
A widely used local anesthetic agent.
The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially to induce anesthesia. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.
A range of methods used to reduce pain and anxiety during dental procedures.
Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.
Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected into the epidural space.
A local anesthetic that is chemically related to BUPIVACAINE but pharmacologically related to LIDOCAINE. It is indicated for infiltration, nerve block, and epidural anesthesia. Mepivacaine is effective topically only in large doses and therefore should not be used by this route. (From AMA Drug Evaluations, 1994, p168)
A thiophene-containing local anesthetic pharmacologically similar to MEPIVACAINE.
Investigations conducted on the physical health of teeth involving use of a tool that transmits hot or cold electric currents on a tooth's surface that can determine problems with that tooth based on reactions to the currents.
A surface anesthetic that acts by preventing transmission of impulses along NERVE FIBERS and at NERVE ENDINGS.
A branch of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The mandibular nerve carries motor fibers to the muscles of mastication and sensory fibers to the teeth and gingivae, the face in the region of the mandible, and parts of the dura.
A potent local anesthetic of the ester type used for surface and spinal anesthesia.
Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.
Ion channels that specifically allow the passage of SODIUM ions. A variety of specific sodium channel subtypes are involved in serving specialized functions such as neuronal signaling, CARDIAC MUSCLE contraction, and KIDNEY function.
A class of drugs that act by inhibition of sodium influx through cell membranes. Blockade of sodium channels slows the rate and amplitude of initial rapid depolarization, reduces cell excitability, and reduces conduction velocity.
A local anesthetic with rapid onset and long action, similar to BUPIVACAINE.
The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.
Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected directly into the spinal cord.
An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
Process of administering an anesthetic through injection directly into the bloodstream.
Injection of an anesthetic into the nerves to inhibit nerve transmission in a specific part of the body.
Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.
Agents used for the treatment or prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. They may affect the polarization-repolarization phase of the action potential, its excitability or refractoriness, or impulse conduction or membrane responsiveness within cardiac fibers. Anti-arrhythmia agents are often classed into four main groups according to their mechanism of action: sodium channel blockade, beta-adrenergic blockade, repolarization prolongation, or calcium channel blockade.
Pain during the period after surgery.
A local anesthetic of the ester type that has a slow onset and a short duration of action. It is mainly used for infiltration anesthesia, peripheral nerve block, and spinal block. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1016).
Antiarrhythmic agent pharmacologically similar to LIDOCAINE. It may have some anticonvulsant properties.
Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.
The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.

Arterial blood gas tensions during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. (1/2241)

Arterial blood gas tensions were measured before and during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, with (group I) and without (group 2) sedation with intravenous diazepam. There was a highly significant fall in the PaO2, which occurred in both groups and was therefore not attributable to diazepam. Measurement of FEV, and FVC before endoscopy had no predictive value for those patients whose PaO2 fell the most.  (+info)

Neural modulation of cephalexin intestinal absorption through the di- and tripeptide brush border transporter of rat jejunum in vivo. (2/2241)

Intestinal absorption of beta-lactamine antibiotics (e.g., cefixime and cephalexin) has been shown to proceed through the dipeptide carrier system. In a previous study, nifedipine (NFP), an L-type calcium channel blocker, enhanced the absorption of cefixime in vivo but not in vitro, and it was suggested that neural mechanisms might be involved in the effect of NFP. The aim of the present study was to assess the involvement of the nervous system on the intestinal absorption of cephalexin (CFX). To investigate this, we used a single-pass jejunal perfusion technique in rats. NFP and diltiazem enhanced approximately 2-fold the plasma levels of CFX in treated rats versus untreated controls. NFP also increased approximately 2-fold the CFX level in portal plasma and increased urinary excretion of CFX, thus indicating that CFX did effectively increase CFX intestinal absorption. Perfusing high concentrations of dipeptides in the jejunal lumen competitively reduced CFX absorption and inhibited the enhancement of CFX absorption produced by NFP. Hexamethonium and lidocaine inhibited the effect of NFP, whereas atropine, capsaicin, clonidine, and isoproterenol enhanced CFX absorption by the same order of magnitude as NFP. Thus, complex neural networks can modulate the function of the intestinal di- and tripeptide transporter. Sympathetic noradrenergic fibers, intestinal sensory neurons, and nicotinic synapses are involved in the increase of CFX absorption produced by NFP.  (+info)

Electrophysiological evidence for tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels in slowly conducting dural sensory fibers. (3/2241)

A tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant sodium channel was recently identified that is expressed only in small diameter neurons of peripheral sensory ganglia. The peripheral axons of sensory neurons appear to lack this channel, but its presence has not been investigated in peripheral nerve endings, the site of sensory transduction in vivo. We investigated the effect of TTX on mechanoresponsiveness in nerve endings of sensory neurons that innervate the intracranial dura. Because the degree of TTX resistance of axonal branches could potentially be affected by factors other than channel subtype, the neurons were also tested for sensitivity to lidocaine, which blocks both TTX-sensitive and TTX-resistant sodium channels. Single-unit activity was recorded from dural afferent neurons in the trigeminal ganglion of urethan-anesthetized rats. Response thresholds to mechanical stimulation of the dura were determined with von Frey monofilaments while exposing the dura to progressively increasing concentrations of TTX or lidocaine. Neurons with slowly conducting axons were relatively resistant to TTX. Application of 1 microM TTX produced complete suppression of mechanoresponsiveness in all (11/11) fast A-delta units [conduction velocity (c.v.) 5-18 m/s] but only 50% (5/10) of slow A-delta units (1.5 +info)

RINm5f cells express inactivating BK channels whereas HIT cells express noninactivating BK channels. (4/2241)

Large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated BK-type K+ channels are expressed abundantly in normal rat pancreatic islet cells and in the clonal rat insulinoma tumor (RINm5f) and hamster insulinoma tumor (HIT) beta cell lines. Previous work has suggested that the Ca2+ sensitivity of BK channels in RIN cells is substantially less than that in HIT cells, perhaps contributing to differences between the cell lines in responsiveness to glucose in mediating insulin secretion. In both RIN cells and normal pancreatic beta cells, BK channels are thought to play a limited role in responses of beta cells to secretagogues and in the electrical activity of beta cells. Here we examine in detail the properties of BK channels in RIN and HIT cells using inside-out patches and whole cell recordings. BK channels in RIN cells exhibit rapid inactivation that results in an anomalous steady-state Ca2+ dependence of activation. In contrast, BK channels in HIT cells exhibit the more usual noninactivating behavior. When BK inactivation is taken into account, the Ca2+ and voltage dependence of activation of BK channels in RIN and HIT cells is essentially indistinguishable. The properties of BK channel inactivation in RIN cells are similar to those of inactivating BK channels (termed BKi channels) previously identified in rat chromaffin cells. Inactivation involves multiple, trypsin-sensitive cytosolic domains and exhibits a dependence on Ca2+ and voltage that appears to arise from coupling to channel activation. In addition, the rates of inactivation onset and recovery are similar to that of BKi channels in chromaffin cells. The charybdotoxin (CTX) sensitivity of BKi currents is somewhat less than that of the noninactivating BK variant. Action potential voltage-clamp waveforms indicate that BK current is activated only weakly by Ca2+ influx in RIN cells but more strongly activated in HIT cells even when Ca2+ current magnitude is comparable. Concentrations of CTX sufficient to block BKi current in RIN cells have no effect on action potential activity initiated by glucose or DC injection. Despite its abundant expression in RIN cells, BKi current appears to play little role in action potential activity initiated by glucose or DC injection in RIN cells, but BK current may play an important role in action potential repolarization in HIT cells.  (+info)

Evaluation of lidocaine as an analgesic when added to hypertonic saline for sclerotherapy. (5/2241)

PURPOSE: The efficacy of sclerosing agents for the treatment of telangiectasias and reticular veins is well established. The injection of these agents is often associated with pain, and it is not uncommon for sclerotherapists to include lidocaine with the sclerosants in an attempt to reduce the pain associated with treatment. However, there are concerns that this may reduce the overall efficacy of the treatment because of dilution of the sclerosant. Patient comfort and overall outcome associated with treatment using HS with lidocaine (LIDO) versus that using HS alone was compared. METHODS: Forty-two patients were prospectively entered into the study and randomized blindly to sclerotherapy with 23.4% HS or 19% LIDO. Study subjects and treating physicians were blinded to the injection solution used. Injection sites were chosen for veins ranging in size from 0.1 to 3 mm. Photographs of the area to be treated were taken, and the patients rated their pain. They were then observed at regular intervals for four months, and clinical data was collected. Thirty-five subjects completed the full follow-up period, and photographs of the injected area were taken again. Three investigators blinded to the treatment assignment then evaluated the photographs and scored the treatment efficacy according to a standardized system. RESULTS: In the HS group, 61.9% (13 of 21) patients rated their pain as none or mild, whereas 90.5% (19 of 21) of patients in the LIDO group had no or mild discomfort. This difference is significant, with a P value of.034. There was no difference in the overall efficacy of treatment between the two groups. The groups had similar rates of vein thrombosis and skin necrosis. CONCLUSION: Although lidocaine is often used with sclerosing agents, there are no previous reports in the literature to evaluate its effectiveness in reducing the pain experienced by the patient. In this study, patients receiving LIDO experienced significantly less discomfort at the time of injection than patients who received HS alone. There were no differences in the effectiveness of treatment or in the incidence of complications between the two groups.  (+info)

Dispersion of signal-averaged P wave duration on precordial body surface in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. (6/2241)

AIMS: This study sought to investigate whether the spatial dispersion of signal-averaged P wave duration would be increased in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, by use of precordial mapping of the P wave signal-averaged ECG. METHODS AND RESULTS: The P wave signal-averaged ECG was recorded by the P wave-triggering method from 16 precordial leads in 55 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and 57 control subjects. As an index of the dispersion of signal-averaged P wave duration, we obtained the difference between the maximum and minimum in 16 recording sites. The dispersion was significantly greater in the patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation than the controls (26.6 +/- 9.5 vs 14.8 +/- 6.7 ms, P<0.0001). In 25 patients with symptomatic attacks of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, the signal-averaged ECG was repeated 1 h after a single dose of orally administered pilsicainide, a new class Ic drug. These patients were prospectively followed-up for 10 +/- 11 months with pilsicainide. The rate of freedom from recurrence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation attacks was significantly (P<0.0001) higher in patients with whom dispersion was decreased by the single dose (54%[7/13]) than in those in whom dispersion increased (8%[1/12]). CONCLUSION: Increased dispersion of signal-averaged P wave duration would play an important role in generating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and would be useful in the prediction of drug efficacy to evaluate the change in dispersion by a single administration of pilsicainide.  (+info)

Profiles of aprindine, cibenzoline, pilsicainide and pirmenol in the framework of the Sicilian Gambit. The Guideline Committee for Clinical Use of Antiarrhythmic Drugs in Japan (Working Group of Arrhythmias of the Japanese Society of Electrocardiology). (7/2241)

The Vaughan Williams classification has been used widely by clinicians, cardiologists and researchers engaged in antiarrhythmic drug development and testing in many countries throughout the world since its initial proposal in the early 1970s. However, a major criticism of the Vaughan Williams system arose from the extent to which the categorization of drugs into classes I-IV led to oversimplified views of both shared and divergent actions. The Sicilian Gambit proposed a two-dimensional tabular framework for display of drug actions to solve these problems. From April to December 1996, members of the Guideline Committee met to discuss pharmacologic profiles of 4 antiarrhythmic drugs (aprindine, cibenzoline, pilsicainide, and pirmenol) that were not included in the original spreadsheet but are used widely in clinical practice in Japan. The discussion aimed to fit the drug profiles into the Gambit framework based on all the important literature published to date regarding the actions of the 4 drugs. This report is a summary of that deliberation.  (+info)

Action potentials in the dendrites of retinal ganglion cells. (8/2241)

The somas and dendrites of intact retinal ganglion cells were exposed by enzymatic removal of the overlying endfeet of the Muller glia. Simultaneous whole cell patch recordings were made from a ganglion cell's dendrite and the cell's soma. When a dendrite was stimulated with depolarizing current, impulses often propagated to the soma, where they appeared as a mixture of small depolarizations and action potentials. When the soma was stimulated, action potentials always propagated back through the dendrite. The site of initiation of action potentials, as judged by their timing, could be shifted between soma and dendrite by changing the site of stimulation. Applying QX-314 to the soma could eliminate somatic action potentials while leaving dendritic impulses intact. The absolute amplitudes of the dendritic action potentials varied somewhat at different distances from the soma, and it is not clear whether these variations are real or technical. Nonetheless, the qualitative experiments clearly suggest that the dendrites of retinal ganglion cells generate regenerative Na+ action potentials, at least in response to large direct depolarizations.  (+info)

Lidocaine is a type of local anesthetic that numbs painful areas and is used to prevent pain during certain medical procedures. It works by blocking the nerves that transmit pain signals to the brain. In addition to its use as an anesthetic, lidocaine can also be used to treat irregular heart rates and relieve itching caused by allergic reactions or skin conditions such as eczema.

Lidocaine is available in various forms, including creams, gels, ointments, sprays, solutions, and injectable preparations. It can be applied directly to the skin or mucous membranes, or it can be administered by injection into a muscle or vein. The specific dosage and method of administration will depend on the reason for its use and the individual patient's medical history and current health status.

Like all medications, lidocaine can have side effects, including allergic reactions, numbness that lasts too long, and in rare cases, heart problems or seizures. It is important to follow the instructions of a healthcare provider carefully when using lidocaine to minimize the risk of adverse effects.

Local anesthetics are a type of medication that is used to block the sensation of pain in a specific area of the body. They work by temporarily numbing the nerves in that area, preventing them from transmitting pain signals to the brain. Local anesthetics can be administered through various routes, including topical application (such as creams or gels), injection (such as into the skin or tissues), or regional nerve blocks (such as epidural or spinal anesthesia).

Some common examples of local anesthetics include lidocaine, prilocaine, bupivacaine, and ropivacaine. These medications can be used for a variety of medical procedures, ranging from minor surgeries (such as dental work or skin biopsies) to more major surgeries (such as joint replacements or hernia repairs).

Local anesthetics are generally considered safe when used appropriately, but they can have side effects and potential complications. These may include allergic reactions, toxicity (if too much is administered), and nerve damage (if the medication is injected into a nerve). It's important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully when using local anesthetics, and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Prilocaine is an amide local anesthetic that is often used in topical, injectable, and regional anesthesia. It is commonly combined with lidocaine to reduce the risk of methhemoglobinemia, a rare but potentially serious side effect that can occur with prilocaine use.

Prilocaine works by blocking sodium channels in nerve cell membranes, which prevents the transmission of nerve impulses and results in local anesthesia. It has a rapid onset of action and a relatively short duration of effect.

In addition to its use as a local anesthetic, prilocaine is also used in some dental procedures and for the treatment of premature ejaculation. As with any medication, prilocaine can have side effects, including allergic reactions, numbness, tingling, and pain at the injection site. It should be used with caution in patients with certain medical conditions, such as heart disease, liver or kidney dysfunction, and in pregnant or breastfeeding women.

Local anesthesia is a type of anesthesia that numbs a specific area of the body, blocking pain signals from that particular region while allowing the person to remain conscious and alert. It is typically achieved through the injection or application of a local anesthetic drug, which works by temporarily inhibiting the function of nerve fibers carrying pain sensations. Common examples of local anesthetics include lidocaine, prilocaine, and bupivacaine.

Local anesthesia is commonly used for minor surgical procedures, dental work, or other medical interventions where only a small area needs to be numbed. It can also be employed as part of a combined anesthetic technique, such as in conjunction with sedation or regional anesthesia, to provide additional pain relief and increase patient comfort during more extensive surgeries.

The duration of local anesthesia varies depending on the type and dosage of the anesthetic agent used; some last for just a few hours, while others may provide numbness for up to several days. Overall, local anesthesia is considered a safe and effective method for managing pain during various medical procedures.

Bupivacaine is a long-acting local anesthetic drug, which is used to cause numbness or loss of feeling in a specific area of the body during certain medical procedures such as surgery, dental work, or childbirth. It works by blocking the nerves that transmit pain signals to the brain.

Bupivacaine is available as a solution for injection and is usually administered directly into the tissue surrounding the nerve to be blocked (nerve block) or into the spinal fluid (epidural). The onset of action of bupivacaine is relatively slow, but its duration of action is long, making it suitable for procedures that require prolonged pain relief.

Like all local anesthetics, bupivacaine carries a risk of side effects such as allergic reactions, nerve damage, and systemic toxicity if accidentally injected into a blood vessel or given in excessive doses. It should be used with caution in patients with certain medical conditions, including heart disease, liver disease, and neurological disorders.

Combined anesthetics refer to the use of two or more types of anesthetic agents together during a medical procedure to produce a desired level of sedation, amnesia, analgesia, and muscle relaxation. This approach can allow for lower doses of individual anesthetic drugs, which may reduce the risk of adverse effects associated with each drug. Common combinations include using a general anesthetic in combination with a regional or local anesthetic technique. The specific choice of combined anesthetics depends on various factors such as the type and duration of the procedure, patient characteristics, and the desired outcomes.

Dental anesthesia is a type of local or regional anesthesia that is specifically used in dental procedures to block the transmission of pain impulses from the teeth and surrounding tissues to the brain. The most common types of dental anesthesia include:

1. Local anesthesia: This involves the injection of a local anesthetic drug, such as lidocaine or prilocaine, into the gum tissue near the tooth that is being treated. This numbs the area and prevents the patient from feeling pain during the procedure.
2. Conscious sedation: This is a type of minimal sedation that is used to help patients relax during dental procedures. The patient remains conscious and can communicate with the dentist, but may not remember the details of the procedure. Common methods of conscious sedation include nitrous oxide (laughing gas) or oral sedatives.
3. Deep sedation or general anesthesia: This is rarely used in dental procedures, but may be necessary for patients who are extremely anxious or have special needs. It involves the administration of drugs that cause a state of unconsciousness and prevent the patient from feeling pain during the procedure.

Dental anesthesia is generally safe when administered by a qualified dentist or oral surgeon. However, as with any medical procedure, there are risks involved, including allergic reactions to the anesthetic drugs, nerve damage, and infection. Patients should discuss any concerns they have with their dentist before undergoing dental anesthesia.

A nerve block is a medical procedure in which an anesthetic or neurolytic agent is injected near a specific nerve or bundle of nerves to block the transmission of pain signals from that area to the brain. This technique can be used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, such as identifying the source of pain, providing temporary or prolonged relief, or facilitating surgical procedures in the affected region.

The injection typically contains a local anesthetic like lidocaine or bupivacaine, which numbs the nerve, preventing it from transmitting pain signals. In some cases, steroids may also be added to reduce inflammation and provide longer-lasting relief. Depending on the type of nerve block and its intended use, the injection might be administered close to the spine (neuraxial blocks), at peripheral nerves (peripheral nerve blocks), or around the sympathetic nervous system (sympathetic nerve blocks).

While nerve blocks are generally safe, they can have side effects such as infection, bleeding, nerve damage, or in rare cases, systemic toxicity from the anesthetic agent. It is essential to consult with a qualified medical professional before undergoing this procedure to ensure proper evaluation, technique, and post-procedure care.

Epidural anesthesia is a type of regional anesthesia that involves the injection of local anesthetic medication into the epidural space in the spine, which is the space surrounding the dura mater, a membrane that covers the spinal cord. The injection is typically administered through a catheter placed in the lower back using a needle.

The local anesthetic drug blocks nerve impulses from the affected area, numbing it and relieving pain. Epidural anesthesia can be used for various surgical procedures, such as cesarean sections, knee or hip replacements, and hernia repairs. It is also commonly used during childbirth to provide pain relief during labor and delivery.

The effects of epidural anesthesia can vary depending on the dose and type of medication used, as well as the individual's response to the drug. The anesthetic may take several minutes to start working, and its duration of action can range from a few hours to a day or more. Epidural anesthesia is generally considered safe when administered by trained medical professionals, but like any medical procedure, it carries some risks, including infection, bleeding, nerve damage, and respiratory depression.

Mepivacaine is a local anesthetic drug, which is used to cause numbness or loss of feeling before and during surgical procedures. It works by blocking the nerve signals in your body. Mepivacaine has a faster onset of action compared to bupivacaine but has a shorter duration of action. It can be used for infiltration, peripheral nerve block, and epidural anesthesia.

The medical definition of Mepivacaine is:

A amide-type local anesthetic with fast onset and moderate duration of action. Its molar potency is similar to that of procaine, but its duration of action is approximately 50% longer. It has been used for infiltration anesthesia, peripheral nerve block, and epidural anesthesia. Mepivacaine is metabolized in the liver by hydrolysis.

It's important to note that mepivacaine, like any other medication, can have side effects and should be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Carticaine" is not a recognized medical term or a commonly used medication in the field of medicine. It's possible that there may be some misunderstanding or misspelling in the term. If you have more context or information about where this term came from, I would be happy to help you further clarify or research the correct term.

However, if you are referring to "Articaine," it is a type of local anesthetic that is used in dental and medical procedures to numb specific areas of the body. Articaine works by blocking nerve signals in the area where it is administered, which helps to reduce pain and discomfort during various procedures.

If you have any questions about "Articaine" or other local anesthetics, I would be happy to help answer them for you.

A dental pulp test is a medical procedure used to determine if the pulp of a tooth is alive or dead. The pulp is the soft tissue inside the tooth that contains nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissue. There are several types of dental pulp tests, including:

1. Cold Test: This involves applying a cold stimulus to the tooth using a substance such as ice or a cold spray. A healthy pulp will respond to the cold by causing a brief, sharp pain. If the pulp is dead or damaged, there will be no response to the cold.
2. Heat Test: This involves applying a heat stimulus to the tooth using a hot substance such as gutta-percha or a hot water bath. A healthy pulp will respond to the heat by causing a brief, sharp pain. If the pulp is dead or damaged, there will be no response to the heat.
3. Electric Pulp Test: This involves applying a low-level electrical current to the tooth. A healthy pulp will respond to the electrical current by causing a tingling or buzzing sensation. If the pulp is dead or damaged, there will be no response to the electrical current.

The results of these tests can help dental professionals determine if a tooth needs root canal treatment or if it can be saved with other treatments.

Benzocaine is a local anesthetic agent that works by numbing the skin or mucous membranes to block pain signals from reaching the brain. It is commonly used as a topical medication in the form of creams, gels, sprays, lozenges, and ointments to relieve pain associated with minor cuts, burns, sunburn, sore throat, mouth ulcers, and other conditions that cause discomfort or irritation.

Benzocaine works by temporarily reducing the sensitivity of nerve endings in the affected area, which helps to alleviate pain and provide a soothing effect. It is generally considered safe when used as directed, but it can have some side effects such as skin irritation, stinging, burning, or allergic reactions.

It's important to note that benzocaine products should not be used on deep wounds, puncture injuries, or serious burns, and they should not be applied to large areas of the body or used for prolonged periods without medical supervision. Overuse or misuse of benzocaine can lead to rare but serious side effects such as methemoglobinemia, a condition that affects the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood.

The mandibular nerve is a branch of the trigeminal nerve (the fifth cranial nerve), which is responsible for sensations in the face and motor functions such as biting and chewing. The mandibular nerve provides both sensory and motor innervation to the lower third of the face, below the eye and nose down to the chin.

More specifically, it carries sensory information from the lower teeth, lower lip, and parts of the oral cavity, as well as the skin over the jaw and chin. It also provides motor innervation to the muscles of mastication (chewing), which include the masseter, temporalis, medial pterygoid, and lateral pterygoid muscles.

Damage to the mandibular nerve can result in numbness or loss of sensation in the lower face and mouth, as well as weakness or difficulty with chewing and biting.

Tetracaine is a local anesthetic commonly used for surface anesthesia of the eye, ear, and mucous membranes. It functions by blocking the nerve impulses in the area where it's applied, thereby numbing the area and relieving pain. It's available in various forms such as solutions, ointments, and sprays. Please note that all medical procedures and treatments should be conducted under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

Pain measurement, in a medical context, refers to the quantification or evaluation of the intensity and/or unpleasantness of a patient's subjective pain experience. This is typically accomplished through the use of standardized self-report measures such as numerical rating scales (NRS), visual analog scales (VAS), or categorical scales (mild, moderate, severe). In some cases, physiological measures like heart rate, blood pressure, and facial expressions may also be used to supplement self-reported pain ratings. The goal of pain measurement is to help healthcare providers better understand the nature and severity of a patient's pain in order to develop an effective treatment plan.

Sodium channels are specialized protein structures that are embedded in the membranes of excitable cells, such as nerve and muscle cells. They play a crucial role in the generation and transmission of electrical signals in these cells. Sodium channels are responsible for the rapid influx of sodium ions into the cell during the initial phase of an action potential, which is the electrical signal that travels along the membrane of a neuron or muscle fiber. This sudden influx of sodium ions causes the membrane potential to rapidly reverse, leading to the depolarization of the cell. After the action potential, the sodium channels close and become inactivated, preventing further entry of sodium ions and helping to restore the resting membrane potential.

Sodium channels are composed of a large alpha subunit and one or two smaller beta subunits. The alpha subunit forms the ion-conducting pore, while the beta subunits play a role in modulating the function and stability of the channel. Mutations in sodium channel genes have been associated with various inherited diseases, including certain forms of epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmias, and muscle disorders.

Sodium channel blockers are a class of medications that work by blocking sodium channels in the heart, which prevents the rapid influx of sodium ions into the cells during depolarization. This action slows down the rate of impulse generation and propagation in the heart, which in turn decreases the heart rate and prolongs the refractory period.

Sodium channel blockers are primarily used to treat cardiac arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, and ventricular tachycardia. They may also be used to treat certain types of neuropathic pain. Examples of sodium channel blockers include Class I antiarrhythmics such as flecainide, propafenone, lidocaine, and mexiletine.

It's important to note that sodium channel blockers can have potential side effects, including proarrhythmia (i.e., the development of new arrhythmias or worsening of existing ones), negative inotropy (decreased contractility of the heart muscle), and cardiac conduction abnormalities. Therefore, these medications should be used with caution and under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

Etidocaine is a local anesthetic drug, which is used to numb a specific area of the body before certain medical procedures. It works by blocking the nerve signals in the affected area, thereby reducing the sensation of pain. Etidocaine is more potent and has a longer duration of action compared to other local anesthetics like lidocaine.

Etidocaine is available as a topical cream or gel, as well as an injectable solution for local anesthesia. It may be used in various medical procedures such as skin grafting, wound debridement, and certain types of surgeries. However, due to its potential cardiovascular side effects, it is usually avoided in patients with heart disease or other serious medical conditions.

Like all medications, etidocaine can have side effects, including allergic reactions, numbness that lasts too long, and changes in heart rate or blood pressure. It should be used only under the supervision of a healthcare professional who is familiar with its potential risks and benefits.

Epinephrine, also known as adrenaline, is a hormone and a neurotransmitter that is produced in the body. It is released by the adrenal glands in response to stress or excitement, and it prepares the body for the "fight or flight" response. Epinephrine works by binding to specific receptors in the body, which causes a variety of physiological effects, including increased heart rate and blood pressure, improved muscle strength and alertness, and narrowing of the blood vessels in the skin and intestines. It is also used as a medication to treat various medical conditions, such as anaphylaxis (a severe allergic reaction), cardiac arrest, and low blood pressure.

Spinal anesthesia is a type of regional anesthesia that involves injecting local anesthetic medication into the cerebrospinal fluid in the subarachnoid space, which is the space surrounding the spinal cord. This procedure is typically performed by introducing a needle into the lower back, between the vertebrae, to reach the subarachnoid space.

Once the local anesthetic is introduced into this space, it spreads to block nerve impulses from the corresponding levels of the spine, resulting in numbness and loss of sensation in specific areas of the body below the injection site. The extent and level of anesthesia depend on the amount and type of medication used, as well as the patient's individual response.

Spinal anesthesia is often used for surgeries involving the lower abdomen, pelvis, or lower extremities, such as cesarean sections, hernia repairs, hip replacements, and knee arthroscopies. It can also be utilized for procedures like epidural steroid injections to manage chronic pain conditions affecting the spine and lower limbs.

While spinal anesthesia provides effective pain relief during and after surgery, it may cause side effects such as low blood pressure, headache, or difficulty urinating. These potential complications should be discussed with the healthcare provider before deciding on this type of anesthesia.

Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage. It is a complex phenomenon that can result from various stimuli, such as thermal, mechanical, or chemical irritation, and it can be acute or chronic. The perception of pain involves the activation of specialized nerve cells called nociceptors, which transmit signals to the brain via the spinal cord. These signals are then processed in different regions of the brain, leading to the conscious experience of pain. It's important to note that pain is a highly individual and subjective experience, and its perception can vary widely among individuals.

The double-blind method is a study design commonly used in research, including clinical trials, to minimize bias and ensure the objectivity of results. In this approach, both the participants and the researchers are unaware of which group the participants are assigned to, whether it be the experimental group or the control group. This means that neither the participants nor the researchers know who is receiving a particular treatment or placebo, thus reducing the potential for bias in the evaluation of outcomes. The assignment of participants to groups is typically done by a third party not involved in the study, and the codes are only revealed after all data have been collected and analyzed.

Intravenous anesthesia, also known as IV anesthesia, is a type of anesthesia that involves the administration of one or more drugs into a patient's vein to achieve a state of unconsciousness and analgesia (pain relief) during medical procedures. The drugs used in intravenous anesthesia can include sedatives, hypnotics, analgesics, and muscle relaxants, which are carefully selected and dosed based on the patient's medical history, physical status, and the type and duration of the procedure.

The administration of IV anesthesia is typically performed by a trained anesthesiologist or nurse anesthetist, who monitors the patient's vital signs and adjusts the dosage of the drugs as needed to ensure the patient's safety and comfort throughout the procedure. The onset of action for IV anesthesia is relatively rapid, usually within minutes, and the depth and duration of anesthesia can be easily titrated to meet the needs of the individual patient.

Compared to general anesthesia, which involves the administration of inhaled gases or vapors to achieve a state of unconsciousness, intravenous anesthesia is associated with fewer adverse effects on respiratory and cardiovascular function, and may be preferred for certain types of procedures or patients. However, like all forms of anesthesia, IV anesthesia carries risks and potential complications, including allergic reactions, infection, bleeding, and respiratory depression, and requires careful monitoring and management by trained medical professionals.

Conduction anesthesia is a type of local anesthesia in which an anesthetic agent is administered near a peripheral nerve to block the transmission of painful stimuli. It is called "conduction" anesthesia because it works by blocking the conduction of nerve impulses along the nerve fibers.

There are several types of conduction anesthesia, including:

1. Infiltration anesthesia: In this technique, the anesthetic agent is injected directly into the tissue where the surgical procedure will be performed. This type of anesthesia can be used for minor surgeries such as wound closure or repair of simple lacerations.
2. Nerve block anesthesia: In this technique, the anesthetic agent is injected near a specific nerve or bundle of nerves to block sensation in a larger area of the body. For example, a brachial plexus block can be used to numb the arm and hand for procedures such as shoulder surgery or fracture reduction.
3. Field block anesthesia: In this technique, the anesthetic agent is injected around the periphery of the surgical site to create a "field" of anesthesia that blocks sensation in the area. This type of anesthesia is often used for procedures such as hernia repair or circumcision.

Conduction anesthesia has several advantages over general anesthesia, including reduced risk of complications, faster recovery time, and lower cost. However, it may not be appropriate for all types of surgical procedures or patients, and its effectiveness can vary depending on the skill of the practitioner and the individual patient's response to the anesthetic agent.

An injection is a medical procedure in which a medication, vaccine, or other substance is introduced into the body using a needle and syringe. The substance can be delivered into various parts of the body, including into a vein (intravenous), muscle (intramuscular), under the skin (subcutaneous), or into the spinal canal (intrathecal or spinal).

Injections are commonly used to administer medications that cannot be taken orally, have poor oral bioavailability, need to reach the site of action quickly, or require direct delivery to a specific organ or tissue. They can also be used for diagnostic purposes, such as drawing blood samples (venipuncture) or injecting contrast agents for imaging studies.

Proper technique and sterile conditions are essential when administering injections to prevent infection, pain, and other complications. The choice of injection site depends on the type and volume of the substance being administered, as well as the patient's age, health status, and personal preferences.

Anti-arrhythmia agents are a class of medications used to treat abnormal heart rhythms or arrhythmias. These drugs work by modifying the electrical activity of the heart to restore and maintain a normal heart rhythm. There are several types of anti-arrhythmia agents, including:

1. Sodium channel blockers: These drugs slow down the conduction of electrical signals in the heart, which helps to reduce rapid or irregular heartbeats. Examples include flecainide, propafenone, and quinidine.
2. Beta-blockers: These medications work by blocking the effects of adrenaline on the heart, which helps to slow down the heart rate and reduce the force of heart contractions. Examples include metoprolol, atenolol, and esmolol.
3. Calcium channel blockers: These drugs block the entry of calcium into heart muscle cells, which helps to slow down the heart rate and reduce the force of heart contractions. Examples include verapamil and diltiazem.
4. Potassium channel blockers: These medications work by prolonging the duration of the heart's electrical cycle, which helps to prevent abnormal rhythms. Examples include amiodarone and sotalol.
5. Digoxin: This drug increases the force of heart contractions and slows down the heart rate, which can help to restore a normal rhythm in certain types of arrhythmias.

It's important to note that anti-arrhythmia agents can have significant side effects and should only be prescribed by a healthcare professional who has experience in managing arrhythmias. Close monitoring is necessary to ensure the medication is working effectively and not causing any adverse effects.

Postoperative pain is defined as the pain or discomfort experienced by patients following a surgical procedure. It can vary in intensity and duration depending on the type of surgery performed, individual pain tolerance, and other factors. The pain may be caused by tissue trauma, inflammation, or nerve damage resulting from the surgical intervention. Proper assessment and management of postoperative pain is essential to promote recovery, prevent complications, and improve patient satisfaction.

Procaine is a local anesthetic drug that is used to reduce the feeling of pain in a specific area of the body. It works by blocking the nerves from transmitting painful sensations to the brain. Procaine is often used during minor surgical procedures, dental work, or when a patient needs to have a wound cleaned or stitched up. It can also be used as a diagnostic tool to help determine the source of pain.

Procaine is administered via injection directly into the area that requires anesthesia. The effects of procaine are relatively short-lived, typically lasting between 30 minutes and two hours, depending on the dose and the individual's metabolism. Procaine may also cause a brief period of heightened sensory perception or euphoria following injection, known as "procaine rush."

It is important to note that procaine should only be administered by trained medical professionals, as improper use can lead to serious complications such as allergic reactions, respiratory depression, and even death.

Mexiletine is defined as an antiarrhythmic agent, classified as a Class IB medication. It works by blocking sodium channels in the heart, which helps to stabilize cardiac membranes and reduces the rate of firing of cardiac cells. This makes it useful for treating certain types of irregular heart rhythms (ventricular arrhythmias).

Mexiletine is also known to have analgesic properties and is sometimes used off-label for the treatment of neuropathic pain. It is available in oral form, and its use should be under the close supervision of a healthcare provider due to its potential side effects, which can include gastrointestinal symptoms, dizziness, tremors, and cardiac arrhythmias.

Intravenous injections are a type of medical procedure where medication or fluids are administered directly into a vein using a needle and syringe. This route of administration is also known as an IV injection. The solution injected enters the patient's bloodstream immediately, allowing for rapid absorption and onset of action. Intravenous injections are commonly used to provide quick relief from symptoms, deliver medications that are not easily absorbed by other routes, or administer fluids and electrolytes in cases of dehydration or severe illness. It is important that intravenous injections are performed using aseptic technique to minimize the risk of infection.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

The sciatic nerve is the largest and longest nerve in the human body, running from the lower back through the buttocks and down the legs to the feet. It is formed by the union of the ventral rami (branches) of the L4 to S3 spinal nerves. The sciatic nerve provides motor and sensory innervation to various muscles and skin areas in the lower limbs, including the hamstrings, calf muscles, and the sole of the foot. Sciatic nerve disorders or injuries can result in symptoms such as pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness in the lower back, hips, legs, and feet, known as sciatica.

Topical administration refers to a route of administering a medication or treatment directly to a specific area of the body, such as the skin, mucous membranes, or eyes. This method allows the drug to be applied directly to the site where it is needed, which can increase its effectiveness and reduce potential side effects compared to systemic administration (taking the medication by mouth or injecting it into a vein or muscle).

Topical medications come in various forms, including creams, ointments, gels, lotions, solutions, sprays, and patches. They may be used to treat localized conditions such as skin infections, rashes, inflammation, or pain, or to deliver medication to the eyes or mucous membranes for local or systemic effects.

When applying topical medications, it is important to follow the instructions carefully to ensure proper absorption and avoid irritation or other adverse reactions. This may include cleaning the area before application, covering the treated area with a dressing, or avoiding exposure to sunlight or water after application, depending on the specific medication and its intended use.

... solution for injection Topical lidocaine spray 2% viscous lidocaine Lidocaine is the International Nonproprietary Name (INN), ... Lidocaine is often added to cocaine as a diluent. Cocaine and lidocaine both numb the gums when applied. This gives the user ... Lidocaine drops can be used on the eyes for short ophthalmic procedures. There is tentative evidence for topical lidocaine for ... "Lidocaine". Drug Information Portal. U.S. National Library of Medicine. "Lidocaine Transdermal Patch". MedlinePlus. US patent ...
"Lidocaine". The Merck Index Online. Retrieved 2015-10-13. W. G. Christiansen and S. E. Harris, U. S. Patent 2,404,691 (1946). L ...
Treatments of low dosage lidocaine and gabapentin might be effective in relieving itch that is thought to originate in the ... 2003 Itch Fishman SM, Caneris OA, Stojanovic MP, Borsook D (1997). "Intravenous lidocaine". Am J Med. 102 (6): 584-585. doi: ...
It is used as a eutectic mixture with lidocaine, 50% w/w, as lidocaine/prilocaine. The mixture is an oil with a melting point ... It is also often combined with lidocaine as a topical preparation for dermal anesthesia (lidocaine/prilocaine or EMLA), for ... The United States Pharmacopeial Convention, Revision Bulletin: Lidocaine and Prilocaine Cream-Revision to Related Compounds ... Lidocaine/prilocaine "Prilocaine". Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Retrieved 2016-01-21. Patel V, Morrissey J (2011-09-15). ...
Lidocaine/tetracaine patch. A self-heating anesthetic patch containing a eutectic mixture of lidocaine and tetracaine has been ... February 2009). "Heated lidocaine/tetracaine patch compared with lidocaine/prilocaine cream for topical anaesthesia before ... "Comparison of iontophoresis of lidocaine with a eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine (EMLA) for topically administered ... EMLA is a topical anesthetic cream that is a eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine. It is a prescription cream in the ...
The use of chloroacetyl chloride in the synthesis of lidocaine is illustrative: The major use of chloroacetyl chloride is as an ... 3 T. J. Reilly (1999). "The Preparation of Lidocaine". J. Chem. Educ. 76 (11): 1557. Bibcode:1999JChEd..76.1557R. doi:10.1021/ ...
Ditza (2020). "Dilators, Lidocaine, vaginismus treatment , Women's Therapy Center". Retrieved 2021-01-21.{{cite web}}: CS1 ...
Examples include lidocaine and bupivacaine. Passerini reaction Ugi I, Meyr R, Fetzer U, Steinbrückner C (1959). "Versuche mit ...
Lidocaine should not be used, however, because lidocaine has been linked to several pediatric near-death episodes. The title of ... Berger, Itai; Steinberg, Avraham (May 2002). "Neonatal mydriasis: intravenous lidocaine adverse reaction". J Child Neurol. 17 ( ... S2CID 2169066.[dead link] Rezvani, Massoud; Finkelstein, Yaron (2007). "Generalized seizures following topical lidocaine ...
"DEPO-MEDRONE WITH LIDOCAINE INJECTION" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2018-03-19. Retrieved 2018-01-23. Blumenfeld ...
They include lidocaine, mexiletine and phenytoin. Class Ic greatly slow phase 0 depolarization in the ventricles (however ...
Lidocaine and intravenous lipid emulsion have been successfully used for serious ventricular tachyarrhythmias in several case ... in a similar way of local anesthetics such as lidocaine, and interferes with action potential propagation. This Vaughn-Williams ... "Competitive binding between cocaine and lidocaine". Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 27 (2): 80. doi:10.1016/ ...
Viscous lidocaine may also be useful. While steroids may help with the pain, they are not routinely recommended. Aspirin may be ... "Generic Name: Lidocaine Viscous (Xylocaine Viscous) side effects, medical uses, and drug interactions". MedicineNet.com. ...
Derry S, Wiffen PJ, Moore RA, Quinlan J (July 2014). Derry S (ed.). "Topical lidocaine for neuropathic pain in adults". The ... A 2014 Cochrane review of topical lidocaine for the treatment of various peripheral neuropathies found its usage supported by a ...
Lidocaine can be given in 1.5 mg/kg IV a few minutes before sedation and paralysis. The purpose of administering lidocaine is ... Pretreatment includes 100% oxygen, lidocaine, and atropine. 100% oxygen should be administered for 3 to 5 minutes. The time ...
These drugs may include lidocaine and amiodarone.[citation needed] Rearrest may reduce the likelihood of survival when compared ...
Lidocaine HCl 2% + epinephrine 1:50,000, Lidocaine HCl 2% + epinephrine 1:80,000; Lidocaine HCl 2% + epinephrine 1:100,000 and ... Lidocaine 2% with 1:100,000 adrenaline is the local anesthetic of choice in the treatment of pregnant women. Allergic reactions ... In the UK and Ireland, manually operated hand syringes are used to inject lidocaine in to a patient's gums. Topical anesthetics ... In root canal treatment, for example, more Lidocaine is required than for a simple filling. Other local anesthetic agents in ...
"Lidocaine disposition kinetics in monkey and man; I. Prediction by a perfusion model". Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics. 16 ...
Femoral nerve block Lidocaine Mallinson, Tom (2019). "Fascia iliaca compartment block: a short how-to guide". Journal of ...
Lidocaine is injected first to numb the skin and then a blunt needle is used to protect the nerves from damage as the physician ... Lidocaine preferentially binds to the inactivated state of voltage-gated sodium channels, but has also been found to bind ... It is unclear if the use of epinephrine in addition to lidocaine is safe for nerve blocks of fingers and toes due to ... Skin testing with lidocaine, bupivacaine, and mepivacaine was performed to identify the most effective local anesthetic (i.e. ...
... is an oral analogue of lidocaine. It is a class IB antiarrhythmic which shorten the refractory period and action ...
Preparations may contain lidocaine and/or steroids. They may be considered for short-term pain relief or to delay surgery, but ...
Lidocaine mouthwash may help with the pain. Colchicine may decrease the frequency of attacks. While rare in the United States ...
Lidocaine usage has already been linked to deaths from liposuction. Scars at the site of the incision are usually small and ... Lidocaine was also added as a local anesthetic. Fournier also advocated using compression after the operation, and travelled ... Jeffrey Klein published a method that became known as "tumescent" in which a large volume of very dilute lidocaine, along with ... Toxicity from anesthesia due to the use of lidocaine, a skin-numbing drug, can cause lightheadedness, restlessness, drowsiness ...
In the UK and Ireland, manually operated hand syringes are used to inject lidocaine into patients' gums. A dose-sparing syringe ... "Lidocaine Hydrochloride (Local) Monograph for Professionals - Drugs.com". Archived from the original on 2017-07-29. Zakrzewska ...
... the effects of lidocaine and mexiletine are antagonized. Antibacterials: increased risk of ototoxicity with aminoglycosides, ...
... and topical analgesia with lidocaine, ice and heat. Immediate surgery may be indicated if the symptoms are severe or sudden in ...
see comment in Pigman E, Smith M (1993). "Prehospital prophylactic lidocaine for uncomplicated acute myocardial infarction". J ... 1993). "Early out-of-hospital lidocaine administration decreases the incidence of primary ventricular fibrillation in acute ...
Diphenhydramine and lidocaine also give blue organic layers. These compounds are known false positives for cocaine. Lidocaine ...
Pyrrocane has very similar side effects on blood pressure and heart rate compared to lidocaine. Selfsame as lidocaine, albeit ... The cogency of pyrrocaine is equivalent to lidocaine in blocking the motor nerve and sensory. Pyrrocaine was proven to be ... somewhat harmless compared to lidocaine. No signs of methemoglobinemia was found while observing. It was considered unsafe for ...
... pain associated with vaginal atrophy can be effectively treated with self-administered topical lidocaine to the vulvar ... After the 4-week double-blind phase, median score on a 10-point pain scale was lower in the lidocaine group than in the placebo ... The blinded trial was followed by a 2-month open-label trial of lidocaine. After the open-label trial, 90% of women reported ... The women were randomized to the precoital application of 4% aqueous lidocaine or saline for 4 weeks. They recorded pain ...
LIDOCAINE (UNII: 98PI200987) (LIDOCAINE - UNII:98PI200987) LIDOCAINE. 50 mg in 1 g. ... Lidocaine is not contraindicated in labor and delivery. Should Lidocaine Ointment 5% be used concomitantly with other products ... When Lidocaine Ointment 5% is used concomitantly with other products containing lidocaine, the total dose contributed by all ... Composition of Lidocaine Ointment USP, 5%: acetamide, 2-(diethylamino)-N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-, (lidocaine) 5% in a water ...
Mohnark Pharmaceuticals is recalling Lidocaine 4% Topical Anesthetic Cream whose packaging is not child resistant as required ... The recall involves Mohnark Pharmaceuticals Lidocaine 4% Topical Anesthetic Cream sold in a white tube with a flip-top closure. ... Mohnark Pharmaceuticals of Davie, Fla., is recalling about 9,000 tubes of Lidocaine 4% Topical Anesthetic Cream. ...
A team of researchers investigated the efficacy of lidocaine for the treatment of neck pain. ... In a recent preprint study posted in Preprints with The Lancet, a team of researchers investigated the efficacy of lidocaine ... Exploring the efficacy of topical lidocaine in individuals with chronic neck pain. *Download PDF Copy ... Topical lidocaine has shown promise in relieving myofascial neck pain. The use of topical medications is particularly appealing ...
... its best to choose wisely between benzocaine and lidocaine, as they have different properties. ... while lidocaine cannot, according to The Mayo Clinic. Lidocaine must be prescribed by a doctor because it tends to be a ... Lidocaine, on the other hand, is used for more intense procedures on other parts of the body such as surgical incisions (via Dr ... Because lidocaine is stronger, it has also been proven to be more effective when it comes to reducing pain in general. In fact ...
... Notes. *This display requires that Java be installed on your system and your browser to ...
Lidocaine and prilocaine cream alone was compared with lidocaine and prilocaine cream followed by lidocaine infiltration and ... Lidocaine and prilocaine cream was comparable to subcutaneous lidocaine, but was less efficacious than intradermal lidocaine. ... General: Repeated doses of lidocaine and prilocaine cream may increase blood levels of lidocaine and prilocaine. Lidocaine and ... LIDOCAINE (UNII: 98PI200987) (LIDOCAINE - UNII:98PI200987) LIDOCAINE. 25 mg in 1 g. ...
... neither amiodarone nor lidocaine resulted in a significantly higher rate of survival or favorable neurologic outcome than the ... for lidocaine versus placebo, 2.6 percentage points (95% CI, -1.0 to 6.3; P=0.16); and for amiodarone versus lidocaine, 0.7 ... Amiodarone, Lidocaine, or Placebo in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest N Engl J Med. 2016 May 5;374(18):1711-22. doi: 10.1056/ ... Methods: In this randomized, double-blind trial, we compared parenteral amiodarone, lidocaine, and saline placebo, along with ...
LIDOCAINE in preparations for topical use other than eye drops:. *containing 10 per cent or less of total local anaesthetic ... I confirm the reasons for my final decision to amend the Poisons Standard in relation to the Schedule 2 entry for lidocaine are ... Final decision in relation to Lidocaine. Final decision. Pursuant to regulation 42ZCZR of the Regulations, a Delegate of the ... has made a final decision to affirm the interim decision and amend the current Poisons Standard in relation to lidocaine as ...
This medicine is used for the following purposes: anal itching or pain, anal/rectal pain, hemorrhoids, inflammation, itching, local anesthesia, skin irritation, skin wound. Brand Name(s): AneCream, Lidocream, LMX. Generic Name: Lidocaine.
... Conference Poster Overview abstract * ... Objectives: Intranasal lidocaine has been demonstrated to target the trigeminal nerve and decrease trigeminal neuralgia pain in ... This study used a novel behavior apparatus to assess the effect of intranasal lidocaine in a rat model of carrageenan-induced ... Conclusions: These results along with previously published evidence indicate that intranasal lidocaine is an effective ...
Lidocaine 5% patch is shown to have significant effect on peripheral neuropathic pain and some data point at better effect in ... Pain relief with lidocaine 5% patch in localized peripheral neuropathic pain in relation to pain phenotype. a randomised, ... Pain relief with lidocaine 5% patch in localized peripheral neuropathic pain in relation to pain phenotype: a randomised, ... Pain relief with lidocaine 5% patch in localized peripheral neuropathic pain in relation to pain phenotype: a randomised, ...
Assessment report Lidocaine/Prilocaine Plethora. Assessment report for Lidocaine/Prilocaine Plethora (lidocaine, prilocaine), ... Toxicity. Lidocaine has moderate acute toxicity.. Risk. The use of lidocaine (sales data Sweden 2020) has been considered to ... Persistence. Lidocaine is potentially persistent.. Bioaccumulation. Lidocaine has low potential for bioaccumulation.. ... Fass environmental information for lidocaine from Rocephalin med lidokain (ceftriaxone, lidocaine), Roche (downloaded 2022-02- ...
... tumescent liposuction on more than 400 patients using lidocaine doses in the range of 50-60 mg/kg without evidence of lidocaine ... At typical therapeutic plasma concentrations of lidocaine, metabolism of lidocaine is so efficient that lidocaine does not seem ... Hepatic Metabolism of Lidocaine. Lidocaine is rapidly eliminated by hepatic metabolism.5 The liver metabolizes 70% of the ... Lidocaine and CYP3A4. Lidocaine is principally metabolized by the CYP3A4. CYP3A4 oxidizes a diversity of substrates including ...
... Temporarily relieve pain with Bengay Lidocaine 4% Tropical Jasmine ... Bengay Pain Relieving Lidocaine Cream Tropical Jasmine 3 oz. Temporarily relieve pain with Bengay Lidocaine 4% Tropical Jasmine ... Formulated with maximum strength 4% lidocaine HCl as an active ingredient.. For ages 12 and up. Apply the topical analgesic to ... Ingredients: Active ingredients Lidocaine Hydrochloride (4%) Purpose Topical analgesic Inactive ingredients Acrylates/C10-30 ...
Buy Passion Anal Desensitizing Lube with Lidocaine and more at eXtremeRestraints: Make anal sex as pleasurable as possible with ... Passion Anal Desensitizing Lube with Lidocaine Specs and Benefits:. *Size: 8.5 fl. oz. *Active Ingredient: Lidocaine 2.0 ...
Download the citation for this article by clicking on one of the following citation managers:. ...
Lidocaine Hydrochloride Oral Topical Solution (Viscous) 2%. Products Affected - Description. * *Viscous Lidocaine oral solution ... Hikma has viscous lidocaine 2% in 100 mL bottles on allocation.. *Wockhardt has viscous lidocaine 2% in 100 mL bottles on back ... Several products, including lidocaine 2% viscous oral topical solution, are being transitioned to Wockhardt NDC codes. ... Viscous Lidocaine oral solution, Akorn, 2%, 15 mL unit-dose cup 40 count, NDC 50383-0775-17 - discontinued ...
Made in the USA! Lidocaine 2.0 percent (numbing agent) ... Passion Anal Desensitizing Lubricant With Lidocaine - 8.5 Fl. ... Passion Anal Desensitizing Lubricant With Lidocaine - 8.5 Fl. Oz. - is backordered and will ship as soon as it is back in stock ...
Hempväna Ultra Strength Pain Relief Cream with Lidocaine, Hempväna Ultra Strength Pain Relief Cream Night with Lidocaine, ... Hempväna Ultra Strength Pain Relief Cream Turmeric with Lidocaine, Hempväna Pain Relieving Hand & Body Lotion with Lidocaine ... The products contain the substance lidocaine which must be in child resistant packaging as required by the Poison Prevention ... Telebrands Recalls Hempvana Pain Relief Products with Lidocaine Due to Failure to Meet Child Resistant Packaging Requirement; ...
Implant Plus with Lidocaine - Medical SPA RX ...
... July 7, 2015. Stan Goff ... Oraqix, a combination of lidocaine and prilocaine, is uniquely combined with a thermosetting system to deliver pain relief ...
In the lidocaine group pain was reduced by 50% or more in 4/12 patients. In the group combining lidocaine and cocaine pain was ... exp CLUSTER HEADACHE/) OR ((cluster AND headache).ti,ab)) AND ((exp LIDOCAINE/) OR (lidocaine.ti,ab) OR (lignocaine.ti,ab))) [ ... Five patients received cocaine (0.3 ml 10% cocaine), 12 patients received lidocaine (0.5-0.8ml 4% lidocaine), seven patients ... Should intranasal lidocaine be used in patients with acute cluster headache?. * Report By: Anna Morgan and Vanessa Jessop - ST7 ...
Results 1 - 10 of 7,618 for ACETAMINOPHEN OR ALCOHOL OR BENZALKONIUM OR LIDOCAINE OR NEOMYCIN OR WATER ...
We stock lidocaine hydochloride 1% & 2% vials for sale. Always in stock ... Buy lidocaine hydochloride 1% for Injection online at Mountainside Medical. ... Pfizer Lidocaine Hydrochloride 1% for Injection 50mL Vial, 25/pk (Rx) Click or scroll to zoom ... Each lidocaine Hydrochloride 1% vial slowly reduces the of pain signals to the brain and eventually numbs the area youre ...
Buy LMX4 Lidocaine 4% Cream 5g Online & More Local Anaesthetics From My Pharmacy , Free Online Consultation Included , Next Day ... Active Ingredient: Lidocaine. LMX4 temporarily numbs the surface of the skin. It can be used to provide pain relief when a ... LMX4, lidocaine or any other local anaesthetic.. *Any medicine used to prevent or treat an irregular heartbeat, such as ... Home » Shop » non prescription medicine » General Health » Pain Relief » LMX4 Lidocaine 4% Cream - 5g ...
A Clinical Trial of Intravenous Lidocaine After Spinal Surgery to Prevent Delirium and Reduce Pain ... Allergy or intolerance of lidocaine Yes for Allergy or intolerance of lidocaine exclusion criteria 5 ... lidocaine infusions. Chi-square tests will be conducted to determine the association between lidocaine infusions and incident ... Secondary outcomes include intravenous lidocaine safety and tolerability, the effect of a lidocaine infusion on opioid usage, ...
The Global Lidocaine Market has been segmented into ... The Market for Lidocaine Market Will Grow Steady Booming CAGR ... The Market for Lidocaine Market Will Grow Steady Booming CAGR during the Forecasted Period 2018-2021. The Global Lidocaine ... By formulation, the Lidocaine Market has been segmented into internal use and topical use. The internal use segment has been ... Lidocaine Market Development Trend 2018 to 2023 , By Top Industry Players like AstraZeneca, Amneal Pharmaceuticals and More. ...
Septodont Lidocaine Ointment is a topical analgesia for the oral mucosa before anesthetic injection during dental procedures ... Septodont Lidocaine Ointment is a topical analgesia for the oral mucosa before anesthetic injection during dental procedures. ...
The quaternary lidocaine derivative, qx-314, produces long-lasting local anesthesia in animal models in vivo. Anesthesiology ... However, other quaternary lidocaine derivatives exist, such as QX-572 and QX-222 (Figure 1), whose local anesthetic utility ... A comparison of the systemic toxicity of lidocaine versus its quaternary derivative qx-314 in mice. Can J Anaesth 2011;58:443- ... Graduate Student Award Research Update: Evaluation of Local Anesthesia in Mice Produced by Quaternary Lidocaine Derivatives Jul ...
  • Lidocaine Hydrochloride. (druglib.com)
  • Lidocaine Viscous (Lidocaine Hydrochloride Oral Topical Solution USP) contains a local anesthetic agent and is administered topically. (druglib.com)
  • Once a headache attack became established patients were treated with cotton swab previously immersed in a 10% solution of cocaine hydrochloride (1 ml, mean amount of application 40-50 mg), or 10% lidocaine (1 ml), or saline. (bestbets.org)
  • Lidocaine Hydrochloride 1% for Injection is a local anesthetic agent used to provide temporary relief of pain associated with various conditions. (mountainside-medical.com)
  • Lidocaine Hydrochloride 1% for Injection is administered by injection and produces a transient local anesthesia. (mountainside-medical.com)
  • Pfizer Injectables Lidocaine Hydrochloride 1% Injection 50mL Vial is local anesthetic and is used during surgeries, pregnancies, and general dental work. (mountainside-medical.com)
  • Each lidocaine Hydrochloride 1% vial slowly reduces the of pain signals to the brain and eventually numbs the area you're targeting. (mountainside-medical.com)
  • Simple, selective and highly detectable spectrophotometric method has been developed and validated for the determination of Lidocaine hydrochloride in standard and commercial solutions .The method is based on the formation of a soluble colored Lidocaine hydrochloride-eriochrome black T ion-pair complex at pH 1.80. (ccsenet.org)
  • This developed method has been successfully employed to determine concentration of Lidocaine hydrochloride in injection and spray without interference by the common co-formulated substances.The numerical results obtained using both proposed and official methods were in concordance with each other. (ccsenet.org)
  • lidocaine hydrochloride (Lidocaine Hydrochloride) injection, solution. (medscape.com)
  • The dose of tumescent lidocaine totaled 59 mg/kg (lidocaine 800 mg/L, epinephrine 0.65 mg/L, sodium bicarbonate 10 meq/L) in 0.9% NaCI at 37°C. Liposuction produced of 2,700 mL of supernatant fat, and 250 mL of infranatant blood-tinged anesthetic solution. (liposuction.com)
  • Between 11:20 a.m. and 13:00 p.m. she received 58 mg/kg of tumescent lidocaine (lidocaine 900 mg/L, epinephrine 0.65 mg/L, bicarbonate 10 meq/L) in 0.9% NaCI at 37°C. The liposuction was uneventful, yielding 1,800 mL of supernatant fat, and 650 mL of infranatant blood-tinged anesthetic solution. (liposuction.com)
  • Local Anesthetic Lidocaine HCl with Epinephrine 1% (1:100,000) injection in 50mL multiple dose glass flip-top vial with red cap. (accutome.com)
  • Generic drug name is Lidocaine HCl / Epinephrine. (accutome.com)
  • I was reacting to the epinephrine used to increase the effectiveness of the lidocaine. (cdc.gov)
  • Lidocaine Ointment USP, 5% contains a local anesthetic agent and is administered topically. (nih.gov)
  • Composition of Lidocaine Ointment USP, 5%: acetamide, 2-(diethylamino)- N -(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-, (lidocaine) 5% in a water miscible ointment vehicle containing polyethylene glycols. (nih.gov)
  • Lidocaine Ointment 5% effects local, topical anesthesia. (nih.gov)
  • Lidocaine Ointment USP, 5% is indicated for production of anesthesia of accessible mucous membranes of the oropharynx. (nih.gov)
  • Lidocaine is used as a local anesthetic, most often as a topical cream or ointment, to cause numbness or loss of feeling before a surgical procedure, dental work or childbirth. (soberrecovery.com)
  • Septodont Lidocaine Ointment is a topical analgesia for the oral mucosa before anesthetic injection during dental procedures. (dentalcity.com)
  • For gastritis, drinking a viscous lidocaine formulation may help with the pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several products, including lidocaine 2% viscous oral topical solution, are being transitioned to Wockhardt NDC codes. (ashp.org)
  • Hikma has viscous lidocaine 2% in 100 mL bottles on allocation. (ashp.org)
  • Wockhardt has viscous lidocaine 2% in 100 mL bottles on back order and the company estimates a release date in 4th quarter 2023. (ashp.org)
  • Prescription mouthwashes, sometimes called miracle or magic mouthwash, or local anesthetics like viscous lidocaine can be used to manage pain. (cdc.gov)
  • Formulated with maximum strength 4% lidocaine HCl as an active ingredient. (ecrater.com)
  • Active ingredient Lidocaine 2.0 percent as a numbing agent. (sextoy.com)
  • The active ingredient Lidocaine in Climax spray helps in desensitizing the penile nerves and helps in delaying orgasm. (reliablerxpharmacy.com)
  • Lidocaine and prilocaine are amide-type local anesthetic agents. (nih.gov)
  • Lidocaine is an amide-type local anesthetic available as a crystalline powder soluble in alcohol and normal saline. (medscape.com)
  • 6,7 Further, many of their secondary and objective outcomes were improved by IV lidocaine infusion, including reduced risk of ileus, time to first defecation/bowel movement, and postoperative nausea. (asra.com)
  • The majority of the RCTs included in the Cochrane review stopped the lidocaine infusion at the end of surgery. (asra.com)
  • In this study, the investigators seek to study whether a postoperative intravenous infusion of lidocaine, known to improve pain control in other contexts, can decrease the risk of postoperative delirium and other opioid-related side effects, following major reconstructive spinal surgery. (centerwatch.com)
  • The investigators will perform a pilot prospective randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled trial of 60 patients undergoing major elective reconstructive spinal surgery to investigate the effect of a postoperative lidocaine infusion on the incidence and severity of postoperative delirium. (centerwatch.com)
  • The most comparable published study to the investigators' proposal is work done by Kaba (2009) studying a lidocaine infusion for abdominal surgery where the average opioid reduction was ~50% (24mg +/-16.3 of piritramide in the placebo vs. 10.33mg +/- 10.33 in the treatment group). (centerwatch.com)
  • All patients will receive a general anesthetic to consisting of 50% oxygen and total intravenous anesthetics consisting of infusions of propofol (60-150 mcg/kg/min), lidocaine (1 mg/kg bolus, then 1.5 mg/kg/hr infusion), magnesium (30 mg/kg bolus, then 6 mg/kg/hr infusion), fentanyl (1 mcg/kg bolus, then 1 mcg/kg/hr infusion, prn boluses), and 0.3 Minimum Alveolar Concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane. (centerwatch.com)
  • A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Intravenous Lidocaine Infusion With Thoracic Epidural for Perioperative Analgesia and Quality of Recovery After Surgery in Laparoscopic Left-Sided Colon and Sphincter-Sparing Rectal Resection Surgery. (iasp-pain.org)
  • Objectives The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to compare the efficacy of intravenous lidocaine infusion (IVL) with thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) in the management of perioperative pain and recovery in the laparoscopic left-sided colon and sphincter-sparing rectal surgery. (iasp-pain.org)
  • Lidocaine levels are used for dosage adjustment, and an increase or decrease in the lidocaine infusion rate is used to achieve optimal concentration. (medscape.com)
  • Blood drawn at 23:48 p.m. had a plasma lidocaine concentration of 6.3 mg/L by immunoassay (IA), and confirmed by gas chromatography (GC) to be 6.1 mg/L. Lidocaine plasma levels greater than 6 mg/L are associated with an increased risk of toxicity. (liposuction.com)
  • If the lidocaine blood level is greater than 6 mg/L, serious side effects may be observed, including seizures, cardiovascular depression, AV block, and hypotension. (medscape.com)
  • The elimination half-life of lidocaine following an intravenous bolus injection is typically 1.5 to 2.0 hours. (druglib.com)
  • In June 2018, Massachusetts based leading medical device company, Spectra Medical Devices, Inc., obtained FDA approval for 1% Lidocaine HC1 Injection USP, and 1%, 5mL single use 'Safety Snap' ampules. (medgadget.com)
  • Some health-care providers believe that the discomfort of the injection may be reduced by using 1% lidocaine solution as a diluent. (cdc.gov)
  • Lidocaine patches with enhanced bioavailability were used, along with identical placebo patches. (news-medical.net)
  • The results of the study showed that out of the 76 patients recruited in this study, 60 completed both the lidocaine and placebo patch phases, while 12 completed only one phase (seven in the placebo patch group and five in the lidocaine patch group). (news-medical.net)
  • The researchers further reported that the percentage of patients who had a successful outcome, defined as a 2-point or greater reduction in average neck pain coupled with a score greater than 5 on the patient global impression of change (PGIC) scale, was 27.7% in the lidocaine patch group compared to 14.9% in the placebo patch group. (news-medical.net)
  • Adverse events were reported by 27.5% of patients in the lidocaine patch group compared to 20.5% in the placebo patch group. (news-medical.net)
  • The most common complication in both groups was pruritus, experienced by 9.0% of patients in the placebo phase and 9.2% in the lidocaine phase. (news-medical.net)
  • In this randomized, double-blind trial, we compared parenteral amiodarone, lidocaine, and saline placebo, along with standard care, in adults who had nontraumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, shock-refractory ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia after at least one shock, and vascular access. (nih.gov)
  • More amiodarone recipients required temporary cardiac pacing than did recipients of lidocaine or placebo. (nih.gov)
  • Overall, neither amiodarone nor lidocaine resulted in a significantly higher rate of survival or favorable neurologic outcome than the rate with placebo among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to initial shock-refractory ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia. (nih.gov)
  • This randomised, double-blind, phenotype panel, crossover study with 4-week treatment periods of lidocaine 5% patch and placebo was performed to search for phenotype differences in effect. (lww.com)
  • A 2018 Cochrane review of randomized controlled trials (RCT) evaluating IV lidocaine compared to placebo/no treatment in patients undergoing elective or urgent surgeries under general anesthesia [68 trials (4,525 randomized patients)] indicated statistical significance of IV lidocaine in reducing pain at 1-4 hours and at 24 hours after surgery. (asra.com)
  • Factors such as acidosis and the use of CNS stimulants and depressants affect the CNS levels of lidocaine required to produce overt systemic effects. (nih.gov)
  • No reports pertaining to hemolysis have been seen to result in low levels of lidocaine. (medscape.com)
  • Climax spray (Lidocaine) is a class Ib antiarrhythmic drug, widely given to treat ventricular arrhythmias. (reliablerxpharmacy.com)
  • Lidocaine is a class IB antiarrhythmic used as a second-line agent and after myocardial infarction in certain groups of patients to treat premature ventricular contractions, ventricular tachycardia, and fibrillation. (medscape.com)
  • After a 5 to 10 minute application of lidocaine and prilocaine cream to female genital mucosa, the average duration of effective analgesia to an argon laser stimulus (which produced a sharp, pricking pain) was 15 to 20 minutes (individual variations in the range of 5 to 45 minutes). (nih.gov)
  • Dermal application of lidocaine and prilocaine cream may cause a transient, local blanching followed by a transient, local redness or erythema. (nih.gov)
  • The widening range of application of lidocaine as an anti-itching and pain relief drug for the treatment of insect's bites, eczema, minor cuts, skin scrapes, burns, etc. is likely to fuel demand in the market. (medgadget.com)
  • IV lidocaine infusions are a promising analgesic intervention in the perioperative setting. (asra.com)
  • Further, these additional sites are typically found along pain pathways in the central nervous system (CNS) or in the dorsal root ganglion and may explain why systemic IV lidocaine has analgesic benefits through peripheral and central sites of action. (asra.com)
  • In September 2018, Korean research team has concluded that Intraoperative IV lidocaine is a feasible analgesic alternative in children who are undergoing laparoscopic hernia repair. (medgadget.com)
  • Intravenous lidocaine, which has both analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties, may improve the overall recovery of patients. (iasp-pain.org)
  • Each gram of lidocaine and prilocaine cream contains lidocaine 25 mg, prilocaine 25 mg, polyoxyethylene fatty acid esters (as emulsifiers), carboxypolymethylene (as a thickening agent), sodium hydroxide to adjust to a pH approximating 9, and purified water to 1 gram. (nih.gov)
  • Objectives: Intranasal lidocaine has been demonstrated to target the trigeminal nerve and decrease trigeminal neuralgia pain in humans. (healthpartners.com)
  • This study used a novel behavior apparatus to assess the effect of intranasal lidocaine in a rat model of carrageenan-induced orofacial pain. (healthpartners.com)
  • Conclusions: These results along with previously published evidence indicate that intranasal lidocaine is an effective trigeminal nerve block to orofacial structures. (healthpartners.com)
  • BestBets: Should intranasal lidocaine be used in patients with acute cluster headache? (bestbets.org)
  • You remember being told that intranasal lidocaine can help in cluster headaches and you wonder what the evidence is for this therapy. (bestbets.org)
  • The efficacy profile of lidocaine as a local anaesthetic is characterized by a rapid onset of action and intermediate duration of efficacy. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a recent preprint study posted in Preprints with The Lancet , a team of researchers investigated the efficacy of lidocaine for the treatment of neck pain and assessed the need for additional research in this area. (news-medical.net)
  • The primary efficacy measure was the total pain intensity on an 11-point numeric rating scale, and the primary objective was to compare the effect of lidocaine in patients with and without IN phenotype as defined by hypersensitivity and preserved small-fibre function determined by quantitative sensory testing. (lww.com)
  • However, government enforcement regulating the efficacy as well as the safety of lidocaine are likely to restrict the expansion of the market in the forthcoming years. (medgadget.com)
  • Anaesthetic efficacy of incorporating different additives into lidocaine for the inferior alveolar nerve block: A systematic review with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis. (bvsalud.org)
  • Incorporating an additive into lidocaine is a method to enhance the efficacy of the inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) in mandibular posterior teeth . (bvsalud.org)
  • To assess the efficacy of incorporating additives into lidocaine in the success rate of IANB for teeth with the diagnosis of normal pulp (NP) or symptomatic irreversible pulpitis (SIP). (bvsalud.org)
  • The very low to low certainty of evidence indicated that incorporating additives into lidocaine did not increase the efficacy of IANB and supplemental injections are still necessary to help practitioners achieve painless dentistry . (bvsalud.org)
  • Benzocaine Vs. Lidocaine: What's The Difference? (thelist.com)
  • Many may not know that there are two main different types of topical local anesthetics: benzocaine and lidocaine. (thelist.com)
  • However, despite these similarities, benzocaine and lidocaine are actually quite different when it comes to their properties and functions. (thelist.com)
  • Keep scrolling to find out the main differences between benzocaine and lidocaine. (thelist.com)
  • One main difference between benzocaine and lidocaine is that benzocaine can be acquired without a doctor's prescription, while lidocaine cannot, according to The Mayo Clinic . (thelist.com)
  • Lidocaine must be prescribed by a doctor because it tends to be a stronger product overall, while benzocaine is more mild. (thelist.com)
  • In fact, according to a study by The Indian Endodontic Society , lidocaine is 10 times more effective against pain when inserted by a needle than benzocaine. (thelist.com)
  • However, just because lidocaine is the stronger topical local anesthetic of the two, doesn't mean benzocaine doesn't have its uses as well. (thelist.com)
  • Overall, even though lidocaine has been proven to be stronger against pain, there are certain scenarios and areas where you're better off using benzocaine, meaning that one isn't inherently superior over the other. (thelist.com)
  • Topical benzocaine/lidocaine gels can be used for temporary relief. (cdc.gov)
  • Therefore Lidocaine/Prilocaine is not expected to pose a risk to the environment. (janusinfo.se)
  • The women were randomized to the precoital application of 4% aqueous lidocaine or saline for 4 weeks. (medscape.com)
  • Intravenous lidocaine infusions are also used to treat chronic pain and acute surgical pain as an opiate sparing technique. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several institutions to our knowledge within the U.S. and Canada currently utilize postoperative IV lidocaine infusions on hospital wards, and while formal clinical trials are needed, data from these centers aid in developing our understanding of this intervention. (asra.com)
  • Reductions in opioid consumption by ~25% using intravenous lidocaine infusions have been shown to decrease opioid related side effects, but there is essentially no data linking a specific degree of opioid reduction to effects on delirium (46, 47). (centerwatch.com)
  • Mohnark Pharmaceuticals of Davie, Fla., is recalling about 9,000 tubes of Lidocaine 4% Topical Anesthetic Cream. (consumeraffairs.com)
  • The recall involves Mohnark Pharmaceuticals Lidocaine 4% Topical Anesthetic Cream sold in a white tube with a flip-top closure. (consumeraffairs.com)
  • Lidocaine 2.5% and Prilocaine 2.5% Cream, USP is an emulsion in which the oil phase is a eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine cream in a ratio of 1:1 by weight. (nih.gov)
  • Lidocaine and prilocaine cream contains no preservative, however it passes the USP antimicrobial effectiveness test due to the pH. (nih.gov)
  • The specific gravity of lidocaine and prilocaine cream is 1.00. (nih.gov)
  • Lidocaine and prilocaine cream applied to intact skin under occlusive dressing, provides dermal analgesia by the release of lidocaine and prilocaine from the cream into the epidermal and dermal layers of the skin and by the accumulation of lidocaine and prilocaine in the vicinity of dermal pain receptors and nerve endings. (nih.gov)
  • The onset, depth and duration of dermal analgesia on intact skin provided by lidocaine and prilocaine cream depend primarily on the duration of application. (nih.gov)
  • To provide sufficient analgesia for clinical procedures such as intravenous catheter placement and venipuncture, lidocaine and prilocaine cream should be applied under an occlusive dressing for at least 1 hour. (nih.gov)
  • To provide dermal analgesia for clinical procedures such as split skin graft harvesting, lidocaine and prilocaine cream should be applied under occlusive dressing for at least 2 hours. (nih.gov)
  • Lidocaine and prilocaine cream is a eutectic mixture of lidocaine 2.5% and prilocaine 2.5% formulated as an oil in water emulsion. (nih.gov)
  • In this eutectic mixture, both anesthetics are liquid at room temperature (see DESCRIPTION ) and the penetration and subsequent systemic absorption of both prilocaine and lidocaine are enhanced over that which would be seen if each component in crystalline form was applied separately as a 2.5% topical cream. (nih.gov)
  • The amount of lidocaine and prilocaine systemically absorbed from lidocaine and prilocaine cream is directly related to both the duration of application and to the area over which it is applied. (nih.gov)
  • In two pharmacokinetic studies, 60 g of lidocaine and prilocaine cream (1.5 g lidocaine and 1.5 g prilocaine) was applied to 400 cm 2 of intact skin on the lateral thigh and then covered by an occlusive dressing. (nih.gov)
  • Temporarily relieve pain with Bengay Lidocaine 4% Tropical Jasmine Cream. (ecrater.com)
  • S-Caine™ Peel (lidocaine 7% and tetracaine 7% cream) is a new skin numbing cream made of lidocaine and tetracaine. (drugpatentwatch.com)
  • The purpose of this study is to further estimate the effectiveness of S-Caine™ Peel (lidocaine 7% and tetracaine 7% cream) for treating pain during laser-assisted tattoo removal. (drugpatentwatch.com)
  • Studies of lidocaine metabolism following intravenous bolus injections have shown that the elimination half-life of this agent is typically 1.5 to 2.0 hours. (nih.gov)
  • Lidocaine is a local anesthetic and antiarrhythmic drug. (fishersci.com)
  • A reduced rate of lidocaine metabolism following tumescent liposuction may result from an inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) by sertraline (Zoloft) and flurazepam (Dalmane). (liposuction.com)
  • 6,7 With this perspective in mind, the findings of the Cochrane review, where both pain scores (1-4 hours and 24 hours) and opioid consumption were reduced, convey a compelling story for IV lidocaine. (asra.com)
  • Randomized, Double-Blind Study of the Effect of Intraoperative Intravenous Lidocaine on the Opioid Consumption and Criteria for Hospital Discharge After Bariatric Surgery. (iasp-pain.org)
  • Most ADRs associated with lidocaine for anesthesia relate to administration technique (resulting in systemic exposure) or pharmacological effects of anesthesia, and allergic reactions only rarely occur. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systemic exposure to excessive quantities of lidocaine mainly result in central nervous system (CNS) and cardiovascular effects - CNS effects usually occur at lower blood plasma concentrations and additional cardiovascular effects present at higher concentrations, though cardiovascular collapse may also occur with low concentrations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lidocaine has moderate acute toxicity. (janusinfo.se)
  • Lidocaine Toxicity Lidocaine Toxicity with Tumescent Liposuction A Case Report of Probable Drug Interactions JEFFREY A. KLEIN, MD NORMA KASSARJDIAN, MD We report a case of mild lidocaine toxicity. (liposuction.com)
  • We report a case of mild lidocaine toxicity. (liposuction.com)
  • One study with 10 patients concluded that tumescent anesthesia with a lidocaine dose of 55 mg/kg is safe for liposuction.1 We have personally performed tumescent liposuction on more than 400 patients using lidocaine doses in the range of 50-60 mg/kg without evidence of lidocaine toxicity. (liposuction.com)
  • Lidocaine toxicity is seen at levels greater than 5 mcg/mL. (medscape.com)
  • This active metabolite also contributes to the toxicity of lidocaine. (medscape.com)
  • Lidocaine level testing is useful in when the expected response to lidocaine administration is not seen or lidocaine toxicity is observed at low doses. (medscape.com)
  • Recently a new formulation of lidocaine patch was approved in the United States for treating postherpetic neuralgia. (news-medical.net)
  • Lidocaine mixtures may also be applied directly to the skin or mucous membranes to numb the area. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lidocaine may be absorbed following topical administration to mucous membranes, its rate and extent of absorption depending upon the specific site of application, duration of exposure, concentration, and total dosage. (nih.gov)
  • To the best of my knowledge, that was the first documented case of tumescent liposuction totally by local anesthesia where a standard dose of lidocaine, widely recognized as safe, has led to potentially toxic plasma lidocaine concentrations. (liposuction.com)
  • The intraoperative anesthetic regimen will be standardized to consist of total intravenous anesthesia using sevoflurane, propofol, lidocaine and magnesium (institutional protocol), and fentanyl with boluses allowed per provider discretion. (centerwatch.com)
  • Although most adults tolerate noninvasive reduction methods with only calm reassurance and a topical anesthetic, penile anesthesia-such as a penile ring block (subcutaneous lidocaine circumferentially about the base of the penis) and/or dorsal block-may be required in some cases (eg, aggressive manual reduction, use of Babcock clamps, or needle insertions into the foreskin). (msdmanuals.com)
  • This article aims to briefly discuss the existing literature evaluating the benefits of IV lidocaine on acute postoperative pain and as a preventative agent for chronic post-surgical pain (CPSP) and consider the terrain of shifting evidence and propose strategies that could improve safer use and adoption. (asra.com)
  • Postoperative pain symptoms were more intense following surgery employing lidocaine. (bvsalud.org)
  • Lidocaine, also known as lignocaine and sold under the brand name Xylocaine among others, is a local anesthetic of the amino amide type. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are rare when lidocaine is used as a local anesthetic and is administered correctly. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lidocaine stabilizes the neuronal membrane by inhibiting the ionic fluxes required for the initiation and conduction of impulses, thereby effecting local anesthetic action. (nih.gov)
  • Lidocaine, intended as a local anesthetic or numbing agent, is sometimes used illicitly as an additive that is cut into other drugs, like cocaine or crack. (soberrecovery.com)
  • Both lidocaine and prilocaine stabilize neuronal membranes by inhibiting the ionic fluxes required for the initiation and conduction of impulses, thereby effecting local anesthetic action. (nih.gov)
  • Topical anesthetic of Lidocaine 4% or Lidocaine 5% in a non-oily, clear, translucent gel. (delasco.com)
  • Lidocaine is a local anesthetic that desensitizes penile skin without affecting the ejaculating sensation. (reliablerxpharmacy.com)
  • There is tentative evidence for topical lidocaine for neuropathic pain and skin graft donor site pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • In conclusion, lidocaine 5% patch had an effect on peripheral neuropathic pain, and it may be most efficacious in patients with IN phenotype. (lww.com)
  • Lidocaine 5% patch is shown to have significant effect on peripheral neuropathic pain and some data point at better effect in the "irritable nociceptor" phenotype. (lww.com)
  • The Global Lidocaine Market has been segmented into Formulation, Application, and Distribution Channel. (medgadget.com)
  • By formulation, the Lidocaine Market has been segmented into internal use and topical use. (medgadget.com)
  • An adhesive transdermal patch containing a 5% concentration of lidocaine in a hydrogel bandage, is approved by the US FDA for reducing nerve pain caused by shingles. (wikipedia.org)
  • The plasma binding of lidocaine is dependent on drug concentration, and the fraction bound decreases with increasing concentration. (nih.gov)
  • Fass environmental information for lidocaine from Depo-Medrol cum lidocain (lidocaine, methylprednisolone) from Pfizer (downloaded 2022-02-09). (janusinfo.se)
  • When used for local anaesthesia or in nerve blocks, lidocaine typically begins working within several minutes and lasts for half an hour to three hours. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lidocaine works by reducing nerve sensitivity which helps improve stay power or delay ejaculation. (shevibe.com)
  • A total of 100 mg of lidocaine was injected to the subject's nerve. (cdc.gov)
  • As we now know, intravenous (IV) lidocaine is used widely, predominately in the perioperative setting in gastrointestinal surgeries and as an outpatient chronic pain intervention. (asra.com)
  • The factors that are favoring the growth of the regional market include the rising count of surgeries, increasing healthcare expenditure, and growing demand for lidocaine formulations. (medgadget.com)
  • The desensitizing property of Lidocaine makes it useful in the treatment of premature ejaculation. (reliablerxpharmacy.com)
  • Information on bioaccumulation can also be found in the assessment report Lidocaine/Prilocaine Plethora. (janusinfo.se)
  • Lidocaine/Prilocaine PEC surfacewater value is below the action limit of 0.01 µg/L and is not a PBT substance as log Kow does not exceed 4.5. (janusinfo.se)
  • Fass environmental information for lidocaine from Rocephalin med lidokain (ceftriaxone, lidocaine), Roche (downloaded 2022-02-09). (janusinfo.se)
  • Conclusions TEA provides better analgesia and decreased opioid requirements compared to intravenous lidocaine during the 24-hour period in the ward after laparoscopic left-sided colon and sphincter-sparing rectal surgery, although there was no difference in the quality of recovery between IVL and TEA groups. (iasp-pain.org)
  • It is widely advised to use Lidocaine as per the doctor's recommendations, as the dosage depends upon the size of the area. (reliablerxpharmacy.com)
  • You should discuss with the doctor if you are allergic to Lidocaine or any other type of numbing medicine, or if you have liver disease, kidney disease, severe heart-blocking problems, circulation problems, and heart disease. (reliablerxpharmacy.com)
  • Lidocaine levels are not routinely monitored as compared to other cardiac drugs because its effect can be directly observed on the ECG monitor (termination of the arrhythmia). (medscape.com)
  • You can avail Lidocaine in topical spray form from our website. (reliablerxpharmacy.com)
  • Climax spray is a topical aerosol, containing Lidocaine. (reliablerxpharmacy.com)
  • JO® PROLONGER SPRAY WITH LIDOCAINE is an intimate delay spray, designed to enhance endurance by temporarily prolonging the time until ejaculation. (shevibe.com)
  • Pain relief with lidocaine 5% patch in localized peripheral. (lww.com)
  • Renal dysfunction does not affect lidocaine kinetics but may increase the accumulation of metabolites. (nih.gov)
  • The active metabolite of lidocaine is monoethylglycinexylidide (MEGX) and can accumulate in patients with renal failure. (medscape.com)
  • Several studies and meta-analyses have now been published on the merits of perioperative IV lidocaine across a range of surgical groups on acute pain and improved recovery after surgery. (asra.com)
  • Surprisingly high doses of lidocaine are well tolerated when delivered subcutaneously by the tumescent technique. (liposuction.com)
  • For several years 60-mg/kg doses of lidocaine for tumescent liposuction had been the de facto, unpublished, recommended maximum safe dose. (liposuction.com)
  • At concentrations of 1 to 4 mcg of free base per mL, 60 to 80 percent of lidocaine is protein bound. (nih.gov)
  • Lidocaine is 70% protein bound and 30% unbound, depending on the levels of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein concentrations. (medscape.com)
  • Patients were instructed to use four sprays of 4% lidocaine in the ipsilateral nostril for two consecutive cluster headaches. (bestbets.org)
  • Medi-Derm with Lidocaine consists of multiple generic medications. (rxwiki.com)
  • Passion Anal Desensitizing Lubricant With Lidocaine - 8.5 Fl. (mypleasure.com)
  • Lidocaine is often added to cocaine as a diluent. (fishersci.com)

No images available that match "lidocaine"