LeukopeniaLeukocyte Count: The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.Cell Count: The number of CELLS of a specific kind, usually measured per unit volume or area of sample.CD4 Lymphocyte Count: The number of CD4-POSITIVE T-LYMPHOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD. Determination requires the use of a fluorescence-activated flow cytometer.Blood Cell Count: The number of LEUKOCYTES and ERYTHROCYTES per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD. A complete blood count (CBC) also includes measurement of the HEMOGLOBIN; HEMATOCRIT; and ERYTHROCYTE INDICES.Platelet Count: The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Thrombocytopenia: A subnormal level of BLOOD PLATELETS.Erythrocyte Count: The number of RED BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Drug Evaluation: Any process by which toxicity, metabolism, absorption, elimination, preferred route of administration, safe dosage range, etc., for a drug or group of drugs is determined through clinical assessment in humans or veterinary animals.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Viral Load: The quantity of measurable virus in a body fluid. Change in viral load, measured in plasma, is sometimes used as a SURROGATE MARKER in disease progression.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Lymphocyte Count: The number of LYMPHOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD.Anti-HIV Agents: Agents used to treat AIDS and/or stop the spread of the HIV infection. These do not include drugs used to treat symptoms or opportunistic infections associated with AIDS.Cisplatin: An inorganic and water-soluble platinum complex. After undergoing hydrolysis, it reacts with DNA to produce both intra and interstrand crosslinks. These crosslinks appear to impair replication and transcription of DNA. The cytotoxicity of cisplatin correlates with cellular arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle.Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active: Drug regimens, for patients with HIV INFECTIONS, that aggressively suppress HIV replication. The regimens usually involve administration of three or more different drugs including a protease inhibitor.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.HIV-1: The type species of LENTIVIRUS and the etiologic agent of AIDS. It is characterized by its cytopathic effect and affinity for the T4-lymphocyte.Neutropenia: A decrease in the number of NEUTROPHILS found in the blood.Hematologic Diseases: Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.Fluorouracil: A pyrimidine analog that is an antineoplastic antimetabolite. It interferes with DNA synthesis by blocking the THYMIDYLATE SYNTHETASE conversion of deoxyuridylic acid to thymidylic acid.Leukocytes: White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Infusions, Intravenous: The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Paclitaxel: A cyclodecane isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew tree, TAXUS BREVIFOLIA. It stabilizes MICROTUBULES in their polymerized form leading to cell death.Cyclophosphamide: Precursor of an alkylating nitrogen mustard antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent that must be activated in the LIVER to form the active aldophosphamide. It has been used in the treatment of LYMPHOMA and LEUKEMIA. Its side effect, ALOPECIA, has been used for defleecing sheep. Cyclophosphamide may also cause sterility, birth defects, mutations, and cancer.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Doxorubicin: Antineoplastic antibiotic obtained from Streptomyces peucetius. It is a hydroxy derivative of DAUNORUBICIN.AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections: Opportunistic infections found in patients who test positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The most common include PNEUMOCYSTIS PNEUMONIA, Kaposi's sarcoma, cryptosporidiosis, herpes simplex, toxoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, and infections with Mycobacterium avium complex, Microsporidium, and Cytomegalovirus.Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor: A glycoprotein of MW 25 kDa containing internal disulfide bonds. It induces the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of neutrophilic granulocyte precursor cells and functionally activates mature blood neutrophils. Among the family of colony-stimulating factors, G-CSF is the most potent inducer of terminal differentiation to granulocytes and macrophages of leukemic myeloid cell lines.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic: Agents obtained from higher plants that have demonstrable cytostatic or antineoplastic activity.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Anemia: A reduction in the number of circulating ERYTHROCYTES or in the quantity of HEMOGLOBIN.Anti-Retroviral Agents: Agents used to treat RETROVIRIDAE INFECTIONS.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Mastitis, Bovine: INFLAMMATION of the UDDER in cows.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Etoposide: A semisynthetic derivative of PODOPHYLLOTOXIN that exhibits antitumor activity. Etoposide inhibits DNA synthesis by forming a complex with topoisomerase II and DNA. This complex induces breaks in double stranded DNA and prevents repair by topoisomerase II binding. Accumulated breaks in DNA prevent entry into the mitotic phase of cell division, and lead to cell death. Etoposide acts primarily in the G2 and S phases of the cell cycle.Hematocrit: The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Bone Marrow DiseasesSurvival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993.Cellophane: A generic name for film produced from wood pulp by the viscose process. It is a thin, transparent sheeting of regenerated cellulose, moisture-proof and sometimes dyed, and used chiefly as food wrapping or as bags for dialysis. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Carboplatin: An organoplatinum compound that possesses antineoplastic activity.Vinblastine: Antitumor alkaloid isolated from Vinca rosea. (Merck, 11th ed.)Nausea: An unpleasant sensation in the stomach usually accompanied by the urge to vomit. Common causes are early pregnancy, sea and motion sickness, emotional stress, intense pain, food poisoning, and various enteroviruses.Gastric Fistula: Abnormal passage communicating with the STOMACH.CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes: A critical subpopulation of T-lymphocytes involved in the induction of most immunological functions. The HIV virus has selective tropism for the T4 cell which expresses the CD4 phenotypic marker, a receptor for HIV. In fact, the key element in the profound immunosuppression seen in HIV infection is the depletion of this subset of T-lymphocytes.Fever: An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.Leukocytosis: A transient increase in the number of leukocytes in a body fluid.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Sperm Count: A count of SPERM in the ejaculum, expressed as number per milliliter.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.DeoxycytidineTaxoids: A group of diterpenoid CYCLODECANES named for the taxanes that were discovered in the TAXUS tree. The action on MICROTUBULES has made some of them useful as ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS.Neutrophils: Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.Granulocytes: Leukocytes with abundant granules in the cytoplasm. They are divided into three groups according to the staining properties of the granules: neutrophilic, eosinophilic, and basophilic. Mature granulocytes are the NEUTROPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and BASOPHILS.Remission Induction: Therapeutic act or process that initiates a response to a complete or partial remission level.HIV Seropositivity: Development of neutralizing antibodies in individuals who have been exposed to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/HTLV-III/LAV).RNA, Viral: Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Phlebovirus: A genus of the family BUNYAVIRIDAE comprising many viruses, most of which are transmitted by Phlebotomus flies and cause PHLEBOTOMUS FEVER. The type species is RIFT VALLEY FEVER VIRUS.Ehrlichia: Small, often pleomorphic, coccoid to ellipsoidal organisms occurring intracytoplasmically in circulating LYMPHOCYTES. They are the etiologic agents of tick-borne diseases of humans; DOGS; CATTLE; SHEEP; GOATS; and HORSES.Menogaril: A semisynthetic anthracycline with the amino sugar on the D ring. It displays broad-spectrum antineoplastic activity against a variety of tumors.Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic: Antimetabolites that are useful in cancer chemotherapy.Pancytopenia: Deficiency of all three cell elements of the blood, erythrocytes, leukocytes and platelets.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.CD4-CD8 Ratio: Ratio of T-LYMPHOCYTES that express the CD4 ANTIGEN to those that express the CD8 ANTIGEN. This value is commonly assessed in the diagnosis and staging of diseases affecting the IMMUNE SYSTEM including HIV INFECTIONS.Azathioprine: An immunosuppressive agent used in combination with cyclophosphamide and hydroxychloroquine in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), this substance has been listed as a known carcinogen. (Merck Index, 11th ed)Sputum: Material coughed up from the lungs and expectorated via the mouth. It contains MUCUS, cellular debris, and microorganisms. It may also contain blood or pus.Agranulocytosis: A decrease in the number of GRANULOCYTES; (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS).Lymphocytes: White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Camptothecin: An alkaloid isolated from the stem wood of the Chinese tree, Camptotheca acuminata. This compound selectively inhibits the nuclear enzyme DNA TOPOISOMERASES, TYPE I. Several semisynthetic analogs of camptothecin have demonstrated antitumor activity.Levamisole: An antihelminthic drug that has been tried experimentally in rheumatic disorders where it apparently restores the immune response by increasing macrophage chemotaxis and T-lymphocyte function. Paradoxically, this immune enhancement appears to be beneficial in rheumatoid arthritis where dermatitis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia, and nausea and vomiting have been reported as side effects. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p435-6)Ehrlichiosis: A tick-borne disease characterized by FEVER; HEADACHE; myalgias; ANOREXIA; and occasionally RASH. It is caused by several bacterial species and can produce disease in DOGS; CATTLE; SHEEP; GOATS; HORSES; and humans. The primary species causing human disease are EHRLICHIA CHAFFEENSIS; ANAPLASMA PHAGOCYTOPHILUM; and Ehrlichia ewingii.Aminopterin: A folic acid derivative used as a rodenticide that has been shown to be teratogenic.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Mycophenolic Acid: An antibiotic substance derived from Penicillium stoloniferum, and related species. It blocks de novo biosynthesis of purine nucleotides by inhibition of the enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase. Mycophenolic acid is important because of its selective effects on the immune system. It prevents the proliferation of T-cells, lymphocytes, and the formation of antibodies from B-cells. It also may inhibit recruitment of leukocytes to inflammatory sites. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p1301)Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Hematologic Tests: Tests used in the analysis of the hemic system.Vomiting: The forcible expulsion of the contents of the STOMACH through the MOUTH.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Methotrexate: An antineoplastic antimetabolite with immunosuppressant properties. It is an inhibitor of TETRAHYDROFOLATE DEHYDROGENASE and prevents the formation of tetrahydrofolate, necessary for synthesis of thymidylate, an essential component of DNA.Leucovorin: The active metabolite of FOLIC ACID. Leucovorin is used principally as an antidote to FOLIC ACID ANTAGONISTS.HIV: Human immunodeficiency virus. A non-taxonomic and historical term referring to any of two species, specifically HIV-1 and/or HIV-2. Prior to 1986, this was called human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV). From 1986-1990, it was an official species called HIV. Since 1991, HIV was no longer considered an official species name; the two species were designated HIV-1 and HIV-2.Alopecia: Absence of hair from areas where it is normally present.6-Mercaptopurine: An antimetabolite antineoplastic agent with immunosuppressant properties. It interferes with nucleic acid synthesis by inhibiting purine metabolism and is used, usually in combination with other drugs, in the treatment of or in remission maintenance programs for leukemia.Nogalamycin: An anthrocycline from a Streptomyces nogalater variant. It is a cytolytic antineoplastic that inhibits DNA-dependent RNA synthesis by binding to DNA.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Carcinoma, Small Cell: An anaplastic, highly malignant, and usually bronchogenic carcinoma composed of small ovoid cells with scanty neoplasm. It is characterized by a dominant, deeply basophilic nucleus, and absent or indistinct nucleoli. (From Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1286-7)Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Stomatitis: INFLAMMATION of the soft tissues of the MOUTH, such as MUCOSA; PALATE; GINGIVA; and LIP.Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung: A heterogeneous aggregate of at least three distinct histological types of lung cancer, including SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA; ADENOCARCINOMA; and LARGE CELL CARCINOMA. They are dealt with collectively because of their shared treatment strategy.Vincristine: An antitumor alkaloid isolated from VINCA ROSEA. (Merck, 11th ed.)Reticulocyte Count: The number of RETICULOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD. The values are expressed as a percentage of the ERYTHROCYTE COUNT or in the form of an index ("corrected reticulocyte index"), which attempts to account for the number of circulating erythrocytes.Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid: Washing liquid obtained from irrigation of the lung, including the BRONCHI and the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. It is generally used to assess biochemical, inflammatory, or infection status of the lung.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Bunyaviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by the BUNYAVIRIDAE.Salvage Therapy: A therapeutic approach, involving chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery, after initial regimens have failed to lead to improvement in a patient's condition. Salvage therapy is most often used for neoplastic diseases.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Maximum Tolerated Dose: The highest dose of a biologically active agent given during a chronic study that will not reduce longevity from effects other than carcinogenicity. (from Lewis Dictionary of Toxicology, 1st ed)Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating: A class of drugs that differs from other alkylating agents used clinically in that they are monofunctional and thus unable to cross-link cellular macromolecules. Among their common properties are a requirement for metabolic activation to intermediates with antitumor efficacy and the presence in their chemical structures of N-methyl groups, that after metabolism, can covalently modify cellular DNA. The precise mechanisms by which each of these drugs acts to kill tumor cells are not completely understood. (From AMA, Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p2026)Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Rickettsiaceae Infections: Infections with bacteria of the family RICKETTSIACEAE.Ifosfamide: Positional isomer of CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE which is active as an alkylating agent and an immunosuppressive agent.Interferon-alpha: One of the type I interferons produced by peripheral blood leukocytes or lymphoblastoid cells. In addition to antiviral activity, it activates NATURAL KILLER CELLS and B-LYMPHOCYTES, and down-regulates VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR expression through PI-3 KINASE and MAPK KINASES signaling pathways.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Pneumonia, Staphylococcal: Pneumonia caused by infections with bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS, usually with STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS.Infusions, Parenteral: The administration of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through some other route than the alimentary canal, usually over minutes or hours, either by gravity flow or often by infusion pumping.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Hematopoiesis: The development and formation of various types of BLOOD CELLS. Hematopoiesis can take place in the BONE MARROW (medullary) or outside the bone marrow (HEMATOPOIESIS, EXTRAMEDULLARY).Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Mechlorethamine: A biologic alkylating agent that exerts its cytotoxic effects by forming DNA ADDUCTS and DNA interstrand crosslinks, thereby inhibiting rapidly proliferating cells. The hydrochloride is an antineoplastic agent used to treat HODGKIN DISEASE and LYMPHOMA.Area Under Curve: A statistical means of summarizing information from a series of measurements on one individual. It is frequently used in clinical pharmacology where the AUC from serum levels can be interpreted as the total uptake of whatever has been administered. As a plot of the concentration of a drug against time, after a single dose of medicine, producing a standard shape curve, it is a means of comparing the bioavailability of the same drug made by different companies. (From Winslade, Dictionary of Clinical Research, 1992)Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Tegafur: Congener of FLUOROURACIL with comparable antineoplastic action. It has been suggested especially for the treatment of breast neoplasms.Ovarian Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Prednisone: A synthetic anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid derived from CORTISONE. It is biologically inert and converted to PREDNISOLONE in the liver.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Parasite Egg Count: Determination of parasite eggs in feces.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Zidovudine: A dideoxynucleoside compound in which the 3'-hydroxy group on the sugar moiety has been replaced by an azido group. This modification prevents the formation of phosphodiester linkages which are needed for the completion of nucleic acid chains. The compound is a potent inhibitor of HIV replication, acting as a chain-terminator of viral DNA during reverse transcription. It improves immunologic function, partially reverses the HIV-induced neurological dysfunction, and improves certain other clinical abnormalities associated with AIDS. Its principal toxic effect is dose-dependent suppression of bone marrow, resulting in anemia and leukopenia.Mitomycin: An antineoplastic antibiotic produced by Streptomyces caespitosus. It is one of the bi- or tri-functional ALKYLATING AGENTS causing cross-linking of DNA and inhibition of DNA synthesis.HIV Seronegativity: Immune status consisting of non-production of HIV antibodies, as determined by various serological tests.Cerebrospinal Fluid: A watery fluid that is continuously produced in the CHOROID PLEXUS and circulates around the surface of the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and in the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.Endotoxins: Toxins closely associated with the living cytoplasm or cell wall of certain microorganisms, which do not readily diffuse into the culture medium, but are released upon lysis of the cells.Antiviral Agents: Agents used in the prophylaxis or therapy of VIRUS DISEASES. Some of the ways they may act include preventing viral replication by inhibiting viral DNA polymerase; binding to specific cell-surface receptors and inhibiting viral penetration or uncoating; inhibiting viral protein synthesis; or blocking late stages of virus assembly.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Hemoglobins: The oxygen-carrying proteins of ERYTHROCYTES. They are found in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The number of globin subunits in the hemoglobin quaternary structure differs between species. Structures range from monomeric to a variety of multimeric arrangements.Viremia: The presence of viruses in the blood.Chemotherapy, Adjuvant: Drug therapy given to augment or stimulate some other form of treatment such as surgery or radiation therapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Nevirapine: A potent, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor used in combination with nucleoside analogues for treatment of HIV INFECTIONS and AIDS.Eosinophils: Granular leukocytes with a nucleus that usually has two lobes connected by a slender thread of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing coarse, round granules that are uniform in size and stainable by eosin.Spleen: An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Polyethylene Glycols: Polymers of ETHYLENE OXIDE and water, and their ethers. They vary in consistency from liquid to solid depending on the molecular weight indicated by a number following the name. They are used as SURFACTANTS, dispersing agents, solvents, ointment and suppository bases, vehicles, and tablet excipients. Some specific groups are NONOXYNOLS, OCTOXYNOLS, and POLOXAMERS.Ehrlichia chaffeensis: A species of gram-negative bacteria that is the causative agent of human EHRLICHIOSIS. This organism was first discovered at Fort Chaffee, Arkansas, when blood samples from suspected human ehrlichiosis patients were studied.Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.Epirubicin: An anthracycline which is the 4'-epi-isomer of doxorubicin. The compound exerts its antitumor effects by interference with the synthesis and function of DNA.Injections, Subcutaneous: Forceful administration under the skin of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the skin.Epothilones: A group of 16-member MACROLIDES which stabilize MICROTUBULES in a manner similar to PACLITAXEL. They were originally found in the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum, now renamed to Polyangium (MYXOCOCCALES).Blood Platelets: Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.DairyingCytomegalovirus Infections: Infection with CYTOMEGALOVIRUS, characterized by enlarged cells bearing intranuclear inclusions. Infection may be in almost any organ, but the salivary glands are the most common site in children, as are the lungs in adults.Drug Combinations: Single preparations containing two or more active agents, for the purpose of their concurrent administration as a fixed dose mixture.Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin: Any of a group of malignant tumors of lymphoid tissue that differ from HODGKIN DISEASE, being more heterogeneous with respect to malignant cell lineage, clinical course, prognosis, and therapy. The only common feature among these tumors is the absence of giant REED-STERNBERG CELLS, a characteristic of Hodgkin's disease.Organoplatinum Compounds: Organic compounds which contain platinum as an integral part of the molecule.C-Reactive Protein: A plasma protein that circulates in increased amounts during inflammation and after tissue damage.HIV Protease Inhibitors: Inhibitors of HIV PROTEASE, an enzyme required for production of proteins needed for viral assembly.Platinum: Platinum. A heavy, soft, whitish metal, resembling tin, atomic number 78, atomic weight 195.09, symbol Pt. (From Dorland, 28th ed) It is used in manufacturing equipment for laboratory and industrial use. It occurs as a black powder (platinum black) and as a spongy substance (spongy platinum) and may have been known in Pliny's time as "alutiae".
It takes a number of forms: Low red blood cell count: resulting in anemia. Low white blood cell count: leukopenia or ... Low granulocyte count: granulocytopenia Low red blood cell, white blood cell, and platelet counts: pancytopenia. Polycythemia, ... Because neutrophils make up at least half of all white cells, they are almost always low in leukopenia[citation needed]. Low ... Cytopenia is a reduction in the number of mature blood cells. ...
White blood cell count is usually elevated. Severe sepsis may present with hypothermia or leukopenia. The objective of ... There is relative destruction of the ganglion cells and swelling of the nerve fibres in the myenteric plexus, with concomitant ...
Monocytopenia is a form of leukopenia associated with a deficiency of monocytes. A very low count of these cells is found after ... A monocyte count is part of a complete blood count and is expressed either as a percentage of monocytes among all white blood ... Vacuolization may be present in a cell that has recently phagocytized foreign matter. Many factors produced by other cells can ... "Nr4a1-Dependent Ly6Clow Monocytes Monitor Endothelial Cells and Orchestrate Their Disposal". Cell. 153: 362-375. doi:10.1016/j. ...
... has been associated with a decrease in white blood cell count (leukopenia). Lamotrigine does not prolong QT/QTc in ... Nicholson, R J; Kelly, K P; Grant, I S (25 February 1995). "Leucopenia associated with lamotrigine". BMJ. Retrieved 16 June ... Serious side effects include lack of red blood cells, suicide, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and allergic reactions. There are ...
Other laboratory findings include normal peripheral white cell count, and occasional leucopenia with relative lymphocytosis. ... Blood tests characteristically reveal a low number of white blood cells and red blood cells, show some elevation of liver ... However, the use of more than one antibiotic is needed for several weeks, because the bacteria incubate within cells. ...
All were nauseated and vomiting, and two of them were showing leukopenia (low white blood cell count). Reviewing the cases on ... All but one of the patients developed agranulocytosis or bicytopenia (depletion of white blood cells and/or platelets). Several ...
... low red blood cell count), leukopenia (white blood cell count. 3.0.CO;2-F. PMID 10211873. Kasama, T; Maeoka, A; Oguro, N (2016 ... Early apoptotic cells express "eat-me" signals, of cell-surface proteins such as phosphatidylserine, that prompt immune cells ... This material may present a threat to the tolerization of B cells and T cells. Dendritic cells in the germinal center may ... People with SLE have intense polyclonal B-cell activation, with a population shift towards immature B cells. Memory B cells ...
anemia: hemoglobin < 13.5 g/dL (male) or 12 g/dL (female). leukopenia: total white cell count < 4.0 x 109/L. Decrease in all ... The T cell activated macrophages engulf erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, as well as their progenitor cells. Such finding is ... types of white blood cells (revealed by doing a differential count). thrombocytopenia: platelet count < 150×109/L. Treat the ... Pancytopenia is a medical condition in which there is a reduction in the number of red and white blood cells, as well as ...
Zaltrap has adverse effects typical of anti-cancer drugs, such as reduced blood cell count (leukopenia, neutropenia, ... "The Role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Estradiol in the Regulation of Endometrial Angiogenesis and Cell ... of overall survival in the Vital phase III trial for second-line treatment of locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell ...
... low platelet count), leucopenia (low white blood cell count), and elevated liver enzyme levels. SFTS virus (SFTSV) is a ...
... low platelet count), leukopenia (low white blood cell count) and elevated liver enzyme levels. In 2009 Xue-jie Yu and ...
It is recommended to obtain complete WBC (White Blood Cell) counts during and after each cycle frequently. 2Common references ... The following side-effects have been noticed so far: Dysgeusia (abnormal or bad taste) Drug induced leukopenia (very common)[ ... of T cells to the S and G2/M phases and the polarization of the T cells into IFN-gamma-secreting Th1 effector T cells, ... resulting in the inhibition of growth of activated naive CD4 T cells. Gusperimus was developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb. ...
288) Diseases of white blood cells (288.0) Leukopenia (288.1) Functional disorders of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (288.2) ... Elevated white blood cell count (288.60) Leukocytosis, unspecified (288.61) Lymphocytosis (symptomatic) (288.62) Leukemoid ... Genetic anomalies of leukocytes (288.3) Eosinophilia (288.4) Hemophagocytic syndromes (288.5) Decreased white blood cell count ... Sickle-cell trait (282.6) Sickle-cell anemia (283) Acquired hemolytic anemias (283.0) Autoimmune hemolytic anemias Warm ...
... the most common adverse reactions associated with ceftriaxone are changes in white blood cell counts, local reactions at site ... Leukopenia (2.1%) Elevation in BUN (1.2%) Local reactions-pain, tenderness, irritation (1%) Rash (1.7%) Some less frequently ... so the inhibition of PBPs leads to damage and destruction of the cell wall and eventually to cell lysis. Absorption: ... that catalyze the cross-linking of the peptidoglycan polymers forming the bacterial cell wall. The peptidoglycan cell wall is ...
Leukopenia (low white blood cell count) Neutropenia (low neutrophil count) Pure red cell aplasia Agranulocytosis Extrapyramidal ... List of adverse effects of valproic acid by frequency: Nausea Vomiting Diarrhea Headache Low platelet count (dose-related) ...
Decreased white blood cell counts including pancytopenia, leukopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, agranulocytosis, and ... This is thought to change cell membrane permeability, causing fungal cell lysis. Terbinafine is sold in India as Terboderm by ... decreased red blood cell count (anemia), muscle pain (myalgia), joint pain (arthralgia) In 2015 physicians reported that a ...
... low white blood cell count (leukopenia) and easy bruising from low platelet count(thrombocytopenia). Elevated liver ... and leukopenia. The Lone Star Tick transmits the virus to people when feeding on blood. The Heartland virus is part of the ...
Leukopenia (a low total white cell count) is associated with relatively poor survival in HIV infection and this association is ... The strength of this association increases inversely with the total white cell count. The basis for this association is ... Duffy-positive patients exhibit higher counts of white blood cells, polynuclear neutrophils, higher plasma levels of IL-8 and ... While the Duffy antigen is expressed on erythrocytes it is also found on some epithelial cells, Purkinje cells of the ...
The absolute neutrophil count in this test will be below 500, and can reach 0 cells/mm³. Other kinds of blood cells are ... to imply reduced cell numbers (as in "leukopenia"); for these reasons, granulopenia is a more etymologically consistent term, ... To be precise, neutropenia is the term normally used to describe absolute neutrophil counts (ANCs) of less than 500 cells per ... lowered white blood cell count), most commonly of neutrophils causing a neutropenia in the circulating blood. It is a severe ...
... low white blood cell count) including neutropenia, anemia (low red blood cell count), thrombocytopenia (low platelet count), ... Side effects that occurred in 20% or more of patients in studies were diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, leukopenia ( ... Blocking this pathway prevents cells from progressing to the S phase, thereby inducing apoptosis (cell death). After oral ... a Cell Cycle Inhibitor Selective for CDK4 and CDK6, in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma A Study of ...
... red blood cells, or even with a low white blood cell count (leukopenia). While a presumptive diagnosis of AML can be made by ... occur when the leukemic cells can not be classified as either myeloid or lymphoid cells, or where both types of cells are ... A drop in red blood cell count (anemia) can cause fatigue, paleness, and shortness of breath. A lack of platelets can lead to ... Play media Most signs and symptoms of AML are caused by the replacement of normal blood cells with leukemic cells. A lack of ...
leukopenia: total white cell count , 4.0 x 109/L. Decrease in all types of white blood cells (revealed by doing a differential ... The T cell activated macrophages engulf erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, as well as their progenitor cells. Along with ... Pancytopenia is a medical condition in which there is a reduction in the number of red and white blood cells, as well as ... If only two parameters from the complete blood count are low, the term bicytopenia can be used. The diagnostic approach is the ...
... include low blood cell counts (pancytopenia, thrombocytopenia, anaemia, leucopenia, neutropenia, lymphopenia), airway ... Comparison of HDAC inhibitors in clinical development: Effect on HIV production in latently infected cells and T-cell ... Panobinostat was able to selectively target triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells by inducing hyperacetylation and cell ... These resting cells are not recognized by the immune system as harboring the virus and do not respond to antiretroviral drugs. ...
"What causes low blood cell counts?". Retrieved March 3, 2012. "Managing a Low White Blood Cell Count (Neutropenia)". Retrieved ... Decreased white blood cell count may be present in cases of arsenic toxicity. Leukopenia can be identified with a complete ... stem cell transplant, bone marrow transplant, HIV, AIDS, and steroid use. Other causes of low white blood cell count include ... and the prescriber information suggests a complete blood count, including differential cell count, before and after, in ...
Complete Blood Count (CBC): a test of the white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets used to assess the presence of ... various disorders such as leukocytosis, leukopenia, thrombocytosis and anemia which may result from malnutrition. Urinalysis: a ... An obsession with counting calories and monitoring fat contents of food. Preoccupation with food, recipes, or cooking; may cook ... Sheridan AM, Bonventre JV (2000). "Cell biology and molecular mechanisms of injury in ischemic acute renal failure". Current ...
Langerhans cells - LAS - lentivirus - lesion - leukocytes - leukocytosis - leukopenia - leukoplakia - LFT - LIP - lipid - ... complete blood count (CBC) - computed tomography scan (C-T scan) - concomitant drugs - condyloma - condyloma acuminatum - ... T suppressor cells - T4 cell - T4 cells (T-helper cells) - T8 cells - Tanner staging - TAT - TB - template - TeachAIDS - ... B-cell lymphoma - B cells - B lymphocytes (B cells) - bactericidal - bacteriostatic - bacterium - baculovirus - baseline - ...
... also known as a low white blood cell count. Leukocytes are a type of white blood cell, and when the body has low levels of them ... Low White Blood Cell Count, Low White Blood Cell Count Causes, Low White Blood Cell Count Diet, Low White Blood Cell Count ... Anemia: A low red blood cell count (anemia) can often occur alongside leukopenia as the body begins to lose red blood cells ... Leukopenia (low white blood cell count) is not so much a condition as it is a state of the body. Leukocytes are a type of white ...
What is Leukopenia. Leukopenia refers to abnormal lowering in the white blood cell count of a person. This Buzzle article ... How to Increase White Blood Cell Count. Leukopenia, i.e., abnormal decline in white blood cells (WBCs) in the body, can weaken ... Low White Blood Cell Count Symptoms. A low white blood cell count could be an indication of some underlying disease or disorder ... Low White Blood Cell Count Treatment. A low white blood cell count treatment helps improve the immune system of an individual, ...
Leukopenia. Rufinamide has been shown to reduce white cell count. Leukopenia (white cell count , 3X109L) was more commonly ... Leukopenia [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]. Clinical Trials Experience. Because clinical trials are conducted under widely ... Rufinamide was not clastogenic in the in vitro mammalian cell chromosomal aberration assay or the in vivo rat bone marrow ... Rufinamide was not mutagenic in the in vitro bacterial reverse mutation (Ames) assay or the in vitro mammalian cell point ...
... team brings new hope to patient s receiving chemotherapy by offering a portable device that can monitor white blood cell count ... Leucopenia / Leukopenia. Leucopenia / Leukopenia is a decrease in the number of total white blood cells found in blood. The ... The MIT team estimated that if there were a way to detect when patients white cell counts went below the threshold level, so ... They also plan to adapt the technology so that it can generate more precise white blood cell counts, which would make it useful ...
... or leucopenia) is a decrease in the number of white blood cells (leukocytes) found in the blood, which places individuals at ... just low white cells blood count. She even told me there was nothing that could be done to increase the cell count. She gave me ... In leukopenia there is a diminished white blood cell count. When this happens, the immunity is severely weakened and the ... Leukopenia may be caused by diseases, medications, and genetic deficiencies.. White blood cells. White blood cells are also ...
What Is Leukopenia? Leukopenia is the medical term for a low white blood cell count. White blood cells are essential for proper ... so its important that a low white blood cell count is diagnosed and treated before a serious infection develops.. By Leigh A. ...
Leukopenia is a deficiency in white blood cells. Learn what causes this condition and what complications can develop if it is ... Leukopenia is the medical term for a low white blood cell count. White blood cells are essential for proper immune system ... Leukopenia can be diagnosed with a simple WBC count test or the more comprehensive complete blood count (CBC). The WBC count ... Treatment of Leukopenia. Treating a low white blood cell count can be done in several ways. If it is possible to treat the ...
"What causes low blood cell counts?". Retrieved March 3, 2012. "Managing a Low White Blood Cell Count (Neutropenia)". Retrieved ... Decreased white blood cell count may be present in cases of arsenic toxicity. Leukopenia can be identified with a complete ... stem cell transplant, bone marrow transplant, HIV, AIDS, and steroid use. Other causes of low white blood cell count include ... and the prescriber information suggests a complete blood count, including differential cell count, before and after, in ...
Leukopenia. A reduced white blood cell count.. Lipids. Substances, such as fats, that are some of the principal structural ... Beta particles that enter the body can damage cells, which can lead to cell death or, later in life, to cancer.. ... An abnormal reduction in the number of red blood cells, white blood cells, and blood platelets in the blood.. ... Red blood cell.. Ethanol. A colorless, volatile, flammable liquid that is the intoxicating agent in liquors and is also used as ...
... complete blood and differential white blood cell counts, platelet counts and blood chemistries, including liver function tests ... Leukopenia. In controlled clinical trials, leukopenia was reported in 18% of patients receiving BETASERON (compared to 6% on ... Patients with myelosuppression may require more intensive monitoring of complete blood cell counts, with differential and ... have or have had blood problems such as bleeding or bruising easily, low red blood cells (anemia) or low white blood cells ...
Leukopenia and Severe Thrombocytopenia: Monitor platelet and white blood cell counts. (5.2) ... 5.2 Leukopenia and Severe Thrombocytopenia 5.3 Risk of Adverse Reactions Due to Glycerol Content of ORFADIN Oral Suspension 6 ... Nitisinone was mutagenic in the mouse lymphoma cell (L5178Y/TK+/-) forward mutation test and in an in vivo mouse bone marrow ... 5.2 Leukopenia and Severe Thrombocytopenia In clinical trials, patients treated with ORFADIN and dietary restriction developed ...
Low White Blood Cell Count (Leukopenia or Neutropenia). White blood cells (WBC) are important for fighting infection. While ... Your red blood cells are responsible for carrying oxygen to the tissues in your body. When the red cell count is low, you may ... Low Platelet Count (Thrombocytopenia). Platelets help your blood clot, so when the count is low you are at a higher risk of ... and it works by blocking two processes that allow cancer cells to grow. First, it interferes with a protein that promotes cell ...
Low White Blood Cell Count (Leukopenia or Neutropenia). White blood cells (WBC) are important for fighting infection. While ... Your red blood cells are responsible for carrying oxygen to the tissues in your body. When the red cell count is low, you may ... Low Platelet Count (Thrombocytopenia). Platelets help your blood clot, so when the count is low you are at a higher risk of ... A kinase is an enzyme that promotes cell growth. There are many types of kinases, which control different phases of cell growth ...
Leukopenia and/or Elevated Alkaline Phosphatase Levels: Monitor white blood cell count and alkaline phosphatase levels; ... Low white blood cell count and certain abnormal liver function blood tests. Your doctor should check you for these problems. ... Monitor white blood cell counts and alkaline phosphatase levels. If tests values remain elevated, consider decreasing the dose ... 5.5 Leukopenia and/or Elevated Alkaline Phosphatase Levels. Cysteamine has been associated with reversible leukopenia and ...
Leukopenia is caused by a variety of medical issues including viral infections, autoimmune disorders, medications, aplastic ... What Conditions Can Lead to Leukopenia?. A: Leukopenia, or low white blood cell count, may be caused by diseases such as ... Why Is My White Blood Cell Count Low?. A: Low white blood cell counts are commonly caused by viral infections, conditions that ... Leukopenia is a medical condition in which a patient has a low white blood cell count, reports Mayo Clinic. Typically, if a ...
Pederson on could having leukopenia lead to hodgkin disease or any other type of cancers: Leukopenia means low white cell count ... Could Having Leukopenia Lead To Hodgkin Disease Or Any Other Type Of Cancers ... YES: Leukopenia means low white cell count. It can be associated with various things, which can include: infection (eg., cold/ ... Leukopenia (Definition) This term is generic for any low total white blood cell count. ...Read more ...
Feied invented this word as well, stealing the suffix from "leucopenia," or low white-blood-cell counts.) ... I was told that I also had leucopenia, a dangerously low white blood cell count. ... I was told that I also had leucopenia, a dangerously low white blood cell count. ... leukopenia. .. from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.. *noun an abnormal lowering of the ...
Leukopenia is commonly observed. Differential white blood cell counts may show a relative lymphocytosis and the presence of ... Laboratory abnormalities observed in patients with CTF can be largely attributed to infection of hemopoietic progenitor cells. ...
Carica papaya leaves juice or extract increases platelet counts in cases of dengue fever. Papaya leaves protect the bone marrow ... and leukopenia (the white blood cell count was 3,600/ L). On the 8th day of Carica papaya leaf juice administration his ... The administration of papaya leaf juice was effective in increasing the platelet and white blood cell count in the reported ... Home Remedies - Natural Ways to Increase Platelet Count during Dengue. Dengue is an infectious disease caused by dengue virus, ...
It takes a number of forms: Low red blood cell count: resulting in anemia. Low white blood cell count: leukopenia or ... Low granulocyte count: granulocytopenia Low red blood cell, white blood cell, and platelet counts: pancytopenia. Polycythemia, ... Because neutrophils make up at least half of all white cells, they are almost always low in leukopenia[citation needed]. Low ... Cytopenia is a reduction in the number of mature blood cells. ...
Leukopenia. *Acute anemia (Hb , 9mg%). *Platelet count ,100,000 cell/mm3. *Need for emergency surgery for any reason ...
Billable Medical Code for Other Decreased White Blood Cell Count Diagnosis Code for Reimbursement Claim: ICD-9-CM 288.59 Code ... Leukopenia Definition and Symptoms. Leukopenia is a condition where a person has an abnormally low white blood cell count and ... The Short Description Is: Decreased WBC count NEC.. Known As. Leukopenia is also known basophilic leukopenia, decreased blood ... Billable Medical Code for Other Decreased White Blood Cell Count. Diagnosis Code for Reimbursement Claim: ICD-9-CM 288.59. Code ...
Leukopenia/Neutropenia Mar 14, 2010. Normal WBC count in AIDS. Mar 7, 2010. ... low CD4 count-med related?. Apr 17, 2004. Twice, huge differences between labs/T cells and Abs Lymphs a week apart. Apr 11, ... I need help figuring out my white blood cell count and lymphocyte differential. Jul 27, 2003. ... Understanding my white boold count. Mar 22, 2008. Estimating CD4 count/percentage from Lymphocytes/Leukocytes percentage. Mar ...
Asymptomatic leukopenia: In a 51-year-old woman following chronic use of echinacea. Her white blood cell count returned to ... Reduced white blood cell count: In a 51-year-old woman following chronic use of echinacea. Her white blood cell count returned ... Increased eosinophil count in the bloodstream: In a 58-year-old man, there was an increase in this type of white blood cell ... Possible leukopenia associated with long-term use of echinacea. J Am Board Fam Pract. 2002 Sep-Oct;15(5):417-9. ...
A T-cell count measures the number of T cells in the blood. Your doctor may order this test if you have signs of a weak immune ... Berliner N. Leukocytosis and leukopenia. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... One type of T cell is the CD4 cell, or "helper cell." People with HIV/AIDS have regular T-cell tests to check their CD4 cell ... Normal results vary depending on the type of T-cell tested.. In adults, a normal CD4 cell count ranges from 500 to 1,200 cells/ ...
  • Two weeks later, she had oral thrush and a leukocyte count of 1,700 cells/μL. (cdc.gov)
  • Leukocyte is another name for white blood cell. (cancer.ca)
  • The study will determine whether patients with functioning Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) matched kidney transplants for at least one year and who want to discontinue immunosuppressive drugs can be treated with Total Lymphoid Irradiation (TLI) and rabbit Anti-Thymocyte Globulin (rATG) and an HLA matched donor hematopoietic progenitor cell infusion such that their drugs are successfully withdrawn while maintaining normal renal function. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • As a child, I had watched my father suffer through a constellation of what I have since learned were autoimmune illnesses: inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and leucopenia . (wordnik.com)
  • In a February 2013 study, researchers measured serum levels of the chemokine CXCL13 in 179 men diagnosed with HIV-associated non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma (AIDS-NHL) and 179 male controls to determine whether levels are elevated before an AIDS-NHL diagnosis. (medscape.com)
  • The diagnosis was confirmed by an indirect immunofluorescence assay with fetal rhesus kidney cells that were infected with coronavirus and fixed in acetone to detect a serological response to the virus 3 or by a positive viral culture. (bmj.com)
  • A mucocutaneous plasmacytoma is a rapidly developing skin tumor of plasma cells origin. (petmd.com)
  • Topotecan works by blocking the action of an enzyme in cells called topoisomerase, which is necessary for cell replication and tumor growth. (oncolink.org)
  • Their activation is necessary for the expression of interferon-regulated genes and production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, which are key in the cell-mediated inflammatory response. (ccjm.org)
  • These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. (patientsville.com)
  • These data highlight that the interaction between DARC genotype and the cellular milieu defined by WBC counts may influence HIV disease course, and this may provide a partial explanation of why ethnic leukopenia remains benign in HIV-infected AAs, despite immunodeficiency. (nih.gov)