Renal Artery: A branch of the abdominal aorta which supplies the kidneys, adrenal glands and ureters.Renal Artery Obstruction: Narrowing or occlusion of the RENAL ARTERY or arteries. It is due usually to ATHEROSCLEROSIS; FIBROMUSCULAR DYSPLASIA; THROMBOSIS; EMBOLISM, or external pressure. The reduced renal perfusion can lead to renovascular hypertension (HYPERTENSION, RENOVASCULAR).Hypertension, Renovascular: Hypertension due to RENAL ARTERY OBSTRUCTION or compression.Renal Veins: Short thick veins which return blood from the kidneys to the vena cava.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Hypertension, Renal: Persistent high BLOOD PRESSURE due to KIDNEY DISEASES, such as those involving the renal parenchyma, the renal vasculature, or tumors that secrete RENIN.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Renal Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the vessels of the KIDNEY.Aortography: Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Ischemia: A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.Acute Kidney Injury: Abrupt reduction in kidney function. Acute kidney injury encompasses the entire spectrum of the syndrome including acute kidney failure; ACUTE KIDNEY TUBULAR NECROSIS; and other less severe conditions.Reperfusion Injury: Adverse functional, metabolic, or structural changes in ischemic tissues resulting from the restoration of blood flow to the tissue (REPERFUSION), including swelling; HEMORRHAGE; NECROSIS; and damage from FREE RADICALS. The most common instance is MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Renin: A highly specific (Leu-Leu) endopeptidase that generates ANGIOTENSIN I from its precursor ANGIOTENSINOGEN, leading to a cascade of reactions which elevate BLOOD PRESSURE and increase sodium retention by the kidney in the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM. The enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.4.99.19.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Nephrectomy: Excision of kidney.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Mesenteric Arteries: Arteries which arise from the abdominal aorta and distribute to most of the intestines.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Basilar Artery: The artery formed by the union of the right and left vertebral arteries; it runs from the lower to the upper border of the pons, where it bifurcates into the two posterior cerebral arteries.Angioplasty, Balloon: Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.Aneurysm: Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Celiac Artery: The arterial trunk that arises from the abdominal aorta and after a short course divides into the left gastric, common hepatic and splenic arteries.Vertebral Artery: The first branch of the SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY with distribution to muscles of the NECK; VERTEBRAE; SPINAL CORD; CEREBELLUM; and interior of the CEREBRUM.Mesenteric Artery, Superior: A large vessel supplying the whole length of the small intestine except the superior part of the duodenum. It also supplies the cecum and the ascending part of the colon and about half the transverse part of the colon. It arises from the anterior surface of the aorta below the celiac artery at the level of the first lumbar vertebra.Mammary Arteries: Arteries originating from the subclavian or axillary arteries and distributing to the anterior thoracic wall, mediastinal structures, diaphragm, pectoral muscles and mammary gland.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Radial Artery: The direct continuation of the brachial trunk, originating at the bifurcation of the brachial artery opposite the neck of the radius. Its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to the three regions in which the vessel is situated, the forearm, wrist, and hand.Subclavian Artery: Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.Splenic Artery: The largest branch of the celiac trunk with distribution to the spleen, pancreas, stomach and greater omentum.Angioplasty: Reconstruction or repair of a blood vessel, which includes the widening of a pathological narrowing of an artery or vein by the removal of atheromatous plaque material and/or the endothelial lining as well, or by dilatation (BALLOON ANGIOPLASTY) to compress an ATHEROMA. Except for ENDARTERECTOMY, usually these procedures are performed via catheterization as minimally invasive ENDOVASCULAR PROCEDURES.Carotid Artery, Internal: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Hepatic Artery: A branch of the celiac artery that distributes to the stomach, pancreas, duodenum, liver, gallbladder, and greater omentum.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Carotid Artery Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Brachial Artery: The continuation of the axillary artery; it branches into the radial and ulnar arteries.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Angiography, Digital Subtraction: A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.Radioisotope Renography: Graphic tracing over a time period of radioactivity measured externally over the kidneys following intravenous injection of a radionuclide which is taken up and excreted by the kidneys.Carotid Artery, Common: The two principal arteries supplying the structures of the head and neck. They ascend in the neck, one on each side, and at the level of the upper border of the thyroid cartilage, each divides into two branches, the external (CAROTID ARTERY, EXTERNAL) and internal (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL) carotid arteries.Vasoconstriction: The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Iodohippuric Acid: An iodine-containing compound used in pyelography as a radiopaque medium. If labeled with radioiodine, it can be used for studies of renal function.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular: Enlargement of the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart. This increase in ventricular mass is attributed to sustained abnormal pressure or volume loads and is a contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Vasodilation: The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Arteriosclerosis: Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Vascular Patency: The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.Ophthalmic Artery: Artery originating from the internal carotid artery and distributing to the eye, orbit and adjacent facial structures.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Captopril: A potent and specific inhibitor of PEPTIDYL-DIPEPTIDASE A. It blocks the conversion of ANGIOTENSIN I to ANGIOTENSIN II, a vasoconstrictor and important regulator of arterial blood pressure. Captopril acts to suppress the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM and inhibits pressure responses to exogenous angiotensin.Middle Cerebral Artery: The largest of the cerebral arteries. It trifurcates into temporal, frontal, and parietal branches supplying blood to most of the parenchyma of these lobes in the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These are the areas involved in motor, sensory, and speech activities.Umbilical Arteries: Specialized arterial vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry waste and deoxygenated blood from the FETUS to the mother via the PLACENTA. In humans, there are usually two umbilical arteries but sometimes one.Thoracic Arteries: Arteries originating from the subclavian or axillary arteries and distributing to the anterior thoracic wall, mediastinal structures, diaphragm, pectoral muscles, mammary gland and the axillary aspect of the chest wall.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Technetium Tc 99m Pentetate: A technetium imaging agent used in renal scintigraphy, computed tomography, lung ventilation imaging, gastrointestinal scintigraphy, and many other procedures which employ radionuclide imaging agents.Ultrasonography, Doppler: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with frequency-shifted ultrasound reflections produced by moving targets (usually red blood cells) in the bloodstream along the ultrasound axis in direct proportion to the velocity of movement of the targets, to determine both direction and velocity of blood flow. (Stedman, 25th ed)Temporal Arteries: Arteries arising from the external carotid or the maxillary artery and distributing to the temporal region.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Bronchial Arteries: Left bronchial arteries arise from the thoracic aorta, the right from the first aortic intercostal or the upper left bronchial artery; they supply the bronchi and the lower trachea.Vasoconstrictor Agents: Drugs used to cause constriction of the blood vessels.Vasodilator Agents: Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Glomerular Filtration Rate: The volume of water filtered out of plasma through glomerular capillary walls into Bowman's capsules per unit of time. It is considered to be equivalent to INULIN clearance.CreatininePopliteal Artery: The continuation of the femoral artery coursing through the popliteal fossa; it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.Ulnar Artery: The larger of the two terminal branches of the brachial artery, beginning about one centimeter distal to the bend of the elbow. Like the RADIAL ARTERY, its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to their locations in the forearm, wrist, and hand.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Atherosclerosis: A thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES that occurs with formation of ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES within the ARTERIAL INTIMA.Uterine Artery: A branch arising from the internal iliac artery in females, that supplies blood to the uterus.Takayasu Arteritis: A chronic inflammatory process that affects the AORTA and its primary branches, such as the brachiocephalic artery (BRACHIOCEPHALIC TRUNK) and CAROTID ARTERIES. It results in progressive arterial stenosis, occlusion, and aneurysm formation. The pulse in the arm is hard to detect. Patients with aortitis syndrome often exhibit retinopathy.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Constriction: The act of constricting.Carotid Artery, External: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the exterior of the head, the face, and the greater part of the neck.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Aneurysm, False: Not an aneurysm but a well-defined collection of blood and CONNECTIVE TISSUE outside the wall of a blood vessel or the heart. It is the containment of a ruptured blood vessel or heart, such as sealing a rupture of the left ventricle. False aneurysm is formed by organized THROMBUS and HEMATOMA in surrounding tissue.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Atrial Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the LEFT ATRIUM.Carotid Artery Injuries: Damages to the CAROTID ARTERIES caused either by blunt force or penetrating trauma, such as CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; THORACIC INJURIES; and NECK INJURIES. Damaged carotid arteries can lead to CAROTID ARTERY THROMBOSIS; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; pseudoaneurysm formation; and INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY DISSECTION. (From Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1997, 18:251; J Trauma 1994, 37:473)Antihypertensive Agents: Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular HYPERTENSION regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are DIURETICS; (especially DIURETICS, THIAZIDE); ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS; ADRENERGIC ALPHA-ANTAGONISTS; ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS; CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS; GANGLIONIC BLOCKERS; and VASODILATOR AGENTS.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Endovascular Procedures: Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Kidney Function Tests: Laboratory tests used to evaluate how well the kidneys are working through examination of blood and urine.Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Aneurysm, Dissecting: Aneurysm caused by a tear in the TUNICA INTIMA of a blood vessel leading to interstitial HEMORRHAGE, and splitting (dissecting) of the vessel wall, often involving the AORTA. Dissection between the intima and media causes luminal occlusion. Dissection at the media, or between the media and the outer adventitia causes aneurismal dilation.Norepinephrine: Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Infarction: Formation of an infarct, which is NECROSIS in tissue due to local ISCHEMIA resulting from obstruction of BLOOD CIRCULATION, most commonly by a THROMBUS or EMBOLUS.Ligation: Application of a ligature to tie a vessel or strangulate a part.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Mesenteric Artery, Inferior: The artery supplying nearly all the left half of the transverse colon, the whole of the descending colon, the sigmoid colon, and the greater part of the rectum. It is smaller than the superior mesenteric artery (MESENTERIC ARTERY, SUPERIOR) and arises from the aorta above its bifurcation into the common iliac arteries.Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Flank Pain: Pain emanating from below the RIBS and above the ILIUM.Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery: NECROSIS occurring in the MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY distribution system which brings blood to the entire lateral aspects of each CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE. Clinical signs include impaired cognition; APHASIA; AGRAPHIA; weak and numbness in the face and arms, contralaterally or bilaterally depending on the infarction.Technetium Tc 99m Mertiatide: A technetium diagnostic aid used in renal function determination.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Aortic Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the AORTA.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Aneurysm, Ruptured: The tearing or bursting of the weakened wall of the aneurysmal sac, usually heralded by sudden worsening pain. The great danger of a ruptured aneurysm is the large amount of blood spilling into the surrounding tissues and cavities, causing HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK.Angiotensin II: An octapeptide that is a potent but labile vasoconstrictor. It is produced from angiotensin I after the removal of two amino acids at the C-terminal by ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME. The amino acid in position 5 varies in different species. To block VASOCONSTRICTION and HYPERTENSION effect of angiotensin II, patients are often treated with ACE INHIBITORS or with ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTOR BLOCKERS.Axillary Artery: The continuation of the subclavian artery; it distributes over the upper limb, axilla, chest and shoulder.Endarterectomy: Surgical excision, performed under general anesthesia, of the atheromatous tunica intima of an artery. When reconstruction of an artery is performed as an endovascular procedure through a catheter, it is called ATHERECTOMY.Vascular Diseases: Pathological processes involving any of the BLOOD VESSELS in the cardiac or peripheral circulation. They include diseases of ARTERIES; VEINS; and rest of the vasculature system in the body.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Acetylcholine: A neurotransmitter found at neuromuscular junctions, autonomic ganglia, parasympathetic effector junctions, a subset of sympathetic effector junctions, and at many sites in the central nervous system.Retinal Artery Occlusion: Sudden ISCHEMIA in the RETINA due to blocked blood flow through the CENTRAL RETINAL ARTERY or its branches leading to sudden complete or partial loss of vision, respectively, in the eye.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Incidental Findings: Unanticipated information discovered in the course of testing or medical care. Used in discussions of information that may have social or psychological consequences, such as when it is learned that a child's biological father is someone other than the putative father, or that a person tested for one disease or disorder has, or is at risk for, something else.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Contrast Media: Substances used to allow enhanced visualization of tissues.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Carotid Artery Thrombosis: Blood clot formation in any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES. This may produce CAROTID STENOSIS or occlusion of the vessel, leading to TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBRAL INFARCTION; or AMAUROSIS FUGAX.Injections, Intra-Arterial: Delivery of drugs into an artery.Cerebral Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Vascular Resistance: The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.
Nutcracker syndrome - Compression of the left renal vein between aorta and upper mesenteric artery. Butros SR, Liu R, Oliveira ... The specific problem is compression of the left common iliac vein by the overlying right common iliac artery. This leads to ... but the vast majority are on the left side. While this is the suspected cause of the syndrome, the left iliac vein is ... the left common iliac vein traverses diagonally from left to right to enter the inferior vena cava. Along this course, it goes ...
Recurrence of FPE is thought to be associated with hypertension and may signify renal artery stenosis. Prevention of recurrence ... It is due to either failure of the left ventricle of the heart to remove blood adequately from the pulmonary circulation ( ... Classically it is cardiogenic (left ventricular) but fluid may also accumulate due to damage to the lung. This damage may be ... By convention cardiogenic refers to left ventricular causes. Congestive heart failure which is due to the heart's inability to ...
It is an independent predisposing factor for heart failure, coronary artery disease, stroke, renal disease, and peripheral ... Individuals with left ventricular hypertrophy are at increased risk for, stroke, CHF, and sudden death. Aggressive control of ... Hypertension is a risk factor for renal injury and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Renal risk appears to be more closely ... are early markers of renal injury. These are also risk factors for renal disease progression and for cardiovascular disease. ...
The kidneys have an extensive blood supply via the renal arteries which leave the kidneys via the renal vein. Each kidney ... Left side with frontal section). 7. Adrenal gland. Vessels: 8. Renal artery and vein, 9. Inferior vena cava, 10. Abdominal ... followed by the major calyces that ultimately join the renal pelvis. From here, urine continues its flow from the renal pelvis ... The urinary system, also known as the renal system or urinary tract, consists of the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and the urethra ...
... most commonly the right front limb and the renal arteries. Clopidogrel (Plavix) is used to try to prevent left atrial thrombus ... The thrombus generally forms in the left atrium, most commonly the left auricle. The formation is thought to be primarily due ... Since the pacemaker activates the interventricular septum before the left ventricular free wall, the gradient across the left ... between the left ventricle and the aorta, with the left ventricular pressure higher than the aortic pressure. This gradient ...
Compression of the left renal vein (marked by the arrow) between the superior mesenteric artery (above) and the aorta (below) ... Since the left gonadal vein drains via the left renal vein it can also result in left testicular pain in men or left lower ... "Left Renal Vein Entrapment Syndrome (Nutcracker Syndrome) treated with Left Renal Vein Transposition". Jnp J Vasc Surg. 10: 503 ... Thrombosis in the left renal vein associated with dilation. A nutcracker. The legs of this nutcracker, with some imagination, ...
... renal a. testicular or ovarian a. four lumbar arteries inferior mesenteric a. left colic a. sigmoid arteries (2 or 3) superior ... inferior phrenic a. celiac a. left gastric a. splenic a. short gastric arteries (6) splenic arteries (6) left gastroepiploic a ... sending the right renal artery travelling behind it. The IVC likewise sends its opposite side counterpart, the left renal vein ... On the left side are the left crus of the diaphragm, the left celiac ganglion, the ascending part of the duodenum, and some ...
Affected arteries develop endothelial dysfunction and impairment of normal vasodilation, which alter renal autoregulation. When ... As the left ventricle becomes unable to compensate for an acute rise in systemic vascular resistance, left ventricular failure ... and renal artery embolization in cases of anesthesia risk. It is also important that the blood pressure is lowered smoothly, ... People with hypertensive crises often have chest pain as a result of this mismatch and may suffer from left ventricular ...
... on invasive treatment methods of resistant hypertension by novel sympathetic denervation techniques of the renal arteries ( ... Assessment of left atrial pressure-area relation in humans by means of retrograde left atrial catheterization and ... He subsequently made studies on the elastic properties of aorta and the function of left atrium. A large part of his research ... Effects of balloon mitral valvuloplasty on left atrial function in mitral stenosis as assessed by pressure-area relation. J Am ...
Renal artery stenosis (RAS) may be associated with a localized abdominal bruit to the left or right of the midline (unilateral ... renal artery stenosis (from atherosclerosis or fibromuscular dysplasia), hyperparathyroidism, and pheochromocytoma. Other ... It may also show whether there is thickening of the heart muscle (left ventricular hypertrophy) or whether the heart has ... This condition is believed to be due to calcification of the arteries resulting in abnormally high blood pressure readings with ...
Rarely periptosis left inferior vena cava. Bumpy ekfysis the right subclavian artery and both carotids (1955). • Human Anatomy ... "Contribution to the study of human renal artery (after own observations)", so was acclaimed Doctor of Medicine from the ... Contribution to the study of human renal artery (after own observations) (doctoral thesis) (1939). • About the position of the ...
... coronary artery stenosis) Carotid artery stenosis which predispose to (strokes and transient ischaemic episodes) Renal artery ... of the left heart), therefore causing narrowing Tricuspid valve stenosis, which is the thickening of the tricuspid valve (of ... atherosclerosis causes stenotic lesions in arteries. birth defects calcification diabetes iatrogenic, e.g. secondary to ... Examples of vascular stenotic lesions include: Intermittent claudication (peripheral artery stenosis) Angina ( ...
... admits the renal artery, vein, ureter, and nerves Splenic hilum, on the surface of the spleen, admits the splenic artery, vein ... a triangular depression where the structures which form the root of the lung enter and leave the viscus Hilum of lymph node, ...
... such as the renal artery. Fractures of the left lower ribs are associated with spleen lacerations in 20 percent of cases. The ... X-ray can help determine the path of a penetrating object and locate any foreign matter left in the wound, but may not be ...
The renal circulation supplies the blood to the kidneys via the renal arteries, left and right, which branch directly from the ... 1. Renal pyramid • 2. Interlobular artery • 3. Renal artery • 4. Renal vein 5. Renal hilum • 6. Renal pelvis • 7. Ureter • 8. ... Each renal artery branches into segmental arteries, dividing further into interlobar arteries, which penetrate the renal ... A recessed area on the concave border is the renal hilum, where the renal artery enters the kidney and the renal vein and ...
The right is somewhat lower than the left; left artery lies behind the left renal vein, the body of the pancreas and the ... the right renal artery is normally longer than the left renal artery.[5][6] ... Renal artery stenosis, or narrowing of one or both renal arteries will lead to hypertension as the affected kidneys release ... It is located above the renal vein. Supernumerary renal arteries (two or more arteries to a single kidney) are the most common ...
A dissection usually includes the region from the bifurcation of the aorta to the superior mesenteric artery or the renal veins ... The left lateral aortic glands form a chain on the left side of the abdominal aorta in front of the origin of the psoas major ... Both sets of glands on the right and left side receive (a) the efferents of the common iliac lymph nodes (b) the lymphatics ... The right lateral aortic glands, are situated partly in front of the inferior vena cava near the termination of the renal vein ...
... or renal arteries. The intralobar variety accounts for 75 percent of all sequestrations. Usually presents in adolescence or ... Venous drainage is usually to the left atrium via pulmonary veins establishing a left to left shunt. Abnormal connections to ... The creation of a left-right shunt, where blood flows in a shortcut through the feed off the aorta. Chronic infection. Diseases ... Two thirds of the time, the sequestration is located in the paravertebral gutter in the posterior segment of the left lower ...
... the renal artery enters, and the renal pelvis exits the kidney. The superior, middle, and inferior vessels enter or leave the ... renal artery and renal pelvis, respectively. Renal artery Renal vein Renal pyramids Renal medulla Hilum of kidney This article ... The renal hilum (Latin: hilum renale) or renal pedicle is the hilum of the kidney, that is, its recessed central fissure where ... From anterior to posterior, the renal vein exits, ... hilum of kidney: from anterior to posterior is renal vein, ...
... the left behind the left colic and sigmoid arteries and the iliac colon. Each crosses obliquely over the ureter and the lower ... They are two slender vessels of considerable length, and arise from the front of the aorta a little below the renal arteries. ... The testicular artery (the male gonadal artery, also called the internal spermatic arteries in older texts) is a branch of the ... It is a paired artery, with one for each of the testes. It is the male equivalent of the ovarian artery. Because the testis is ...
Blood enters into the kidney via the renal artery, which then splits up to form the interlobar arteries. The interlobar ... through the distal tubule and finally leaves the kidney by means of the collecting duct, leading to the renal pelvis, the ... The renal medulla is the innermost part of the kidney. The renal medulla is split up into a number of sections, known as the ... Renal medulla Renal medulla Medullipin Kokko and Rector Model, a theory to explain how a gradient is generated in the inner ...
... right suprarenal vein drains into the inferior vena cava The left suprarenal vein drains into the left renal vein or the left ... Three arteries usually supply each adrenal gland: The superior suprarenal artery, a branch of the inferior phrenic artery The ... middle suprarenal artery, a direct branch of the abdominal aorta The inferior suprarenal artery, a branch of the renal artery ... The adrenal glands have one of the greatest blood supply rates per gram of tissue of any organ: up to 60 small arteries may ...
Nerves in the wall of the renal artery are ablated by applying radiofrequency pulses or ultrasound to the renal arteries. This ... Congestive heart failure (CHF), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), atrial fibrillation (AF), obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), ... Other documented procedure related complications include femoral artery pseudoaneurysm and renal artery dissection. Of ... Currently, no renal denervation device has FDA approval. The procedure involves endovascular access via the femoral artery with ...
... "meandering artery", an arterial connection between the left colic artery and the medial colic artery). The territory of ... The IMA branches off the anterior surface of the abdominal aorta below the renal artery branch points, and approximately midway ... and therefore the superior mesenteric artery. The SMA and IMA anastomose via the marginal artery of the colon (artery of ... Front of abdomen, showing surface markings for arteries and inguinal canal. Inferior mesenteric artery Lumbar and sacral plexus ...
Located under this portion of the superior mesenteric artery, between it and the aorta, are the following: left renal vein - ... This artery is completed by branches of the left colic which is a branch of the inferior mesenteric artery. Compared to other ... The SMA can compress the left renal vein, leading to nutcracker syndrome; and/or the third (horizontal) part of the duodenum, ... leading to superior mesenteric artery syndrome. Superior mesenteric artery Abdominal cavity.Superior mesenteric artery.Deep ...
They can extend and contract, twist to left or right, bend at any place in any direction or be held rigid.[27][28] ... Before reaching the branchial heart, each branch of the vena cava expands to form renal appendages which are in direct contact ... The blood vessels consist of arteries, capillaries and veins and are lined with a cellular endothelium which is quite unlike ... Before it leaves the funnel, the ink passes through glands which mix it with mucus, creating a thick, dark blob which allows ...
Left Renal Artery. *Left Renal Vein. *Left Suprarenal Arteries. *Left Suprarenal Vein ... Right Renal Vein. The right renal vein, along with the left renal vein, makes up the renal veins that drain the kidneys. They ... These veins are behind the renal arteries. This goes against most other relationships between veins and arteries in the abdomen ... The right renal vein is smaller than the left. It begins at the hilum of the kidney where three to six tributaries meet. ...
... right renal artery; L.RA, left renal artery) suggestive of significant bilateral renal arteries stenosis. ... Renal function was normal. Doppler examination of the renal arteries was arranged because of poorly controlled hypertension. ... Bilateral renal arteries were normal.. Subsequent magnetic resonance arteriography confirmed a segmental coarctation of the ... A 49 year old man was referred to our interventionist for percutaneous revascularisation for suspected bilateral renal artery ...
Fundus exam showed pale and swollen optic nerve in the left eye, and temporal artery biopsy showed diffuse and extensive ... We describe a case of a 75-year-old man with diabetes type II and end-stage renal disease, presenting with a one-month history ... Fundus exam showed pale and swollen optic nerve in the left eye, and temporal artery biopsy showed diffuse and extensive ... Fundus exam showed pale and swollen optic nerve in the left eye, and temporal artery biopsy showed diffuse and extensive ...
The left renal artery passes laterally from the abdominal aorta into the left kidney. It then divides into several smaller ... The left renal artery passes laterally from the abdominal aorta into the left kidney. It then divides into several smaller ... Home > Cardiovascular System > Cardiovascular System of the Lower Torso > Blood Supply to the Kidneys > Left Renal Artery ... Left Renal Artery * Left Renal Vein * Left Suprarenal Arteries * Left Suprarenal Vein ...
... erythema nodosum and uveitis developed complete occlusion of left renal artery. Although he had been suspicious of having ... stenosis of abdominal aorta just beneath the origin of the renal arteries as well as complete occlusion of left renal artery. ... erythema nodosum and uveitis developed complete occlusion of left renal artery. Although he had been suspicious of having an ... Renal Artery* / radiography. Takayasu Arteritis / complications*. From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National ...
1. The renal artery was constricted leaving the opposite kidney intact in ten conscious and seven anaesthetized dogs. ... Pathogenesis of Arterial Hypertension after the Constriction of the Renal Artery Leaving the opposite Kidney Intact Both in the ... Pathogenesis of Arterial Hypertension after the Constriction of the Renal Artery Leaving the opposite Kidney Intact Both in the ... Before and after renal artery constriction in the conscious dogs cardiac output, stroke volume, total peripheral resistance and ...
CURRENT CASE Occluded Stent in Left Renal Artery with Renal Infarcts Diagnosis Hidden ... 7,661 Clear Cell RCC Left Kidney Diagnosis Hidden 7,660 Extensive Vascular Disease Especially Involving the Renal Arteries ...
Unspecified injury of left renal artery, subsequent encounter. 2016 2017 2018 2019 Billable/Specific Code POA Exempt *S35.402D ... Short description: Unspecified injury of left renal artery, subs encntr. *The 2019 edition of ICD-10-CM S35.402D became ...
Left renal artery aka Arteria renalis sinistra in the latin terminology and part of abdominal and pelvic parts of the ureters ... Left renal artery This feature is available to Premium subscribers only.. More Info data-html=true data-placement=bottom ... term/left-renal-artery-2/B2RYFh42FYhYm4yqXAkQ_A._renalis_sinister_02.png data-fullscreen-images=null data-html=true data- ... term/left-renal-artery/2VQS2vD9N6ibG1cKQp7qOw_A._renalis_sinistra_02.png data-fullscreen-images=null data-html=true data- ...
Siegelman SS, Sprayregen S, Strasberg Z, Attai LA, Robinson G. Aortic dissection and the left renal artery. RADIOLOGY. 1970 Apr ... Siegelman, S. S. ; Sprayregen, S. ; Strasberg, Z. ; Attai, L. A. ; Robinson, G. / Aortic dissection and the left renal artery. ... Aortic dissection and the left renal artery. / Siegelman, S. S.; Sprayregen, S.; Strasberg, Z.; Attai, L. A.; Robinson, G. ... Siegelman, SS, Sprayregen, S, Strasberg, Z, Attai, LA & Robinson, G 1970, Aortic dissection and the left renal artery., ...
... sinistra in the latin terminology and part of arteries of the small intestine with focus on the superior mesenteric artery. ... AnatomyAbdomen & PelvisSmall intestineArteries of the small intestineLeft renal artery ... Left renal artery This feature is available to Premium subscribers only.. More Info data-html=true data-placement=bottom ... term/left-renal-artery-2/B2RYFh42FYhYm4yqXAkQ_A._renalis_sinister_02.png data-fullscreen-images=null data-html=true data- ...
Keywords: Accessory renal artery; Renal vascular variations; Multiple renal arteries. Introduction. The paired renal arteries ... The main renal artery on the left was larger in diameter than the accessory renal artery. However, the accessory artery was ... Usually there is only one right renal artery and one left renal artery penetrating the hila of each kidney. The right renal ... Figure 1: Renal artery (white arrow) and accessory renal artery (black arrow). Also shown are the Superior Mesenteric Artery ( ...
... and renal artery stenosis. Journal of the American Society of Hypertension : JASH Elsevier 1878-7436 10.1016/J.JASH.2014.02.007 ...
Retrograde cannulation of the left renal artery with a 4 Fr JR catheter; injection of contrast medium through the catheter ... both renal arteries were found to be accidentally occluded.After three months, both renal arteries were patent and renal ... both renal arteries were found to be accidentally occluded.After three months, both renal arteries were patent and renal ... the right renal artery was catheterized and a chimney stent was deployed; however this was not possible for the left renal ...
... accessory left renal artery是什么意思,accessory ... 为您提供accessory left renal artery的在线翻译, ... 单词 accessory left renal artery 的词典定义。@海词词典-最好的学习型词典. ... accessory left renal artery的用法和样例:. 例句. *Keeping the aorta in view slide the transducer cranially until you find the left renal ... METHODS: Left renal artery stenosis in SD rats was established by inserting silver
Renal Artery Stenosis Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Procedure: stenting angioplasty plus medical therapy Drug: Medical therapy ... The Stenting of Renal Artery Stenosis in Coronary Artery Disease (RASCAD) study was planned to test whether renal artery ... Renal Artery Stenosis in Coronary Artery Disease: Medical Therapy Versus Medical Therapy Plus Renal Artery Stenting in ... Stenting of Renal Artery Stenosis in Coronary Artery Disease Study (RASCAD). The safety and scientific validity of this study ...
The pathogenetic mechanisms that lead to PVD are similar to those of coronary artery disease (CAD). ... Preangioplasty left superficial femoral artery angiogram in a middle-aged woman with severe left leg claudication and an ankle- ... Renal Artery Stenoses. Atherosclerotic disease that causes stenosis of more than 50% in at least 1 renal artery is encountered ... renal artery disease is bilateral. About 11% of renal arteries with stenoses of greater than 60% progress to total occlusion ...
The right is somewhat lower than the left; left artery lies behind the left renal vein, the body of the pancreas and the ... the right renal artery is normally longer than the left renal artery.[5][6] ... Renal artery stenosis, or narrowing of one or both renal arteries will lead to hypertension as the affected kidneys release ... It is located above the renal vein. Supernumerary renal arteries (two or more arteries to a single kidney) are the most common ...
He developed non-oliguric acute renal failure secondary to extrinsic compression of the left renal artery by enlarged lymph ... A case of acute renal failure caused by extrinsic compression of the left renal artery in lymphoma / 대한내과학회지 ... A case of acute renal failure caused by extrinsic compression of the left renal artery in ... showed the complete absence of perfusion of the left kidney due to extrinsic compression of the left renal artery by a huge ...
Variant left testicular artery from the superior polar artery and triple right renal arteries: A case report. European Journal ... Variant left testicular artery from the superior polar artery and triple right renal arteries : A case report. / Rai, ... title = "Variant left testicular artery from the superior polar artery and triple right renal arteries: A case report", ... Variant left testicular artery from the superior polar artery and triple right renal arteries: A case report. ...
... the renal artery was blocked selectively to protect renal function. Thirdly, after clamping the target artery, the renal ... After entering the retroperitoneal space and dissociating the renal artery and renal vein, the target artery was clamped beyond ... After entering the retroperitoneal space and dissociating the renal artery and renal vein, the target artery was clamped beyond ... Retroperitoneal laparoscopic partial nephrectomy with segmental renal artery clamping for cancer of the left upper calyx: a ...
Left ventricular ejection fraction ,50%. *GFR ≤ 40 ml/min/1.73m² as calculated the abbreviated MDRD formula ... Coronary Artery Disease. Myocardial Ischemia. Coronary Disease. Renal Insufficiency. Cardio-Renal Syndrome. Heart Diseases. ... Calcium, Phosphate, Renal Impairment and Coronary Artery Disease in the Cardio-renal Syndrome, The CAPRICORN-CRS Study. ... Calcium, Phosphate, Renal Impairment and Coronary Artery Disease in the Cardio-renal Syndrome, The CAPRICORN-CRS Study ( ...
Known renal artery stenosis. *Serum creatinine , 1.8 mval/l. *Relevant hepatic or pulmonary disorders ... Left ventricular ejection fraction , 40%. *Diastolic blood pressure , 110mm Hg at rest ...
Create healthcare diagrams like this example called Renal Cell Cancer in minutes with SmartDraw. SmartDraw includes 1000s of ... Left kidney. Right renal artery. Left Ureter. Abdominal aorta. Segmental artery. ©1994-2020 SmartDraw, LLC ... Renal Cell Cancer Cancer that starts in the ureters or the renal pelvis (the part of the kidney that collects urine and drains ... Renal Cell Cancer. Create healthcare diagrams like this example called Renal Cell Cancer in minutes with SmartDraw. SmartDraw ...
The left ventricle-right atrium (LV-RA) shunt of a congenital etiology was first reported by Gerbode et al. [ 1 ] in 1958 and ... nächster Artikel A curable cause of hypertension: renal artery p... Tipp. Weitere Artikel dieser Ausgabe durch Wischen aufrufen ... Acquired left ventricular-right atrial communication: Gerbode-type defect. Echocardiography. 2002;19(1):67-72. CrossRefPubMed ... Left ventricular-right atrial fistula complicating redo mitral valve replacement. Ann Thorac Surg. 2001;71(1):343-5. CrossRef ...
  • The temporal artery calcific lesions should hence be differentiated from the less extensive atherosclerotic changes, which mainly affect the media of the artery, as it is crucial to suspect this life-threatening diagnosis in patients at risk. (elsevier.com)
  • However, when they originate from some other artery, they become surgically significant, since the ligature of the main artery giving rise to the testicular artery might lead to testicular atrophy. (elsevier.com)
  • Malignant lymphomas can involve any organ, but rarely cause acute renal failure as an initial manifestation. (bvsalud.org)
  • The following variables were measured in all animals before and after renal artery constriction: plasma renin concentration, blood pressure, cumulative sodium balance, plasma volume, extracellular fluid volume and plasma non-protein nitrogen. (portlandpress.com)
  • 2. There was no significant difference between the regression of change in blood pressure on change in plasma renin concentration within 2 h from renal artery constriction in the conscious dogs and that observed during intravenous infusion of renin. (portlandpress.com)
  • Calcification of the arteries is caused by deposits of calcium within the walls of the blood vessels. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Calcifications of the arteries may result in a loss of elasticity of the blood vessels. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • 1) several blood tests, 2) pictures taken of your heart by echocardiogram and computed tomography (CT) scan, and 3) measurements of the elasticity of your arteries. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In conclusion, ARP and selective renal vasodilation may effectively promote salt and water excretion in the setting of heart failure, particularly when systemic blood pressure is low. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Preliminary data indicate that, by specifically targeting efferent sympathetic and afferent sensory renal nerve signaling, selective renal sympathetic nerve ablation improves blood pressure control ( 5 ), at least in part by reducing central nervous system sympathetic output ( 6,7 ). (onlinejacc.org)
  • Risk factors for renal and mesenteric artery disease include smoking - the number one risk factor for all cardiovascular diseases - a family history of atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, advanced age, obesity, and a sedentary lifestyle. (nyp.org)
  • To perform these tests, doctors place a tiny, soft plastic tube called a catheter into the artery or vein, usually in the groin, and inject a dye that makes the blood vessels clearly visible on an x-ray image. (nyp.org)
  • To surgically correct the decreased blood flow through the artery, doctors place a bypass graft made of synthetic material or a natural vein taken from another part of the body. (nyp.org)
  • Interventions targeting renal artery stenoses have been shown to lower blood pressure and preserve renal function. (onlinejacc.org)
  • With the exception of the pulmonary and umbilical arteries, the arteries contain red or oxygenated blood. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Once in place it is inflated to open the artery and restore normal blood flow (bottom left image). (sciencephoto.com)
  • This invention relates to method and apparatus for forming a channel to allow communication of fluids from one portion of a patient's body to another, and more particularly, to a device that can communicate blood between the left ventricle and coronary arteries or veins. (google.ca)
  • It is filtered and the 'clean' blood leaves via the renal vein . (s-cool.co.uk)
  • However, in the conditions like obesity where circulating level of leptin is increased, this local effect may be opposed by centrally mediated stimulation of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). (ahajournals.org)
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that sodium balance after exogenous leptin infusion is determined by tubular effect and renal sympathetic nerve activity. (ahajournals.org)
  • This study was designed to investigate whether microinjection of angiotensin II (Ang II) into the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in renal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury has any effect on renal oxidative stress and damage through renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). (ingentaconnect.com)
  • Losartan caused a reduction in plasma creatinine, urinary NAG activity, histological changes, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and renal MDA levels, and increased renal SOD activity compared with the IR group ( p (ingentaconnect.com)