Problem-Based Learning: Instructional use of examples or cases to teach using problem-solving skills and critical thinking.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Maze Learning: Learning the correct route through a maze to obtain reinforcement. It is used for human or animal populations. (Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 6th ed)Schools: Educational institutions.Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Discrimination Learning: Learning that is manifested in the ability to respond differentially to various stimuli.Education, Special: Education of the individual who markedly deviates intellectually, physically, socially, or emotionally from those considered to be normal, thus requiring special instruction.Avoidance Learning: A response to a cue that is instrumental in avoiding a noxious experience.Verbal Learning: Learning to respond verbally to a verbal stimulus cue.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Reversal Learning: Any situation where an animal or human is trained to respond differentially to two stimuli (e.g., approach and avoidance) under reward and punishment conditions and subsequently trained under reversed reward values (i.e., the approach which was previously rewarded is punished and vice versa).Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Mainstreaming (Education): Most frequently refers to the integration of a physically or mentally disabled child into the regular class of normal peers and provision of the appropriately determined educational program.Physiology: The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.Computer-Assisted Instruction: A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.Reinforcement, Social: The strengthening of a response with a social reward such as a nod of approval, a parent's love or attention.Serial Learning: Learning to make a series of responses in exact order.Achievement: Success in bringing an effort to the desired end; the degree or level of success attained in some specified area (esp. scholastic) or in general.Education, Distance: Education via communication media (correspondence, radio, television, computer networks) with little or no in-person face-to-face contact between students and teachers. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1997)Memory: Complex mental function having four distinct phases: (1) memorizing or learning, (2) retention, (3) recall, and (4) recognition. Clinically, it is usually subdivided into immediate, recent, and remote memory.Generalization (Psychology): The phenomenon of an organism's responding to all situations similar to one in which it has been conditioned.Education, Pharmacy: Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.Socialization: The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Psychology, Educational: The branch of psychology concerned with psychological aspects of teaching and the formal learning process in school.Sociometric Techniques: Methods for quantitatively assessing and measuring interpersonal and group relationships.Biology: One of the BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DISCIPLINES concerned with the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of animals, plants, and microorganisms.Students, Pharmacy: Individuals enrolled in a school of pharmacy or a formal educational program leading to a degree in pharmacy.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Behavior Therapy: The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.Reinforcement, Verbal: Use of word stimulus to strengthen a response during learning.Education of Intellectually Disabled: The teaching or training of those individuals with subnormal intellectual functioning.Remedial Teaching: Specialized instruction for students deviating from the expected norm.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Educational Technology: Systematic identification, development, organization, or utilization of educational resources and the management of these processes. It is occasionally used also in a more limited sense to describe the use of equipment-oriented techniques or audiovisual aids in educational settings. (Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, December 1993, p132)Programmed Instruction as Topic: Instruction in which learners progress at their own rate using workbooks, textbooks, or electromechanical devices that provide information in discrete steps, test learning at each step, and provide immediate feedback about achievement. (ERIC, Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1996).Reinforcement (Psychology): The strengthening of a conditioned response.Probability Learning: Usually refers to the use of mathematical models in the prediction of learning to perform tasks based on the theory of probability applied to responses; it may also refer to the frequency of occurrence of the responses observed in the particular study.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Group Processes: The procedures through which a group approaches, attacks, and solves a common problem.Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Includes two similar disorders: oppositional defiant disorder and CONDUCT DISORDERS. Symptoms occurring in children with these disorders include: defiance of authority figures, angry outbursts, and other antisocial behaviors.Underachievement: Performance, usually in school work, poorer than that predicted from aptitude and/or intelligence testing.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Token Economy: A practice whereby tokens representing money, toys, candy, etc., are given as secondary reinforcers contingent upon certain desired behaviors or performances.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Conditioning, Classical: Learning that takes place when a conditioned stimulus is paired with an unconditioned stimulus.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Teaching Materials: Instructional materials used in teaching.Education of Hearing Disabled: The teaching or training of those individuals with hearing disability or impairment.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Artificial Intelligence: Theory and development of COMPUTER SYSTEMS which perform tasks that normally require human intelligence. Such tasks may include speech recognition, LEARNING; VISUAL PERCEPTION; MATHEMATICAL COMPUTING; reasoning, PROBLEM SOLVING, DECISION-MAKING, and translation of language.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Problem Solving: A learning situation involving more than one alternative from which a selection is made in order to attain a specific goal.BooksElements: Substances that comprise all matter. Each element is made up of atoms that are identical in number of electrons and protons and in nuclear charge, but may differ in mass or number of neutrons.Motor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Neuronal Plasticity: The capacity of the NERVOUS SYSTEM to change its reactivity as the result of successive activations.Play and Playthings: Spontaneous or voluntary recreational activities pursued for enjoyment and accessories or equipment used in the activities; includes games, toys, etc.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Conditioning (Psychology): A general term referring to the learning of some particular response.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Transfer (Psychology): Change in learning in one situation due to prior learning in another situation. The transfer can be positive (with second learning improved by first) or negative (where the reverse holds).Imitative Behavior: The mimicking of the behavior of one individual by another.Comprehension: The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.Retention (Psychology): The persistence to perform a learned behavior (facts or experiences) after an interval has elapsed in which there has been no performance or practice of the behavior.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Sign Language: A system of hand gestures used for communication by the deaf or by people speaking different languages.Education: Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.Spatial Behavior: Reactions of an individual or groups of individuals with relation to the immediate surrounding area including the animate or inanimate objects within that area.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Hippocampus: A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.Practice (Psychology): Performance of an act one or more times, with a view to its fixation or improvement; any performance of an act or behavior that leads to learning.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Reward: An object or a situation that can serve to reinforce a response, to satisfy a motive, or to afford pleasure.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Persons With Hearing Impairments: Persons with any degree of loss of hearing that has an impact on their activities of daily living or that requires special assistance or intervention.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.Fear: The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.ReadingStudents, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Test Taking Skills: Skills and strategies, unrelated to the traits a test is intended to measure, that may increase test takers' scores -- may include the effects of coaching or experience in taking tests. (ERIC Thesaurus)Competency-Based Education: Educational programs designed to ensure that students attain prespecified levels of competence in a given field or training activity. Emphasis is on achievement or specified objectives.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Role Playing: The adopting or performing the role of another significant individual in order to gain insight into the behavior of that person.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Schools, Pharmacy: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of pharmacy.Paired-Associate Learning: Learning in which the subject must respond with one word or syllable when presented with another word or syllable.Mental Recall: The process whereby a representation of past experience is elicited.Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Feedback, Psychological: A mechanism of information stimulus and response that may control subsequent behavior, cognition, perception, or performance. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Memory Disorders: Disturbances in registering an impression, in the retention of an acquired impression, or in the recall of an impression. Memory impairments are associated with DEMENTIA; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ENCEPHALITIS; ALCOHOLISM (see also ALCOHOL AMNESTIC DISORDER); SCHIZOPHRENIA; and other conditions.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Conditioning, Operant: Learning situations in which the sequence responses of the subject are instrumental in producing reinforcement. When the correct response occurs, which involves the selection from among a repertoire of responses, the subject is immediately reinforced.Learning Disorders: Conditions characterized by a significant discrepancy between an individual's perceived level of intellect and their ability to acquire new language and other cognitive skills. These disorders may result from organic or psychological conditions. Relatively common subtypes include DYSLEXIA, DYSCALCULIA, and DYSGRAPHIA.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Sheltered Workshops: Protective places of employment for disabled persons which provide training and employment on a temporary or permanent basis.Task Performance and Analysis: The detailed examination of observable activity or behavior associated with the execution or completion of a required function or unit of work.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Social Control, Informal: Those forms of control which are exerted in less concrete and tangible ways, as through folkways, mores, conventions, and public sentiment.Compact Disks: Computer disks storing data with a maximum reduction of space and bandwidth. The compact size reduces cost of transmission and storage.Interior Design and Furnishings: The planning of the furnishings and decorations of an architectural interior.Education, Pharmacy, Graduate: Educational programs for pharmacists who have a bachelor's degree or a Doctor of Pharmacy degree entering a specific field of pharmacy. They may lead to an advanced degree.Social Desirability: A personality trait rendering the individual acceptable in social or interpersonal relations. It is related to social acceptance, social approval, popularity, social status, leadership qualities, or any quality making him a socially desirable companion.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Knowledge: The body of truths or facts accumulated in the course of time, the cumulated sum of information, its volume and nature, in any civilization, period, or country.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.Amplifiers, Electronic: Electronic devices that increase the magnitude of a signal's power level or current.Videotape Recording: Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.Deafness: A general term for the complete loss of the ability to hear from both ears.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Students, Health Occupations: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.Air Pollution, Indoor: The contamination of indoor air.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Aptitude: The ability to acquire general or special types of knowledge or skill.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Child Nutrition Sciences: The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease of children, infants or adolescents.Long-Term Potentiation: A persistent increase in synaptic efficacy, usually induced by appropriate activation of the same synapses. The phenomenological properties of long-term potentiation suggest that it may be a cellular mechanism of learning and memory.Space Perception: The awareness of the spatial properties of objects; includes physical space.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Social Facilitation: Any enhancement of a motivated behavior in which individuals do the same thing with some degree of mutual stimulation and consequent coordination.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Education, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform individuals of recent advances in their particular field of interest. They do not lead to any formal advanced standing.Verbal Behavior: Includes both producing and responding to words, either written or spoken.Facility Design and Construction: Architecture, exterior and interior design, and construction of facilities other than hospitals, e.g., dental schools, medical schools, ambulatory care clinics, and specified units of health care facilities. The concept also includes architecture, design, and construction of specialized contained, controlled, or closed research environments including those of space labs and stations.Rats, Long-Evans: An outbred strain of rats developed in 1915 by crossing several Wistar Institute white females with a wild gray male. Inbred strains have been derived from this original outbred strain, including Long-Evans cinnamon rats (RATS, INBRED LEC) and Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima Fatty rats (RATS, INBRED OLETF), which are models for Wilson's disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, respectively.Ventilation: Supplying a building or house, their rooms and corridors, with fresh air. The controlling of the environment thus may be in public or domestic sites and in medical or non-medical locales. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Vocabulary: The sum or the stock of words used by a language, a group, or an individual. (From Webster, 3d ed)Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Genetics: The branch of science concerned with the means and consequences of transmission and generation of the components of biological inheritance. (Stedman, 26th ed)Smell: The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.Odors: The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Education, Professional: Formal education and training in preparation for the practice of a profession.Early Intervention (Education): Procedures and programs that facilitate the development or skill acquisition in infants and young children who have disabilities, who are at risk for developing disabilities, or who are gifted. It includes programs that are designed to prevent handicapping conditions in infants and young children and family-centered programs designed to affect the functioning of infants and children with special needs. (From Journal of Early Intervention, Editorial, 1989, vol. 13, no. 1, p. 3; A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, prepared for the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, 1976)Models, Neurological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the neurological system, processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Amygdala: Almond-shaped group of basal nuclei anterior to the INFERIOR HORN OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLE of the TEMPORAL LOBE. The amygdala is part of the limbic system.Conditioning, Eyelid: Reflex closure of the eyelid occurring as a result of classical conditioning.Autistic Disorder: A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Social Marginalization: Individuals or groups, excluded from participation in the economic, social, and political activities of membership in a community.Education, Nursing, Graduate: Those educational activities engaged in by holders of a bachelor's degree in nursing, which are primarily designed to prepare them for entrance into a specific field of nursing, and may lead to board certification or a more advanced degree.Vocalization, Animal: Sounds used in animal communication.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Language Development: The gradual expansion in complexity and meaning of symbols and sounds as perceived and interpreted by the individual through a maturational and learning process. Stages in development include babbling, cooing, word imitation with cognition, and use of short sentences.Mobile Applications: Computer programs or software installed on mobile electronic devices which support a wide range of functions and uses which include television, telephone, video, music, word processing, and Internet service.Dental Hygienists: Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.Intellectual Disability: Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28)Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Escape Reaction: Innate response elicited by sensory stimuli associated with a threatening situation, or actual confrontation with an enemy.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Extinction, Psychological: The procedure of presenting the conditioned stimulus without REINFORCEMENT to an organism previously conditioned. It refers also to the diminution of a conditioned response resulting from this procedure.ManikinsFriends: Persons whom one knows, likes, and trusts.Stanford-Binet Test: An individual intelligence test designed primarily for school children to predict school performance and the ability to adjust to everyday demands.Hyperkinesis: Excessive movement of muscles of the body as a whole, which may be associated with organic or psychological disorders.Concept Formation: A cognitive process involving the formation of ideas generalized from the knowledge of qualities, aspects, and relations of objects.Neural Networks (Computer): A computer architecture, implementable in either hardware or software, modeled after biological neural networks. Like the biological system in which the processing capability is a result of the interconnection strengths between arrays of nonlinear processing nodes, computerized neural networks, often called perceptrons or multilayer connectionist models, consist of neuron-like units. A homogeneous group of units makes up a layer. These networks are good at pattern recognition. They are adaptive, performing tasks by example, and thus are better for decision-making than are linear learning machines or cluster analysis. They do not require explicit programming.Sick Building Syndrome: A group of symptoms that are two- to three-fold more common in those who work in large, energy-efficient buildings, associated with an increased frequency of headaches, lethargy, and dry skin. Clinical manifestations include hypersensitivity pneumonitis (ALVEOLITIS, EXTRINSIC ALLERGIC); allergic rhinitis (RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, PERENNIAL); ASTHMA; infections, skin eruptions, and mucous membrane irritation syndromes. Current usage tends to be less restrictive with regard to the type of building and delineation of complaints. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Developmental Disabilities: Disorders in which there is a delay in development based on that expected for a given age level or stage of development. These impairments or disabilities originate before age 18, may be expected to continue indefinitely, and constitute a substantial impairment. Biological and nonbiological factors are involved in these disorders. (From American Psychiatric Glossary, 6th ed)Noise: Any sound which is unwanted or interferes with HEARING other sounds.Memory, Long-Term: Remembrance of information from 3 or more years previously.Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Speech Perception: The process whereby an utterance is decoded into a representation in terms of linguistic units (sequences of phonetic segments which combine to form lexical and grammatical morphemes).Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Exploratory Behavior: The tendency to explore or investigate a novel environment. It is considered a motivation not clearly distinguishable from curiosity.Acoustic Stimulation: Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Role: The expected and characteristic pattern of behavior exhibited by an individual as a member of a particular social group.Physical Education and Training: Instructional programs in the care and development of the body, often in schools. The concept does not include prescribed exercises, which is EXERCISE THERAPY.Wechsler Scales: Tests designed to measure intellectual functioning in children and adults.Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Speech Intelligibility: Ability to make speech sounds that are recognizable.Habituation, Psychophysiologic: The disappearance of responsiveness to a repeated stimulation. It does not include drug habituation.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Intelligence: The ability to learn and to deal with new situations and to deal effectively with tasks involving abstractions.Affective Symptoms: Mood or emotional responses dissonant with or inappropriate to the behavior and/or stimulus.Acoustics: The branch of physics that deals with sound and sound waves. In medicine it is often applied in procedures in speech and hearing studies. With regard to the environment, it refers to the characteristics of a room, auditorium, theatre, building, etc. that determines the audibility or fidelity of sounds in it. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Child Day Care Centers: Facilities which provide care for pre-school and school-age children.
... and learn more about themselves. In the middle school they have been learning about good health and wellbeing during personal ... "House Arts and Chorals". Beyond the Classroom. Korowa Anglican Girls' School. 2011. Retrieved 2011-01-24. Murray-Smith, Nita ( ... These learning areas are supported by studies in Speech and Drama, Literature and a Perceptual Motor Program. The Middle School ... In these subjects they learn about the habits of mind. In term 4 they focus on sexual reproduction and puberty which is a good ...
Also, specifically in an ESL classroom, students learning a foreign language out of their country are very vulnerable to high ... and motivation in the L2 classroom". Language Learning. 36: 1-25. doi:10.1111/j.1467-1770.1986.tb00366.x. Liu, M.; Jackson, J ... which drew attention to the fact that anxiety could be a cause of poor language learning or a result of poor language learning ... anxiety becomes a cause of poor language learning when it was due to anxiety that student is unable to adequately learn the ...
"2Know! Classroom Response System - overview". Renaissance Learning. "Alphasmart.com". alphasmart.com. Retrieved 9 June 2017. " ... portable personal learning solutions for the classroom" and to "deliver affordable, lightweight, rugged portable computing ... "RENAISSANCE LEARNING, INC". www.sec.gov. Retrieved 9 June 2017. "Form 8-K". www.sec.gov. Retrieved 9 June 2017. "Alphasmart.com ... In June 2005, it was acquired by Renaissance Learning (NASDAQ: RLRN). The name changed again in the Spring of 2009, this time ...
Jones & Bartlett Learning. p. 38. Irvine, Janice M. (2004). Talk about Sex: The Battles over Sex Education in the United States ... "Sex in the Classroom". Time. July 25, 1969. Bruess, Clint E.; Greenberg, Jerrold S. (2008). Sexuality Education: Theory and ...
Black, P., & Wiliam, D. (1998a). Assessment and classroom learning. Assessment in Education, 5(1), 7-74. "Making A Difference ... as they learn to facilitate more inquiry-based learning environments that are well aligned with constructivist learning ... Uniting three learning constructs to improve praxis in science and mathematics classrooms". Journal of Science Teacher ... Lessons from the Lesson Planning Tool integrate key concepts (essential ideas) into an inquiry-based learning environment and ...
... classrooms; a cafeteria; a distance learning lab; two computer labs; a conference room; administrative offices; an agriculture ...
These new technologies allow for students to be engaged in digital learning in the classroom. EdX and Coursera have committed ... techlearning.com, Classroom Technology News , Educational Apps , Bloom's Taxonomy ,. "Future Ready Schools , Tech Learning". ... group will help schools integrate technology and utilize digital learning in classroom through building a professional learning ... focused on professional learning and refine them using the Professional Learning Strategies Self-Assessment Tool created by the ...
Meyers, C., & Jones, T. B. (1993). Promoting Active Learning. Strategies for the College Classroom. Jossey-Bass Inc., ... but that they also impacted their perceptions of their classroom learning. This was reaffirmed by Orsmond, Merry, and Reiling ( ... Journal of Computer Assisted Learning 17. pp. 420-432. Liu, N. F., & Carless, D. (2006). Peer feedback: the learning element of ... Learning by peer feedback gives students more of an opportunity to work as a unit instead of individuals working alone. Working ...
2004). The Routledge Encyclopedia of Language Teaching and Learning. p. 609. ISBN 9780415332866. ... Depending on who indicates and fixes the error either in conversation or in classroom, there can be four possible ways of error ... Language Learning. 27 (1): 29-46. doi:10.1111/j.1467-1770.1977.tb00290.x. Ellis, p. 584 Allwright, Dick; Bailey, Kathleen M. ( ... linguistic errors made in the course of learning a second language. Many error treatment studies seek to address issues like ...
Konza, Deslea, and Jessica Grainger, Keith Bradshaw (2001). Classroom Management: A Survival Guide. Cengage Learning Australia ... Kimmel, Renee Rosenblum-Lowden with Felicia Lowden (2008). You have to go to school-- you're the teacher!: 300+ classroom ... Burke, Kay (2008). What to do with the kid who: developing cooperation, self-discipline, and responsibility in the classroom ( ... Other techniques teachers are taught to manage mild misbehaviour in the classroom include pausing for effect, thanking students ...
"Learning Strategies in the Classroom". Mun.ca. Retrieved 2015-09-20. "Improving Students' Learning With Effective Learning ... Students learn to share their thoughts, justify and defend for the individual's derivation of the answer. Students can also ... Elaborative interrogation is one of a simple strategy used for the enhancement of memory during the process of learning. This ...
... distance learning and classroom based. The classroom based courses are held and administered in Manchester or in its licensed ... The College is also a member of UKRLP, UK Register of Learning Provider: Number 10028428. International Association of Teachers ... centres; while the distance learning courses are delivered via the college's website. Notting Hill College has regional offices ...
"Isle of Wight Activity Centre - Residential School Trips & Tours , Kingswood - Learning beyond the classroom". Kingswood. ... A more recent extension houses a two-storey classroom block, sports hall and the junior school, which shares the main Westmont ... A number of the rooms were converted into classrooms and laboratories. Owing to increased numbers of pupils, extra buildings ... where the family also moved to allow more classrooms in the original school building. In 1923, the school leased Seaford Lodge ...
... useful theories of classroom teaching do not yet exist". However, there are useful theories on how children learn mathematics ... The Effects of Classroom Mathematics Teaching on Students' Learning, 1, Reston VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics ... "Assessment and Classroom Learning" (PDF). Assessment in Education. 5 (1): 7-74. doi:10.1080/0969595980050102. Research clips ... When learning symbols, many students believe letters always represent unknowns and struggle with the concept of variable. They ...
Braund & Reiss (2004). Learning Science Outside the Classroom. RoutledgeFalmer. pp. 111-130. ISBN 0415321174. "Schools:Science ... Braund & Reiss (2006). Towards a More Authentic Science Curriculum: The contribution of out‐of‐school learning (Report). 28. ... The programme includes specially designed classroom sessions with practical experiments, to capture children's interest, ... school science learning that draws on the actual world (e.g. through field trips to industry etc.), the presented world (e.g. ...
This allows for the students' knowledge to continue beyond what they have learned within the classroom. The idea behind this ... Buehl, D. (2006). Classroom strategies for interactive learning. Delaware: International Reading Association. Jones, R. (2007 ... In this particular methodology the students are given the space to learn by constructing their own learning pace and their own ... Materials required can vary on the type of classroom activity the teacher intends to carry. For a classroom activity if the ...
"Psychology of Classroom Learning. 2. 30 November 2008.. *^ "Demetriou, A. (2003). Mind, self, and personality: Dynamic ... Upon learning that such is the case for his friends, he must separate his self from the object, resulting in a theory that the ... Infants learn that new objects can be grabbed in the same way of familiar objects, and adults explain the day's headlines as ... Child-centered classrooms and "open education" are direct applications of Piaget's views.[5] Despite its huge success, Piaget's ...
Implications for the Classroom (1998). Transforming Classroom Grading (2000). Classroom Instruction that Works: Research-Based ... "Learning Sciences Marzano Center". Learning Sciences Marzano Center. Spring 2012. Sagowitz, Megan (Summer 2008). "Robert J. ... In Classroom Instruction That Works (2001), Marzano, Pickering, and Pollock outlined nine instructional strategies likely to ... He is also Executive Director of Learning Sciences Marzano Center in West Palm Beach, Florida. Marzano has identified three ...
They note that sharing notes promotes learning, which is the purpose of classes, and that notes taken in class are the property ... "Notehall: RMT Comes to the Classroom". Terra Nova. Retrieved 19 December 2011. Inside Higher Education, October 6, 2009. ... 4][dead link] "GradeBuddy, Course Hero and Koofers! Oh My!". learning.colostate.edu. Retrieved 5 November 2017. Castronova, ... Indiana University-Bloomington professor Edward Castronova noted that this sort of commercialization of classroom note taking ...
Douglas Vidler (2003). Classroom Manual for Automotive Engine Performance. Cengage Learning. pp. 317-. ISBN 0-7668-4864-7. ...
higherlearningatwork.org A guide to part-time learning in higher education in the UK Complete University Guide Alternatives to ... Vygotsky's theory in the classroom: Introduction. European Journal of Psychology of Education - EJPE, 19(1), 3-7. Retrieved ... Merriam, S. B., Caffarella, R., S., & Baumgartner, L., M. (2007). Learning in adulthood" A comprehensive guide (3rd Edition). ... Kroth, M. (2000). Life Mission and Adult Learning. Adult Education Quarterly, 50 (2). McDonough, G. (2005). Moral maturity and ...
Chong, Suk Ching Stella (2007). Learning Diversity in the Chinese Classroom. Hong Kong University Press. pp. 35-64. ISBN 978- ... speakers is increasing into the sixties to seventies in areas of heterogeneous communities because children are learning the ...
Barnes, Douglas (1971). "Language and learning in the classroom". Journal of Curriculum Studies. Taylor and Francis. 3 (1): 27- ... In classrooms with a high achievement record, researchers were less likely to find social aggression. Vice versa can be found ... that males are afforded more attention in the context of the classroom and that this can lead to their gaining more attention ... The role of classroom status hierarchy, academicachievement, and grade". Developmental Psychology. APA via PsycNET. 47 (6): ...
They are designed to enrich classroom education with additional experiences of life. It is learning beyond the classroom. Utpal ... It is an additional mode of learning through experiencing. USGS educational trips promote learning with enjoyment. A lot of ... It accommodates an average of 30-40 students per classroom in the primary and secondary section. The school celebrated its ...
Jacobs, G. M., & Goh, C. M. C. (2007). Cooperative learning in the language classroom. Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language ... Jacobs, G. M., Gan, S. L., & Ball, J. (1997). Learning cooperative learning via cooperative learning: A sourcebook of lesson ... "Controversy over cooperative learning: An interview with Dr. George M. Jacobs". Retrieved July 20, 2015. ... San Clemente, CA: Kagan Cooperative Learning. [Also translated into Chinese and Malay.] Jacobs, G. M., Davis, C., & Renandya, W ...
Among the facilities of Lillian, aside from the classrooms, there is a church, a greenhouse, a kendo dojo, an auditorium, a ... That was the song you were made to learn first upon entering kindergarten.. ...
Learn how to use the new 2012 Industrial Measurement Standard during this live, hands-on workshop. It is two hours long and ... These classroom-based courses may be customized for corporate organizations and firms. If you would like to request a proposal ... BOMA International has developed classroom-based courses designed to be delivered by our federated Local BOMA associations. For ... Learn how to maximize these key changes during this hands-on workshop. ...
Teachers have begun to wonder when the Group-Learning Technologies (GLTs) in their classrooms will be modernized and what those ... Engaged Classroom Technology Showcase posted Dec 1, 2016, 11:24 AM by Robert Pohl [ updated May 12, 2017, 12:46 PM ] ... Because manufacturers are changing and discontinuing entire product lines its time for us to learn what is new and how these ... This site is maintained by the Digital Learning & Infrastructure team.. Monroe Public Schools , 200 E Fremont St, Monroe, WA ...
... * 1. 2/1/2008 The Beginning of Something Big! Native Learning Ecosystem ... Our Outdoor Classroom February 8. 2007 The best part about building an outdoor classroom is not that well have a classroom ... Native Learning Ecosystems May 28, 2008 * 28. Was it Worth it? Was it worth it? In the spring of 2007 students asked if we ... Students learned how important their environment at AD Harris is and developed a strong sense of community and pride. Native ...
... everyday biases in the nations classrooms pose major obstacles to academic success for low-income students and students of ... Learning Under Threat. Under normal, nonthreatening circumstances, a student learning to solve a linear equation gets a little ... Learn more here.) If you are logged in as a subscriber or registered user and already have a Display Name on edweek.org, you ... Classroom interactions that teachers intend to be inclusive can instead make students feel vulnerable if they are singled out ...
Jack Richards will explore these opportunities, and the issues they raise for classroom based teaching. ... Technology offers vast new opportunities for meaningful and authentic language use outside the classroom. ... The opportunities for learning or affordances available in the classroom are hence quite restricted, consisting of a limited ... There are two important dimensions to successful second language learning: what goes on inside the classroom and what goes on ...
Logitech USB school headsets with unidirectional microphones are designed for the classroom with plug-n-play setup, easy care, ... EMPOWERING INDEPENDENT LEARNING. Headsets help kids focus by blocking out distractions and classroom noises. When students are ... a perfect task for classroom helpers. Both sides of the storage box include a designated space to write a teacher, classroom or ... The on-ear design of this model has thicker ear pad cushioning to help block out more classroom noise so students can focus ...
3. Do a Learning Center Check. Be sure that the learning centers in your classroom focus on different processing skills and ... In turn, you might suggest to parents that some learning areas that have been helpful to the child in the classroom be set up ... Classroom Management Developmental Problems and Disorders Early Social Skills Family and Community Involvement Learning and ... What can I do to be sure that Im creating a classroom environment where the needs of all the children in my group can be met? ...
... including e-learning, live web, video tutorials and classroom courses. With SAS Training you can learn analytics skills both ... Learning Formats. With SAS® training you get to choose what you learn - and how you learn it. Find a format that suits your ... Are self-motivated and prefer to learn on your own time.. Want to jump into a lesson for quick training, or immerse yourself in ... I was able to start using what I learned in class the next day at work. The instructor was knowledgeable and explained things ...
It provides a sense of how deeper learning classrooms are designed, what the students are learning, and questions you can ask ... If youve ever walked into a classroom where the noise levels are high and you cant immediately spot the teacher, this guide ... Its intended to help reporters and parents and anyone else who is trying to understand what 21st century learning looks like, ... In May 2017, the Hewlett Foundation published a guide about deeper learning for the Education Writers Association conference. ...
Figure 1: Dynamic Hybrid Learning Classroom Setup. Desk arrangements in the classroom can be made following the recommended ... Essentially, this is online learning that doesnt feel like online learning.. Recreating the Classroom Experience. This school ... Shifting to Online Learning-in the Classroom. Mike Flynn. As schools prepare for the start of the academic year amid the COVID- ... The Classroom Design. This work begins by setting up the classroom space so that the key areas are visible to both the online ...
Access resources that will help you design and develop e-learning and classroom training that incorporates best practices in ... The resources below will help you design and develop e-learning and classroom training that uses best practices in education ...
Technology innovations to improve student engagements in the classroom. Register now and get free access to our special reports ... Teaching & Learning Top Stories. 5 core computational thinking skills that strengthen humanities skills. By Danielle Vind ... Get the weeks top education technology news and find out how schools are solving technology problems to improve learning. ... Find out the latest technology tips, tools and the innovative best practices schools are using everyday to improve learning. ...
The core of the volume demonstrates how translanguaging is put into practice in actual classroom settings. Applying a ... Declaring Freedom: Translanguaging in the social studies classroom to understand complex texts ... and specifically in classrooms in New York State, Translanguaging with Multilingual Students links findings and theories to ... this book focuses on how it is already happening in classrooms as well as how it can be implemented as a pedagogical ...
Mike Kuczala talks about the value of movement in teaching and learning. Mike Kuczala is the coauthor t... ... Learning how to learn , Barbara Oakley , TEDxOaklandUniversity - Duration: 17:51. TEDx Talks 1,110,304 views ... "The Kinesthetic Classroom: Teaching and Learning through Movement," a book and philosophy that has changed the view of teaching ... How to learn any language in six months , Chris Lonsdale , TEDxLingnanUniversity - Duration: 18:27. TEDx Talks 16,646,845 views ...
All of the chapters are available for free via Learn Chemistry.Follow the links below to buy a copy from our online shop for £ ... learningManaging learningEliciting learners ideasDeveloping conceptsLearning impedimentsTeaching sequences/lesson plans ... Chemical misconceptions II: classroom resources Description. Chemistry is a conceptual subject and this book has been designed ... Chemical misconceptions II: classroom resources Chemical misconceptions II - Spot the bonding Chemical misconceptions II - ...
Cooperative learning works best when group size is smaller. The ideal cooperative learning classroom has about 15 to 20 ... Cooperative Learning Classroom. Research objective. This project was undertaken to examine the changing needs of public middle ... cooperative learning classroom , research , design , parts , renderings mindset , writings , laboratory , design , identity , ... Students learn from their peers and become less dependent on the teacher for help.. organization of the classroom. One of the ...
Classrooms as learning communities. [Chris Watkins] -- This book presents the practice and vision of classrooms that operate as ... 2. Classrooms, change, learning, teaching, community --. 3. Community --. more than a warm glow --. 4. Classrooms as learning ... Classrooms as learning communities : a review of research -- 5. Goals in a learning community : classrooms with purpose -- 6. ... 5. Goals in a learning community : classrooms with purpose --. 6. Tasks in a learning community : creating knowledge together ...
Children get to learn about the life-giving rivers around the world and at the same time learn not to fear but appreciate each ... If youre planning to expand your childs horizon by giving her a lesson outside of the classroom, look no further than to our ... This is a great way for them to learn about paying for things and earning money in the real world! ... linear learning? Mind you, my daugther, Danielle, is only 3 turning 4 this year, but trust me, Im not the only parent who is ...
"Being in this classroom has encouraged me to think more critically about what active learning is, how I can use it to increase ... Flexible Learning Spaces. Moveable chairs with tablet arm desks allow for different group configurations and infinite ... and also just how important physical space is when it comes to promoting certain activities and ways of learning." -Instructor ...
... learning and transfer, the structure of the disciplines, motivation, and creating classrooms that support learning. Next, try ... Creating bridges of another sort to the community is an example of Creating a Classroom That Supports Learning. ... Suggest other practical things the teacher could do to incorporate key learning theory ideas into his classroom activities. ... Johnson demonstrates Learning and Transfer by providing his students with a knowledge-rich environment to transfer what they ...
Im having a hard time finding e-learning/distance education opportunities. Ive taken my fair share of these classes, but I ... Finding E-Learning and Distance Education Jobs. *Posted by Mac Slocum on January 4, 2008 at 10:43am in E-Learning and Online ... Ive been tracing and posting any e-learning jobs I come across on my E-Learning and Online Teaching blog. Heres the link to ... Ive been tracing and posting any e-learning jobs I come across on my E-Learning and Online Teaching blog. Heres the link to ...
... hands-on educational materials for classrooms worldwide and learning toys. ... Learning Resources® is a leading manufacturer of innovative, ... Yes! I would like to sign up for the Learning Resources ...
... A. Manneh, Ilana Stockholm University, Faculty of ... Supporting Learning and Teaching of Chemistry in the Undergraduate Classroom(1114 kB). 402 downloads. ... checking and modifying might be helpful for students learning to draw Lewis structures. By doing so, the students may learn to ... 1. Developing an approach for teaching and learning about Lewis structures. Open this publication in new window or tab ,, ...
... discussed some broad brain-science principles regarding how people learn that may be helpful for classroom educators. ... In a captivating keynote last Sunday at the Learning & the Brain conference in Boston, G. Christian Jernstedt, a professor of ... Brain Expert Offers Learning Principles for the Classroom. By Liana Heitin Loewus on November 20, 2013 2:21 PM ... Once the students learned the Chinese character a single symbol it was easier for them to learn to read the word in English. " ...
Related Story: What Learning Looks Like: The Art And Science Of Classroom Transitions. Transcript:. This is a rush transcript ... He says there is also things that adults may take for granted the kids are still learning to communicate and do not always ... We start -- saw in the classroom is a lot of scaffolding. We saw adults interact with kids to guide and regulate and constrain ... I am interested in the fact that theres free choice in the classroom featured in the story that we heard. Well explain how ...
  • A limiting factor has been the difficulty of defining and measuring enhanced learning outcomes attributable specifically to the use of learning technologies (Mitchell & Bluer, 1997). (ifets.info)
  • Looking closely at what happens when translanguaging is actively taken up to teach emergent bilingual students across different contexts, this book focuses on how it is already happening in classrooms as well as how it can be implemented as a pedagogical orientation. (routledge.com)
  • and (4) teach learning style selection strategies. (ed.gov)
  • Through engaging, interactive activities, you will learn proven ways to teach your students how to learn from their mistakes, improve based on feedback and persevere in their journey toward greater proficiency in the target language. (ber.org)
  • St John Ambulance has hit the road with a mobile classroom to teach people how to perform CPR as part of Radio Lincolnshire's Save A Life campaign. (spaldingtoday.co.uk)
  • Students must learn to work together, express and listen carefully to ideas, integrate information from oral, visual, quantitative, and media sources, evaluate what they hear, use media and visual displays strategically to help achieve communicative purposes, and adapt speech to context and task. (edutopia.org)
  • The authors present a catalog of active-learning techniques aimed at fostering student learning in the context of a lecture course. (scribd.com)
  • The results of this study provide empirical support for the theoretical relationships among cognitive evaluation theory, achievement goal theory, and self-regulated learning strategies in the context of the classroom. (avroarrow.org)
  • The present study extends this research by examining children's learning approaches in the context of classroom activities from a range of curricular areas. (springer.com)
  • Strong research suggests that when learning an L2, students have a greater colloquial understanding of a language, or can express their exact meaning more clearly, if they do not learn about grammar rules in isolation, but within the context in which those rules are used. (ukessays.com)
  • Those who say they are lifelong learners, like to gather as much information as they can, and look for opportunities to grow are more likely to have done a personal learning activity in the past year. (pewinternet.org)
  • Professional learners are more likely than those who are not to agree that attributes indicating an interest in learning describe them very well. (pewinternet.org)
  • It doesn't matter if some of the fruits don't feature in your immediate or even longer-term learning plan: the posters/flashcards give learners daily opportunities to engage with the written SPANISH word, to develop their recognition and recall of individual words and cognates, and to begin to link spelling with sound in SPANISH. (teacherspayteachers.com)
  • 1090 words - 5 pages involves learning strategies and mental processes that learners deliberately engage to help themselves learn and perform better academically. (avroarrow.org)
  • Unlike print texts, however, comics and graphic novels reach out to diverse types of literacy learners and their particular reading strengths, making them the perfect, high-quality, literary-level texts for core content-area classrooms. (capstonepub.com)
  • Using Content-Area Graphic Texts for Learning begins with the building blocks of graphic novel terminology 101, moves into a detailed look at how graphic texts specifically help and empower different types of learners, and then branches off into specific chapters for each of four content areas: math, language arts, social studies, and science. (capstonepub.com)
  • Numerous studies attempt maximising learners' English proficiency with the aim of identifying the best practices to increase acquisition and development in second-language learning. (ukessays.com)
  • Students have reported that they feel more involved in the learning process when these techniques are used in the classroom because it requires them to focus on what they're learning - they become active participants rather than passive learners. (wikipedia.org)
  • Groups get a chance to express their feelings about beneficial and unhelpful aspects of the group learning process in order to correct unwanted behavior and celebrate successful outcomes in the group work. (mit.edu)
  • Explicit instruction on cognitive strategies that can help students learn how to learn may have a positive impact on both academic performance and classroom management by emphasizing that students are in charge of their own behavior and learning. (edutopia.org)
  • Investigation of dimensions of social-emotional classroom behavior and school readiness for low-income urban preschool children. (springer.com)
  • Be sure that the learning centers in your classroom focus on different processing skills and that the materials in them can be adapted to meet the needs of children who are at varying developmental levels. (scholastic.com)
  • When he isn't taking courses in such things as thermodynamics, materials science, conceptual design and labour management relations, this well-rounded undergrad is active in alumni-funded design team projects that add a valuable dimension to his classroom and laboratory assignments. (mcgill.ca)
  • EduMic works together with Oticon pediatric hearing aids, Oticon Opn Play™ and Oticon Xceed Play, to deliver world-class sound quality that enables students to hear the teacher's voice clearly while interacting with other students in the classroom. (audiologyonline.com)
  • Unlike typical distance-learning models, this one seeks to fully integrate the online students in order to make them feel like they are sitting right in class with their peers. (ascd.org)
  • Obviously, school leaders need to make decisions about what learning model their school will use this year based on the specific circumstances in their locality, in concert with government and medical guidelines. (ascd.org)
  • The program has since grown to include more advanced technology in order to make it a smoother experience, but at its core, dynamic hybrid learning doesn't have to break the bank. (ascd.org)
  • According to Justine Tutuska, chair of the Health Promotion Department, who is involved in coordinating Uganda experiences for Daemen students and accompanied Kumar, "Participating in this extended service learning opportunity helps students make a connection between what they learn in the classroom with real-life experiences and gain a cultural sensitivity that will make them better public health professionals. (daemen.edu)
  • When you make learning fun and connect it to them, it sticks so much better," Countryman said. (cbs42.com)
  • But getting back up and getting back in that classroom - that grit is what will make you successful. (nytimes.com)
  • With free courses like "Make a Website," "Deploy a Website" and "Learn the Command Line," Codecademy picks up where Code School's "Try" courses leave off. (godaddy.com)
  • They tell me that they would rather learn about somethnig that they can use to make money. (blogspot.com)
  • Learning basic techniques at the start, like cutting, will free up time later to make more complex foods. (ioby.org)
  • After sacrificing download asian students classroom communication patterns in us universities an emic perspective contemporary studies in set teams, are outside to keep an few page to make there to years you are single in. (danijohnson.com)
  • In this article, we provide a catalog of active-learning strategies, illustrated, where appropriate, with examples from our own courses. (scribd.com)
  • Collaborative learning in a SAS training center with an expert by your side. (sas.com)
  • Today, however, the internet, technology and the media, and the use of English in face-to-face as well as virtual social networks provide greater opportunities for meaningful and authentic language use than are available in the classroom. (cambridge.org)
  • Desk arrangements in the classroom can be made following the recommended guidelines for social distancing. (ascd.org)
  • These carrels are perfect for reinforcing social distancing within the classroom. (kaplanco.com)
  • Now, thirteen years later, we've witnessed such significant changes in social and intellectual life that the subject of classroom discourse is more important than ever. (indigo.ca)
  • So how might you use social listening in your classroom? (emergingedtech.com)
  • Are you interested in how social media may be changing students' concepts of literacy, digital citizenship, identity, relationships, and learning? (iastate.edu)
  • When Johnson begins the assignment with helping students to remember the principals of physics and the principles of design, he is using the Structure of the Disciplines learning theory. (learner.org)
  • The CD360 is designed specifically for regular classroom use, using shatterproof ABS plastic for safety and durability. (techlearning.com)
  • They're learning to engage with another person, to be purposeful (for example reaching for an object they want or pointing to it), and to do what we call opening and closing many circles of communication with another child or an adult. (scholastic.com)
  • The difference between learning a skill and being able to implement it effectively resides in your capacity to engage in deep, continuous thought about that skill. (worldcat.org)
  • Engage students in asking what kind of health lessons they want to learn, then devise your recipes from there. (ioby.org)